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The Ubyssey Feb 3, 2014

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Array The results are in: students want a campus microbrewery
and Tanner Bokor will be the next AMS president
CLEAN RECORDS
Three years after its founding, the Blank Vinyl Project                      Dfi
celebrates its musical achievements on campus                            l^O
SAY HELLO
Bus driver Brian Revel wants you to                   DO
make friends on your commute                         w A
THE SEAGULL REVIEWED P9 MINING INSTITUTE CONCERNS P4 BOOKSTORE DELAYED P3
965 STUDENTS TURNED AWAY FROM HEALTH SERVICES P3 MODERN DAY GLADIATORS P5 // Page 2
WHAT'S ON // THIS WEEK, MAY WE
MONDAY / 03
POST-SUPERBOWL
WITHDRAWAL
ALLDAY@ER'WHERE
Conqratuations/don't feel too
bad.Eroncos/Seahawks fans.
Whetheryou feel like shit oryou
feel like shit from celebrating too
much: there, there.
TUESDAY ' 04
LUNARNEW
YEAR CELEBRATION
11:30 A.M.-2 P.M. @ C.K. CHOI BLDG
It's the Year ofthe Horse. Come
and watch a tea presentation and
some lion dancing, presented by
the Institute of Asian Research.
There will also be music and a
food sale, so try something other
than the Moon in the Sub.
Free to attend, $ for food
WEDNESDAY' 05
PRODUCTION NIGHTS
3P.M.@SUB24
Learn how we put the newspaper
together. Proofreading pages.
Camaraderie. Sofas. Learning
InDesign. Learning Canadian
Press style. Free dinner. Need we
say more?
Free
THE
COVER
"Oneofthe mosthecticevents i'veshotailyear. Itailcamedowntoone find moment.
Winnie Code crowning Tanner president right infront of me was a classic shot. Afterward, Winnie took her crown back and ran off." Photo by Carter Brundage
Video content
Watch Tanner Bokor get crowned AMS
president, plus all kinds of elections
excitement at ubyssey.ca/video.
►
^|THE UBYSSEY
EDITORIAL
Coordinating Editor
Geoff Lister
coordinating@ubyssey.cs
Managing Editor, Print
Ming Wong
orinteditor@ubyssey.es
Managing Editor, Web
CJ Pentland
webeditor@ubyssey.es
News Editors
Will McDonald +
Sarah Bigam
iews@ubyssey.es
Senior News Writer
Veronika Bondarenko
vbondarenko@ubyssey.es
Culture Editor
Rhys Edwards
eulture@ubyssey.es
Senior Culture Writer
Aurora Tejeida
atejeida@ubyssey.es
Sports + Rec Editor
Natalie Scadden
sports@ubyssey.es
Senior Lifestyle Writer
Reyhana Heatherington
"heatherington@ubyssey.es
Features Editor
Amo Rosenfeld
features@ubyssey.es
Video Producer
Lu Zhang
video@ubyssey.es
Copy Editor
Matt Meuse
eopy@ubyssey.es
Photo Editor
Carter Brundage
ehotos@ubyssey.es
Illustrator
Indiana Joel
joel@ubyssey.es
Webmaster
Tony Li
webmaster@ubyssey.es
Distribution Coordinator
Lily Cai
cai@ubyssey.es
STAFF
Catherine Guan, NickAdams
Kanta Dihal, Marlee Laval,
Angela Tien, Carly Sotas, Alex
Meisner, Luella Sun, Jenny
Tang.AdrienneHembree^
Mehryar Maalem, Jack Hauen
Kosta Prodanovic, Olivia Law,
JethroAu, Bailey Ramsay,
Jenica Montgomery.Austen
Erhardt, Alice Fleerackers
Nikos Wright, Milica Palinic
Jovana Vranic, Mackenzie
Walker, Kaveh Sarhangpour
Steven Richards
BUSINESS
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LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official studentnews-
aaper of the University of Rritish Cn-
umbia. It is published
anclThursclaybyTheUbyssey Publications Society. We are an autonomous,
democratically run student organization, and all students are encouragec
to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written bythe
Jbyssey staff. They are the expressec
opinion ofthe staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views ofThe Ubyssey
Publications Society or the University
of British Columbia. All editorial content
appearing In The Ubyssey Is the property ofThe Ubyssey Publications Society. Stones, opinions, photographs anc
artwork contained herein cannot be re-
aroduced with out the expressed, written permission ofThe Ubyssey Publications Society.
_etters to the editor must be under
300 words. Please Include your phone
number, student number and signature (not for publication) as well as
your year and faculty with all submissions. ID will be checked when submissions are dropped off at the editorial office ofThe Ubyssey; otherwise
verification will be done by phone.
The Ubyssey reserves the right tc
editsubmis: ir length and clar-
ty. All letters must be received by 12
noon the day before Intended publication. Letters received after this point
will be published In the following Issue unless there Is an urgent time restriction or other matter deemed relevant by the Ubyssey staff.
It Is agreed by all persons placing dis-
alay or classified advertising that if the
Jbyssey Publications Society falls tc
aubllsh an advertisement or If an er-
'or in the ad occurs the liability ofthe
JPS will not be greater than the price
aald for the ad. The UPS shall not be
•esponslble for _, ■ ■ angesorty-
aographlcal errors that do not lessen the value or the Impact of the ad.
OUR CAMPUS//
Brian Revel
invites you
to say hello
to strangers
Olivia Law
StaffWriter
Commuter students board the
bus at VCC-Clark station. As
they halfheartedly flash their
U-Pass, they are given a leaflet.
The leaflet invites them to
remove their earphones and to
say hello to the person next to
them. Signs are placed around
the buses informing people of
the event, encouraging people
to introduce themselves to
somebody new.
This is the Say Hi on the
Bus campaign, founded by
Brian Revel, a TransLink
driver who wants to build
community where human
interaction occurs on a daily
basis: the bus.
Say Hi on the Bus was
inspired by a video entitled
Then-N-Now, which shows
two versions of an everyday
encounter: one where two
strangers connect and the
other where that connection is
inhibited by technology: cellphones, iPods and so forth.
Revel says the idea came
about in conversation with a
friend. "We lamented about
how there had been a breakdown in social interaction
with others. We wanted to
encourage people to take a
moment to say hi and to chat
to one another." The Facebook
page for the campaign was
launched August 2012.
Growing up in Salmon Arm
in interior B.C., Brian believes
there is a sense of community missing from the big city.
"You can take the kid out of
the small town but you can't
take the small town out ofthe
kid. There's something weird
that's happened in the last
few years — [Vancouver] used
to be so social and now it just
isn't. The small town boy in
me has missed this interaction and acknowledgement,
even on a superficial level."
Today, Revel lives downtown with his partner. Though
he has no kids of his own, Revel
says everyone who gets on his
bus are kind of like his kids.
He's driven the 3, 7, 9 and
10 route, but UBC students
might know him from the 84.
"When you're doing a route
ONE ON ONE WITH THE PEOPLE WHO MAKE UBC
PHOTO STEVEN RICHARDS/THE UBYSSEY
If you've taken the 84 before, you may have come across Brian Revel and his Say Hi on
the Bus social experiment.
like the number 84, you see the
same people over and over, as
there are people who travel in a
certain window and so will wind
up on the same bus. Oftentimes
people get on the bus and say hello; it's great to have recognition
and built a rapport over time."
Revel acknowledges the daily
stresses with which students are
so preoccupied on a daily basis.
"Often I know that the bus is a
damned inconvenience to get
from one place to another."
But he is also aware ofthe
importance of his job. If there
were no buses, thousands of
commuter students would have
to find other ways to come to
school. The Skytrain, although
convenient, doesn't take students
all the way to UBC. "I'm looking
at the future when looking at the
people going on the bus to study
at UBC," says Brian. "Some kids
I've found are super interactive,
but others not so much."
His social experiment may
take some people out of their
comfort zones, but Revel has not
experienced any difficulties with
passengers. He reports there
has been only positive feedback.
"People come up to me saying
that it's a great idea, they thank
me and say that they love the
interaction! I think that this
speaks to something universal in
all of us."
In terms of expanding his
vision, Revel says a number of
other TransLink drivers are interested in the campaign. People
are still finding and liking his
Facebook page every day — so far
the page has 293 likes. Eventually, Revel is aiming to turn
the interaction levels on public
transit around, one passenger at
a time.
Ultimately, he believes social
interaction is like a muscle that
needs regular exercise. "You have
to use it or else you lose it." XI
Know someone at UBC who's done something interesting? Think they deserve to
be profiled in Our Campus? Email them to printeditor@ubysseY.ca.
Write
Shoot
Edit
Code
Drink
COME BY THE UBYSSEY OFFICE
SUB 24, FOLLOW THE SIGNS
PACKAGE
EXPRESS
You Ship. We Deliver.
Ship more and pay less with our
'enient shipping options.  /
isit shipgreyhound.ca     /
for more information. // News
)RS WILL MCDONALD + SARAH BIGAM
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 3,20
BUDGET»
FILE PHOTO PETER WOJNAR3THE UBYSSEY
UBC measured the number of students turned away from Student Health Services for the first time last year and found 965 students couldn't get a same-day appointment in one term.
Confidential documents show lack of student services funding
965 students 'turned away from Student Health Services in one term
Will McDonald
News Editor
The Ubyssey has obtained
confidential university budget
documents showing that student services are unfunded by
$2.6 million.
The document says UBC health
services turned away 965 students
from January to April 2013 due to
a $300,000 budget shortfall.
UBC spokesperson Lucie
McNeill says that while 965 students did not receive immediate
attention, cases are dealt with in
priority and the number does not
reflect those who scheduled an
appointment at a later date.
"All students in distress or
with urgent concerns are seen
the same day in an emergency
appointment," said McNeill in a
statement.
According to the document,
UBC's current domestic student fees do not support student
services at the "level of excellence
expected in Place and Promise."
Patricia Mirwaldt, director of Student Health Services,
said six to eight doctors work
at UBC health services per day,
and there are around 50 unbooked slots per day open for
walk-in appointments.
Mirwaldt said the period from
January to April 2013 was the first
time UBC calculated the number
of students turned away from
same-day appointments.
"That's of course very concerning [that 965 students were turned
away] and we try to limit that as
much as possible by taking on
extra patients if someone is urgent
and needs to be seen, certainly if
somebody shows up in distress,
we'll help them even if it's over
and above our regular patients,"
said Mirwaldt.
Mirwaldt said most students
can come back for an appointment the next day or whenever is
convenient for them if their case is
not urgent.
"In all of primary health care, in
all of Canada we have access problems. And so having 50 available
slots every day is actually good as
compared to many clinics across
the lower mainland."
The document also shows
that Work Learn and Go Global
are both looking for $1 million, and $200,000 is needed
to hire two new enrollment
services professionals.
It also shows disability advising
is underfunded by $100,000, which
would be needed to fund the increase form 1,500 to 1,800 cases.
UBC spokesperson Lucie
McNeill would not confirm if the
document is official, but said it may
be from a presentation VP Finance
Pierre Ouillet and VP Students
Louise Cowin made to the AMS.
"I'm not going to comment on
that because I don't know what
document you have," said McNeill.
"We will not go into specific issues
because the budget is far from
final." XI
This story is taken from one page
of a longer document. There will be
more stories to come.
NEWS BRIEFS
U BC Law vs. Trinity Western
UBC Law has asked the B.C. Law
Society to look into a controversial
policy at Trinity Western University's
proposed law school that could
be used to discriminate against
LGBT students.
The proposed policy at Trinity
Western would require students to
sign a pledge saying they will not
engage in "biblically condemned"
sexual activities.
UBC Law's faculty council has
asked the B.C. Law Society to examine the effects of such a pledge.
"The reports published so far
have failed to identify the range
of interests at stake and have not
considered the particularstatutory
responsibilities of the Law Society to
protect rights and freedoms and to
act in the public interest. We urge a
full, public, participatory process for
considering these critical questions
in relation to the proposed new law
school," said UBC law professor
Margot Young.
Researchers offer suggestions
to preserve waterways
A team of researchers, including a
UBC prof, have found a number of
ways to help preserve waterways.
Theirsuggestions include
connecting waterways as well as
ensuring biodiversity.
"Fish are strongly impacted when
nutrients, sediments or pollutants
are added to their habitat. We cannot
protect fish without maintaining a
healthy freshwater ecosystem," said
UBC forestry prof John Richardson, xi
RESEARCH»
New category
for international
students
Andrew Liang
Contributor
UBC is creating a new student category for international students who
want to do research here.
The new student category, "visiting international research student,"
was created to address reporting
issues and potential immigration
problems surrounding the current
visiting research student program.
The VIRS classification will cover
students in the visiting undergraduate research student and visiting
graduate, master's and doctorate
research student programs.
The proposed VIRS classification
will only affect students currently
in the VURS and VGRD programs
and will result in a decrease of fees
for these students. Starting in the
2014-2015 school year, the fees will
drop from $1,060 per year to about
$384.25 plus medical insurance per
year, as these students will no longer
have to pay for one credit of domestic tuition or the AMS fees incurred
by that credit.
Students will be charged a flat
fee of $384.24 for a stay between
one and 12 months. The fee would
be renewed after a year and covers
the GoGlobal administrative charge.
The cost ofthe medical insurance
will vary depending on how long the
student plans on staying.
Costs for similar classifications
at other universities range from
PHOTO STEPHANIEXU3THE UBYSSEY
Visiting international research students will pay a fiat rate that includes a GoGlobal fee.
$400 per year at Berkeley to almost
$2,000 per eight months at the
University of Toronto.
Harrison said the creation of
this designation was necessary to
make work and application to the
program easier for these visiting
students and to better support these
students, who often lack proper
access to administrative resources.
"Basically, there are many
categories of students... but there
was none for a student from another
institution [abroad] coming to UBC
solely to do research," Harrison
said. "Without the ability to register
such students, UBC had no way
to count them or to provide them
with the necessary administrative
support."
Without a way to count these
students, Harrison said, UBC was
not able to report on part of its international activity.
Harrison also said that this
new classification should help
resolve certain immigration
issues that can arise for visiting
students, who often have no formal status at the university.
Katherine Beaumont, director
of GoGlobal, said the creation of
the VIRS classification would
have a positive impact on the
international reputation of UBC.
"What we really want to do is
be able to say to the world: UBC
welcomes visiting international
research students," said Beaumont.
"They contribute to the
research enterprise here. We
want to support them. We want
to enable faculty to invite them
easily, regardless of whether
they are in a master's program,
PhD program or undergraduate
program." XI
CONSTRUCTION »
Bookstore
renovations
delayed
__1 I'.'Kf?
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=HOTO CARTER BRUNDAGE3THE UBYSSEY
Renovations on the bookstore are expected to finish in March.
Molly Lambert
Contributor
Renovations on the UBC Bookstore will not be complete for
another three months.
Originally scheduled to be
finished for the start ofthe winter
term, the bookstore is now scheduled to open at the end of March,
but construction on the new cafe
and convenience store will continue through April.
Construction began at the end
of February 2013. "We had an
extremely aggressive schedule, so
I think many of us were delusional in thinking it could be done as
quickly as we hoped it could," said
Debbie Harvie, managing director
of university community services.
Harvie said weather was a major factor in the delays, as Syncra
Construction had to temporarily
stop exterior construction due to
rain and the roof icing over.
Piping issues and the need
to dig deeper in the soil than
expected caused further delays,
Harvie said. Construction inside
the bookstore also had to be
stalled for three weeks in January
to allow for full operation ofthe
store during the back-to-school
period.
An informal welcome to the
bookstore will be held the weekend of March 28.
"It won't be a grand opening in
the sense that everything's done,
but it's [to] come and see everything we've been doing this term,"
said Harvie. "We're very conscious that we want students who
are here now to be able to come in
and celebrate the space before the
term's over."
When complete, an elevator
will replace the old ramp into the
building to increase accessibility.
A full Starbucks with cold
drinks will replace the previous
small cafe, and the convenience
store will also be upgraded.
"When it fully opens, we expect
that certainly by the end of April,
in time for summer, we'll be
carrying a full line of salads and
sandwiches and dairy and pop
and a Slurpee machine and all the
normal convenience store items,"
said Harvie. XI NEWS    I    MONDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2014
RESEARCH»
International mining institute opens at
UBC amid questions over independence
Arno Rosenfeld
Features Editor
A UBC-based mining institute
officially launched Wednesday
at a ceremony in downtown Vancouver. While university officials
have touted its potential to help
the developing world, critics are
questioning its independence
from industry and government.
The institute, based on campus
at the Technology Enterprise
Facility, is a partnership between
UBC, SFU and Ecole Polytech-
nique de Montreal. It is funded
by a five-year $25 million grant
from the Canadian International
Development Agency (CIDA).
Known as the Canadian International Institute for Extractive
Industries and Development
(CIIEID), the stated goal ofthe
institute is to help developing
countries draft regulations
and policies governing natural
resource extraction.
"UBC has a strong track record
in the field of sustainable, socially
responsible mining and we are
delighted to join hands with our
colleagues at Simon Fraser University and Ecole Polytechnique
de Montreal to effect lasting
change," John Hepburn, UBC VP
research and international, said in
a UBC press release.
The institute will work with
governments of developing
countries in order to alleviate
poverty in those regions, said
Malcolm Scoble, director of
advisory services as CIIEID and
former head of UBC's mining
engineering department.
"A major emphasis is the need
to ensure that there's economic
well-being and health and safety
and poverty alleviation as a consequence," Scoble said.
CIIEID will conduct research
on foreign government's policies
toward the mining industry, coordinate dialogue between local
populations in affected areas and
governments or mining companies and assist vulnerable groups,
identified as women and aboriginal peoples, to benefit from mining
operations in their countries.
The funding from CIDA will
allow the institute to operate for
five years, and UBC and SFU have
committed to running the insti
tute for at least five years. While
UBC has already contributed
$6.69 million to CIIEID, it is not
clear who will fund the institute
in the future.
A UBC report pointed to three
potential sources of funding: donations from mining, oil and gas
companies, donations and grants
from other sources, and tuition
or fees for CIIEID-provided
services. Among the CIIEID's 60
"institutional partners" are several mining corporations, including
Vancouver-based Goldcorp.
Critics ofthe institute say its
funding from the federal government compromises its independence and that it may seek to aid
industry over the interests of local
populations in the areas it works.
A group of UBC and SFU students
have organized under the name
"Not From My Campus" to raise
awareness about what they see as
potential issues with the institute.
The group met with UBC President Stephen Toope to express its
concerns, and he responded to the
group in a letter.
"I want to affirm that the
CIIEID was created to generate
new knowledge through research,
to share that knowledge through
education and training and to
provide technical assistance,"
Toope wrote. "It is an independent academic centre and is not an
instrument ofthe government of
Canada."
We see this very much
as part of trying to
promote the interests
of Canadian mining
companies.
Jennifer Moore
Mining Watch
But Jennifer Moore ofthe Canadian-based NGO Mining Watch
believes the institute will in fact
promote Canadian trade interests.
"We see this ... very much as
part of trying to promote the
interests of Canadian mining
companies overseas," said Moore.
Moore also questioned
the institute's independence
from Ottawa.
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=HOTO DON ERHARDT/UBC
Above: from left, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal CEO Christophe
Guy, Simon Fraser University President Andrew Petter, UBC Vice-President Research and International
John Hepburn and institute interim
executive director Bern Klein at the
launch ofthe CIIEID. Right: Goldcorp trucks at a Canadian mine.
"The government has ensured
that it has considerable influence
over both what the institute can
say publicly about its work and
also in terms of the direction of
the institute," Moore said.
That CIDA is funding the institute has also
provoked criticism.
Nipa Banerjee, a professor
at the University of Ottawa
specializing in international
development, said that following CIDA's integration with
Canada's Department of Foreign Affairs and International
Trade over the summer, government development funds are
now more focused on helping
Canadian companies.
"The main critique I have is
that it's really not humanitarian
assistance anymore," said Banerjee, who worked for CIDA for 35
years. "It is directly linked with
Canada's economic interests."
Documents show the university recognized that it might receive criticism over the institute.
"Work of institute perceived
to primarily respond to Canadian
industry needs vs. developing
• ■
countries," was listed under
potential "reputational" risks
to the university if it approved
the CIIEID, according to an
April 2013 report, written by
Hepburn, given to UBC's Board
of Governors.
The university declined
to make Hepburn available
to answer questions about
the institute.
CIIEID director Bern Klein
was also unavailable to comment,
as he was on institute business
in South Africa, but Scoble defended CIIEID's independence.
"We're all quite confident
that we can maintain this fully
independent situation," Scoble
said, while admitting it might be
=HOTO COURTESY GOLDCORP
difficult to do so at times.
Scoble said the institute is a
wonderful opportunity for Canadian universities to contribute
to the developing world and that
it had the potential to be more effective than past efforts by CIDA
and the Canadian government.
"We've got an inherent belief
in the nature of this kind of assistance to the developing world
and we want to try and make it
succeed," Scoble said.
Critics like Moore remain unswayed on the potential for the
institute to do positive work.
"I think that there's not a lot of
potential given how it's been conceived and established," Moore
said. XI
AUS»
New Arts mascot gives a hoot
Barney retires, to be succeeded by AUS Owl
The AUS welcomed in their new mascot in January,
=HOTO COURTESY ARTS UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Alex Meisner
StaffWriter
The Arts Undergraduate Society's
old mascot, Barney, has stepped
down to make way for the AUS Owl.
After a voting period of five days
in November, the newly chosen
mascot, which will represent
12,000 Faculty of Arts students, was
revealed on Jan. 13, the first day of
Arts Week.
AUS VP internal and AMS VP
admin elect Ava Nasiri said the
search for the new mascot began
last year because the Barney suit
was worn out and the AUS was
running a budget surplus.
Barney was originally acquired
by the AUS in 2007 after being
adopted from a Dumpster by the
McDonald's on campus.
"Given the students' attachment
to wearing the Barney suit, it was
an organic choice to make it the
mascot," said Nasiri. "Since at this
point the physical Barney suit has
deteriorated severely... it was time
to make a change."
AUS clubs and associations have
been showing their support for the
new mascot. "I personally feel that
the mascot change from Barney
to the owl is awesome," said Alex
Bouchard, president ofthe French
club. "I think this AUS rebranding
is for the best."
"Arts has been struggling for a
few years [trying] to figure out a
sense of identity," said German club
president Jonathan Elmer.
"I think it is good to have a
symbol of reference for members of
any organization... so as to better
organize and unite students," said
Avi Ames, the AUS representative
for the Sociology Students Association. XI
News
Meetings
are
Mondays
at 2 p.m.
COME BY THE UBYSSEY OFFICE
SUB 24, FOLLOW THE SIGNS // Sports + Rec
EDITOR  NATALIE SCADDEN
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 3,20
RECREATION »
Students defend their honour in UBC REC's Gladiator event
Billed as a collection of "unconventional activities" that challenge the mind, body and team
Reyhana Heatherington
Senior Lifestyle Writer
"Oh my God, this is a war!"
Shael Guyan of Team Dat Asterix
can't contain his excitement as he
cheers on a teammate locked in a
one-on-one jousting marathon in an
inflatable ring.
Billed as a collection of "unconventional activities" that challenge
the mind, body and team, UBC
REC's Gladiator event took over
the second floor ofthe Student Rec
Centre Thursday evening.
Forty teams signed up and gathered to rotate through five events
facing off against one other team at
each Under the Sea-themed station.
Blue lights contributed to the
dramatic atmosphere and pop hits
spanning the last 20 years blared
from speakers.
At "In Search of Atlantis: The
Lost Empire," contenders were
required to find puzzle pieces in
a maze and bring them outside
to assemble a photo of Atlantis.
The all-female Phly Phi team was
made up of people who had "never
heard of this before last week," and
people like fourth-year Arts student
Katy Ogloff who was back for a
second year.
"I liked that you don't necessarily
need to be athletic, even though I
am," she said. "[It's] mentally challenging as well and you're working
as a team."
Being a gladiator in
Rome, though it could
be very lucrative and
you could be very
very popular, came
with huge restrictions
on your legal status.
Siobhan McElduff
UBC professor of early Roman
history
Though her team lost the puzzle
challenge, their opponents came
over to exchange sportsmanlike
"good game" handshakes.
For Ogloff, the name "Gladiator"
was a successful marketing strategy.
"It makes people interested,
definitely," she said. "They're like,
'What is that?'.... It's ambiguous
enough that people want to know."
But in reality, the competition
was not what some participants expected when they think ofthe name
"Gladiator."
"It's almost the opposite. You
think of blood. Manliness," said
Ogloff's teammate, fourth-year sociology major Andrea Mameri.
At the "Free Willy" station, players navigated an inflatable obstacle
course of stairs and slides while
holding an ocean-dwelling stuffed
animal. While Beta Pi team member
and second-year Arts student Hogan
Chan waited to enter the course, he
said the photos online attracted him
to the event.
"I saw a giant Q-tip so I said, 'I
like giant Q-tips,'" Chan said with a
laugh. He decided that the so-called
"Q-tip" station was the most true to
the Gladiator name.
"You got the weapon, you got the
helmet, and you got the competing
element," he said.
As for those Q-tips, they presented arguably the most physically
challenging task ofthe event. At the
"duel for the Black Pearl," players
faced off in an inflatable ring and
tried to knock their opponent off of
a three-foot wide square platform
using a foam baton that did indeed
resemble a giant inflatable Q-tip.
Though the most "gladiator-like"
station deflated in the first round, it
was soon pumped up again. Second-
year history student Cheryl Nordal
watched her Dat Asterix teammate
face off and did not let her forget
the gravity ofthe situation while
beating her hands against the side of
the ring.
"This is what you worked for
your whole life!" she screamed to
her teammate, who eventually won
the round.
Researchers have called the
film Gladiator "an investigation of
the stoic code ofthe warrior, the
applicability of morality in the face
of violence and imminent death, and
an investigation of resistance in the
face of apparent defeat and impossible odds."
So what does the term "gladiator"
bring to mind for first-year engineering student Jarek Tan?
"Being a beast!"
"I think 'intense warrior,'" said
fourth-year genetics and psychology student Paria Assadipour,
standing at the "Escaping Ursula's
Lair" game. "There's only one actual
gladiator station, and the rest are
just to keep it going."
As she finished her sentence,
her helmet-wearingteammate was
nailed in the head with a tennis ball
shot from a motorized machine.
"It gets a little physical, you could
say," she said with a laugh.
Assadipour's team faced off
against the Glawdiators who were
— you guessed it — a team of law
students. Aicha Kouyate, a third-
year law student, was also expecting
a tougher course.
"It's a little more tame than I
expected," she said. "I was thinking,
not blood, but more physical."
Perhaps the least physical station
was "Finding Nemo," where competitors searched a dark fog-filled
equipment room for tiny Nemos in
bins.
Alena Freberg, a UBC REC staff
member, was the director ofthe
Gladiator event this year. Her crew
took suggestions from friends and
coworkers and chose the theme
based on popularity, feasibility and
decorating logistics. Past event
themes have included Tron and
recess; this year, they decided on
ocean-themed events. Freberg said
the new format was a welcome
change.
"It's nice this year also because
it's only time slot champions, so
you're only required to be here
for two hours," she said. "So it's a
good study break, especially with
midterms coming up. It's just a lot
of fun."
REAL-LIFE ROMAN
GLADIATORS
Though gladiators are portrayed in
pop culture as rogue beasts, they
were historically very different.
Siobhan McElduff is a UBC professor who specializes in early Roman
history and teaches a second-year
class on Greek and Roman spectacles — including gladiators.
"In popular culture they are
heroic individuals who don't play by
the rules," she said. "You can send
one guy in a theatre against 10 men
and they use every weapon they can,
and they're mainly naked most of
the time — at least according to the
Spartacus TV series — and the death
rate is incredibly high and it's a
miracle if our heroes survive beyond
a year or two."
In reality, McElduff said, scholars
know the "particularly deadly
sport" featured fighters with one
set of weapons, a highly regimented
atmosphere and a measly 10 per cent
death rate. For 500 years starting
around 300 BCE, McElduff said
gladiators were highly paid fighters
who had often trained at gladiator
schools since childhood.
"All the Romans really [wanted
was] skill," she said. "I mean, they
liked to see the occasional death, but
nobody wants to see a whole pile of
death."
Today, McElduff said the
Ultimate Fighting Championship
and professional boxing would
be the most comparable sports
for their "stripped down" nature
that crowns a clear victor. The
main difference today, though, is
the celebratory nature of one-on-
one combat for entertainment. In
ancient Rome, gladiators became
infames who lost most of their
legal rights and were classified
at the same level as those who
sold their bodies, including actors
and prostitutes.
"Being a gladiator in Rome,
though it could be very lucrative
and you could be very, very popular,
came with huge restrictions on your
legal status," McElduff said. "We
don't do that to athletes, obviously.
Now, no matter how much we may
disapprove of a sport... those people
are celebrated."
In Canada, perhaps none are
more revered than hockey players,
and McElduff said similar themes
resonate in the culture of hockey.
"The way hockey fights are often
talked about is like it's an honour
thing. If you watch Hockey Night,
you see Don Cherry and he [says,]
'This is a necessary thing about
honour,'" she said. "This is the way
that gladiators [kept] their honour
or what honour they [had] left, even
though they're fighting for entertainment."
National identity also plays into
the parallels between hockey for
Canadians and gladiators for the
ancient Romans.
"We get that especially at big
things like the Olympics," she said.
"The idea that somehow these
people are representing us by taking
risks. Even though some of those
things like skeleton seem insane,
somehow they are making us proud
to be ourselves."
While there was no guidebook
to verify the details of real gladiators, certain communal morals
seemed to be strong. Like the UBC
REC event, ancient competitors
faced off against people from their
own school.
"We don't really know, but the
assumption was if you were too keen
to kill people they didn't like it,"
McElduff said.
As a co-ed competition, the
UBC REC event did hold true to
the historical accuracy of ancient
gladiators. Though many people
believe the sport was restricted to
men, McElduff said women were
also involved in particularly lavish
games as an "expensive speciality."
In the Student Rec Centre however, female and male competitors
were equally "special." The "guaranteed laughter" was not an empty
promise as players busted their guts
watching their teammates bounce
around inflatable obstacles like their
lives depended on it. And all the
enthusiasm really did paid off in the
end — after the "war" was over, Dat
Asterix emerged the victors in their
PHOTO CARTER BRUNDAGE/THE UBYSSEY
UBC students duked it out as part of UBC REC's Under the Sea-themed Gladiator event.
LAUNCH YOUR CAREER
WITH A POSTGRAD
IN BUSINESS
CHOOSEYOUR
CERTIFICATE
<j)'HUMBER ELECTIONS    I    MONDAY, FEBRUARY 3,2014
=HOTOSCARTER BRUNDAGE AND GEOFF LISTER/THE UBYSSEY
Left to right: presidential candidate Harsev Oshan hears the election results; AMS "Yes" referendum campaign members; current VP externalTanner Bokor embraces his associate VP and the new VP external Bahareh Jokar after winning.
AMS ELECTIONS 2014 RESULTS
Whistler lodge
to be axed as
all referendum
questions pass
C J Pentland
Managing Editor, Web
Students voted in favour of all six
referendum questions on this year's
AMS elections ballot, meaning the
Whistler Lodge can be sold by the
AMS and a microbrewery may be
coming to campus.
After failing to reach quorum
when it was on the ballot two years
ago, the Whistler Lodge decision
was made this year as student voted
in favour of giving the AMS permission to dispose ofthe lodge as
they see fit. The lodge is currently
in poor condition and losing around
$30,000 a year.
The other two AMS-related
questions also passed. The AMS
pushed heavily for students to vote
in favour of an AMS fee restructure and bylaw changes, and the
majority of students voted yes. The
fee restructure is intended to help
the student society get out of their
$800,000 deficit.
The fate ofthe microbrewery has
also been decided, as students have
voted in favour of having one on
campus. There will now be a new
student fee to help cover the cost
ofthe microbrewery: $2.50 for the
first two years, $5 for the following
year, $7 for the fifth year and then
chained to inflation after that.
Students who display a "financial
need" are able to opt out.
Students have also asked for the
AMS to urge UBC to divest from
fossils fuels. UBCC350, a group of
UBC students committed to climate
action, proposed this question and
got it on the referendum after their
campaign exceeded 1,000 signatures. The majority of students
voted in favour of their movement.
The sixth referendum question
asked if students wanted the AMS
to push for lower tuition, to which
they voted yes. XI
=HOTO GEOFF LISTER3THE UBYSSEY
AMS president-elect Tanner Bokor celebrates with some bubbly at the elections results party on Friday night.
Bokor to be 105th AMS prez
Current VP external to take student society reins
Sarah Bigam
News Editor
Tanner Bokor has won the AMS
presidential election, beating out
candidates Winnie Code, Harsev
Oshan and Jackson Chen.
"I'm going to cry," Bokor said
in his acceptance speech. "Quite
honestly, sincerely, thank you
so much. I cannot tell you how
much this means to me, from the
bottom of my heart.
"It was a long race. I think I'm
probably one ofthe first AMS
presidents that didn't really get
to campaign because I was working for you guys, but thank you,
honestly, thank you."
He said his opponent Oshan
ran one ofthe most impressive
presidential campaigns he had
ever seen.
"[Bokor] won, and that's bottom line," said Oshan. He said he
hopes to work on the microbrewery project in the coming year.
Bokor now aims to improve
relationships with AMS constituencies and clubs and work on the
transition to the New SUB.
"We've got a lot to do, but 15
months to do it, so I'm looking
forward to it," Bokor said.
"I think the team's fantastic,
and congratulations to everyone
who ran in this election. It was a
fantastic race. Well done to all."
Bokor said he was "incredibly
relieved" that all the referendum
questions passed.
"I'm happy that students supported all the questions on the
ballot. In terms of the microbrewery, we're going to make
it work, it's going to take some
time, but we're going to follow
through on our commitment,"
said Bokor. "We'll start hopefully
having a much healthier financial society going forward so I'm
really happy, really pleased, and
again, really grateful to all the
students for their support."
Jackson Chen was not present
for the announcement of the
results. XI
Miadlikowski
wins VP
finance race
Veronika Bondarenko
StaffWriter
Mateusz Miadlikowski beat out
incumbent Joaquin Acevedo and
joke candidate Alex Bucci in the
race for VP finance this year.
Miadlikowski, who lost to Acevedo in the same race last year, is
looking forward to the chance to
take over as the new VP finance.
"I feel pretty excited about
the prospect of working for
the AMS at the higher level,"
said Miadlikowski.
Miadlikowski is confident he
will be able to manage AMS funds
during his term in office.
"I think that I ran a good
campaign and I think [students]
chose the representative that was
appealing to them. So I'll think
that I'll do a great job for all the
students of UBC."
While Acevedo was
disappointed about not being
reelected for a second term, he is
pleased the fee structure referendum, which he has been working
on for the past year, has passed.
"I think that all the work that
I did this year was vindicated by
the referendum passing, which
was my main goal this year, to be
able to fix this referendum up,"
said Acevedo.
Bucci is livid students made
such a "deplorable and devastating decision" by not choosing him
as the next VP finance.
"Obviously I would have made
a better VP finance. Since I didn't
win this time, I expect to try
infiltrating the AMS through less
conventional means, perhaps in
the middle ofthe night, just by
sitting in [Miadlikowski's] chair.
When I talk about the seat of
power, I mean it literally."
Bucci also said he lost the race
because his looks do not live up to
Miadlikowski and Acevedo's. XI
Nasiri beats out Ng for VP admin
Ava Nasiri celebrates her victory at the elections results party.
Jovana Vranic
StaffWriter
Ava Nasiri will be the AMS's new
VP administration after defeating contender Serena Ng in this
year's elections.
In this position, Nasiri will
be responsible for the workings
ofthe old SUB, keeping the
New SUB project running on
track and overseeing over 370
AMS clubs.
"I am incredibly humbled,"
said Nasiri. "I had so much
support. I felt so much love from
everyone on campus throughout
the whole process. I'm feeling
blessed."
To start off her term as VP
admin, the first project Nasiri
wants to start work on is driving
a smooth transition into the New
SUB building. "The first step of
that would be clearing up how we
communicate with clubs," she said.
She plans to ensure that all
deadlines for the project are met.
"I'm pretty well versed in what's
going on with the New SUB
committee."
Ng expressed her best wishes to Nasiri and said she would
follow Nasiri's progress on the
VP admin's portfolio projects
throughout her term.
"I'm interested to see what's
going to happen next year," Ng
said.?! MONDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2014    |    ELECTIONS
Karimi
and Roach
take Board
seats
Will McDonald
News Editor
Chris Roach and Nina Karimi
have won the two student representative spots on the UBC Board
of Governors.
Roach and Karimi beat out
candidates Spencer Keys and
liana Shecter for the positions.
"I hope I did well. I'm happy
to work with Nina. Disappointed
for both liana and Spencer, but I
wish them the best," said Roach.
"[Nina and I] have similar
ideologies but different platforms, so it's going to be making
sure we that find a balance and
don't argue amongst one another," said Roach.
Karimi said her first goal on
the Board would be to establish
student representation regarding
Acadia Park.
"I'm incredibly motivated by
the fact that I can now have the
ability to prove everyone wrong
who didn't think that I was capable and I'm excited for the year
to come," said Karimi.
Shecter said she was
disappointed by the results, but
happy that the divestment referendum, one of her main platform
points, passed.
=HOTOSCARTER BRUNDAGE/THE UBYSSEY
Chris Roach, above, was elected to both the Senate and the Board of Governors, as was with Nina Karimi, below.
"It's great that divestment
passed. That's a huge step for the
university and a huge step for
climate activism," said Shecter.
Keys said he wasn't disappointed with the results.
"You're electing people that
can do the job and that means
both technical skills and someone with the ability to reach out
to certain communities and so,
demonstrably, these two have at
least one or both of those skills.
And that's what was important to
people and that's just fine," said
Keys.1!!
Incumbent
Kessler
triumphs as
VP academic
Arno Rosenfeld
Features Editor
Incumbent Anne Kessler has been
elected to a full term as AMS VP
academic and university affairs,
defeating former interim VP
academic and student senator
Mona Maleki.
"I had never done AMS
elections before, so I think the
whole time you don't know what
the general public will think,"
Maleki said.
"I've worked with Anne before
and she's going to be awesome in
the position."
Kessler ran on her experience
as the incumbent, having held
the position since October after
defeating Adam Melhem in the
election to replace Kiran Mahal,
who resigned from her post as
VP academic in September.
Maleki, who filled in as executive following Mahal's resignation and before Kessler's byelection, emphasized her grassroots
organizing experience and work
with students.
Both candidates emphasized
student housing, mental health
and the importance of closely
monitoring UBC's increasing use
of technology in the classroom.
Kessler was travelling and
could not be reached for comment. XI
=HOTO GEOFF LISTER/THE UBYSSEY
Bahareh Jokar moves from being an associate VP to the full-fledged VP external.
Jokar wins VP external
Sarah Bigam
News Editor
Bahareh Jokar has beaten comedic
Game of Thrones competitor Jon
Snow to become the new AMS
VP external.
"I'm thrilled, and very grateful
to all the students that voted,"
Jokar said.
This year, Jokar plans to work on
her three campaign points of transportation, tuition and provincial
lobbying.
"I intend to follow through on all
my campaign promises," she said.
Jokar also hopes to continue
working with the Alliance of BC
Students, an organization she
recently helped found as associate
VP external.
"I'm dead," said Snow. As
Snow died, he maintained that he
knew nothing.
Snow said he thought SFU would
now surely invade. "It's better to
be dead than to be subject to the
necromancy of SFU," he said. XI
OTHER WINNERS
Senate
Ubyssey president
Anne Kessler
Jason Kim
Mona Maleki
Nina Karimi
Ubyssey board
Eric Zhao
Brendan Lim
Chris Roach
SunilSuvarna
Daniel Cockburn
Student Legal Fund Society
Quartermain Lim
JanzenLee
Navi Purewal
Voter-funded media
Joseph Gorman
VoteforMe,UBC!:$198
Aaron Sihota
UBC Underground: $242
Dawei Ji
Tyler Suzuki Nelson: $154
Jordan Stewart
The Syrup Trap: $374
TRU-Watch:$132
Computed CAPEX
and OPEX. Then
learned how to
cook Tex-Mex.
"One thing I've learned during
my first year here is that capital
-xpenditures and operating
xpenditures are only part of
the EY eguation.
On my project team, I work wi
people from around the world.
Thursday is our international
cooking night, when we share
our favorite dishes and a bit
about our ancestries. We're a
team in the office, a team in
the kitchen."
every amazing angle at
xceptionalEY.com. II Culture
RHYS EDWARDS
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 3,20
MUSIC »
Blank Vinyl Project mints campus music community
Alexis Wolfe + Rebekah Ho
Contributors
On Jan. 21, Koerner's Pub was
packed full with UBC's finest
musicians, listeners and members
ofthe music community at large.
The recently re-opened pub had
partnered up with the Blank Vinyl
Project (BVP) for live shows every
Tuesday evening, promising good
company, a welcoming atmosphere
and no shortage of Mason jars full
ofPBR.
In only three years, BVP has
grown to become part ofthe core
UBC music community. Originally
founded as a record label for UBC
students, BVP has helped artists
such as Amie Yoshitake and the
Mouths connect with professional
producers and release original records. In its first few years, BVP ran
a "featured artist" audition series;
one ofthe winners, Anxiojam, won
a spot to play at AMS Block Party,
which Ben Chen, founder of BVP
and current board member, considers to be a "crown achievement."
However, the featured artist
audition structure started to prove
unsustainable over the years.
"There was one band, Funk-
Dirty, that were really hot this
summer, and we really wanted to
work with them, but we couldn't
because we limited ourselves by
saying that we only wanted to
work with our featured artists,"
said Chen, a fourth-year marketing
student. "That hurt us, that we
couldn't give people opportunities.
The Blank Vinyl Project, founded by Ben Chen, will be hosting shows at Koerner's Pub every Tuesday night.
=ILE PHOTO JONCHIANG3THE UBYSSEY
We were being selective while were
trying to be a community and that
didn't make sense."
Dimitri Kanaris, BVP's current
president, and the rest ofthe BVP
team made an executive decision
last September to remove the featured artist program and create an
inclusive environment that works
on a project-by-project basis.
"What I wanted to do was have
a community where kids in their
dorm rooms could pick a guitar,
come to a jam session and play at
open mics," said Kanaris. "I found
that that didn't really exist on
campus."
By combining the record label
and community concepts together, Kanaris is confident BVP can
offer help, guidance and opportunities to students. In so doing,
BVP's membership has expanded
remarkably, from around 30 to 40
consistent attendees in its first
year to a membership of nearly five
times that.
Aiden Danaher, events manager
and musician with BVP, expressed
his enthusiasm for BVP's evolution
and shift to a more inclusive music
community. "We're branching out
a lot this year. We're focusing on
involving everybody. Any musician
that wants help, we can supply
them with it."
BVP's momentum is unrestricted. Upcoming events, including
the annual year-end "Goose
Hunt" at the Pit and a live show
sponsored by Red Bull, are driving the BVP community towards
further exposure and success.
Other plans in the works include a
radio show and an online streaming program, BVPTV.
Members and musicians ofthe
BVP community are connected to a network of likeminded
individuals who are given the
opportunity to become involved
in the events and guidance that
BVP offers, whether it be recording an EP or finding a venue to
showcase work.
"Whatever artists come our
way, if they want to do some
recordings [or] want to get some
shows out... we work closely
with them and we establish these
relationships. We don't limit ourselves, and we give equal opportunity to everyone," said Chen.
Ultimately, BVP has been successful in reaching out to students
with an affinity for music and
sharing it with the community,
whether it be on campus, Tuesday
nights at Koerner's Pub or in Vancouver venues such as the Backstage Lounge and Rowan's Roof.
"It's a home for people to feel
comfortable and show their artwork and music and be accepted
in that way," said Chen. "It's for
practicing and continually [motivating] people to collaborate and
build music on campus." XI
that no longer accepts that an accident of latitude determines
whether a child lives or dies. But will we be that generation?
Bono
Bono thinks poverty and hunger are key global issues.What do you think?
Have you ever thought about what causes food insecurity in developing
countries? Do you have a passion to make a difference?
The University of Guelph s Department of Food, Agricultural and Resource
Economics (FARE) is Canada's leading food education and research institution.
Thinking about graduate studies for 2014-15? Join a group of thinkers who are
hard at work on a better tomorrow.
For more information on graduate studies at FARE, visit
uoguelph.ca/fare/grad
UNIVERSITY
^"GUELPH
Food, Agricultural
and Resource
Economics MONDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2014    |    CULTURE
THEATRE»
Laughing to keep from crying
The Seagull a challenging, timeless tragicomedy
Gabriel Germaix
Contributor
"After all, the author insisted
it was a comedy!" For the
first time in a long while, the
audience laughs.
Until Feb. 8, Theatre at UBC
is staging the frantic, passionate and disillusioned world of
Anton Chekhov in their take of
The Seagull. Adapting the late
19th century Russian master's
famous play, director Kathleen
Duborg has come back to her
favourite "teacher." But grasping
the author's teachings is no easy
thing, and one can guess from the
post-show talk-back that Duborg,
like many other directors, still
wonders why Chekhov labelled his
play a "comedy." While The Seagull
contains several comical moments
in the first two acts, the performance ofthe cast insists on the more
dramatic aspects ofthe play.
In the warm atmosphere ofthe
Telus Studio at the Chan Centre, the cast recreates a world of
changing, indecisive characters
who stand as witnesses to the
collapse of their own illusory
grandeur. Konstantin, a symbolist
playwright played by young Thomas Elms, is maybe the one who best
sees the abyss in front of him; he
takes the audience down with him
when the soft lighting shrinks the
space like a dying candle.
His mother, Irina Arkadina, in
her red dress and vivid manners,
clings back to the stage as an aging
actress, a creature ofthe past who
refuses to leave the spotlight to a
younger generation. Mercedes de
la Zerda's remarkable performance
manages to render a character who
is both exasperating and pathetic,
a careless persecutor of her son
=HOTO COURTESY TIM MATH ESON/UBC THEATRE
Mercedes de la Zerda, left, and Thomas Elms, right, dole out morbid realities in The Seagull.
racing blindly against her age. Her
character is remarkably prescient,
given our 21st century obsession
with Botox and designer dresses.
Although a loud and somewhat
predictable bang can be heard
from Chekhov's gun, the play
revolves around silences. Awkwardness seems essential to The
Seagull, accentuating both comical
and tragic misunderstanding of
the characters' ideals; but the
producers chose to rule out several
silences that would have made
light of certain tense scenes, thereby generating a quicker rhythm
— though in a debatable tradeoff.
Nevertheless, one actress stands
out in the mute play: Helena Fisher-Welsh, who plays the depressive
Masha, highlights her words by
surrounding them with walls of silence and jaded glances, surprising
us even more when Chekhov gives
her sudden life and joy.
In the circular theatre, not two
metres away from the first row of
seats, the cast tries to grasp the
weakness, self-importance and
self-loathing Chekhov carved in
his sometimes comically pathetic
characters. In the family house,
by the lake that appears when the
light shines on the back screen
composed of lavish blue, green and
purple spots, this small world of
unshared love keeps the audience
on the edge of their seats. Viewers perpetually oscillate between
laughing at Chekhov's humour
ofthe absurd, trying to untangle
Chekhov's complex subtext and
simply feeling the strong desire to
tear down the walls of incomprehension that appear in every
dialogue ofthe play. XI
MUSIC »
Rolla Olak rolls into Gallery with style
Thorn Spano
Contributor
If someone had told me there was
a glitch in the space-time continuum and a folk musician from
the mid 1960s had materialized
in the Gallery Lounge last Wednesday night, I wouldn't have
second-guessed them.
Rolla Olak was easily identifiable, sitting with a brass harmonica
holder around his neck and a brown
safari hat on his head, casually
sipping a beer with bandmate John
Sponarski.
Moments later, Olak shouldered
a worn Telecaster, quickly re-tuned
it, and took a final gulp of his beer.
After a brief introduction, Olak
strummed the riff of his latest single
"Waiting for You," a love song about
a homeless couple. The duo immediately drowned the intellectual
conversations flying back and forth
between an array of supercilious
third- and fourth-year students,
sparking a powder keg of noise, filling the room with a boot-stomping,
harmonica-playing folk echo ofthe
Vietnam era.
The two men managed to evoke
a grandiose dynamic of sound
within the Gallery. Rolla's loud
electric guitar traversed the realms
of folk, country and blues, swaying
between nostalgic melodies and pop
chorus chord progressions. While
his harmonica conjured sincere and
weathered emotions of a homeless
man left to rot in the streets of
Nashville, Sponarski's steel guitar
gently accompanied the harmonica's lonesome cry with its distinct
sinking sound.
CARTERBRUNDAGEJTHEUBYSSEY
John Sponarski, left, and Rolla Olak, right, invoked another era last Wednesday night.
"I think growing up on Vancouver Island really influenced my
writing," Rolla said confidently after
the show. "Knowing that there's
more out there in the world and the
universe than just sort of what we
make believe our lives to be about —
those still moments really influence
me."
Olak, who provided much ofthe
sountrack to the Vice documentary
Doin' It Baja, described his style as
"straight-up, like country, rock, and
folk and blues. It sounds pretty old
school." It's a familiar sound, heavily
influenced by the likes of Bob Dylan,
Neil Young and Tom Petty, the three
of whom Rolla cited as the music
he listened to while growing up on
Vancouver Island.
"I feel like listening to them
growing up is kind of like goingto
school: learning how to write a good
pop song, learning about melody in
a good pop song and learning how
to be okay with writing words or
poetry like Bob Dylan does.
"The best songs I've written
are definitely the ones that sort of
come through and you kind of just
be in that moment and not try to
worry where they're coming from
and get that real stream-of-con-
sciousness style of writing."
Since 2009, Olak has released
two studio albums, one live album,
and his latest single, "Waiting for
You." Prior to his solo career, Olak
played guitar for the Canadian
band Boy. Although Boy has since
disbanded, Olak remains close
with the lead singer, Stephen
Kozmeniuk. He plans to return to
Toronto in May, where Kozmeniuk
will produce Rolla's upcoming
album, expected to be released
this summer.
But Olak doesn't necessarily
need bandmates to succeed. When
asked how he might he have lived
in a past life, he responded:
"Maybe like a wolf, or some sort
of cool animal that can survive out
in the wilderness by itself." XI
FOOD»
Student Cooking: Upgraded mac and cheese
3 tablespoons fresh or
dried breadcrumbs
Equipment
Medium-sized bowl
Pot
Instructions
1. Cook the pasta in a pot of boiling
water until soft enough to eat. This
should take around six to eight
minutes. Reserve one cup ofthe
boiling liquid, then drain the pasta.
Do not rinse.
2. In a medium bowl, add the
cream cheese, black pepper and
cayenne pepper.
3. Pour the cooked pasta onto the
cream cheese mixture, and allow
the hot pasta to stand on top of the
cream cheese until melted. This will
take around a minute.
4. Stir the pasta to distribute the
cream cheese and spices evenly.
Add the remaining water slowly, tablespoon by tablespoon
until the sauce reaches a creamy,
smooth consistency.
5. Add the breadcrumbs and grated
Parmesan, and serve immediately.
6. Optional, but recommended:
pour the macaroni and cheese
into a small baking dish, then top
with the Parmesan and breadcrumbs and place in an oven at
350 degrees for around three
minutes, or until the crumbs
become golden brown. XI
=HOTO COURTESY SMITEME/FLICKR
Olivia Law
StaffWriter
As students and generally busy
people, pasta is a staple in our diets.
When eaten in moderation and balanced with other nutritious foods,
pasta is definitely a good choice
for its slow-release energy and the
general "comfort food" quality
it exudes.
This is a quick, easy, better-
than-Kraft version of macaroni
and cheese. It uses real cheese, and
therefore has real flavour; it's also
probably slightly better for you
than your average package of neon
orange pasta. Plus, it takes only 13
minutes to prepare.
Upgraded mac and cheese
Ingredients (makes four servings)
Water
2 cups dried macaroni pasta (other
types can be substituted, but this is
a classic)
4 ounces of cream cheese
1 teaspoon of garlic powder
Black pepper
Pinch of cayenne pepper
Vi cup grated Parmesan cheese
ALTERNATIVE
DISPUTE
RESOLUTION
TOSTGRADUATE
CERTIFICATE
<j)'HUMBER II Opinions
THE  NEW BOOKSTORE
-LUSTRATION JETHROAU/THE UBYSSEY
The bookstore opening has been delayed, but it's not about books.
LAST WORDS//
WHEN A BOOKSTORE
ISN'T
The UBC Bookstore opening has
been delayed, which one supposes
was inevitable given that manager
Debbie Harvey called the projected
opening date "delusional."
What doesn't make sense
though, actually, is to refer to the
delayed opening being at "the
bookstore." Because, of course,
UBC had a perfectly functional
bookstore. Was anyone avoiding
purchasing textbooks because
the store wasn't at street level?
Because its windows weren't big
enough? No way.
But this renovation isn't about
books — it is about turning the
bookstore into "UBC Central."
Harvey and friends tried to make
the push for this change, renaming
the bookstore with a more generic
name, a couple years ago, and the
university said no — as they should
have. But the bookstore hasn't
given up its dream of becoming
more than a bookstore. Indeed,
it wants to become UBC's prime
emporium for all things university.
Which is, of course, absurd.
The campus bookstore should be
a place to buy textbooks at the beginning ofthe term, and books and
magazines at other times during
the year. It should also sell office
supplies — binders, notebooks,
the kind of things you need for
school — and UBC apparel and souvenirs. Beyond that, the store's expansion into selling more clothing,
odd toys, more food and opening a
new cafe seem altogether unnecessary. There are better places to get
everything the bookstore sells, and
its location on campus only makes
it convenient when it comes to selling things people want for school
and can't get elsewhere on campus.
Sorry, guys, we already have
enough Starbucks.
BUDGET SHORTFALLS
CONCERNING
UBC student services are currently underfunded by $2.6 million.
$2 million of this shortage is in
Work Learn and Go Global, but
what is more concerning is the
shortfall in disability advising
and Student Health Services.
Even though director of
Student Health Services Patricia
Mirwaldt says UBC's services
are actually more accessible
than in many clinics across the
Lower Mainland, 965 students
were turned away from Student Health Services during the
second term last year. And UBC
needs $100,000 more for another
full-time employee in disability
advising to fund the increase in
cases from 1,500 to 1,800.
UBC's plan commits them to
increasing support for student
well-being, and they do acknowledge that the services they currently offer are inadequate. UBC
needs to find the funding to be
able to operate these services at a
satisfactory level.
And when they do get the
funding, hopefully they have
their priorities straight. While
international programs like Go
Global scream prestige — and
don't get us wrong, getting more
students going on exchanges is a
nice idea — it is more important
to ensure the health and well-being, both physical and mental, of
the thousands of students who
are already here.
STRIDES MADE ON
MENTAL HEALTH
Five years ago at UBC, we didn't
really talk about depression on
campus. Early Alert was not
a part of RA or student leader
training and UBC counselling
was swamped with students. You
can poke through the Ubyssey
archives yourself, but a quick
search of "depression" shows
up mostly in opinion pieces and
articles about research.
That's a stark contrast to the
conversation we're having today.
Mental health is at the forefront
how the university interacts with
students. Now, you have to skim
through several pages of articles
about mental health initiatives
and websites relating to depression in recent years if you Google
"depression UBC." And while
students might not be able to get
access to a doctor, UBC says they
at least see 100 per cent of people
who show up at counselling.
And it's not just the university — it's our society in general.
Bell's "Let's Talk" campaign,
aimed at breaking the stigma
around depression and other
mental health issues, was a
booming success this year,
raising almost $5.5 million. You
can find conversations about
depression and mental health in
news, arts and sports blogs, all
of which play a part in destigma-
tizing mental health, one ofthe
most important parts of winning
this battle.
MINING INSTITUTE
NEEDS CLOSE
SUPERVISION
UBC's new mining institute
has the potential to do good. Its
goal, according to a professor
who is part ofthe institute, is to
alleviate poverty.
But its close association with
the federal government and the
implicit goal to receive industry
funding is cause for concern. The
federal government's control over
its scientists is well documented
and impedes academic freedom,
damaging the integrity of supposedly impartial voice. For the
institute, government funding and
the expressed desire to seek future
funding from industry may muzzle
a group that should be advocating
for miners and the rights of people
affected by mining operations
around the world.
At the very least, it's something
that needs watching. While not the
outright evil that some activists
claim it to be, the institute could
become little more than an industry mouthpiece without proper
safeguards. XI
UBC blows opportunity
on sports review
=HOTOMATTMEUSE3THE UBYSSEY
The UBC men's volleyball team has not been guaranteed varsity status.
LETTER
Dear Editor,
As a UBC alumnus (97) and a
former member ofthe Thunderbird men's volleyball team, I have
spent the last 14 years coaching
at NCAA schools (13 of those in
Division I), and I have read your
recent articles about UBC's decision to restructure the funding
within their athletic programs
with great interest — and no
small amount of dismay. Prioritizing sports funding in order to
achieve specific goals that benefit the university is a legitimate
aim, but UBC must have the
courage to be honest and public
that this is what they are trying
to achieve and that their sports
will be selected to achieve this
goal. In both of these areas, they
have failed, and in doing so have
wasted a golden opportunity to
turn their athletic department
into a sports juggernaut that dramatically increases the profile
and desirability ofthe school.
To achieve the maximum positive exposure for the school, all
athletic teams should be funded
and tasked with winning at the
national level while creating an
exciting, dynamic on-campus
environment. Since UBC cannot
afford to do this for all of its current teams, the selection process
should determine which sports
i) are the most relevant to the
school's target audience (winning
national championships in checkers isn't relevant to many people),
ii) can provide the best game-day
environment for current students, the local community and
TV audiences, and iii) have the
best chance at national success.
Schools in NCAA Division I are
the most obvious examples of
this, and they reap huge benefits by creating the perception
that the school is a fun, exciting,
cool place to go. UBC could set
this curve for Canada. It would
be a daring, exciting, visionary
project. Sadly, their current path
uses an opaque selection process
to achieve inarticulate goals.
If UBC wants to transform its
athletic department into a PR
machine to increase the school's
profile (a la Stanford, Notre
Dame, Duke, etc.), then more
power to them. However, the
complete lack of clarity in stating
their goals or transparency in selecting the teams will not achieve
this. How can a world-class academic institution with a reputation for excellence and integrity
follow a process lacking both?
UBC is the Canadian school
best situated to create a relevant
sports dynasty and I applaud the
attempt. But they should at least
have the courage to be honest
that this is what they are doing.
Regards,
Chris Campbell
Head women's volleyball coach
Boston College
Have opinions?
Let's hear 'em.
Come to opinions meetings, Monday at 12:30 p.m. and Thursday at 1 p.m.
SUB 24. Follow the signs. II Scene
COMIC »
Goin'nutS byTubey
CHIPMUNK CHIPMONK
tube9io0nS.com
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For more information, please visit bcit.ca/business
SCHOOL OF
BUSINESS
Real Experience. Real Results.
CATCULTY
EDUCATION
LLUSTRATION LUELLA SUN/THE UBYSSEY
Volunteer for The Ubyssey
What are you interested in?
Design, illustrations
comics,
Pusheen the Cat
emaileditor
Ming Wong
printed itor@
ubyssey.ca
Arts,
entertainment,
sophistry
emaileditor
Rhys Edwards
culture©
ubyssey.ca
Qj
Lights,
camera,
selfies
emaileditor
Carter Brundage
photo@ubyssey.ca
Varsity sports,
athletic reviews,
milkshakes
emaileditor
Natalie Scadden
sports@ubyssey.ca
5| FEBRUARY 2014
i<^y PROGRAMS
February 5 Women &? Queer Mght
6-9pm. a safe space program about bikes!
February 12 Member Night Social
6-9pm. come hang out and. fix your bike!
February 24 Commuting 101: Biking Everyday!
6:30-8pm. learn rules of road in Van. &? other tips!
February 26 Bike Recycling Party
6-9pm. strip bikes, sort parts, recycle! yay!
REGISTER r visit us at
ONLINE Ibikecoop.ca
na
bit.ly/UBCBike
twitter.com/UBCBike 12    I    GAMES    I    MONDAY, FEBRUARY 3,2014
CROSSWORD
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=UZZLE COURTESY BESTCROSSWORDS.COM. USED WITH PERMISSION.
ACROSS
1- Created
5-Flat sound
9-Jazz pianist Art
14- Doozy
15-Cut ruthlessly
16-Pong maker
17- Ten Commandments
19-Boat spines
20-Ham
21-1957 hit for the Bobbettes
23-Masquerade ball
25-Aussie hopper
26-Biol., e.g.
29-Scot's refusal
30-Navel
33-Actress Taylor
34-Not us
35- majeste
38-Deity
40- -European
41- Title of reverence for God
44-Head supporters
47-Formidable
49-Fall behind                                  : 48-Swarmed
52-Actress Alicia                              i 49-Female demon in Semitic myth
53-Actress Charlotte                        • .
50-       Fideles
54-Shore                                         : .
51-Deutsch,here
56-Jeter of the Yankees                     i .
55-Dry stalks
58-Deer horn                                   • .
56-Fall
59-Minute Maid Park player              j .
57- Animistic god or spirit
62-Idiosyncrasy                               : .
59-Beast of burden
64-Simple seat                                 : (
50- Letters on a Cardinal's cap
65-Big birds                                     ; (
51-Likewise
66-       girl!                                      i (
53-Convent dweller
67-Slant                                           i
68-Take a meal
Ubyssey Staff Meetings:
^U
69-At what time                                i
12 p.m., SUB 24
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DOWN
1-Contemporary
2- Hemoglobin deficiency
3- Extract meaning from
4-Muse of love poetry
5-Abbreviate
6-Droop
7-Worthless person
8-Small rocky island
9-Food ordered to go
10-Fit to	
11- kwondo
12-Modern address
Fire starter?
Do not disturb
Timber wolf
DesignerCassini
26-Type of gun
27-Thin rope
28-Not many words
31-Hotelier Helmsley
32-Michael Moore's
Downsize /
33- City in Western Nevada
Dr. Zhivago's love
First place?
35
36-
37- Pop
39-Ball belles
42-Halo
43-Support beam
45-Purify
46- The Family Circus
cartoonist Bil
stimulating, informative,
a place to sit
JAN. 30 ANSWERS
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=UZZLECOURTESYKRAZYDAD USED WITH PERMISSION.
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
UBC Land Use Plan Amendment: Regional Context Statement
The University of British Columbia's Public Hearing Committee will hold a Public Hearing respecting a proposed amendment
to the Land Use Plan for UBC's Vancouver Campus. The Public Hearing is being held in accordance with Part 10-2010
of the Municipalities Enabling and Validating Act.
The proposed amendment affects the UBC Vancouver
campus lands, shown in MAP A.
The proposed Land Use Plan amendment is as follows:
■    Delete Chapter 2 in the current Land Use Plan, titled
'Regional Context Statement', in its entirety
•    Replace Chapter 2 with a new 'Regional Context
Statement' that includes an Appendix to the
Land Use Plan titled: 'Appendix 1 to Regional Context
Statement: UBC Land Use Plan relationship to the
Regional Growth Strategy, October 28, 2013'
All persons who believe they may be affected by the above
proposal will be afforded an opportunity to be heard in
person and/or by written submission.
A speakers list will be available for the public to sign at the
entrance of the Public Hearing venue approximately 30
minutes prior to the start of the Public Hearing. Speakers
will be asked to come forward in the order of the speakers
list and will be allowed up to five minutes to address
the Public Hearing Committee regarding the proposed
amendment.
Should you have any concerns or comments you wish
to communicate to the Committee in advance of the
Public Hearing, you can write to: Committee Clerk for
the Public Hearing, c/o Campus and Community
Planning, 2210 West Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z4
or public.hearing.clerk@ubc.ca. To be considered,
advanced submissions must be received by noon
on Wednesday, February 12, 2014.
After this deadline, any written submissions must be
made, in person only, directly to the Committee Clerk until
the end ofthe Public Hearing.
Written submissions received prior to or submitted during
the Public Hearing will be included as part of the official
public record by the Committee Clerk. Submissions
received after the conclusion ofthe Public Hearing will
not be considered by the Public Hearing Committee or
the UBC Board of Govenors.
The proposed amendment and relevant background
material may be inspected at the offices of Campus and
Community Planning, 2210 West Mall, Vancouver, BC,
from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and 1:30 p.m. to 4 p.m.,
Monday to Friday, except statutory holidays,
from January 30 - February 12, 2014.
Also starting January 30, the Procedural Rules for the
Public Hearing will be available for inspection at the
offices of Campus and Community Planning or by
contacting the office as noted below.
Please note, no refreshments or food will be provided
at the hearing.
For further information, contact:
Campus and Community Planning
2210 West Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z4
604-822-5350
melissa.pulido-gagnon@ubc.ca
www.planning.ubc.ca
6:00pm
Wednesday, February 12, 2014
irine Drive Residence Ballroom,
^05 Lower Mall, Vancouver, BC
MAP A: LANDS SUBJECT TO LAND USE PLAN AMENDMENT
UBC Vancouver
Campus Lands
MAP B: PUBLIC HEARING LOCATION
This notice contains important information which may affect you. Please ask someone to translate it for you.
litJI^a-g-figfaM, &uSM4iBmfo<,m%A%ifcMn,   I   o| s*i^ ggg n|g ^ si^ gas ga,n ■
foj sj^mlik 9<m« *i§h a am ti^sh^ *mm ssisw^i hi-ih^-.

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