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The Ubyssey Feb 8, 1972

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Array The fee hike we don't need
An editorial
It is now almost three years
since UBC students were asked to
fork out an additional $4 to the
people who run the Alma Mater
Society.
At that time, The Ubyssey
opposed the proposal to raise the
AMS fee to $28. In a front-page
editorial, we opposed it for several
reasons.
We said the AMS wasn't
making anywhere near the best
possible use of the money it was
already collecting, that student
councillors had ignored a promise
to decentralize the AMS, and that
the planned programs given as
justification for the increase were
not in the best interest of
students.
Students agreed with us. The
proposal to increase fees was
voted down 3,699 to 2,196.
Now, in 1972, the "Students'
Coalition" AMS council wants us
all to do what we wouldn't do in
1969. Vote in favor of a student
fee increase in a referendum to be
held Wednesday. This time they're
asking for $5.
There are two courses of action
open to The Ubyssey and to
student voters. We can support
this request for additional money
on the grounds that the reasons
we defeated it three years ago are
no longer valid. Or we can reject it
because   we   believe   that   these
AMS   candidates'   statements,
page 9.
reasons are still valid and that no
attempt has ben made to remedy
the inequitable situation that
existed in 1969.
The Ubyssey's position is that
a careful analysis of the situation
shows that nothing is changed.
We therefore urge students to
vote NO and defeat, once again,
what can only be considered an
irresponsible suggestion that
students throw more of their
none-too-plentiful money down
the AMS drain.
It is hard to find words strong
enough to describe the arrogant
failure of AMS councils from time
immemorial to confront the issues
that were raised again during the
fee increase controversy in 1969.
Students have been expected to
support a useless, top-heavy
system without even the slightest
hint of contemplation of a
re-appraisal.
Let's look at the reasons why
the fee hike was voted down
before, and see how the situation
remains essentially the same today
as it did then:
1) The AMS bureaucracy is
inefficient, thus wasting much of
the money now squeezed from
student pockets. The
administration of the AMS is
based on the premise that
students, especially those elected
to run undergraduate societies and
clubs, are not trustworthy or
capable of handling their own
money by themselves. This basic
idea is expressed through a
massive system of red tape, where
a purchase order for a box of
paper clips can take days to
process — simply because it has to
be typed out in triplicate and
gather the signatures or approval
of such worthies as treasurers and
general managers. You can't do
anything on your own. — even if
you have the support of the rest
of your club or your electorate.
This, it might be argued, is
necessary. And it's true that a
certain amount of paperwork is
necessary to adminster any large
sum of money. But is the
situation within the AMS in
proportion?
Of the $24 student fee, $15
goes toward the administration of
the Student Union Building and
paying off the SUB mortgage. A
further $2 is taken up by
publications, including The
Ubyssey. When these are
subtracted from the total AMS
revenue, the remainder is
approximately $120,000 - the
amount actually administered by
the AMS bureaucracy.
But of that $120,000, a
whopping  $63,000 goes to pay
the salaries of AMS office
personnel, including a business
manager at $14,000 and an office
manager at about $10,000, and to
keep the office in stamps and
paper clips.
Thus for every dollar that
actually reaches the students in
the form of AMS programs such
as special events presentations or
club activities, another dollar is
eaten up by an administrative
monster which benefits no one
directly and actually slows down
the operation of many clubs and
committees. This is efficiency?
Although no one talks about it
any more, there is an alternative
to this situation — which brings us
to the second argument against a
fee raise at this time:
2) The AMS has not considerd
alternatives to the present system,
such as decentralizing its
bureaucracy, as a way of cutting
costs. Undergraduate societies are
now able to levy their own fees,
and many more of them will be
doing so next year. This will
reduce the drain on the overall
AMS budget caused by the
demands of these societies. If they
were to be given power to
adminster these funds, instead of
having to run to the AMS finance
committee every time they want
to hire a band, this would
drastically lessen the need for the
vast bureaucracy that now reigns
supreme.
The   same   argument   can  be
made  of clubs  —  and  for  the
various committees that the AMS
sets up from time to time. If the
system were not based on mistrust
of club presidents and committee
chairmen, if they were allowed to
spend funds with only the elected
student council ensuring that their
policies were in the students' best
interest, the justification for still
more triplicate forms would be
eliminated.
It is stated, in propaganda
designed to make students think a
$5 increase is necessary, that $3
of that money is needed "to keep
the existing program running
smoothly" (the other $2 to pay
for new programs). Although it
was a campaign platform of
Human Government, it is obvious
See page 4: REJECTION
IK UBYSSEY
. Vol. LUI, No. 47 VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1972
228-2301
COMPLAIN? PROTEST? D6M0{
thought Monday noon was.as'*-
basement anditaunt,* taotm;
milk went sbw-.«t£t£te
SI? Never. Not the English department TAs. They just
te as any to drag their sleeping bags along to Brock
and cookies. But they forgot their pillows and the
; —kini mcdonald photo
New income tax scheme hits TAs
By SANDI SHREVE
UBC teaching assistants received their
January paychecks last week only to
discover the federal government had laid
claim to a portion of their pay.
Unprecedented income tax deductions
from TAs' salaries have resulted in decreases
to the tune of $22 to $30 in their take home
pay.
Most TAs will receive income tax refunds
on their payments but this will not be until
May or June, 1973.
"A lot of us were barely scraping by on
what we were clearing before — $30 less is
quite a shock," English TA Dave
Schendlinger said Monday.
The new federal tax scheme, which went
into effect Jan. 1, reclassified previously
non-taxable scholarships, bursaries and
fellowships as taxable income.
As a result income tax payments must
now be deducted from a TA's monthly
check.
"Most TAs will be eligible for tax returns
next year because other deductions they can
make will mean they have paid more income
tax than necessary," he said.
"But they need the money now."
English TA Jane Flick said it was a matter
of "being out of more than $100 which we
need now more than we will in a year's
time."
"Prior to the new legislation, TA salaries
were considered half scholarship and half
taxable income," graduate studies dean Ian
Cowan said Monday.
"Tax payments were not deducted from
their checks because it was obvious in the
forms TAs are required to submit to the
university finance department every
September that the taxable amount of their
income did not exceed their personal tax
exemptions," he said.
TA salaries range from $2,000 to $3,500
for eight months work, depending on the
department and the individual's
qualifications.
In addition to the income tax deductions
TAs are also required by the new tax
legislation to contribute $1 to $2 per month
to unemployment insurance.
However, many TAs will be unable to
collect the benefits they are paying for.
Unemployment Insurance Commission
regulations state eligibility for benefits hinge
on being readily available for work and
having worked and made payments during
the past year.
TAs are ineligible to collect UIC benefits
until after they graduate because as graduate
students they are registered students for the
full calendar year and therefore unavailable
for work.
And because many TAs work for the first
few years of their graduate studies program
but not the last they cannot collect benefits
when they graduate.
English TAs expressed consternation and
discouragement over the situation at a quick
sleep-in Monday.
'There is no point in looking into the
matter. The federal government is
responsible," said Flick.
"What can you do - the government isn't
bound to listen to us too hard," said
Schendlinger. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 8,  1972
Developers hover around Jericho
as time runs out on moratorium
By SANDY KASS
Some fishy things are happening around
Jericho Beach, says the chairman of the
Jericho park committee.
But Dennis Gray-Grant won't say what
they are until he's got the goods on the
biggest catch of them all.
That, he says, concerns not the department
of national defence, owners of the 38-acre
former army base near Jericho Beach, but
"businessmen who stand to make $9 million
clear profit on development of the land."
In March, 1971, the federal government
attempted to sell the land to private
developers for the construction of
townhouses, garden apartments and single
family dwellings.
But former defence minister Donald
MacDonald called a year's moratorium on any
sales following complaints from Vancouver
residents.
A lot of people plan to make a lot of
money from development of the land, says
Gray-Grant, whose committee wants the land
to be used as a city park. And he adds "the
plot" may involve more than just the Jericho
lands.
"There are forces at work which find the
Jericho lands very profitable," he told The
Ubyssey Sunday.
The federal government originally planned
to sell the 38 acres' to cover expenses of
moving the DND site to Chilliwack.
But with the moratorium still in effect, it is
uncertain just how hard officials will try to
fulfil the plan with a federal election in the
offing.
And speaking of election years, the city is
producing some pretty fast talkers on the
scheme, with only 10 months before the next
civic election.
What was originally a virtual gold mine of
tax revenue for the city from housing has
been turned into a campaign for open space
by Aid. Art Phillips who is hoping for The
Electors Action Movement nomination for
mayor.
Phillips and Gray-Grant are working
together with the Jericho park committee to
negotiate with the DND for release of the land
to city hands.
City officials have not committed
themselves on plans for the area if they do get
its control.
Plans for a Coney Island development on
72 acres of land adjacent to the 38-acre plot
have been dropped by the Vancouver park
Rent hike announced
Rents in Totem Park and Place Vanier
residences will increase $5 in September.
Monthly single room and board rates will
be raised from $113 to $118 and the cost of
a double room will go up to $113 per
person.
Rising labor and operating costs were
blamed for the increase by the board of
governors when it approved implementation
of the rates Wednesday.
Food services will take $1 of the money
and the housing administration will get the
rest.
Student rates for the new Walter Gage
residences were also set at $75 per month
for a single room and $75 per person for a
double room.
Parking rates at Acadia Park and the Gage
residences were fixed at $15 for the next
academic year, with some spaces in the Gage
underground reserved parking available for
$25.
All but the normal $5 parking fee will go
to the housing administration for the repair
and upkeep of the residence lots.
board, at least until the moratorium on the
total scheme expires in April.
"But any housing developer who goes onto
that land stands to make the biggest profit of
all," Gray-Grant said.
A meeting scheduled for December
between Phillips, Gray-Grant and DND
officials has been postponed because the DND
officials, new to their jobs, were unfamiliar
with the problem.
But Gray-Grant maintains the problem
doesn't lie in Ottawa, "but with local
businessmen who are out to milk the scheme
for all they can get."
"I should have some pretty startling facts
by the end of the week," he said.
Secrecy also shrouds events taking place
currently on the 38-acre site.
DND work crews are clearing the West
Fourth Avenue site of all buildings and are
filling in ditches and holes in the ground with
what Gray-Grant calls "hundreds of truck
loads of fill".
He said he has concluded the DND is
already preparing the site for sale to housing
developers.
"The idea is to get as far along as possible
with the work before the inevitable protest
breaks out."
He called on city council Friday to enforce
a city bylaw which would require the federal
government to obtain a development permit
before altering the Jericho lands in any way.
The federal government is not required to
obey municipal bylaws, but in this case signed
an agreement in 1969 to do so.
Gray-Grant took issue with recent
statements by D. B. Hunnings, the DND
Jericho detachment engineer, that the site is
being restored to fit the 1946 contour maps
which can't be released to the public because
they are "classified".
"It doesn't matter what the contours of
the area were in 1946," Gray-Grant said.
"We want to know what they were in 1939
when the DND took over the area."
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OPEN THURSDAY & FRIDAY TIL 9 P.M. Tuesday, February 8, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
'Slave
becomes
master'
The technology that humanity
developed as a slave in its life has
become its master, a Vancouver
pyschiatrist told more than 250
UBC students last week.
Bennett Wong was speaking on
'The Dehumanizing Effects of our
Present Society' as part of
Phoenix '72, the fraternities' and
sororities' attempt at relevance.
He said the technological
revolution was to create a society
where everyone could be
comfortable and enjoy the profits
of a materialistic world.
"But instead, the human
individual has become subservient
to the state that developed the
technological society," said Wong.
He spoke of the paradoxes of
the modern technological society.
"Increased communication
increases estrangement. As
population explodes, people
implode. From numbers comes
silence. All these are evident in
our society;
"We have to learn to know
each other. If we can't break
down the walls at least we could
lower them," he said.
Wong said people learn from
the earliest ages how to fit into
the slot society has cast for them.
"We learn to lie, not tell people
how we feel about them because
if we do they, get mad."
"Eventually we become two
people. One person is the way we
feel and the other is the idealized
self, the way people expect us to
act.
"In short, the role society has
picked out for us."
This splitting occurs very early,
he said. If a person is going to
split his or her self he has done so
by the age of six.
"Because of this splitting we
become afraid of our environment
and afraid of ourself. We become
. frightened with one another and
avoid contact with one another.
"Education is a part of this
process of splitting people into
two," Wong said. "We're judged
again by how we perform in light
of the standards set by the
technological society. We're living
in a specialization ghetto where
graduation is only a basis for
re-training."
High school
paper under
board's gun
GAS-MASKED FIREMAN
—billy gin photo
. . evacuates building
By BERTON WOODWARD
The Vancouver school board
will decide next Monday whether
the banned inter-high school
newspaper, the Oganookie
Standard, "conforms to the
journalistic standards of the daily
press."
The paper was banned from
distribution in Vancouver schools
Thursday by VSB superintendent
R.F. Sharp, because of a birth
control article it contained.
Sharp said Monday a general
discussion about the paper would
be held in a committee meeting
today but the final decision would
come from a board meeting
Monday.
The criteria of daily press
standards were set up last October
by a board committee discussing a
different issue of the same paper,
he said.
"If there appears at any time in
the schools something that could
be contrary to the policy of the
board, then I have to remove it
until the board can decide on it,"
Sharp said.
Asked how the board could
decide on the "journalistic
standards of the daily press"
without asking a member of that
press, he said: "That's a good
question. I'll have to take it up
with the board."
Standard staffer Bill Annett
said   Monday   he   believed   the
Bomb sends seven to Wesbrook
Campus RCMP are investigating an explosion
which sent seven persons from the civil engineering
building to hospital Friday afternoon.
The bomb went off in a waste paper basket in
room 202 during a Math 155 class, taught by
professor ElodMacskasy.
"A big bomb just went off in the basket and
smoke went up to the top of the room," Macskasy
said Monday.
"Most of us didn't move, we thought it was a
practical joke. Then some of the people in the back
of the class started running out."
The injured, who were admitted to Wesbrook,
were released shortly after.
RCMP are not sure what the bomb was
composed of.
"It acted like a tear gas bomb but we don't
know if it was or not. We have sent it to the lab for
analysis and we won't know conclusively for
another week," a RCMP spokesman said Monday.
The civil engineering building was closed for the
afternoon and a number of classes were cancelled.
"We believe forestry was responsible," said
Vern Gentry, engineering undergraduate society
spokesman, Monday.
Gentry said the forestry undergraduate society
sent the EUS a note Friday saying that Omar, the
forestry car which engineers buried earlier in the
week, would be avenged.
"If we find out who it was, we'll have a nice
little talk to them — well string them up by their
balls," said Gentry.
Exposure: a consumer column
DOLLAR BILLS
The American Empire is really never very
far. In fact it is as near as your pocketbook.
In this case I don't mean that our dollar
bills represent the currency used primarily
by a manufacturing industry 70 per cent
foreign owned and controlled. It's something
else.
If you look very carefully at the bills you
will find that a number of them are printed,
directed, and produced by the Canadian
Bank Note Company Limited.
Needless to say the company is an
American one, 99.8 per cent owned by the
American Bank Note Company.
It's reassuring to know that if Uncle Sam
ever   decided  to  wreak  havoc   with  our
economy by flooding us with counterfeit
, currency he'd have the expertise as well as a
few plates to draw on.
FOOD TRUCKS
I really had promised myself that I would
lay off Food Services for a while but my
frequent trips to the library have forced me
to say something.
Having a handy place near the library to
buy a sandwich or a snack is a good idea but
having to breathe deisel fumes from the
constantly running motor isn't exactly a
pleasure.
For all the time that the truck is in front
of the library they might as well build a
kiosk there permanently.
They might even get an Opportunities
For Youth grant to build it.
By the way the reason they don't like
you to eat in the library is that the crumbs
(not The Ubyssey staff, the other kind)
attract rodents who turn their attention to
tasty glue bindings.
"CANADIAN" PUBLISHERS
In fact all sorts of American firms seem
to be taking deceptive names these days.
Even groups of them.
One group of interest to Canadian
students and teachers at all levels is the
Canadian Book Publishers Council and its
committees.
The Canadian Educational Publishers'
Group, a special-interest committee of the
Canadian Book Publishers Council, has 23
member-firms. Of the 23 firms, only three
are owned and controlled in Canada.
The membership of this committee,
comprises virtually all of the publishing
houses in Canada that are active in
educational publishing.
Less than 15 per cent of these firms are
Canadian.
- ART SMOLENSKY
board would approve distribution
of the paper since they had
approved each of the preceding
three issues.
"But if they don't, well just go
underground," he said.
There are 12-15 regular
workers for the paper, Annett
said, plus several occasional
contributors. As the paper is
distributed free, it has had
financial problems with past issues
and is still paying for the current
edition, he said.
Annett claimed that after the
paper was banned there were
incidents at Lord Byng secondary
school of the school's staff
actually snatching copies of the
paper out of students' hands.
Contacted Monday, Byng's
principal W.L. Bazeley flatly
denied the charge.
"I don't know where this story
originated," he said. "There were
no papers confiscated here and
none destroyed. It was a very
amicable situation."
He said students left the papers
on the school's main counter, as
usual, but were told the Standard
could not be distributed until the
board makes its decision. After
leaving the papers in the main
office for a short time the
students took the papers out of
the school, he said.
A member of Kitsilano
secondary's administration, who
declined to be identified, said
Monday he believes it was his
school that first brought the
offending article to the board's
attention.
However, "this is totally a
school board deal," he said. "If
they say put it out, well put it
out. We just follow orders in this
case."
Hacks emit
fake student
newspaper
CALGARY (CUP) - Student
union executives here published
their own paper Monday in an
attempt to reap personal profits.
The 9,000 copies of the paper,
which called itself a "special open
house supplement to The
Gauntlet", contained glowing
articles about the student
politicos who published it. The
Gauntlet is the regular University
of Calgary paper.
It also contained ads which
merchants thought would appear
in The Gauntlet. The issue was
personally financed by student
vice-president Don Moore and
other executives and it is assumed
they will pocket the profits.
Publication of the paper using
the Gauntlet name is forbidden by
student union laws. Following
protests by Gauntlet staff, the
executives vowed to fire Gauntlet
editor Gus Henderson. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 8,  1972
Rejection would force a change
From page 1
that no attempt has ever been made to stand back from
the present system to see whether it is the best way to
keep the existing program running smoothly. Yet
students are asked to blindly contribute more money to
keep a struggling mass of red tape afloat.
In fact, were some of the reforms we have
mentioned to be instituted, the amount of money
actually administered by the central AMS office could
fall as low as $40,000, necessitating only a minimal
administration budget. If the lion's share of the $63,000
now spent on salaries and office expenses were to be
distributed among programs which actually reach
students, it would totally negate the need for another $3
per student "to maintain the existing program."
Now, what about the $2 chunk of the proposed
increase that is supposed to cover "new programs"?
4) Proposed programs do not justify an increase in
AMS fees. These seem to fall into three categories: day
care, co-op housing and the food services control
proposal.
The AMS' involvement in campus daycare so far is
limited to guaranteeing a bank loan to the UBC daycare
council for construction of a centre in Acadia Park.
What this means is that the AMS simply says it will
cough up if the daycare people go bust. Since there is no
immediate prospect of this, it appears unlikely that the
AMS will be out any money in the forseeable future.
On co-op housing, we can't remember anything but
a fuzzy sentence in a candidate's statement saying that it
would be a good idea.
And the referendum last week in which students
voted for the principle of control of food services will
not necessarily mean a large expenditure. Rather than a
complete takeover of the operation, what appears likely
now is that the AMS will try to gain control of food
services while the administration will still foot the bill.
This of course would involve only the hiring of a
manager for the operation — not the purchase of
equipment and loss of rent revenue.
In fact, AMS executive elections this year have been
fought almost entirely on the question of whether the
AMS should "co-operate with the administration". Since
it doesn't take much money to shake hands with the
president, it is surely the height of high-handedness to
ask for more money for vague "new programs" without
saying what they are.
In the words of a forgotten AMS treasurer of
approximately 1969 vintage: "The bureaucracy is the
best on the continent for running social events — dances
and shows. But students have changed a lot since it was
set up, and their desires have changed."
Much is now being made of the fact that the AMS
fee has not changed since the late 1940s, when that
bureaucracy began to attain its present form. It is less
frequently pointed out, but more significant, that the
structure of our student society has not changed during
that time either. This can only be attributed to the
unforgiveable reluctance of elected executives in recent ■
years to allow even the contemplation of change to enter
their minds.
For this reason The Ubyssey considers the present
executive's request for an additional $5 to be
irresponsible, and calls on students to reject this request.
AMS executive members should have interpreted the
defeat of the 1969 fee increase as a clear indication that
students were dissatisfied with the present wasteful style
of administration. Until a concerted reappraisal of the
AMS bureaucracy is undertaken and concrete changes
are set in motion, any similar demands for more money
should be met with a resounding NO.
AS USELESS AS . .
Letters
THS WSSSY
FEBRUARY 8, 1972
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays
throughout the university year by the Alma Mater
Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions
are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's
editorial offices are located in room 241K of the
Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301, 228-2307; Page
Friday, Sports, 228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Leslie Plommer
Alup Xnok began the match by declaring openly to
an increasingly hostile crowd, including I kern Layfiny,
how totally incumbent he thought he was. Few agreed,
though Few was later discovered to be a cover for the
MAS line hacks. As Snida Hevres was heard to exclaim,
"Forward, to the battlements!" with the ghost of Hnoj
Dresnoan trailing slowly, sadly behind vivacious Nadys
Sask and sprightly Selly Kueergu. The battlements and
the incumbent soon came crushing down, however, on the
heads of Kemi Egasss, Rat Sloskymen and poor, honest
Trebno Doowrawd. Not to be outdone, Kiem Godair and
Tenk Necreps reached for the skies and pulled a few
down, as well as getting Drog Bignos and Mij Loyj in the
bargain. Finally, as if never having to say they were sorry,
Libyl Nig, Kiin Ladcondm and Mij Sadma laid down and
waited for their Dhates.
Outrage
The Friday Ubyssey finally took an
editorial stand on the Young
Socialists' fight to defend open and
democratic elections on UBC. That
editorial was an outrage. The Ubyssey
has attempted to be the proud
upholder of freedom of speech and
democratic rights of junior faculty in
the present tenure dispute, but they
have openly defaulted when the same
issue is at stake within the student
body.
They have accused us of taking the
question to student court "just to
make a name for the YS". It is true
that many students are tired of having
one bureaucratic hack after another
use stupid legalities to tie up student
proceedings just to enhance their
personal careers. That's their fault,
The Ubyssey should take note, not
ours.
Perhaps they think we should just
crawl away and whine in the corner
about our exclusion. Sorry, we won't
do that. Our write-in campaign was a
tremefidous success. It indicated that
not only do a large number of students
support our program for student
action, but that an even larger number
disagree entirely with the way the
elections were held.
The eligibility committee (august
body that it is) and the student
council have both taken a formal stand
that the clause which barred us from
contesting the elections was
undemocratic. (The Ubyssey hasn't
even gone that far. Great upholders of
freedom of speech, where are you now
when you're needed, you gutless
wonders.) They then both turned
around and used it. So much for their
consistency. They are quite willing to
see us excluded when it is they who
must face us in open debate.
Yes, we're going to student court.
The clause is undemocratic. The
election which excluded us on its basis
is undemocratic. Therefore it should
be re-held. It is that which will be
taken to student court, not some
trifling "irregularity". For once, it's a
question of principles versus
bureaucratic maneuvers.
We will continue to circulate the
petition calling for the removal of the
clause. And, yes, we do want to build
the YS. (Surprised, Ubyssey?) No one
else on this campus has shown that
they have either the program or the
guts to lead students. We can. No
personal careers — rights of students;
not irregularities or bureaucratic
procedure — a program which can
unite students in action to begin to
have some control over our lives at
university.
Joan Campana
Libby Davies
Dan McLeod
Andrew Pavey
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be signed and, if
possible, typed.
Pen names will be used when the
writer's real name is also included for
our information in the letter, or
when valid reasons for anonymity are
given.
Although an effort is made to
publish all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
letters for reasons of brevity, legality,
grammar or taste. Tuesday, February 8, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
On Ottawa's Elgin Street, about five minutes' walk
from the parliament buildings, is a gray-stone cubic
building. It's set inconspicuously in the capital's 'tourist
centre', near theatres, art galleries, convention centres and
the Chateau Laurier.
Over the main entrance to the five^torey building, in
small lettering, is the inscription: Department of National
Defence.
Inside the main door, the only door visitors are
permitted through, is a booth partially enclosed in glass
behind which sit three uniformed men. One of them
demands the visitor's business.
If the visitor is there on business, he must call the
office he wishes to visit, and wait for an escort to take
him there. Before he and his official escort can leave the
foyer, however, they both must sign a visitors' register.
The visitor is taken straight to an elevator by the
escort and whisked to the floor of business. On emerging
from the elevator, the visitor is faced with another guard
who makes him sign another register. The visitor, having
been given a pin inscribed 'Escort Required', is then
ushered into the office he is visiting.
After the meeting, the guest is escorted back to the
elevator, the elevator operator is told to take him to the
ground floor, and the visitor is watched as he leaves the
building.
The following story tells why Canada's defence
personnel maintain such a tight security force, and who
benefits from the defence department's silent invisibility.
The Canadian department of national
defence, to those Canadians aware of its
existence, is always associated with
peace-keeping — Cyprus, the Middle East,
Germany, and here at home.
But under the smokescreen of an
international image as peace-keeper,
Canada's defence experts (most of whom
have backgrounds in, and still maintain
connections with, large corporations and
Canadian universities) have built a booming
war industry.
Incredible? During the past 12 yeirs
Canada has jumped to the number %e
position in the world as an international
arms exporter. And today Canada spends
more on defence projects, on a per capita
basis, than the United States does.
With no war to draw attention to it,
very few Canadians are aware of their
country's war machinery. Almost none of
our academic community know that the
Defence Research Board (ever hear of it?)
is sponsoring research in every Canadian
university with an enrolment over 2,500
students.
To. defence analysts, the line between
defensive and offensive weaponry and
warfare research is a very tenuous
delineation. Universities and industries
(most of them American-owned
subsidiaries incorporated under Canadian
law) are currently studying, designing and
testing weaponry that runs the gamut from
chemical and bacteriological to atomic.
This military effort, in the name of
peace, is directed and organized by the
Defence Research Board. Research remains
under the board's jurisdiction until a
finished product is finally marketable.
Salable products in the past have included
commodities of war ranging from chemical
defoliants to green berets to airplanes.
After the defence research people have
done their work, the department of
national defence, operating under
defence-sharing plans with NATO countries
and special agreements with the U.S., steps
in and pushes the products to nations with
more immediate military needs.
It's a lucrative business and an invisible
one. The Canadian war machine is, in
essence, a closed corporation with
interlocking directors who link the major
universities to large corporations, and then
link both these groups to the Defence
Research Board.
The administrative interlockings among
industry, government and the universities is
a basic element in the structure of our
society. And institutions with
complimentary functions and integrated
administration are built to enable the most
efficient operation of the capitalist
political-economic system.
Industry, government and the
universities are operated in the interests of
the same class, so there are no
contradictions — from their viewpoint - in
the close functional co-operation that
springs up in areas such as defence
research.
Defence research and contracting (done
both by the universities and industries) is
always shrouded in secrecy. Tight security
is a necessity, and thousands of dollars are
spent on public relations as each separate
part of the war machine tries to keep its
public image shining.
Occasionally the veil slips. Back in
1956, for example, after a rare security
leak, prime minister Lester Pearson
admitted publicly that Canada was selling
arms to both sides in the Israel-Egypt
conflict. And occasionally, since the
Vietnam war escalated in 1965, word gets
out about some new Canadian discovery
being pressed into service in Indochina.
These leaks, however, affect only a
particular government or an industrial
contractor that relaxed its security at the
wrong moment. The Defence Research
Board, the co-ordinator of the industry,
never steps out of line or takes sides in any
dispute: It has work to do.
What is the Defence Research Board?
Back in 1916 the National Research
Council was created by the Canadian
government because of a necessity for
war-time technology and scientific
research. For the next three decades it
maintained a high percentage of military
research at the expense of industrial
research in the civilian sector of the
economy.
After the Second World War ended, the
National Research Council began a trend
towards basic scientific research and its
applications in an industrial peace-time
economy. At this time other research
agencies began to spin off from the parent
body.
In 1947 the Defence Research Board
(DRB) was set up as an autonomous
research body by a group of National
Research Council personnel who had
participated in scientific and technological
services related to the war effort. In theory
it was then answerable only to the
government of Canada through the
department of national defence.
In practice today, however, it is also to
some degree answerable to its own board
of directors, many of whom have come
from corporations receiving large amounts
of industrial research and industrial
contracting money from DRB. It's a
tightly-knit family with a handful of
companies, the federal treasury and, to a
lesser degree, most Canadian universities,
sharing the spoils.
The spoils that come to the universities
are mainly research grants (for basic
scientific research) with a smaller portion
of contracting. 'Contracting' is the term
used when DRB wants a specific design or
item produced by some scientist (usually a
professor) which binds the scientist to
come across with the goods.
Research in the universities is a chancier
operation for DRB. Scientific research is
always a risk investment (defence research
is not value-free science — it is science
serving corporate and military needs). But
the defence experts, with their corporate
allies, have done it well: For every dollar
they have spent on research, they are
netting about $25 in arms sales.
The universities are, for the most part,
unaware of the end result of the research
they do for DRB. Almost all research done
in Canadian universities is basic scientific
research. The applied research is generally
done in one of DRB's seven private
research institutions, which are spread
across Canada, or by private companies.
But there is no mistaking the
universities' complicity in Canada's massive
war machine. They willingly do the
spadework for all the defence projects in
this country, and they supply the necessary
resources, human and technological, for
the efficient running of the machine.
Besides giving research grants and
contract monies to the universities, DRB
supports universities in one other way: By
giving annual grants to specific scientific
institutes within various Canadian
universities.
See page 6
first of two special reports by ian wiseman of Canadian university press
on the role of universities in Canada's war industry Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 8,  1972
NEED
A SUMMER JOB?
Try
OPPORTUNITIES
FOR YOUTH
Chris Wootten, a Project Officer for
Vancouver, will be at U.B.C. to discuss your
project ideas from 10:00 to 4:00 on
Wed., 9 Feb. lTiur.,10 Feb.
Fri., 11 Feb.
IN ROOM 246
SECOND FLOOR SUB.
Bring all questions, doubts,
fears to him. For greater
certainty, make appointments
via 666-3406
or 666-3753
The government has
money for YOU!
FOR TOP-NOTCH
FOOD
Try SUB   207-209
12;00 — 1:30 Every Day
WE OFFER GOURMET QUALITY
AT PRICES YOU CAN AFFORD
Our menu:
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Chinese Food
Pizza
East Indian Curry
Chinese Food
Vegetarian Organic
AMS INTERNATIONAL
FOOD FESTIVAL
so the pentagon
orders weapons,
the defence research
board produces them
and people die in Vietnam,
and this vicious cycle is suppor
and endorsed, directly and indi
by Canadian universities Tuesday, February 8, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
From page 5
Since the board was formed in 1947, it
has spent $40 million on research in
Canadian universities. About another $10
million has been spent on university
contracting during that period.
Where has the money been spent? All
across the country —from Memorial
University in Newfoundland to the
University of Victoria. The lion's share has
gone to the bigger universities, especially
McGill, University of Toronto and the
University of B.C.
Other major recipients of defence
research monies are the universities of
Alberta, Calgary, Manitoba, McMaster,
Saskatchewan, Waterloo, and the Royal
Military College. In 1970, there were 36
Canadian universities who did work for the
DRB.
In Thursday's Ubyssey, the specifics of
DRB spending will be examined. For now,
however, it should simply be noted that
the board spends money in a wide variety
of fields, ranging from the so-called pure
sciences to the social sciences, with specific
emphasis in the areas of aerospace
technology and aviation, and chemical and
bacteriological weaponry.
Why is Canada so involved in chemical
and bacteriological weaponry research?
There are two reasons: First, Canada
was one of the first countries to explore
the military possibilities of this type of
warfare and has an international reputation
as being a pioneer in the field. Second,
nerve gases, chemical defoliants, non-lethal
gases, and viruses are saleable commodities
with an immediate market in the United
States' war in Vietnam.
While research is done at both Shirley
Bay, Ont., and Ralston, Alta., the actual
testing of these weapons is done near
Ralston. (The research establishment there,
code-named 'Suffield', includes a
1,000-square-mile testing ground.)
Weapons tested there, including defoliants,
crop-destruction agents, insecticides and
non-lethal gases, have already been used in
Vietnam.
And every time Canada-sells weapons,
the university research is paying off for
DRB. War is good business.
Two of the other three research
establishments, at Ottawa and Downsview
(just outside Toronto), study current
problems in the Canadian armed forces.
Among the projects now being done are
studies of human capabilities and
limitations, plus other behavioral studies.
The final establishment, at Valcartier,
Que., again does marketable research. The
scientists there study lasers, armaments,
surveillance equipment, explosives, and
they do weaponry system analysis.
From these seven defence research
establishments come the finished weapons,
ready to be mass produced and sold.
At this point, the 2,500 employees of
DRB have performed their functions well:
The ultimate decisions involving contracting
(for mass produced weapons) and selling,
rest with the actual board members of the
Defence Research Board.
The actual board is split in two parts:
ex-officio members (government
representatives) and appointed members
who represent universities and industries.
These men arc very powerful: They decide
what research should be pursued and which
universities and what industries receive
defence contracts.
Not surprisingly, there is a substantial
amount of patronage toward the
institutions these men represent.
Board members at present include high
administration officials from University of
Winnipeg, University of Saskatchewan,
Universite de Montreal and Laval
University.
Industrial representatives include or
have included directors of de Havilland
Aircraft' of Canada, ATCO (Calgary),
Canadian Westinghouse, and RCA Victor
Company of Canada. All these
corporations are major recipients of
defence contracts.
Most corporations receiving Canadian
defence contracts are foreign-owned and
controlled, with the bulk of them in the
U.S. and others scattered around Britain
and Western Europe.
Among the major contractors are
General Electric, Westinghouse,
Hawker-Siddely, Litton Industries, Bendix,
Sperry Rand and General Dynamics
(America's biggest defence contractor). All
business with these companies is done, of
course, through their Canadian subsidiaries.
Most of these corporations do research,
design, and mass production in the
electronics and aerospace industries. The
more overt weaponry contracting is done
through crown corporations like Atomic
Energy of Canada Limited and Canadian
Arsenals Limited.
The research done and the weapons
produced, the final step for the department
of national defence and the rest of the
government is to find a country at war
which needs a stockpile of arms.
The days of smuggling guns to banana
republics is long gone. Today, in the
sophistication of power-bloc warfare, there
are treaties and alliances and
defence-sharing programs that are socially
acceptable. The two main markets for
Canada's military exports are NATO and
the United States.
In 1970, Canada made more than $400
million by selling its arms to other
countries.
The Defence Production Sharing
Agreement signed by Canada and the U.S.
in 1959, while touting mutual defence for
the protection of North America, binds
Canada to American foreign policy. Canada
is, as Canadian defence analyst William
Cobban says, a contracted appendage of
the American military machine.
How this agreement works is quite
simple. The U.S. is fighting a war, so it
needs certain weapons. Under the Defence
Production Sharing Agreement, there is
very little duplication of work. For
example, Canada is a specialist in chemical
and bacteriological warfare.
If the Pentagon needs a new chemical
defoliant, it gets in contact with Canadian
defence experts who get to work on
perfecting the defoliant and then sell it
back to the U.S. Or if the Americans have
developed a new nerve gas, then they
occasionally bring it to Defence Research
Establishment Suffield (in Alberta) and
have it tested by Canadian scientists of
Canadian soil.
So the Pentagon orders weapons, DRB
produces them, and people die in Vietnam.
And this vicious cycle is supported and
endorsed, directly and indirectly, by
Canadian universities.
It makes one wonder about the
purposes of universities. The ivory-tower
concept of value-free science, or research in
the name of humanity, is a thing of the
past.
Canadian universities serve a
military-industrial complex based mainly
in the U.S. This complex has two basic
aims: To keep down any threat to the
established order at home (particularly in
Quebec), and to provide any equipment to
anybody as long as there are profits to be
made. Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  February 8,   1972
for
Intramurals — Undergrad Societies
Improved Student Services — Better Administration
Co-op Books and Crafts —Clubs — Special Events
Food Services — Conferences — Day Care
Contact with Provincial and
Federal Governments on Educational Problems
Council has voted unanimously to ask for
a $5 increase in the A.M.S. fee.
THE   FIRST INCREASE SINCE 1948!
Support the AM.S.
Support the increase from $9 to $14.
Make this campus a better place to be Tuesday, February 8, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 9
Vice-president
Til Nawatzki
To make a short story long, 111 tell you why
I'm in this: MacKinnon nominated me because he'd
be lonely running by himself. Also, it's one of the
few things around here that's free. Free space in The
Ubyssey and a free audience to yap to at
speech-time. And if one wins, one gets an office, a
phone, and the opportunity to attend boring
meetings with utter crashing bores, or boors, in the
case of red-jacketed engineers. Those are the
advantages.
The disads are that one may be called on to do
something. I promise literally nothing, and that's a
lot. Nothing the Coalition promised really
happened. What became of this utter rot of
"opening the channels of communication" and
"co-operation"? And any chicken-shit can fire an
exec secretary (e.g. Ms. Buzas) whose philosophies
he doesn't share. Keeping her on and getting to
know her is harder.
Avoid shameful, embarrassing acts in the name
of the student body. Avoid any acts at all. Remedy
that error you maue when you didn't vote Ferdman.
It's your last chance this year. (Incidentally, I'll be
around next year. I'm taking education at night
school this year and want to complete my studies in
that respect next year.)
Gordon Blankstein
If elected, I plan on doing a detailed study of
intramurals and extramurals. This will be done by
campus survey as well as finding out what other
universities in Canada are doing, especially McGill
and U of T as they are of comparable size. I want
our programs improved and raised to the levels of
other Canadian universities.
Secondly, I plan on working on an
anti-calendar. At present the administration puts
out a booklet telling us that Chem. 230, for
example, is a good course. The first lecture you're
asleeep and you stay that way for the remainder of
the year. I want to tell the students the truth about
courses and profs so that if they want to sleep they
can, but if they want to learn, sign under a different
person.
In closing, I cannot promise anything without
your support. Please vote for me on Wednesday.
BIGGEST BURGER
ON CAMPUS
THE "MONSTER BURGER"
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BUS STOP COFFEE SHOP
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 Try it — you'll like it!
Ombudsperson
Cinda Harrison
Ombudswoman. What is it and why is it
important? Do you know??? An ombudswoman is
the trouble shooter for the students; she listens to
all the problems and complaints of the students and
attempts to find a solution. This solution may be
seeing other members of the executive, bringing the
matter to council or taking the problem to one of
the AMS subsidiary organizations — whatever gets
the job done.
The ombudswoman must be prepared to spend
a lot of her time on the job and helping with valid
complaints and criticisms. We need more personal
communication in the university between the AMS
executive and the students. The university shouldn't
just be the place one goes in order to get a degree.
It's four years out of your life and you should have
more say regarding policies that will affect you. I'm
going to work towards these objectives but I need
your support so please, vote Wednesday.
Tom MacKinnon
It may seem strange to run twice in a iow for
AMS office. But, when one isn't prepared to spend
$130 campaigning as others have recently, perhaps
one needs to run more than once before students
get to know him.
The attempt by Students' Coalition members to
fire Carol Buzas as a "security risk" was an infantile,
paranoid act, expectable from the likes of Tom
Campbell or W. A. C. Bennett. What have they got
to hide anyway?
All this tickertape nonsense is utterly absurd.
Surely there are better ways to spend AMS funds,
when volunteers have counted ballots for free each
year previously.
During my three years of law, I have fought
several cases (out of court) against such
administrative tribunals as the Motor Vehicle
Branch, with some degree of success. I would
imagine this to be quite similar to dealing with the
registrar's office, and that such experience would be
an asset in the position of ombudsperson.
While taking fourth-year arts next term, if
elected, I intend to follow in Joan Campana's
footsteps and fight for those who need
representation in their hassles with those in
authority on this campus. Thank you.
EAST COAST
BLUES
A CONCERT WITH
THOM ROBERTS
ANNIE SEGAL
LAWRY BREZER
THURS. FEB. 10
12:30
SUB BALLROOM
(not Aud. as previously
advertised)
50*
V
MUSSOC PRESENTS ...
LIVE ON STAGE!
Tiddler
onthe
• :•
Today to Feb. 12th
8:30 P.M.
OLD AUDITORIUM
Tickets $2.50, $3.00
at Vancouver Ticket Centre and Outlets
Special Student Rates: $1.50
Feb. 8 & Matinee Thursday, Feb. 10th-12:30
Tickets available Main Floor of S.U.B.
APPLICATION
FOR GRADUATION
REMINDER
All students who expect to graduate this Spring are
requested to submit "Application for Graduation" cards
(two) to the Registrar's Office (Mrs. Kent) immediately.
This includes students who are registered in a year not
normally considered to be a graduating year (e.g.
one-year teacher-training programme for graduates) but
who are expected to complete a degree programme this
Spring.
PLEASE NOTE: It is the responsibility of the student to make
application for his degree. The list of candidates for graduation to
be presented to the Faculty and the Senate for approval is
compiled from these application cards.
NO APPLICATION — NO DEGREE
Now that you can fly to Europe for peanuts,
here's how little you shell out to get around:
$130 for Two Months of unlimited rail travel in
Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Holland, Italy, Luxembourg,
Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland.
You sheii out $130, and get a Student-Raiipass.
Ah you need is the bread and something to show you're
a bona fide student between 14 and 25.
Our Student-Railpass gives you all that unlimited
rail travel on the 100,000 mile railroad networks of those
13 countries. For two foot-loose months. So with low air
fares and Student-Railpass you've got Europe made
Our Student-Railpass gets you Second Class
travel on our trains. You'll find that there's very little
second class about Second Class. Besides being comfortable, clean, fast, and absurdly punctual, the Euro
pean trains have some other advantages for you. They
t3ke you from city center to city center, so you dcr.'t have
to hassle airports. And the stations are helpful homes
away from home, with pictograms that give you informa-
tlon in the universal language of signs, and dining rooms,
bookstores and other helpful facilities.
Now, here's the catch. You can't get your
Student-Railpass or the regular First Class Eurailpass in
Europe—you have to get them before you leave the country. So see your Travel Agent soon. Meanwhile, send in
the coupon for a free folder, complete with railroad map.
Prices quoted in U.S. dollars.
O I UvLCN I   MlAULl MOO The way to see Europe without feeling like a tourist.
Eurailpass is valid in Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Holland, Italy, Luxembourg, Norway, Portugal,
Spain, Sweden, Switzerland.
Eurailpass, Box 2168, Toronto, 1, Ontario
Please send me your free Eurailpass folder with railroad map. □    Or your Student-Railpass folder order form. □
Name_
City	
.Street,
No. 193A
_Apt._
_Zone_
.Prov. Page 10
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  February  8,   1972
Hot flashes
Political role
for women?
A series of weekly noon-hour
lectures on women and politics
begins Wednesday at the YWCA
board room, 580 Burrard St.
Rosemary Brown,
ombudswoman of the status of
women's action and co-ordinating
committee, will speak on Why Get
Involved.
Frostbite
The Varsity Outdoor Club is
sponsoring a series of free lectures
on the prevention and treatment
of exposure, frostbite and other
related problems that will start at
7:30 p.m., today, in SUB 209.
New dean
The board of governors has
appointed a new dean of the
medicine faculty to succeed
retiring John McCreary.
Dr. David Bates, 50, will take
over the position on July 1.
Dr. Bates, a Canadian, is
currently the physiology
department head at McGill
University.
He is a respiratory physiologist
and chest physician, with training
at universities and hospitals in
Canada, the U.S. and Great
Britain.
Dance
The Paula Ross Dancers will
present a concert at 8:30 p.m.,
today, in the SUB auditorium.
Tickets are $2 at the door.
New zoo head
Peter Larkin, 48, has been
named head of the zoology
department, succeeding William
Hoar.
Larkin's appointment is to take
effect March 1.
He is currently a member of
the Science Council of Canada
and the Fisheries Research Board,
and has been acting head of the
zoology  department  since  1969.
'Tween classes
TODAY
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Election campaign discussion, noon,
SUB 210.
SPECIAL. EVENTS
Sallye"   Davis,      noon,      SUB
auditorium.
NEWMAN CLUB
General  election,   noon,  St. Mark's
music room.
CHESS CLUB
5ee   clubs   workroom   noticeboard
for   information  about  UBC  Open
Chess Tournament.
COMMITTEE FOR AN
INDEPENDENT CANADA
New members welcome, noon, SUB
105B.
TAI CHI
Joint   hands   practice,   noon,   SUB
205.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Prof. Noel Hall, Karl, and all parties
discuss   "How   good   are   strikes?",
noon, SUB 111.
WEDNESDAY
SPECIAL EVENTS
Canadian  poet  Phyllis Webb reads,
noon, SUB art gallery.
VOC
General meeting, noon, Angus 104.
ITALIAN CLUB
Noon, International House stage.
FREESEE
Kenneth      Clark's     "Civilization",
noon, SUB Aud., free.
AUCM
Supper,   5:30   p.m..   Bishop   David
Sommerville,     7     p.m.,     Lutheran
Campus   Centre.   Also   co-op   soup
kitchen,   noon,   Lutheran   Campus
Centre.
ONTOLOGY
Communal living, noon, Buch 216.
THURSDAY
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Film:   "Six  chevaux  bleus",  noon,
Buch 100.
UBC SKYDIVERS
Free   skydiving  films,   10 a.m. - 4
p.m., SUB 125.
CUE MATURE STUDENTS
Dr.   Dorothy   Smith   of   anthrosoc
dept.:    "Is    sociology    relevant?",
noon, Mildred Brock lounge, coffee
no less.
MONARCHIST LEAGUE
Decision-making     meeting,     noon,
SUB212A.
CIS
CO-OPERATIVE INSURANCE SERVICES LTD.
C.I.S. Insurance, a Leader in the field of Insurance innovations, has career
opportunities in the marketing of the Insurance product (Estate Planning —
Annuities — Pensions — and all aspects of Life Insurance: also
advising their clients on General Insurance, i.e. Auto Home — and.
Business). The sound philosophy of Cooperation offers a young man or
woman an excellent opportunity to assist in advising the public on their
insurance necessities.
Please write or phone MARKETING SECRETARY, D. STONEY, C.I.S.
INSURANCE, No. 96 East Broadway, Vancouver, B.C., 872-7454.
CAMPUS LEAGUE
CURLING
BONSPIEL
DATES; Begins   Thurs. Feb. 17 - 12:30-2:30
Mon. Feb. 21   -   5:00-7:00
Continues every Mon. & Thurs. for 3 Weeks
ENTRY DEADLINE: Fri. Feb. 11th 4:30 p.m.
TO ENTER: Phone 228-2295 or enter at Rm. 202 Memorial Gym
RINKS: 2 male & 2 Female curlers
LOCATION: Winter Sports Centre
ENTRY FEE: None
PRIZES: Unique
CALIBRE: Good or Bad
SIGN UP NOW FOR THE 1ST
CAMPUS ONLY SPIEL
Inlet
The second of two talks on the
third crossing of Burrard Inlet,
sponsored by the Environmental
Crisis Operation, will be held
Thursday noon in Henry Angus
110.
Speakers include professor Paul
Roer, School of Community and
Regional Planning, Aids. Harry
Rankin and Halford Wilson, and
Bruce Yorke, chairman of the
Citizens Committee for Public
Transport.
Two doctors, one from the
U.S. and one from Vancouver, will
address a public meeting Feb. 14
on the medical aspects of abortion
in Canada and the U.S.
Frans Koome of Renton, Wash,
and David Claman will speak in
theatre A122 of Vancouver City
College, Langara campus at 8 p.m.
Koome operates a Renton
abortion clinic and Claman works
in the obstetrics and gynecology
department of Vancouver General
Hospital.
UBC BICYCLE CLUB
Meeting about bike trip and party,
noon, SUB 211.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Free   film:   "Background   to   Latin
America",     noon,    upper    lounge,
International House.
ECO
Third    crossing    discussion,    Harry
Ranking,  Halford Wilson,  planning
prof. Paul  Roer et al, noon, Angus
110.
GAY PEOPLE'S ALLIANCE
General meeting to discuss budget,
coffeehouse,   OFY   project,   noon,
SUB 224.
GAY PEOPLE'S ALLIANCE
Music,   coffee,   conversation,    7:30
p.m.   on.   Orange  room, New Arts
One Building.
VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Paul Stevens, noon, SUB Aud.
CCF
"How do you know you are saved?"
Hmmm. Noon, SUB 215.
FRIDAY
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
General meeting. Be sure to submit
nominations for coming election,
noon, International House.
A very special offer!
GRADUATION
PORTRAITS
in
NATURAL
COLOR!
Select from a series of 8 poses
taken in natural colour. We
will finish:
o One 8" x 10" portrait in
natural color (one person)
$21.95
• One 8" x  10" portrait in
natural color (group)
$24.95
Ask about our special
reduced prices on additional
portraits ordered at the same
time.
• Complete selection of Caps
and Gowns available.
campbell
studios
2580 BURRARD STREET,
VANCOUVER 9, B.C.*
736-0261
HONG KONG CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus in the Village
WE SERVE AUTHENTIC CHINESE FOOD
AT REASONABLE PRICES
EAT IN - TAKE OUT
We have enlarged our dining room
to offer you better service.
Open Every Day From Friday
4:30 p.m. to 11 p.m. 4:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m.
5732 University Blvd. Phone 224-6121
CLASSIFIED
Rotes: Compos —.3 Unas,  f  day $1.00; 3 days $&S0
Commwciai - 3 tints,  t  day $f.2S; oddWoual
Hms 30c? 4 days pr!c« of 3.
Classified ads me net accepted by telephone and ate payable
in advance. Deadline i* UtSQ am., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241 S.U.B., VBC, Van. S, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
DancM
11
Greetings
12
Lost & Found
13
Rides & Cai Pools
14
DESPERATE   —   RIDE     TO     UBC
from    Willow   and    l!)ht   between
11:15    and    11:30    (stop).    Contact
Jude,  876-4403.
Special Notices
15
 SKI WHISTLER!	
Rent   furnished  condominium
posite  Gondola,  224-0657   eves
op-
  3 FOR $1.00 ???? 	
Why pay this much for your prophylactics?
We will mail you 24 assorted brand
name prophylactics for only 12.00 in
a plain sealed envelope by return
mail.
Clip and enclose this ad. for additional bonus of 3 prophylactics to:
POSTTRADING
Box 4002 Vancouver.  B.C.
Travel Opportunities
16
FLY' TO EUROPE FROM J170.00
round trip, student vacations and
tours, employment services etc.
Air mail for full details. Campus
Agents also required. A.A.S.A.
Limited, 15 High St. Ventor
I.W.,   England.	
LOOKING FOR A PLACE TO
crash, then stay at the Vancouver
Youth Hostel. Only $1.50 per night.
Phone  224-3208.
Wanted—Information
17
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
'67 SUNBEAM IMP. $650. PHONE
683-1583 or 682-2573  eves.	
'62 COMET WAGON. RUNS. FIRST
$50 takes. Jim 731-6445 or 682-2459-
Automobiles—Parts
23
TWO MICHELIN XAS RADIALS,
used, but lots of tread. 687-4013,
738-5056.
Auto Repairs
24
Motorcycles
25
BUSINESS SERVICES
Art Services
31
STEAMBUBBLE GRAPHICS FOR
creative posters. See John or Nick
3rd   fir.   Lasserre   Bldg.,   228-2030.
Duplicating & Copying
33
Photography
35
Scandals
37
DO YOU DRIVE A MAZDA, TOYOTA or Datsun? Does Henneken-
Auto service it for you? If not
you're paying too much. Call us
at 263-8121 or drop into 8914 Oak
St. (at Marine Drive) — get a
tune up so you can enjoy your
ski trip over Mid Term.	
GOOD FOOD IN SUB 207 - 209
every day from 12:00 to 1:30.
A.M.S. International Food Festival
FEDERAL GOVERNMENT IS
giving away money in Opportunities For Youth. Appointments
666-3406 or 666-3753 to see project
officer in SUB 246 on Wed. 9,
Thur. 10, or Fri. 11.
Typing
40
FAST ACCURATE TYPING OF
essays and thesis. Reasonable
terms. CaU Mrs. Akau, days 688-
5235 — evenings 263-4023.	
YR. ROUND ACC. TYPING FROM
legible drafts. Phone 738-6829 from
10:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Quick ser-
vice on  short essays.	
HOME   TYPING.  EXPERT  WORK.
All   theses,   reports,   essays.   Quick
service,    call   Pari,    738-6498.	
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING
my home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat
accurate work. Reasonable rates.
Phone   263-5317.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
SI
SURVEYOR WANTED WITH HIS
government ticket to survey small
lot near Van. Phone 437-6909.	
STUDENTS WITH JOURNALISM
& photo abilities. Proposed O.F.Y.
project. May 15-Sept. 15. Call
Kathi  939-9805  before  Feb.   11.
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Music Instruction
61
Special Classes
62
Tutoring Service
83
WORRIED ABOUT A COURSE?
The UBC Tutoring Centre is open
12:00-2:00 p.m. Weekdays SUB
228. Tutors available in almost
every   subject.
Tutors—Wanted
64
EXPERIENCE, CHINESE-
speaking lady to teach couple beginner's English, Mon.-Fri. 8:00-
10:00 p.m. Good hourly pay. Tel.
688-3312.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
DOUBLE - BED SIZE ELECTRIC
blanket single control five-year
guaranteed used three months $15.
327-1472. ,	
NTGHT SKI PASS FOR SALE.
Grouse Mountain. Phone 921-7955
after 6  p.m.  $60.
RENTALS 8c REAL ESTATE
Roomi
61
2 STUDENT ROOMS, $50-$60, SEMI
turn., share kitchenette and full
plumbing 4337 W. 11th Ave. 224-
3070  available   immediately.
SLEEPING ROOM FOR RENT NR.
UBC. Warm & attractive 738-1195.
LARGE WARM ROOM AVAILABLE
March 1st. Private residence on
C a mp u s . Light housekeeping,
shower, separate entrance. Phone
224-6397.	
ROOM FOR MALE STUDENT KIT-
chen and laundry facilities. Handy
UBC. $40 per month. Phone 224-
1678.
Room fit Board
82
Furnished Apts.
•3
Unfurnished Apts.
84
Halls For Rent
85
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.      86
Use Ubyssey Classified
TO SELL - BUY - INFORM
The U.B.C. Campus
MARKET PLACE Tuesday, February 8, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11
U. OF S. GOALIE Lauren Shmyr has just blocked a Bob McAneeley (12) shot as Laurie Yaworski (10)
chases the rebound. 'Birds flustered Shymr seven times in the game, emerging the victors 7-2.
Huskies and Wesmen lose
It was like the German front in
the east in 1945 — total
destruction.
The UBC Thunderbirds came
out flying in weekend hockey
action, and won both contest
easily. Friday night the 'Birds
bombarded the University of
Saskatchewan Huskies 7-2, and
Saturday they dive-bombed the
University of Winnipeg 5-0 behind
Ian Wilkie's shutout goaltending.
The 'Birds had a considerably
easier time out this time than in
their previous meetings three
weeks ago. On the road, the 'Birds
won both games but had to go
into overtime to do it.
Friday 'Bird centreman and
league leading scorer Bob
McAneeley opened the scoring at
1:22 of the first period, from
Steve Fera and Arnie Pederson.
Richard Longpre, Brian de Biasio,
Alex Dick, and Doug Buchanon
added singles while left-winger
Laurie Yaworski scored two more.
Chuck Carignan, Tom
Williamson and Longpre scored
one each in Saturday's game.
Buchanon added two more.
After the game Saturday,
Winnipeg head coach Tom
Marshall said the 'Birds were more
aggressive in their own rink and
that his own team hadn't played
the man as much as they should
have.
"We didn't score on our
chances," he said.
Aside from the 'Birds' fine
performance, the games were
marred by a few minor technical
problems ... like, a game played
without ice?
Intramural
exec, wanted
Applications are now being
accepted for the following
positions in the Men's Intramural
Executive: Director, Assistant
director, Referee-in-chief,
Assistant referee-in-chief, and
Publicity Director. Written
applications stating position
sought, year, course work, and
qualifications should be directed
to the following before Feb. 18,
1972.
Mr. N. Korchinsky,
School of PE and Recreation,
War Memorial Gym,
UBC.
Athletic director Buzz Moore
said the air compressor at the
Winter Sports Centre broke down
shortly before game time Friday
and then froze up when the whole
plant was shut down to fix it.
Apparently the brine froze in the
pipes when it wasn't circulated.
Moore said that both teams
were warned before the game that
it might be a "walking contest".
"We warned the teams before
the match that they would have
to pace themselves due to the ice
conditions," he said.
By the middle of the second
period Friday, paint was showing
on one of the face-off circles. The
ice was starting to melt in spots. If
a player dropped his stick on the
ice, when he picked it up it was
wet.
"We dry-scraped the ice
between the second and third
periods so it was okay for the rest
of the game," a spokesman for the
Thunderbird arena told The
Ubyssey.
"At one point we weren't sure
if the game could be played," he
said. "Everything went wrong at
onoe."
Apart from the ice conditions,
U3C spectators were left
cross-eyed and disgusted with the
netting that still surrounds the ice
surface. The glass is on order from
the States but hasn't arrived yet.
The soft ice conditions left
players from both teams with dull
skates, broken sticks, and bad
passes. Several of the 'Birds were
kept stumbling throughout the
night due to the sleazy conditions.
However, Wilkie enjoyed the
ice conditons. 'The slower, the
better," he said.
It was a good week for Wilkie
to show his stuff (only two goals
in two games) because the
Canadian National team is being
picked this week for the world
college hockey tournament in
Lake Placid, N.Y., later this
month.
"It was a matter of time before
we got a shutout," Wilkie said.
"We've been talking about
defensive hockey a lot lately."
UBC coach Bob Hindmarch
rated his four defensemen as the
best group in the league, although
he mentioned Alberta's Steve
Carlyle as being more outstanding
individually.
"I am pleased with the team,"
said Hindmarch after Saturday's
game. "We had to tighten up
defensively and we did."
Marshall wouldn't compare the
'Birds to the league's other top
teams, or give an opinion on the
'Birds' chances of going all the
way. But he did single out
McAneeley and Yaworski as two
of the 'Birds' biggest threats.
The next 'Bird games are this
weekend in Edmonton against the
University of Alberta Golden
Bears. One of the 'Birds' problems
will be ailing defenseman Fera,
who was injured during third
period action Saturday.
"I was cut for four stitches,"
he said pointing to his elbow. "I
pulled some muscles in my back
and might have a chipped bone in
my elbow."
"It all comes down to next
weekend," Hindmarch said. "We'd
like to have the playoff series out
here on the coast."
Intramurals
MEN
BASKETBALL playoffs are
now underway at the War
Memorial gym. Division 2 and 3
title games are on Wednesday at
noon. The division 1
championship game is on Friday
at noon. Admission is free to the
games.
SOCCER playoffs continue
this week.
CAMPUS LEAGUES
are
MONDAY- 8:30- 9:30 p.m.-Gym A      Basketball (Women)
MONDAY- 5:00- 7:00 p.m.-Armouries Tennis (Women)
TUESDAY- 8:30-10:30 p.m.-Gym A      Co-Ed Badminton
WEDNESDAY- 6:30- 8:30 p.m.-Gym A      Co-Ed Volleyball
THURSDAY- 9:00-11:00 p.m.-Armouries Tennis (Women)
ARE YOU?
Women's
Intramurals
FLOOR HOCKEY schedule:
Today, 4:30 p.m. ADPi vs. GPB;
5 p.m. GPB vs. Totem; 5:30 p.m.
Ed 2 vs. Phrateres; 6 p.m. Ed 2 vs.
Pharm 1..
Wednesday, 4:30 p.m. VOC vs.
GPB 2; S p.m. GPB 2 vs. AGO;
5:30 p.m. AGD vs. Agric; 6 p.m.
Agric. vs. Rehab 1.
Thursday, 4:30 p.m. Place
Van. vs. Recreat.; 5 p.m. VCF vs.
Recreat.; 5:30 p.m. Rehab 2 vs.
Ed 3; 6 p.m. Ed 3 vs. Pharm 2.
Beautiful
clothes. .
for
beautiful |
people
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Uiablo  (Metal)     $120
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Children'*   Professional   Buckle.  Plastic.    $40
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Ladies'  Strato         $75
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291-0475 Page  12
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  February  8,   1972
Promises, promises as candidates stump
By JIM JOLY
Cinda Harrison wants to "work
for the students" and Tom
MacKinnon wants to "raise shit in
the proper channels."
Til Nawatzki says he is "not
going to promise the students the
world" while Gordon Blankstein
says president-elect Doug Aldridge
is a good friend of his and "we
can work well together."
Harrison and MacKinnon,
independent candidates for Alma
Mater Society ombudsperson, and
Nawatzki and Blankstein,
independent and Students'
Coalition candidates for
vice-president, spoke Monday
noon to about 25 persons in the
SUB ballroom.
Harrison, arts 2, said she would
like    to    improve    the    AMS's
standing with the students.
"The main thing about the
AMS is that it's just there; it's not
important," she said. "It's time
somebody gets up and does
something for the students."
MacKinnon, law 3, saying he
intended to follow in the
footsteps     of     present
Barred Toronto students to sit in
TORONTO (CUP) - University of Toronto
students will occupy the university's main library to
protest plans to exclude them from the stacks of the
new John Robarts' research library.
The faculty-dominated library council
Wednesday rejected a student demand that the
stacks of the mammoth, new library be open to all
members of the university community.
Current plans will restrict stack access to
graduate students and faculty members. Undergrads
will only be able to get books by ordering them.
Anticipating possible student dissatisfaction
with the result of the library council meeting, U of
T stepped up campus security arrangements
Wednesday.
Although they had nothing to fear that
afternoon, they stationed three campus police
anxiously inside the main entrance to the main
library. They were apparently prepared to close the
doors if an assault on the building was launched.
Police do not normally guard the building.
Last summer, police also began occupying the
library when acting president Jack Sword went to
court to seek an injunction against the Wacheea tent
community. That afternoon, the library was closed
early in case anything happened.
Similar precautions may very likely greet the
Wednesday merry-makers.
Student protest will centre around a party
complete with food, drink and entertainment held
in the main library's foyer. It's expected that the
party will edge its way towards the circulation and
stacks area of the library as the day wears on.
The merriment is scheduled to go on all night
and party-goers will not vacate the stacks when the
library's midnight curfew arrives.
Students began visiting all undergrad courses
Monday to circulate plebiscite ballots seeking to
gauge student opinion on the open stacks question.
Students will also be encouraged to question
professors about their stand.
In three weeks, a special meeting of the
university's academic senate will discuss whether to
open the stacks to the university community.
ombudsperson Joan Campana,
called the Students' Coalition
pledge to institute ticker tape
voting "absurd".
"There are better ways to
spend AMS money than to count
votes that volunteers have always
counted in the past for free," said
MacKinnon.
He said the Students' Coalition
attempt to fire AMS secretary
Carol Buzas was immature.
Nawatzki, law 3, called on
students to vote against the AMS
fee increase referendum.
"AMS money is always being
thrown around and wasted," he
said.
Nawatzki criticized the
Students' Coalition election
platform.
"In the last election the
Students' Coalition talked about
opening channels of
communications. That's bullshit.
But they still got elected."
Nawatzki said people elected
to offices become isolated from
the students.
"We should stick together and
help each other if we can and that
includes those mass-crazed fascist
red-necked red-jacketed boors so
reminiscent of the people who
shouted at Nuremburg. I am
referring, of course, to the
engineers," he said.
Blankstein, agriculture 3, said
he would like to develop better
Monarchy defended
in 1972
The Canadian monarchy may be considered an anachronism
by many in Quebec, but a necessary anachronism in the defence of
the French fact in Canada, says the national chairman of the
Canadian Monarchist League.
"Quite naturally, Quebecers feel less affinity for the crown
than other Canadians. Nevertheless, a history of British guarantees of
French institutions in Quebec is remembered, and she is grateful,"
John Aimers said in a speech on campus Friday.
Even today, Parti Quebecois leader Rene Levesque prefers to
entrust Quebec rights to British rather than Canadian hands, Aimers
said. Thus, the Canadian constitution remains unpatriated.
The Monarchist League was organized two years ago to
promote better understanding of the monarchy in Canada.
League membership numbers 5,000 including opposition
leader Robert Stanfield and constitutional authority Eugene Forsey.
LONGHAIRS!
CAMPUS STYLING
AND
BARBER SHOP
224-4636-9 a.m. - 5:30 Mon. - Fri.    SUB Lower Floor-
CHARTER FLIGHTS
VANCOUVER—LONDON—VANCOUVER
Return Flights
$225.
UP
ONE-WAY
$145 Vancouver to London
$120 London to Vancouver
We have numerous return and one-way flights each month
to and from London. Ring our office for information and
free list of flights.
GEORGIA TRAVEL
AGENTS LTD.
1312-925 W.Georgia, Van. 1
687-2868 (3 lines)
ATTENTION
STUDENTS
GET OUT AND VOTE!
There will be elections for the following positions
Tomorrow, Feb. 9, 1972:
AMS VICE PRESIDENT
TREASURER
COORDINATOR
OMBUDSPERSON
At the same time, students will be asked to vote on two
referendums, one on fees and one on constitutional
amendments.
Polls will be open as follows:
February 9th   10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Angus
MacMillan
SUB South
Buchanan
Main Library
SUB North
Civil
Sedgewick Library
Woodward Librar\
Law
Advance Polls Will Be Open
Today:
1 1:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
SUB
Education
Cafeteria (old auditorium)
Gym (War Memorial)
. . . and from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.:
Fort Camp       Place Vanier       Totem Park
Take an interest
YOUR VOTE COULD BE VITAL
inter and extra mural sports
programs at UBC.
He also said he would like to
work on an anti-calendar for next
year.
"You take a course like
chemistry 230 and boom, you're
asleep and you stay asleep for the
rest of the year," he said.
He said the anti-calendar would
tell the student in advance to
avoid such courses so they can
take other more enjoyable ones.
Second-slate elections will be
held Wednesday.
How to turn "problem"
days into
"no problem" days
Onesimple way is to switch
to Tampax tampons. There
arc so many reasons for trying them.
A doctor developed internally worn Tampax tampons
for girls like you. Their gentle three-way expansion
gives you dependable protection.
The silken-smooth container-applicator makes
them easy and comfortable
to insert. And both the applicator and tampon may be
flushed away.
Best of all, Tampax tampons really do help you forget about "problem days."
Right from the start...
DLVFAOPfO   BY   A   DOCTOR
NOV,   <.S!il   bY   MHLI0SS  OF   WOMEN
TAMPAX   TAMPONS   ARE   MADE  ONLY   BY
CANADIAN  TAMPAX  CORPORATION  LTD
BARRIE     ONTARIO

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