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The Ubyssey Nov 3, 1966

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 KILTED ATTACKER PRANCES AFTER COED
A UBC co-ed Tuesday escaped into
a barn near B-lot from an attacker
wearing a Scottish kilt and a soiled
white T-shirt.
Winona Ford, Sc. 3, said she was
taking a midnight walk around the
campus when the man jumped at her
from behind a car parked in B-lot.
She said the man grabbed her by
the bottom and yelled: "Yummy".
"He squeezed really hard," Miss
Ford told reporters Wednesday. "He
tried to stop me but I got away and
ran into the barn.
"I hid under a pile of hay but he
didn't follow me in," she said.
Campus observers said the incident
is similar to a series of attacks in 1963
by a man described as nude and wearing a bowler hat.
"At first I thought it was a girl,"
Miss Ford said. "But when he squeezed my bottom I realized it was a man
in a kilt—he had very hairy legs but
his knees were cute."
Miss Ford said the man's only other
clothing was a soiled white T-shirt.
"There were stains across the front
—probably from chicken noodle soup,"
she said.
Miss Ford said she was in a state of
"really strong shock" when a Ubyssey
reporter visited her in her room Wednesday.
The chemistry student was shaken
and too weak to rise from her couch.
"I don't plan to go to the RCMP—
but if this happens again something
should be done," she said.
Campus authorities questioned by the
Ubyssey said they had heard nothing of
the incident.
"We know nothing about a sex
maniac roving the campus," one said,
"but if there is one, this kilted man
could be him."
He refused to say whether the
authorities believe the attacker was a
student.
"The fact he was wearing a kilt indicates he could be Scottish," he said.
"But his dirty T-shirt indicates he is
probably Canadian."
Miss Ford said she could not identify
the man's nationality by his accent.
WINONA FORD
. . . yummy
"All hesaicLwps 'tufrjmji'^jifce^gaid.
Miss^Fora said she did not wa
address published. She lives on campus.N
Scots
THE U8YSSEY
\t 0   MTTT
m
nae
Vol. XLVIII, No. 21
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1966
224-3916
Censored,
charges
VCC editor
Administration censorship
has invaded the Vancouver
City College press.
Gerald de Boer, editor of
the Savant, said, "I do not
have final say in editorial
policy."
De Boer said the college
administration chopped several student - written stories
from the first issue in favor
of news about the school administrative policies.
Mrs. Joanne Stemo, journal-
ism teacher at VCC, stated
"It's up to me to decide if
what students submit is suit-
able for publication."
She said the student council paid one-sixth of the paper's cost.
VCC Council president
Peter Lamib said about $1,500
of the $6,000 service fee collected from the students by
the administration goes to the
paper.
An eight-page Savant;
published eight times a semester, 3,000 copies a shot,
would cost approximately
$3,600, said a large city printing firm.
Thus students pay over 40
per cent of the paper's cost,
but do not control editorial
policy.
VCC director of student
affairs Dr. J. S. Denholm told
the council Tuesday, "It's not
a matter of editorial policy,
but we "want to keep the
paper in good taste."
Smallwood maybes
MLA suggestion
ST. JOHN'S N'iFLD. (CUP)
— Memorial University students may ibe the first in
Canada to have their own
provincial legislative member.
Premier Joseph Smallwood
said there is much to be said
tooth for and against the idea
of making the university elec-
torial riding.
He offered to discuss the
idea with students.
GRRRR, says Jill Homewrecker, getting set for the Teacup
game today. Home-ec will tackle the nurses (Bedpanners)
to reclaim the teacup, they lost last year. Chariot race and
boat race are scheduled for half-time.
Group plans
fee strike
says Boylan
A newly-foamed student
student strike if UBC fees go
sident Charlie Boylan warned
The organization, Students
For a Democratic University,
was created at an AMS council meeting Monday.
"We feel that students are
fed up with fee increases and
anticipate that two to three
thousand students will go as
far as a strike on administration," Boylan said in a soapbox speech..
"SDU is confronted with the
very real problem of another
fee hike and the possibility
that there will be no serious
reforms in the administration,"
he said. "Students must be
made aware and must act upon
this awareness.
"SDU does not want to be
pitted against the administration but we are the ones who
must stop another fee increase
—now.
"Bennett's government is
diabolically clever the way it
has never been left with the
hot potato in its lap," commented Boylan. "Last year he used
funds as a political handout to
SFU, at the expense of UBC.
They received $400 per student more than we did.
"This leaves UBC in a predicament. No university knows
the amount of funds available
until April, so the administration may need to increase fees.
"It has to be made quite
clear to the administration and
the government that we will
not take another increase."
SDU is analgous to last
year's Education Action Program, said Boylan, but with
significant differences. The
program last year aimed only
at freezing of fees.
"We want to freeze fees but
committee will organize a
up this term, AMS vice-pre-
Wednesday.
CHARLIE BOYLAN
. . . 'no increase'
are also proposing a number of
changes in administration. All
decisions on university policy
are determined by a board of
governors made up of 11 men
who represent only a section
of the community," he said.
A university is a public institution and should have representation by student, faculty, trade unions, and society
in general. "It is now largely a
(Continued on Page 2)
SEE: SDU
FOCUS HITS
HIGH SCHOOLS
(SEE PAGE 7) Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 3, 1966
PAUL IVORY
watched from above
LATEST FASHION
China models, says prof
By BONI LEE
Under developed   countries
will   use   China   as   a  model
for development, a former student   in   Taiwan    and   Hong
Kong  predicted Wednesday.
"The social problems a late
developing society faces are
such that some version of
Chinese development seems
likely to be found," Simon
Fraser Academy economist Dr.
Paul Ivory told 500 people in
Brock lounge.
He was the second speaker
in this week's UBC China
teach-in.
Ivory said the people's war
theory and social and economic evolution in China are the
two important aspects of the
notion   of   China   as   a   model
for  underdeveloped  countries.
He said China's core theory
is based on overthrowing
backward structures.
"It is organized around the
discontent of the people," he
said.
"Mao Tse-tung said you have
sufficient numbers and dedication to overthrow political
structure if you mobilize
grievance,"   Ivory noted.
The regime thus created can
open up economically backward countries.
Ivory said China tries to
maintain a balance between
city and country by shifting
human resources from country
to city and vice versa.
He said China is using forceful methods to breach the gulf
SDU NEEDS PEOPLE
(Continued from Page 1)
business interest. The board
meets in secrecy and as a body
they are unapproachable. We
cannot bring grievances directly to this board," said Boylan.
SDU wants to reorganize the
board to represent all parts of
the community and have the
board open to the student body
at large.
"This involves changes in
the Universities Act," added
Carolyn Tate, second vice-president.
"With the present council
setup this is hard to implement.
They are overworked. SDU is
Mousers squeak
all this week
Coming Education Week
events:
Today noon, Ed. 100 —
open-forum debate.
Friday 2:30, Ed. lounge —
grad student tea.
Saturday 8 pm Commodore
—Blue Grotto Ball, tickets
on sale education lounge or
the AMS office.
a group designed to take
proposals to the student. It is a
question of making students
aware. We need articuate
people, people who know the
problems or are willing to
learn the problems," said
Boylan.
"Methods of expressing concern would include petitions
and large meetings open to students.
These meetings will start,
with a meeting arranged Friday, at Miss Tate's house, 1291
West Fiftieth.
A lot of learning of what the
real problems are is needed, he
said. "I hope you don't think
we are sitting in council in
abstract from you. We are opposed to the analogy of the
university to a corporation."
"Another purpose of SDU is
to focus council attention on
specific policies," said Miss
Tate. "We have no coherent
policy. Council members want
to do something but have no
chance for action.
"SDU has no definite mold
in which people have to fit
themselves. They will be able
to make their own rules," said
Miss Tate.
between rural and urban sectors.
He said where India has a
vast amount of peasantry
trapped in stagnant villages,
China offers hope to people
living in the country.
"It is obvious that the stagnation of advancing societies
constitutes an unremovable
barrier to the modernization
of these societies," he said.
Ivory said a peasantry dedicated to destroying old values
and introducing the new is the
most important product of
China's people's war.
"The social development of
China will impinge on the development of other countries."
San Francisco satire
probes color hypocracy
The controversial satire 'A Minstrel Show, or Civil
Rights in a Cracker Barrel' will be seen at UBC Nov. 10.
The show, presented by the San Francisco Mime
Troupe, examines deceit and pretence on both sides of
the color line.
"The show bothers everybody, even the performers,"
said Troupe director R. G. Davis.
"We are attempting to deal with hypocrisy in
America."
MARDI GRAS TRYOUTS
OCTOBER 31 to NOVEMBER 4
MALES: Monday and Wednesday
FEMALES: Tuesday and Thursday
BOTH: Friday
12 - 2:30
STAGE ROOM - NORTH BROCK
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SPECIAL   RATES   FOR   TEAM,   CLUB   AND   OTHER ORGANIZATIONS
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MONO - LONG PLAYING
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NAME
ADDRESS
CITY	
(PLEASE PRINT)
.ZONE No.    ..PROVINCE. Thursday, November 3, 1966
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
COME DOWN A LITTLE further says hard-working Joe
Workman to crane operator constructing the rapidly-
rising forestry-agricultural complex cr( the corner of
Agronomy and Main Mall.
Grits grieve bickering,
opt out of parliament
By MURRAY McMILLAN
There will be no Liberals in
this  year's  mock  parliament.
In a statement released
yesterday UBC Liberals said
mock parliament "has fallen
into the state of the federal
parliament in Ottawa—that of
bickering and confusion."
The club, the government in
mock parliament for the last
eight years, says it is with'
drawing its support because of
the "farcical discussion and
petty bickering of the house."
In place of the parliament,
the club is proposing a series
of forum discussions between
the various political clubs on
campus.
Also, a teach-in on Canadian
Identity is planned during
next year's open house.
Club president Shaun Sullivan said the decision was
based on previous year's
assemblies when opposing
parties unified to defeat all
Liberal motions.
Sullivan said: "We don't
want to be bad sports about
this, but we feel a change of
format would improve campus
politics."
The parliament was originally formed ten years ago, to
represent all political parties.
Members hav been elected, up
to now, simultaneously with
AMS first slate balloting.
This year the election date
has been changed to Nov. 18.
Club members cited the
change in date as one cause
for the move, saying the new
Socialist leader demands
education reorganization
By TOM MORRIS
A complete reorganization of
B.C.'s educational system was
demanded Wednesday by NDP
leader Bob Strachan.
Speaking to forty students in
Bu. 202, Strachan cited increased debate among educators as
an example of trouble in the
education system.
"The time has now come for
a complete re-organization of
our education system," he said.
Strachan claimed there was
no debate about education in
the provincial legislature.
East bans group,
may appear here
A  singing   group,   banned   for  alleged   obscenity  at
Hamilton's McMaster university,, could appear at UBC
Special   events   chief   Brian
Plummer said Wednesday the
Fugs, a folk rock group, may
perform here.
But he added the Fugs prefer to stay in the east where
they make more money with
less travel.
"If the Fugs are signed,
there will be no interference
by the administration," Plummer said.
Banning of the group,
known for such standards as
Kill For Peace and Having a
Wet Dream Over You caused
charges of administration censorship at McMaster. Administration authorities criticized
the group's "obscene content".
Pat Conway, co-chairman of
the campus arts festival
charged: "The administration
refused   to  allow   a   perform
ance containing words which
they feel may jeopardize their
position with the good people
of Hamilton."
She claimed the Fugs had
artisic ability and their moral
value  is  unquestionable.
"An evening with the Fugs
is a varied program and many
of their songs do contain the
four letter words commonly
restricted to private conversation."
Must be polish
POINT GREY (UNS) — A
man gone beserk was seen
running amock along a quiet
residential street today, wrapped in many towels and sheets
and festooned with odd socks.
He giggled.
"The only thing we discuss
is the money allotted to education and that's as deep as we
get," he said.
He said he would be meeting students from Victoria College and his own constituency
to discuss education.
Strachan was asked about
financing higher education.
"We should continue receiving money from the central
government," he said.
"But we should also increase
the rate of industrial development which in turn will create
more money for social programs."
"In this case we won't have
to take money from other sectors of the budget," Strachan
said.
He said his party had always
been for the complete abolition
of fees in university and for
equalization grants for students
who live in the interior.
On provincial politics, Strachan had this to say:
"I hope Bob Bonner doesn't
win his iby-election. He has
many qualities not the least of
which is his ability to shoot
the bull."
"The farmers may like it but
the cows won't.
On social problems:
"We leave the solutions of
our social -roblems either to
tradition or to accident, and
that just isn't good enough."
date would cause a small turn
out, and an inaccurate representation of student views.
NDP club president Bob
Easton said: "The Liberal
withdrawal shows a total arrogance and deceit democracy.
"When our motions were
defeated i n parliamentary
council, we did not withdraw.
However, this seems to be the
Liberal's attitude."
Conservative club president
Oscar Johvikas said he was
shocked   at   the   withdrawal,
and added "I wonder if the
Liberals will withdraw from
federal politics if they don't
win."
Campus Socred leader Harold Clare commented: "The
idea of changing mock parliament is basically good, but the
motives are not as pure as
indicated."
Clare added: "The mock
parliament has fallen into disrepute, and this to a large
extent is the fault of the Liberal club itself."
BARE FANGS
EAC sinks teeth
in Mouser mob
By RON SIMMER
With a fanged, roaring mouse on their masthead, education students have formed an ad hoc committee to challenge
the "Mickey Mouse" image of their faculty.
"The Education Action Committee is fed up with the education council's incompetence
and Mickey Mouse attitude,"
spokesman Fred Spencer said
Wednesday.
Education students have organized to do a job left to them
by default, claimed Spencer.
He accused the education
council of cynicism in assuming that there was no faculty
spirit,'' since attendance at
their functions was so poor.
"The events the council holds
are one-money losing flop after
another," he said.
"By their own admission ed
council lost $160 on their
Great Pumpkin mixer Monday night to kick off Education
week, and $147 on their folk
nite, attended by 75 people,
Spencer said.
"With a Ibudget of nothing,
EDAC has sponsored two
events — A folksinger, and
Gabor Mate in the ed lounge,
drawing a crowd of 500 each
time," Spencer said.
More folksingers, a speech
by Charlie Boylan, an art show,
a mixer, and a jazz spectacular
are also planned.
"We have the support of the
students,'' Spencer claimed.
"They come to our meetings
and work on our projects."
Spencer called the council a
group of petty bureaucrats
whose hapazard planning and
poor communication with students forced EDAC into being.
"vVyne Weibe, ed pdesidem.
who was elected by acclamation, has no leadership quali-
FRED SPENCER
. . . 'mice will roar'
ties, is seldom on the job, and
shys away from any meeting
with students,"   Spencer  said.
Ed council accuses the AMS
of fouling up their organization
when they are far more bureaucratic than AMS ever will be,
he said.
"They support the Mickey
Mouse image and are a good
example of it," he said.
"They feel education students
shouldn't have original ideas
or be radical because this will
reflect back on the faculty of
education," he said.
"EDAC wants to project an
image that students can take
pride in."
"We are the mice that roared is our slogan," he said, "and
our insignia is a fanged, roaring, mouse."
Pubsters challenge victors
in half-time bubbly race
A boat race, with teams bubbling from The Ubyssey,
forestry, and engineering will be featured at half-time
of the Teacup football game at noon in UBC stadium.
This year forestry takes on the engineers in the
bloody riot known as the chariot race.
Home Economics lines up against nursing in the
battle for the Teacup, symbol of world football supremacy (female).
Nursing is defending champion.
Admission is by donation, with proceeds donated to
the Crippled Children's Fund. THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinion! are
the editor's and not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding member, Pacific Student Press. Authorized
second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash.
The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page
Friday, loc. 24; features, sports, loc. 23; advertising, loc. 26. Night calls,
731-7019.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
NOVEMBER 3, 1966
Green, green, I'm goin' away
To where the grass is greener still
—Anon
Hike or strike?
Riding a pink cloud of naivete, AMS first vice-
president Charlie Boylan wants to play student strike
when next year's tuition fee raise is announced.
Certainly fees will go up — retiring UBC president
John Macdonald said as much last week, and premier
W. A. C. Bennett's hints of tight budgetting means education will be chopped again.
Also, the third of three projected $50 hikes didn't
materialize this year, when the university got a slightly
better deal than it expected from the province.
But Boylan is naive enough to suppose a raise will
be announced during the academic year.
It won't be — not until April exams or maybe June.
Nobody would strike now because the hike hasn't
happened yet and students never move without a crisis
chewing at their buttocks.
April is a rigid month because nobody wants to lose
a year for a lousy $50.
Nobody moves in June because nobody's here.
And nobody moves next September because the
raise is a dead issue.
The only way to kill a raise is a grinding, concerted
lobby of all legislative members and university governors, with student means survey figures to back it up.
The lobby must be for proper university financing
as opposed to the present Socred silly money theories,
and for as good a UBC deal as Simon Fraser's Gordon
Shrum finagled for his hilltop acropolis.
Lobbying isn't as much fun as a strike maybe, but
it will get more sanity in university finance faster.
We're raining
'Tis November, when a young man's fancy turns
trippingly to thoughts of term papers and the windward
leaves buffet library windows.
And winter is icumen in — lhude sing goddam —
forcing miniskirt shinward and neckline chinward 'neaith
an umbrella sea.
Prof doth chortle while coffee snorkels down to the
pit of a sleepless belly, all grumbling tunelessly syn-
cophant with the fog horn over the bay.
Coats get furry, textbooks blurry and student poli-
ticos brood softly before a festering, fiery hearth.
And nobody gives a lewd goddam who's president
of UBC.
Maple leaf forever
CHU-iqaa
I can hacAUj
uxui for fall!
1969
PLEASE COME
BACK
MAC
BOARD OF GOVERNORS
•p/_KfBaoe»e-l
■■ ,t ..cvmJi-. ^.»>^^^v->^>>.^^
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Misquote
Editor, The Ubyssey:
A correction should be
made in your story on the
NDP in Tuesday's paper. You
have misquoted MLA Ernie
Hall.
At no time has NDP policy
ever been set by the executive.
Policy has always been set
at annual conventions by the
whole party membership.
COLIN GABLEMAN
Aits 4
'Acrimonious'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
The Ubyssey is renowned
for being the most acrimonious student newspaper in
Canada. This is no excuse for
a series of vitriolic attacks__
on the president of the arts
undergraduate society, Don
Wise.
Don is constantly censured
for having done nothing.
This is ridiculous for these
reasons:
(a) The arts US executive
was almost non-existent at
the start of the term; elections had to be held and an
office acquired before anything could be achieved.
(to) Such disparagement
loses all force since it may
even be more aptly applied
to the other undergraduate
societies: engineering, medicine, science, forestry—what
great achievements can they
point to?
(c) And finally, it can be
seen that Don is ably fulfilling his role by his activity in the arts reform debate.
What more do you want?
What do you hope to gain
by forcing the resignation of
one of the few council members who admits that student
*&-
council and the undergraduate
society are farcical at present,
and who has committed himself to their reform?
At least postpone your
criticism until the lead is
taken by the arts students
who elected him.
A believer in justice
'Go to China'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
If Gabor Mate, the writers
of the arts magazine Consensus and all others like him
are so dissatisfied with western society, why don't they
go away somewhere and start
their own society?
They think they know better than people with three
times their experience how
society operates, so let's see
what they can make of it.
Or better still, why don't
they go to live in China
where they can live by the
ideals they preach? Or even
better, they could go to North
Viet Nam and fight for their
cause with the Viet Cong.
Why not, boys?
Could it be that you're
quite happy to haul in the
'benefits of our society and
tear it apart in your spare
time rather than live by your
convictions?
P. LADNER
Arts 1
EDITOR: John Kelsey
Managing
News
City
Photo
Page Friday
Focus
Ass't News
CUP
Ass't Photo
Richard Blair
     Carol Wilson
Danny Stoffman
Powell Hargrave
Claudia Gwinn
Rosemary Hyman
Pat Hrushowy
   Bert Hill
Dennis Gans
'Dear board'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
An open letter to the Board
of Governors:
I wish to express thanks
for your liberal toleration of
the student body.
I especially want to praise
your support of the humanities and pure sciences wherein the preoccupations are of
little immediate utility in the
industrial community.
Nevertheless these people
are conscious of their potential roles as educators. To
pass to the coming generations the splendid tradition
of the American society will
always be foremost in their
wishes.
I do feel that a stronger
liaison between yourselves
and the student could be the
product of one wise decision:
a successor to Dr. Macdonald.
If you would discreetly
suggest to the committee a
representative of the business
world whose concern for the
vested interests of the students is indubitable, a marvelous union will be guaranteed.
Now as many students are
car owners and the automobile industry is the focus of
our culture, who would better appeal to the student than
a representative of Allstate
Insurance.
M. C. DUNN
Arts 3
Lin "Dragon" Tse-hsu, travel-
ling incognito, looked for the
kilted pincher. Norman Gidney
heard about perverts while Jill
Green shopped and Boni Lee, Val
Thorn, Tom Morris, Bo Hansen,
Ron Simmer, Murray McMillan,
Mary Ussner, Kathi Harkness and
Rod Wilczak ferreted news. Shock
and disbelief! Another Hroosh,
Cook.
Deepest apologies to
writers. Meeting today
editor's   office.
Photogs    John    Tilley,
**
•J*
Webb,    and    Kurt
and shuttered.
fe.
sports-
noon   in
Derreck
Hilger   slaved Thursday, November 3, 1966
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  5
jollies
An occasional
page of humor,
both local
and otherwise . . .
jollies
So for an extra assignment, the film technician classes are
re-making old movies.
—from the Ryersonian, Toronto
More creative irrigation
By GABOR MATE
Are you wondering if I was actually
expelled from creative writing? Nobody
else is.   .  .  .
Yesterday I randomly walked up to an
unknown student, and said: "Excuse me,
but . . ."
"Why are your walking up to me randomly?" he interrupted. "I suppose you think I
am just an unknown student."
"Yes," I said, "and I wanted to ask if
you are wondering whether or not I was
actually expelled . . ."
"If you weren't," he cut in again, "you
should be.    Now go away."
"He is just shy," I thought. I met several
similarly shy students that day, so I decided
I'd have to write a column to clear up the
matter.
"I've decided," I told my editor, "that
I'll have to write a column to clear up the
matter."
"I don't think anybody cares," said my
editor.    "To be frank," he added.
"Yes," I said, "there are many shy people
in the world."
"What are you talking about?" he asked.
"To be frank," he added. (He seems to add
"to be frank" in the oddest places.)
"I think I'll do a column on it," I said.
"To be frank in the oddest places," added
my editor.
What actually transpired was I pleaded
with my prof to let me back into the class.
"Listen," he explained, "faced with the
choice between you and my sanity, I will
opt for my sanity every time. Besides, you
are absolutely talentless."
"But I was hoping that the sun of your
wisdom will bring light to the darkness of
my mind," I rhapsodized. "Also that the
virility of your spirit will impregnate the
sterility of my soul."
"Yes," he said after reflection, "I suppose
it is unchristian of me to deny the moisture
of my genius to the parched soil of your
brain."
So it happens that the parched soil of
my brain is once more irrigated three times
a week by my creative writing prof.
or Some ]\me
fjowj, Doctor
vfc
6teW  WoRk.(N6r
v On A foojecT
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—from the Manitoban, Winnipeg
—from the Uniter, Winnipeg ■FOCUS-
UWO's Hall
quits job
of 20 years
Dr. G. Edward Hall, president and vice-chancellor of
the University of Western Ontario will retire at the end of
June.
Dr. Hall, president for almost 20 years, said in his letter
to the board of governors he was retired "in accord with a
long-understood arrangement."
He said it had been understood at the time of his appointment that he would retire in his 60th year, after 20
years   as   president,   and   22   years   in   senior   university
positions.
Reaction on campus to the
resignation was mild.
"Most of the big people
came out with prepared statements, saying he was a great
guy," said Jim Schaeffer,
editor of the UWO student
paper, the Gazette.
SPACE DEMAND
"And a motion was prepared to go before council
almost ordering that the
Gazette devote lots of space
to Hall. The councillors wanted to be sure we wouldn't
run an uncomplimentary editorial." The motion did not
come to a vote.
Most students were little
affected by the announcement, said Schaeffer.
"The majority of the kids
didn't care because they felt
it didn't affect them directly," he said.
The retirement seemed a
triumph for the university
student publications board.
The student newspaper,
the Gazette, ran weekly
stories or pictures, detaining
his rare appearances and
questioning whether he actually existed.
This fall's freshman handbook carried a "wanted"
poster for Dr. Hall, typified
as a mystery man, and a
story on Dr. Hall, part of
which is reprinted below:
Dr. G. Edward Hall has
been president of Western
for a long, long, time.
Nineteen years.
During those years, he had
developed the techniques of
a politician in disarming
people and handling questions. He is soft-spoken, evasive, pleasant in a withdrawn
way, wary. He has a habit of
quietly walking around questions he does not want to
answer.
Last year was a real test
for those qualities. For that
was the year a long-simmering dispute between the faculty and administration of
the university boiled over
into the press. Most people
were surprised at the bitterness of the faculty toward
the administration.
FACULTY BEEFS
And the faculty let people
know how they felt. They
wanted more power in the
governing of the university;
they wanted less power in
the hands of the non-university-oriented members of
the board of governors. Hall
issued only a stream of "no
comments."
Letters from faculty accused the administration of
getting rid of staff members
Page 6
who were a thorn in the
administrators' sides. Hall at
first refused comment on the
statements, then denied their
truth.
Some faculty members suggested that the president of
a university should only hold
office for five years.
But Hall, who has been
president for almost four
times that long, dismissed the
idea.
"If a president were in
there for only five years,
nothing would be accomplished," he says. "A good
man wouldn't accept the post
under those conditions."
NON-PERSONAL
Asked if he feels some of
the faculty complaints against
him were personal attacks,
he retorts with another question. "Does every person in
your congregation like the
minister?"
The rising voices of students protesting in causes
across the continent has caused some university administrators problems.
Not at Western. Last year
the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee and
the Community Action Program were about the only
cause - conscious groups on
campus.
That's the way Hall thinks
it should be.
The prime purpose of a student, he says is to take
every advantage offered him
for higher education. "Education should be his prime motive. Sure he should have
opinions, but there is time to
do something about them
later."
SOME "FINE"
Despite blatant dislike for
Hall among some students, he
says students are a "very,
very  fine group of  people."
Then come the qualifications. "Always in any society
in a group of any size there
are some who are not as responsible as the rest of society as a group."
It seems at times as if there
are two Halls—one the politician-president, the other a
scholar and research scientist.
Before becoming, at 39, the
youngest university president in North America, Hall
had already established a
brilliant academic record.
Hall disclaims credit for
the changes that have come
about at Western during his
presidency.
They are, he says, a result
of    "complete    collaboration
WANTED
G. Edward Hall, alias Big Ed, sometime president
of the University of Western Ontario.
Reported to have once operated in Ontario. Man
answering description appears once a year at
Western, addresses freshmen for a few minutes,
then disappears.
IF YOU SEE THIS MAN, APPROACH WITH CAUTION.
ATTITUDE TOWARDS STUDENTS UNCERTAIN.
rewa
rd
reward
rewa
rd
This poster appeared on the first page of UWO's freshman handbook.
and understanding of all
members  of the university."
In 1952 business administration became a separate
faculty from the department
of arts and science.
Also during his presidency,
the faculty of graduate studies, the faculty of law and
the faculty of engineering
science have been added.
Hall and his administration
are dealing with vastly larger  amounts  of money now,
also. In 1947 the faculty of
arts and science had a budget
of $675,000. Now it has more
than $23,000,000.
The faculty has doubled
since 1947.
UWO GROWS
Although in 1948 Hall said,
"I hope the University of
Western Ontario will never
have to expand its enrollment to more than 3,000," by
1970   there    are    plans    for
about 11,000, including the
affiliated colleges.
Due to pressures and lack
of facilities in the province,
Western has had to expand.
When Hall was 17, a high
school student in his native
Lindsay, he wanted to be a
sheep farmer. But his interests in research and administration led him far away
from his ambition and, he
says, "I never saw the farm
again."
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THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 3, 1966 FOCUS
TEAM-TEACHING METHODS SEE UNIVERSITY-LIKE  LECTURES.
—dennii gans photo
High schools copy college method
By AL BIRNIE
The high-school class just
isn't what it used to be.
Instead   of   the   detention,
the  experiment  is  with  the
honor pass.
HAMBER SETS PACE
And the strict talk-down,
write-this period is giving
way to the university-oriented lecture and seminar.
Trend-setter in the Vancouver high-school experiment
is Eric Hamber Secondary
School.
"We are attempting to produce a more adult, responsible student with an inquiring mind, needing little adjustment in facing university
material or the post-graduation world," said Ken McKenzie, principal of Hamber
and an enthusiastic exponent
of the new system.
"We are becoming convinced that at the high school
stage the methods of learning
the students develop are
more important than the curriculum," said Dr. B. C. Munro, associate professor of
education at UBC and the
man who co-ordinates the
student teachers from UBC
taking practice training at
Hamber.
TEAM SYSTEM
Students at Hamber, from
grade eight onwards, learn
in three stages — large-group
lectures, small-group seminars, and individual study
periods.
A team of three teachers,
usually with the aid of a
number of UBC student
teacher "interns" is responsible for the group of 60 to
120 students taking the
course.
In a large-group lecture the
entire group, in lecture halls
with the overhead projectors
—common at UBC, listen to
and take notes from a single
instructor.
For small-group seminars,
students are broken into
groups of approximately 15,
each   under   the   supervision
Thursday, November 3, 1966
of one of the team members
or an intern.
In a subject like science,
or languages, these seminar
periods may be used for laboratory work, with the advantage of a greater chance
for individualized instruction if needed.
Hamber is also experimenting with the  'honor pass'.
Students are told beforehand what the subject of a
lecture will be, and if they
feel they know enough about
the subject and can spend the
hour better on other work,
the teacher may grant them
a pass to miss the class and
do private study.
SKIP CLASSES
"Naturally the teacher will
consider carefully before he
grants a pass, and only a
small   number   of    students
qualify   for   this   privilege,"
said MacKenzie.
FREE TIME
"But top students can use
this to great advantage.
"One student last year
spent much of his time out
at the library at UBC, and
several outstanding out-of-
class projects were turned in
by other students on the honor pass system.
"Good   students   react   well
when  given  responsibility."
Probably the most revolutionary part of this new system is the individual study
period, where students are
left alone to pursue whatever
line of study they feel will
best benefit them in a particular  course.
The time spent on each
stage of the course depends
The program stresses individual study
THE     UBYSSEY
upon   the   subject,   said   McKenzie.
"In a subject like mathematics, little seminar discussion is possible, and the emphasis is on the lecture section, with some small-group
periods used for individual
instruction.
"The team of teachers is
less restricted in curriculum
than under the traditional
classroom - teaching system,
and can use its initiative in
setting out the schedule of
the group."
LOTS OF FREEDOM
The curriculum at Hamber
is the same as in other B.C.
secondary schools, but teachers have more scope in presenting the material, said
McKenzie.
For example, students interested in art but unable to
fit it into their regular program may use some of their
individual study time for art
work.
They work in a smaller
room adjoining a regular art
class where they may call on
the instructor for assistance
if necessary, but otherwise
have a free hand in what
they do.
A kettle and coffee cups
are provided.
"This is a small thing in
the development of a studio
atmosphere and freedom of
expression but it helps," said
McKenzie.
19 TEAMS
Hamber introduced team
teaching last year, with four
teams of instructors.
This year they have 19
teams in operation, covering
the majority of the school's
1,450 students at all grade
levels, eight to 12.
Hamber's faculty is very
enthusiastic about the project, said McKenzie, and put
in many hours drawing up
schedules and discussing how
techniques can be improved.
"Students benefit from the
large lecture groups as teachers   take  turns  lecturing   on
their    special    fields    within
the subject,"  said McKenzie.
Hamber has found some
problems operating the system within a school built
for the traditional 30 to 40-
student class.
ADDITION PLANNED
They use the auditorium
and the school cafeteria for
two of their large-group lecture halls, and knocked down
a wall between two classrooms to create  a third.
Seminar rooms have been
made by fitting fold-away
partitions in traditional classrooms to cut them in half.
Still, space is lacking, and
it is not unusual, says McKenzie, to see a group sitting
on a floor" at one end of a
hallway.
The situation will improve
next year, however, when a
new wing now under construction will add another
large lecture hall, several
seminar rooms, and a new
10,000-square-foot library to
the school.
NEW LIBRARY
"The library will be the
most important addition, an
integral part of the whole
system,"  says McKenzie.
Apart from increased bookshelf space, the library will
contain more than 250 individual study desks, similar
to those at UBC's Sedgewick
library.
"We believe that individual
study must, as in a university, centre around the library,"  said  McKenzie.
Two other Vancouver secondary schools, Prince of
Wales and Templeton, are
also using team teaching fairly extensively, says Chuck
Bailey, public relations officer for the Vancouver School
Board.
"This whole program is an
attempt to keep the methods
of education abreast of the
current explosion of knowledge."
Other Vancouver schools
are using parts of the system
to a lesser degree, he added.
Page 7 FOCUS
Ward defends CUS relevence
Doug Ward, president of the
Canadian Union of Students
answers the critics of CUS
who led the University of Alberta out of the organization
last month.
OTTAWA—Should the University of Alberta withdraw
from the Canadian Union of
Students? Should we dissolve
CUS? Certainly I would hope
that in the Canadian student
movement we have moved beyond the position that a national organization should be
maintained simply because a
national organization is a nice
thing.
DECENT BURIAL
If CUS has ceased to serve
the students of this country,
then I will be glad to be
among those who help to give
it a decent burial.
Actually it is not that Alberta has anounced its intention to withdraw from the
union that is so disturbing.
Rather, the reasons which
they have put forward to justify this withdrawal indicate
acceptance of the view that a
student and his colleagues are
passive consumers of facts
with no capacity to act upon
their academic community, the
wider society of Canada, or
the world.
Alberta's president, Branny
Schepanovich, argues that he
would like to see students involved with economic and social questions as individuals,
but that as students, they
should concentrate solely on
their studies and other immediate and particular concerns.
This is an attractive argument
until one realizes that its effect is to emasculate the student community, which, in an
age which has opted out of
direct social responsibility, is
an immediate form of community which can be instrumental in re-invigorating a national involvement.
Over the past two or three
years the Canadian Union of
Students has attempted to become an organization relevant
to the problems of Canadians:
Canadian students, people
who should be Canadian students, and the society which
sustains our present educational system.
STUDENT EXCHANGE
Of course the organization
also provides services for its
members. We have the Interregional Scholarship Exchange
Program (ISEP) which enables
students to travel and study in
Canadian centers away from
their homes. We have life insurance available to members
of CUS at very reasonable
rates.
CUS also has programs such
as the Student Government
Research Service which provide student Councils, and in
fact any student who writes,
with information that will enable them to build better academic communities. Whether
it is information on student
union buildings to help campuses avoid the pitfalls of
poorly designed buildings or
information   for   a   brief   on
student finances to be presented to the provincial government, the SGRS is always
available to provide information that will help student
groups face their challenges
more competently and more
completely.
Branny Schepanovich has
argued that Canada does not
need an activist student group
like CUS. He suggests that the
union is over-extended in areas
like international affairs and
domestic policy. Thus he implies that there is no role for
the student as a member of
the student community to promote social reform. But even
from a strictly selfish point of
view, the integrity of the university cannot be secured by
working strictly within the
hallowed halls.
If people are living in slums
around Edmonton, the student
community should be confronting it; and if students at
the University of Alberta have
serious emotional problems,
the student community should
be tackling that, with considerable resources and intellectual application.
The most immediate community that the student can
become involved in is the student community, and this is
the place of his immediate concern. But the student cannot
allow himself to adopt such an
elitist position as to see all his
concerns ending with the immediate.
T1CKY-TACKY?
The Canadian Union of Students is primarily concerned
with questions directly relating to the Canadian student
community, but we are also
concerned with the scores of
other social problems which in
some way come out of an understanding of so-called student   problems.   One   cannot
draw a rigid line between a
student problem and another
kind of social problem. The
problem of poverty on an Indian reserve and the problems
facing the Indian student in
first year university are part
and parcel of the same societal
concern. To admit otherwise is
to contend that our society is
a collection of ticky - tacky
boxes — unrelated and unrel-
ating.
WISE TO ASK
If our disagreement is over
the fundamentals I have attempted to outline above, then
Alberta is wise to question its
involvement with fellow student associations in a national
organization. If however, the
disagreement is about the specific points raised by the Alberta council so far, then I
would very seriously ask you
to consider the following:
• Overextension. There is
no doubt that this has become
a CUS problem. But I have
asked for a mandate for the
union to "pull in its horns"
and stop trying to write a
brief for the sake of verbosity
to every Royal Commission
and Court of Inquiry that
comes along. This is not the
function of a small national
secretariat.
• Poor communications.
Again this problem has plagued CUS just as it has plagued
every national organization in
Canada — every student council. This year, for the first
time we have hired a full time
associate secretary for communications who is working
on ways and means of reaching the student, and of making
his ideas get discussed and
acted upon. A national newsletter is being initiated, with
a much wider circulation and
livelier style than previous attempts, to help to overcome
HALF PRICE!
Playhouse Theatre
Company announces a
special rate for students:
any ticket available
for half price) And far
Saturday matinee: any
ticket available — $1.00.
'(Advance Sale Monday to
Thursday and Matinee
Only).
Show your student card
at Vancouver Ticket
Centre, 630 Hamilton
Street - MU 3-3255. all
Eaton's stores (charge 'em)
or Town & Country Home
Home Furnishings in
Kerrisdale & Richmond.
Playhouse Theatre box
office open 5.30 to 7.30
p.m. or phono 685-4715.
CANDIDA
starring
FRANCES
HYLAND
runs until November 19th.
geography, if nothing else. In
addition, plans are going
ahead for a 1967 national student newspaper which will be
editorially independent of
CUS but which will be able to
keep all students well informed about the national student
scene.
• CUS is too sophisticated
for the average student. The
Congress passed greatly increased travel budgets for all
CUS program staff to enable
everyone in the Secretariat to
get out in the field and find
out what the students are
thinking, and to help build
programs relevant to these
concerns. Our only problem
will be finding that elusive,
"average".
TASK FORCE
• Not all Canadian students are in CUS. It should
not be a mammoth aggregation of purposeless people, but
a task force of student associations which have made clear
some common and basic areas
where work is needed. Two
of the universities which withdrew this year did so in order
to join UGEQ — which is considerably more activistic than
CUS.
ETERNAL PROBLEM
• National office cannot
speak for Canadian students
since it doesn't at any given
time know their thoughts on a
partciular issue. This is the
eternal problem of an organization trying to seek modern
forms of democratic expression, and even the Alberta
student council, judging by
the results of the poll on the
withdrawal, has yet to solve
it. At present the CUS Board
of Directors is conducting a
study of CUS structure and
memberships which may shed
some light on possible solutions to the problem. We need
the constant vigilance of an
involved membership — and
this has been one of the
strongest contributions of Edmonton's campus in recent
years.
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SKATING SCHEDULE - 1966-67 SEASON
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Page  8
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 3, 1966 THE WAYFARER
VANCOUVER. B.C.. THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 3.  1966
SONNY ARGUINZONI, left, talks to Pentecostal Chaplain, Bernice Gerard. Arguinzoni will
speak of his cure from herion addiction in Angus 110 at noon today. Last week. Sonny
addressed a large businessmen's luncheon in Seattle.
WHO IS
THIS MAN?
Jesus Christ—no farce
LORNA TOWERS
Because of an abysmal lack
of knowledge and faith, some
people have portrayed Jesus
Christ as the biggest bore in
history. A meek, meandering
figure clothed in white, with
a mournful face. And some
Churches, careful to create a
favourable "corporate image"
of Christ, play Him up as: the
lowly Nazarene, the kindly
carpenter, the bleeding heart,
the God of mercy (justice forgotten), the meek philosopher.
Odd ...
Because this Man, this Jesus
Christ, challenged the mighty
power of the Roman Empire.
Rome fell—and the names of
the past proud statesmen of
Greece and Rome and the
modern world have come and
gone. The names of the past
scientists, philosophers and
theologians have come and
gone. But . . .
The Name of a Man who
possessed neither wealth nor
influence nor formal education has persistently remained
in the forefront of all worthwhile human endeavour. This
WE HAVE
SINNED
(See Page Three)
The Ubyssey
(Advertisement)
man who never marshalled an
army nor fired a gun had more
volunteers to His Cause than
did the mightiest conquerors
of all time put together. He
never wrote a song, yet He
has furnished the theme for
more songs than any one person.
The latest edition of the Encyclopedia Britannica gives
twenty thousand words to this
person, Jesus Christ — more
words, by the way, than those
given to Aristotle, Alexander,
Cicero, Julius Caesar or Napoleon Bonaparte.
Professor W. Stoner, with
the endorsement of the American Scientific Affiliation, has
estimated that for Christ to
have fulfilled the more than
three hundred prophesies directed to Him from the Old
Testament, purely by chance,
could be expressed mathematically as ONE chance in 10
plus 180 zeros.
David Strauss, one of the
bitterest opponents of the
Supernatural elements in the
Gospels, after all of his slashing, brilliant, vicious criticisms and sweeping denials of
Jesus Christ, was forced to
write: "This Christ is historical, not mythical; is an individual, no mere symbol; and
no perfect piety is possible
without His presence in the
heart."
Samuel Greenleaf, author
of A Treatise on the Law of
Evidence, wrote:   "It was im
possible that they (the Apostles) could have persisted in
affirming the truths they have
narrated had not Jesus actually RISEN from the dead,
and had they not known this
fact as certainly as they knew
any other fact."
And Sir Ambrose Fleming,
in Miracles and Science, declared: "Study at your leisure
the records in the four Gospels . . . with what eminent
lawyers have called a willing
mind, and you will find a deep
assurance that the Christian
See: OPINION
(Continued on  Page 3)
Post addict
talks—films
shown here
Nov. 3
Sonny Arguinzoni, a former
drug addict speaks of his cure
in Angus 110.
Nov. 9
Time    and    Eternity — a
Moody    Institute    of   Science
Film will be shown in Bu. 104.
Nov. 16
In Bu. 104 the Moody Film
"Windows   of the  Soul"   will
be shown. No charge.
Nov. 23
Red River of Life, the story
of   the   most  efficient   pump,
will be shown in Bu. 104.
Nov. 30
The second of the two part
film, "Red River of Life', will
be shown in Bu. 104.
IN ANGUS
Angel speaks
at UBC today
Sonny Arguinzoni, the first "mainliner" to be helped off
herion through the Rev. David Wilkerson's sidewalk ministry
in New York, will speak today at noon in Angus 110. He is
the first "Angel" featured in Wilkerson's book, Twelve
Angels From Hell
Today Arguinzoni will speak
of the days when he thought
Life and Hell were synonymous, of six straight years with
the "monkey on his back", of
the Federal Narcotics Hospital at Leixngton, Kentucky,
and related topics. Says Arguinzoni, "Finally, I gave up,
my family gave up, and my
friends gave me up. I was
absolutely hopeless."
Now, having been off drugs
for seven years, he is prepared
to talk about his cure, and
answer questions.
Anyone who knew the jeering, foul-mouthed Brooklyn
kid of seven years ago would
have difficulty making the
connection between him and
today's clean-cut Sonny Arguinzoni. Then, he was a teenager, but the dark circles
under his eyes, and pitifully
hollow cheeks made him appear thirty-five. Now, having
graduated from a California
Bible College, the Rev. Sonny
Arguinzoni serves as director
for the Teen Challenge Center
in San Francisco.
There, he serves alcoholics,
"muggers", prostitutes, addicts, and even murderers
with the same loving care as
he received earlier. His story
is similar to theirs in many
ways except that, unlike most
kids in trouble, he could not
blame the trouble on his parents.
Dave Wilkinson says that it
was Sonny, doubled up,
drenched in perspiration, and
twitching in unbearable agony,
who gave him his first lessons in the psychological and
physical aspects of withdrawal. Arguinzoni this week will
address audiences in B.C.'s
lower mainland on how to
reach today's troubled youth.
He comes to Vancouver from
Seattle where he was a guest
speaker at the Full Gospel
Business Men's Fellowship
Conference.
DWIGHT DOBSON, assistant
director of Teen Challenge,
in Vancouver. See interviews,
page four.
Star not acclaimed
-box office slides
The Church has a headline
Christ is often kept in the
'wings' of the Church while
men on stage give a treatise
on theology, a dreary harangue on sin or an innocuous
interpretation of current
events.
Little mention is made of
the life and vitally that Christ
offers to anyone desiring it.
It is small wonder that people
seeking life are flocking to
the arena, the stadium and the
grid-iron — anywhere but the
Church.
Consider the method used
by the eminently successful
Apostle Paul. He told of a
Christ who is the same yesterday,   today  and  forever.  Peo-
attraction but who knows it?
pie   were   inevitably   excited
about what they heard.
No one criticizes the audience that lines the city streets
to view a famous person; no
one is upset when twenty
thousand people boisterously
applaud their favorite athlete. But an unwritten rule
seems to require that, while
every form of activity must
be served piping hot, religion
must be kept refrigerated and
"respectable". Surely it is
time to change this "law". We
must talk not only of the
Christ of history, but also of
the Christ of reality who wants
to make Himself known and
felt.
Gospel students retreat
planned for weekend
A weekend retreat is planned for the Associated
Full Gospel Students Nov. 10 to 12.
Topics to be discussed include: Evolution, Inspiration of the Scriptures, and Religion and Reason. The
cost is $7.
Interested students please apply in writing to Box
12, Brock Hall, immediately. Page 2
THE    WAYFARER
Thursday, November 3, 1966
THE WAYFARER
The Wayfarer is published several times annually by the Associated
Full Gospel Students for the purpose of Christian Witness. We believe
that the claims of Jesus Christ have been too summarily dismissed by
too many students. Letters to the editor should be sent to Box 12, Brock
Hall.
EDITOR: KEN GAGLARDI
ASSOC. EDITOR: JOHN RATHJEN
ASSISTANTS
Bernice   Gerard
Garry   Anderson
Anne Bielert
Dave  Bowering
Rick   Bowering
Karen   Dobson
Cathy   Eversfield
Virginia   Hallonquist
Harry   Hartwig
Beverly   Heggen
Douglas   Hugill
Marilyn  Kriese
Gudrun lindemark
Barbara   lye
Burk  Maddaford
Alan   Meakes
Janet Medd
Kent   Mellerstig
Wendy Stibfaards
Irene  Stronstad
Bob Wagar
Dorothy Watts
Trudy Wipperman
Charmein West
Gordon  Wood
Connie Young
1
Lid blowing off!
We are impressed by the new interest in the gifts
of the Holy Spirit that many Christians are now showing.
The phenomenon known as "speaking in tongues"
is not only as old as Christendom but as new as tomorrow's headline. Far from disappearing in our scientific computer-run age, the tongues experience is spreading more rapidly today than any time in church history.
The movement away from formalism toward an interest
in the Holy Spirit's place in worship and ministry is
spoken of as the "charismatic renewal".
One of the ironies of the present situation is that
many "Pentecostal" churches are, at this point, ready
to settle for formality in worship and a "respectable"
image. By far the greater number, however, view with
excitement the desire of thousands of Christians in the
traditional churches to know more about, and to put
into action, the gifts of the Holy Spirit.
Among leaders in the charismatic renewal, two who
spoke in Seattle last week were the Rev. Leonard Evans,
pastor of Roseville Presbyterian Church in Toronto, and
the Rev. A. Herbert Mjorud. Evans refers to the years
since his "Pentecostal experience" as the most exciting
of his Christian life. Mjorud, formerly a Seattle attorney,
recently an evangelist for the American Lutheran
Church, said last week in Seattle that on one of his
recent visits to Alaska, ninety-five persons in the congregation to whom he preached experienced "glos-
salalia."
According to a first-hand report from the Toronto
area, at least eight of the staff representatives of one of
Canada's student Christian associations have spoken in
tongues. Another such group has ruled that no "tongues
speaking" Christian may serve with their organization.
What will be the outcome of all this, we can only
conjecture. Those who think that Christianity's only
hope lies in maintaining a so-called respectable image
are disturbed.
We, along with many others, are looking for a continued resurgence of interest in the charismatic renewal.
It is particularly encouraging to see laymen and a minority of clergymen resisting denominational structures
which work to "keep the lid on" wherever the Holy Spirit
moves in the tradition-shattering, dynamic, early-
Christian way.
"A joyful noise?
After decades, even centuries, of solemn worship
the old-line churches appear to be bending.
The Pepsi generation is too racy, too uninhibited, to
tolerate staid formalism. What they want is joy — like
happy. Cut loose. Be yourself. Slow music, however
pious, bores them. So they leave.
Unless . . .
Unless the churches get with it.
Cut the pipes.
Like jazz? Like folk? Like rock? . . . like church?
* * *
The majestic old hymns often possess a theological
profundity that thrills any believer who seriously reflects on them. But the churches are awakening to the
fact that, without life and spontaneity, religious music
turns people off. Their present swing to "joy music"
indicates  an  admission,  however   reluctant,   that  such
spontaneity is an essential aspect of worship.
• * *
One problem concerns us, however. The tradition
of many denominations offers no precedent for lively
music. As a result, these groups often turn to secular
entertainers. But new life is surely not worth the cost of
compromise. The secular world can provide entertainment, but it cannot provide spirituality. At best it gives
superficial joy.
On the one hand, drab religious music destroys
peoples' interest. On the other hand, secular entertainment compromises spirituality. Perhaps the time has
come to re-examine the "emotional" singing of the more-
evangelical churches.
"Would you believe — eight days and eight nights?"
UNKNOWN GOD
REVEALED
Paul—rude to Greeks
By DAVE BOWERING
(Med. I)
Intellectually - structured
versions of religion, word
temples for a dead God: we
build them but should we expect God to join us? Paul did
not think so. Before the Court
of Areopagus he said, "Men of
Athens, I see that in everything that concerns religion
you are uncommonly scrupulous. For as I was going round
looking at the objects of your
worship, I noticed among
other things an altar bearing
the inscription 'To an Unknown God'. What you worship, but do not know — this
is what  I now proclaim."
If Paul were alive today he
would have no place in polite
theological society. He spoke
of the scrupulousness of Greek
theology with a rudeness and
directness which we associate
with "hot line" moderators.
Probably he would express
similar intolerance toward our
current concept of the "Unknown God" (the dead one)
and the dainty semantics with
which we surround Him. Not
only did Paul claim to have
outright knowledge of God,
he had the impertinence to
proclaim his God in front of
men who had spent their lives
in theological debate. Paul
seemed sadly lacking in tact,
yet the Greeks sensed simplicity and power in his words
and listened to him.
"The God who created the
world and everything in it,
and  who  is  Lord of  heaven
and earth, does not live in
shrines made by men. It is not
because he lacks anything that
he accepts service at men's
hands for he is himself the
universal giver of life and
breath and all else."
Should we expect to find
God in our intellectually structured versions of religion? If
we build "word temples" for a
dead God and even worship
there, should we expect God
to join us? Clearly not says
Paul. And then in an unprecedented theological move, Paul
makes a positive and definitive statement about how man
can find God.
"As for the times of ignor
ance, God has overlooked
them; but now he commands
men everywhere, to repent,
because he has fixed the day
on which he will have the
world judged, and justly
judged, by a man of his choosing; of this he has given assurance to all by raising him
from the dead."
Men are to lead changed
lives because God has chosen
to reveal Himself in a man,
and God is (joing to judge men
in the light of their relationship to His man. As Paul
points out, the essence of
Christianity is not hymn singing, brotherly love, nor theol-
ory,  but  Jesus   Christ.
Missionaries serve
says UBC artsman
The writer, George Ney, is a
fottrth-year Arts student at
U.B.C. He spent last summer
travelling in South-East Asia
with a group ot Canadian
students.
Last June 15, I found myself walking through the market-place in Baun, Phillip-
pines. My companion, Philip
Holder, was an Englishman
— a missionary who assists
in an evangelical church in
this small community of
"fisher-folk".
Philip stopped to chat
light-heartedly with a tall,
middle-aged Filipino. Then,
as we moved on again, Mr.
Holder surprised me by declaring that the man was a
murderer. I was fascinated
to hear about the radical
change which had occurred
in his life when he had committed himself to Jesus
Christ.
That afternoon we talked
to others whose lives had
also been transformed. One
person exclaimed, "It makes
me feel young again!"
The people we met that
day were typical of many
others whom I encountered.
The Ubyssey
(Advertisement) Thursday, November 3, 1966
THE    WAYFARER
Page 3
Bible or playwright?
The Bible is a popular source - book for quotations.
Often, however, sayings are attributed to the Bible which
originate elsewhere.
How well do you know the Bible? Test yourself by
indicating which of the following quotations are from
the Bible (Yes), and which are not (No). Answers appear
elsewhere on this page.
YES      NO
1.        "The   devil  can   cite   scriptures   for   his
own purpose."
2.        "Do   unto   others   as   you   would   have
them do unto you."
3.        "As a door turneth upon his hinges, so
doth the slothful upon his bed.
'"Always listen to the opinions of others;
it probably won't do you any good, but
it will them."
"God   works   in   mysterious   ways,   His
wonders to perform."
"Cleanliness is next to Godliness."
"Man can not live by bread alone."
"When you think little of a person, then
say as little as you think."
"More things are wroueht Iby prayer than
this world dreams of."
10. . "Pride goes before a fall."
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
OPINION
(Continued from Page 1)
Faith is not founded on fiction . . . but on historical and
actual events, which, however
strange they may be, are indeed the greatest events which
have ever happened in the
history of the world."
The late James Dwight Dana
of Yale University said: "I, an
old man, who has known only
science all his life, say to you
that there is nothing truer in
all the universe than the scientific statements contained in
the Word of God."
Renan, the French Scholar,
stated: "Jesus remains an inexhaustible principle of moral
regeneration for humanity. He
is the One who has caused His
fellowmen to make the greatest step towards the Divine."
No, Jesus Christ is no pale-
faced bore, no beatnik philosopher. He miraculously appeared in the arena of time and
more miraculously left it, and
the world has not been able
to forget this supernatural
Man. He came to do the near
impossible—to reconcile mankind to its Creator. He had to
be 'passionately alive. He had
to have power that would
blaze  indefinitely.
Your opinion of this Man,
this Jesus Christ, is the most
important one you will ever
hold; its consequences in this
life are of transforming significance. And the ultimate
consequences of such an opinion reach into eternity.
UBC medic
di sects
Cox book
Kent Mellerstig
Medicine IV
The Secular City, Harvey
Cox, 276 pages; MacMillan, N.
York. $1.65.
In The Secular City Harvey
Cox identifies two closely related movements, the rise of
urban civilization and the collapse of traditional religion, as
the hallmarks of our society.
Cox's description of urban
life which depends on the presentation of concepts such as
anonymity, mobility, the mode
of advancement in status and
occupation comes across with
clarity.
Secularization is the historical process toy which man has
been freed from myth and religious control. Although this
process has been going on since
the Middle Ages, urbanization
is seen to have given the last
impetus.
Since man has been changed
by the process of secularization,
Cox feels that the church needs
to change to meet modern man's
need. He also argues further
that man has changed so much
that his concept of God must
change.
Although the description of
urbanization and secularization
makes the book extremely interesting, the final conclusion
does not necessarily follow.
Hence, I appreciate the description, but I disagree with
the conclusion.
We have sinned-Gerard
BURK MADDAFORD
Ethiopian Emperor Haile
Selassie, meeting with Billy
Graham and 1200 world
churchmen near the Berlin
Wall, recently called for an
all-out Christian evangelistic
effort and unity among
churches.
I  asked  Miss  Bernice   Ger
ard, the Pentecostal  chaplain
of UBC and SFU what she
thought of the emperor's plea
for harmony among evangelicals. She replied, "In my
opinion the Emperor's remarks are well placed. Many
of us evangelicals have 'sinned' in our lack of concern
for unity  in the church. The
Commandments
are dead now?
Author says
God is for
real, man!
Kids from city streets reveal startling insights into
Bible passages ... as they
translate them into their own
language for Carl F. Burke,
author of "God Is For Real,
Man" published by Association Press ($1.95 in paperback).
This off-beat and refreshing
book is the result of an experiment in communication with
adolescents in jail, camps, and
detention home settings. It is
a "play-back" of the thoughts
of youth that provides a method of Bible teaching which
will be understood by hard-to-
reach youngsters in a language that they can understand — the language of the
"cool cats" who are the true
authors of these pages.
The youngsters were encouraged to paraphrase, in their
own words and thought patterns, the Bible stories that
are familiar to us all. The rule
observed was to maintain the
basic meaning of the message
being taught in the Bible.
It is challenging in its fresh,
salt-of-the-earth insights.
Solutions
(1) No—Shakespeare, (2) Yes,
(3) Yes, (4) No — Source unknown, (5) No—Tennyson, (6)
No—unknown, (7) Yes, (8) No—
known, (5) No—Tennyson, (6)
(10) Yes—Proverbs.
From page four:
357
416
213
986
Ten ancient rules; quoted,
preached about . . . and ignored? Obsolete?
They are simply obeyed or
disobeyed. The law and their
truth remains, like "Thou
shalt not kill" . . . But what is
killing? Is it simply the act
of destroying physical life?
John, a New Testament writer,
considered this and said "Whoso hateth his brother is a
murderer ..." In fact, John
went so far as to say that if
you do not love your brethren,
you "abide in death". But this
love is impossible without
Christ.
Other commandments could
be considered similarly, but
Christ summed up them all in
the brief statement, "Thou
shalt love the Lord thy God
with all thy heart and thy
neighbor as thyself". Paul said,
"... the end of the commandment is charity out of a pure
heart, ... of a good conscience,
and faith unfeigned." and
John asserted that this was the
law all along, when he said
that it is "not as though I
wrote a new commandment
. . . but . . . (one) we had from
the beginning, that we love
one another."
This love is old, but it is
also relevant to our society
today. It would be interesting
to see the changes in mankind
if we practised it as the Bible
says we should.
No! the commandments are
not dead. The more appropriate conclusion is that this part
of "the Bible doesn't have to
be rewritten, but reread."
divisive spirit is a hindrance
to the witness of the church.
It is high time the evangelicals
asked themselves what we can
do to help end the schisms
that are the scandal of Christianity."
To the question, "Do you
favour a merging of denominational structures?" Miss Gerard replied, "Definitely not. A
monopolistic super-structure is
not going to solve Christendom's problems. It would only
add to the problems.
"Emperor Haile Selassie is
not so naive as to suppose that
the mere binding together of
the dry bones of the church
will somehow bring them to
life again", said Miss Gerard,
"nor am I." "The Church is
not likely to come to life until
the Holy Spirit is allowed to
move freely throughout it and
each part receives its share of
His power."
SONNY ARGUINZONI
... no 'horse'
SONNY   ARGUINZONI,   a
drug addict for over six
years, speaks today in Angus
110. It has been seven years
since he had his last "fix".
The Medical profession re-
auires a five year abstinence
period before asserting a former addict is cured and
Sonny qualifies with seven
years of not touching the
'horse'. He speaks today of
his cure.
Average Americans
character unveiled
The University of Michigan
Institute of social research recently surveyed 2,122 persons
across the U.S. and claims to
THe 61&LIZ.
IAJ   -FPrCT_   Trr£7'/e/T
STUD///tl£   <r   VilTH
rMmtt"   I     rt/UOW    PEofLt
S>TOO|t£)    ,r    BW   rf/^/v/Q/
have uncovered the genuine
'average' American.
The description. He works 8
hours a day and spends another
45 minutes on work breaks. He
gets to the office in 20 minutes
if he drives a car; 40 minutes
by bus or subway.
Fifteen minutes each day is
spent fixing things around the
house.
He spends 60 minutes a day
primping, 20 minutes resting,
150 minutes watching television, 33 minutes persuing
hobbies, and 7.6 hours sleeping,
with 3 hours of free time.
Only 20 minutes a day is
shared equally between 'religious activities' and helping
his wife with the housework.
The Ubyssey
(Advertisement) Page  4
THE    WAYFARER
Thursday, November 3, 1966
DOUG HUGILL
. . . SFU mathematician
Grad tells
why he is
a Christian
What is Christianity? One
very simple answer to this
question is that Christianity is
Christ; but this just raises the
question of who Christ is.
For His Church, Christ is the
Son of God, the Saviour of the
world
Though often in danger of being perverted by the human
institution, the message still
comes to us afresh via the testimony not only of contemporary
'believers but also through the
writings, often neglected in
their own time, of those now at
"rest".
I owe my own faith in Christ
largely to a witness of the
latter kind, the 19th Century
Danish writer Soren Kierkegaard, I first became aware of
his writings when, in the fall
of 1946, the library of the University of Newcastle - upon-
Tyne, where I was a final year
undergraduate in Mathematics,
put an a display of his works.
A brochure outlining his ideas
immediately attracted me because they dealt so vitally with
those ultimate issues which
should concern us all, and in
common with many students,
very much conerned me; the
problems of life, its meaning
and purpose, of death and
eternity; the issue of good and
evil, sin and guilt, God's judgement and forgiveness.
For Kierkegaard these religious issues were answered
for every man in Christianity
and for himself in his own faith
in Christ. A few months after
my introduction to Kierkegaard, my own faith in Christ
proved to me the truth of his
witness.
A simple
cryptogram
Can you do this sum in
which each letter represents
a different digit, excluding
zero?
TRY
GOD
NOT
LSD
The solution is not unique
but the number of possible
solutions is sufficiently small
that the problem is non-trivial.
(A solution is printed on Page
3.)
Are churches
in trouble?
Dru2 pair sought in t
UlUg       r Iones is in ^factory condition at Van-
...  .  moving car wounded a •-Ge„eral Hospital. ^ wh0
Organized religion today
appears to be at a peak of
strength according to analysts
of religious trends. Nearly two
out of every three North Americans claim affiliation to a
religious congregation. The
churches have never been so
wealthy as they are today,
with thousands of new
churches being built every
year. They operate hospitals,
colleges, and even radio stations all over the world. Yet
never in modern church history has there been such a
period of unrest and controversy on the role of churches
as there is now.
Indications of rising difficulty become more numerous
every year. Church attendance
is experiencing a serious decline; in Britain, for example,
only 15 per cent attend, although 70 per cent are "official" church members. An increasing number of religious
leaders are resigning, while
proportionally fewer students
are training for the ministry.
Affluence and technology are
said to be drawing many
people away from religious
connections. Dr. Thomas Alt-
zer's now-famous "God is
Dead"  theory   has   rocked  re
ligious    thinking    throughout
the   modern   world   and   has
served to bare the "crises of
the church."
Why have so many people
become dissatisfied with the
church when it has operated
with little change for so many
years? The answer can only
be that the church in general
is not just presently failing,
but has been failing for a long
time. In this age of science,
reason, and technological advance, individuals are beginning to realize and dare to admit that churches operating
only on the basis of formalism
and ritual have no meaning in
a realistic society. And those
which resort to modernization
in terms of "improved programs" do little more than
offer activities in just another
social institution. "The church
will fail unless it enables a
person to establish his knowledge of God on a personal
basis instead of strictly on an
idealogical, philosophical
plane" was the comment of an
evangelical church leader. He
predicted that until the church
goes "back" to the God of the
New Testament we will see
further decline in the influence of the church in society.
No room for
Chaplain here
The Pentecostal chaplain,
Rev. Bernice Gerard keeps no
regular office hours; in fact
she has no office at all. But
she can be reached by phone
at her home in Oakridge, or
through Box 12, Brock Hall.
By way of self description
Miss Gerard said, "I suppose
you could call me a neo-classical type chaplain in that the
strength of my conviction concerning the power of primitive
Christianity in its golden age
provides the wherewithal for
my service to God."
Though officially the Pentecostal Chaplain Miss Gerard
is active with inter-denominational groups and, from the
appearance of her schedule,
this seems to be something
she thrives on.
BERNICE GERARD
... no room
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Centre director Ke- ones
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Workers still keen
WENDY   STIBBARDS
These articles and others appeared recently in the local
newspapers. According to subsequent rumors, the incident
aas been a real detriment to tht
success and prosperity of the
newly established Teen Challenge Centre (a ministry among
teens and young adults founded
by David Wilkerson—author of
THE CROSS AND THE
SWITCHBLADE—and organized in Vancouver last spring).
Coupled with these rumors, has
been talk of a petition to close
down the East Hastings "Chapel
Subtle as a
brick wall
L.S.D.: Karl Marx once declared that religion is an opiate of the masses. Now it
seems that an optiate is becoming the religion of the
masses.
C. S. Lewis
Surprised by Joy
"I maintain that God did
not exist. I was also very
angry with God for not existing. I was equally angry with
Him for creating a world."
Mark Twain is reported to
have said, "I am not disturbed
by the things in the Bible that
I do not understand; what
worries me is the things in
the Bible that I do understand.
"Stumbling blocks can be
guideposts pointing to a better way."
on the Street". One would justifiably expect a resultant dampened spirit.
Not so! During a recent
visit to the Chapel on the
Street, I had the eye-opening pleasure of speaking with
those who were directly involved in the three hour ordeal
and saw for myself how 'defeated' they were.
Dwight Dobson, Assistant Director of Teen Challenge, expressed an overall appreciation
of the incident, particularly in
that it re-emphasized the des-
parate need for concentrated
teen ministry. He felt that the
publicity, although exagerat-
ed, has opened new doors in
furthering their aim. The
above incident was also a
positive indication, as Dwight
put it, that they were "approaching the front lines —
where they could be most
effective."
His enthusiasm was strongly
supported by the rest of the
workers, most of whom, I might
add, had experienced one or
more of the conditions they
seek to help cure. These were
people who knew what is was
all about. Two had been alcoholics—they knew what it was
to lose the respect of their
parents and kids and how difficult it was to regain it; one
knew the life of an addict—for
seventeen years he had known
it; others had prostituted — to
the same and to the opposite
sexes — yet all all them claim
to have "found God" and experienced this transforming
love and power.
FILMS EVERY WEDNESDAY
River of blood on campus
On each Wednesday of November beginning with the 9th,
a stimulating and provocative
series of Moody Institute of
Science films will be shown in
Bu 104. Featured will be a two
part study of blood, the Red
River of Life. Part I, Nov. 23,
tells the fascinating story of
ther most efficient pump in
the world, the human heart.
Pictures inside a beating human heart are made possible
by an instrument designed and
constructed in the Moody
Science labratory. Part II'
Nov. 30, shows how life hangs
by a very slender thread, the
red blood cell.
On Nov. 9 the Associated
Full Gospel Students present
the Moody Film,  "Time and
Time and eternity
to be shown Nov. 9
Eternity". The film tells the
meaning of space and time, the
so-called fourth dimension.
Windows of the Soul, Nov.
16, shows the wonder and
mystery of the senses: experiments in silent sound, "seeing" odours, and an impressive
demonstration of how we
"see" with our brains are included. It also considers the
entire spectrum of electromagnetic and sound waves
which reveals that we are almost totally blind and deaf.
See these films in Bu 104
on Nov. 9, 16, 23, and 30.
Free admissoin.
The Ubyssey
(Advertisement) Thursday, November 3, 1966
THE  "UBYSSEY
Page 9
'PARENTS PERVERTED"
Drug man hits society
Society is perverted to the
core.
Parents are masochists.
Sadism is the basis of advertising.
Businessmen and politicians
are power addicts.
Psychiatrists are more perverted than their patients.
Alan Hammond, teacher at
the Matsqui drug centre, took
these mild swipes Wednesday
noon at what he felt ails our
society.
Hammond, speaking to the
Ontological Society, said he
disapproved of some rehabilitation methods used at Matsqui.
"Nurses and secretaries working with the men build up
sexual tensions in them," he
said. "This is supposed to help
the men rid themselves of their
perversions."
Hammond said there is no
difference between the perverted criminal who robs banks
and the businessman who fiddles his income.
"Both   have   the   same   dis-
Judge burns
end-cookers
BOLOGNA, Italy (UNS)—
Four upperclassmen at the
staid twelfth century University of Bologna got a
roasting Wednesday because they made things too
hot for a freshman.
They forced him to sit
bare-bottomed over eight
lighted candles during a
hazing ceremony.
He complained to police
that he had suffered severe
burns.
The upperclassmen, all in
their 20s, were convicted of
private violence and sentenced to 20 days in jail.
ease," he said. "It's just that
the people in prison, no matter
what their crime, are not as
smart as businessmen.
"Everybody who makes a
good deal is a crook".
He added that the most successful businessmen and politicians are power addicts.
"They'll do anything to get
what they want", he said.
Pointing out other types of
perversion rife in society, he
said: "Self pity is the classic
form of masochism. Parents
are the most self sacrificing
perverts in the world."
Criticism is a form of sadism.
Psychologists know all this —
it's the basis of all advertising."
Hammond said present psychiatric methods don't go far
enough.
"They've been going at it
for fifty years now and gotten
nowhere.
Confession,   their   method
FORMAL
AMD
SEMI-FORMAL
rental and sales
Tuxedo, toili, whit* dinner
jackets, mominfl c«oti.
Formal and informal business wear — complete
size range.
MCCUISH   FORSWEAR
STUDENT RATES
2046 W. 41 s» - Ph. 263-3610
A Play in 3 Acts at the
FREDERIC WOOD
STUDIO
THEATRE UBC
Nov. 2 to 5    Nov. 3
8:30 12:30
ADULTS    STUDENTS
1.00 75
Tickets at the door
or
BOX OFFICE Rm. 207
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
Ed. U.S. invites you to
The
BLUE GROTTO
FORMAL
Saturday, Nov. 5, 9-1
COMMODORE CABARET
Tickets: $5.00 per couple. ($4.00 with Ed. Card)
at AMS Office or Ed. Building
now, has been used by the
Catholics for years. A good
evangelist arouses guilt feelings in his audience and thus
stimulates the 'conversion'."
Hammond also said most psychiatrists have more problems
than the people they're trying
to treat.
He suggested a way to relieve one's feelings of guilt and
frustration.
"Act through the highest of
your understanding at this moment," he said. "Give expression to that which you truly
are."
He said if you apply this
treatment every moment for
three weeks all feelings of inadequacy will disappear.
Representatives of
Behind the
A Revealing Look
Bamboo Curtain
A Film Society
Presentation
TODAY at
12:30 p.m.
2:00 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
6:00 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
9:00 p.m.
Auditorium
50c
THE
International Nickel Company
OF CANADA LIMITED
Will visit the university to discuss career opportunities
with graduating and post graduate students in
ENGINEERING
• MINING
• METALLURGICAL
• CHEMICAL
• ELECTRICAL
• MECHANICAL
• CIVIL
CHEMISTRY
GEOLOGY and GEOPHYSICS
COMMERCE
Also, interviews for Summer Employment will be held
with  Geology and  Geophysics  students  in   1st,  2nd,
3rd, 4th and post-graduate years.
On November 23, 24 and 25
We invite you to arrange an interview through
The Office of Student Personnel Services
THE
International Nickel Company
OF CANADA LIMITED
COPPER CLIFF, ONTARIO
THOMPSON, MANITOBA
BYOB
2 BANDS
Bank of Montreal
Canada's First Bank
invites graduating seniors in Arts,
Business and other faculties interested
in new challenges in banking to meet
its campus representative on —
MON., NOV. 7,1966
TUES., NOV. 8,1966
WED., NOV. 9,1966
Learn what the
Bank of Montreal
can offer you
Interviews may be arranged through
your Placement Office Page   10
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 3, 1966
COUNCIL GIGGLES
BY KRIS EMMOTT
Cash-man dodges critics
Some time ago the AMS council passed
a budget.
This budget allocated $8,755 to undergrad
societies.
Of this amount, education received $500.
Last year, education got $1044.
When education president Wayne Wiebe
noticed this, he was outraged.
Treasurer Hudson heaved a mighty sigh.
"I asked you for a budget all summer,"
said Hudson.
"I never got one. I had to look over your
spring statement.
"Look here, you want $300 for a publication. I don't think the students should be
supporting your publication, nor your centennial project, nor your grad banquet or
party, nor your symposium."
"But we need a big grant because we're
a big faculty," complained Wiebe.
"Too bad," said Hudson. "You were
warned your allocation would be cut."
At this point Charlie Boylan announced
that any budget at all was an irrelevant
piece of foolishness.
"We ought to be changing the whole
system, and that's why I'm going to vote
against approving the budget," he said. And
the question was buried under a lengthy
policy wrangle.
If Wiebe had submitted a proper statement, would he have gotten the money?
Probably not. Nearly all the undergrad
societies presented fancy demands for AMS
grants this summer.
Education asked for a grant of $2,585 in
their first draft. They got $500. The difference is the activities they won't be able
,o pay for.
Law asked for $2,015. They got $755.
Commerce wanted $1,679, got $685. Science
asked for a grant of $2,775.    They got $700.
"Science requested nearly $3,000 last
year, too," says treasurer Hudson. "Most of
the items on that budget are just guesses.
"They've included a $50 loss on the
Black and Blue Review as an expense. Now
publications don't deserve student funds
anyway, but as it happens there was $200
more over at the bookstore they never
bothered to pick up.
"That's the kind of sloppy record-keeping I have to contend with day and night.
This $350 yearbook loss — another guess.
They don't even know their printing costs.
Lots of these organizations don't keep any
books."
Some do all right. Engineering wanted
$1,895 from council; they got $1,245, almost
twice as much as the next biggest allocation
and twelve times as much as the smallest.
AMS grants are only part of the undergrad society budget.
Education will sell lockers and jackets
to the tune of $6,440. Grad students will
rake in $11,620 and engineers a fantastic
$18,103.15.
In sharp contrast are science, which expects a paltry $250 in outside income, and
medicine, which budgeted for no income.
Reading a budget doesn't tell you how
it was drawn up, but it can be interesting.
U of T plots
arts changes
TORONTO (CUP) — The
University of Toronto is
undertaking a study similar
to UBC's present examination
of arts but the emphasis will
be on the postgraduate study.
The Macpherson committee,
organized last spring, is examining the structure of arts and
sciences faculty.
Prof. C. B. Macpherson, a
political economist, said submissions from faculty and students will be examined by a
commission composed of representatives from most of the
colleges and departments.
"Hearings will follow in
which recommendations will
be discussed with the authors," he said.
How "Safe"
Is The Cigarette
You Smoke?
Are today's filter-tip cigarettes
really safer than plain ends?
How much harmful tar and
nicotine is in the smoke you inhale into your lungs?
The current Reader's Digest
features a factual, new laboratory report showing the latest
tar and nicotine content of 25
leading Canadian cigarettes
and reveals that some actually
contain 200% — or more — tar
and nicotine than others and
that the smoke from some filter-
tips actually has a higher content, of these injurious substance, than some plain ends.
This Reader's Digest article
will be talked about from Coast
to Coast.
It's   in   November  Reader's
Digest — on newsstands now.
KERRISDALE
CAMERAS
FLOG
A DOG
SALE
(N)-New
(U)-Used
(D)-Demo.
CAMERAS
Olympus   Quickmatic   (n)
Fujica   Rapid   (n)
Fujica    Rapid    Half    (n)
Voigtlander
Irtstamatic   (d)
Voigtlander   Vitoret     (d)
Mansfield   Auto.   Rfr   (n)
Olympus   Electro   (n)
Minolta   Electro   (n)
Praktica IV FB s.l.r.  (n)
Pen    "P"    s.l.r.    (n)
Canon   "FX"  s.l.r.   (n)
Yashica   "J5"   s.l.r.   (n)
Topcon   "RS"  s.l.r.   (n)
Argus   Automatic    (u)
Konica   35   (u)
Ricoh   Automatic   (u)
Zeiss  Contaflex  s.l.r.   (u)
Fujica   35EE   (u)
Agfa   Automatic   (u)
Leica III  E   (u)
Kowa   "SE"   s.l.r.   (u)
Aires   fl.9   (u)
Minoltina    "P"    (u)
Kodak   Signet   35   (u)
Asahiflex   s.l.r.   (u)
Konica Auto   "S"   (u)
Olympus  Pen   (u)
Olympus Pen  EE  (u)
Olympus  Pen W  (u)   z
Edixa
(f2   Biotar)   s.l.r.   (u)
Kodak   Retinette   (u)
Trikkorex  s.l.r.   (u)
Prakti  Auto,   (u)
Mamiyaflex   2*4   (u)
Ricohlfex   2V*   (u)
Yashica  "D"  2%   (n)
4x5   Press   (u)
SLIDE   PROJECTORS
Sawyers   500   (n)
Sawyers   Remite   (n)
Airequipt   500   (n)
2170 W. 41s tAVE.
$54.88
$44.88
..$54.88
$29.88
$23.88
$49.88
$89.88
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$169.88
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$39.00
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$59.00
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$49.00
$55.00
$23.00
$29.00
$25.00
$69.00
$20.00
$59.00
$30.00
$89.00
$12.00
$49.00
$49.00
$39.88
$79.88
$44.88
$35.00
$33.00
Airequipt  Super  33  (u)
Argus Remote  (u)
Leitz
Pradovit   "N24"    (u)     $140.00
MOVIE  CAMERAS
Nizo F.A.  3 Zoom  <n)
Nikkorex   Zoom   8   (n)
DeJur  Zoom   (n)
Canon Super 8 (n)
Rondo  4-1  Zoom   (u)
Kodak   Electric   8   (u)
Kodak   Turret   (u)
Revere   8   (u)
$199.88
$119.88
$99.88
$109.88
$39.00
$49.00
$18.00
$10.00
LENSES
28 mm/f3.5 Auto Nikkor (u)
$99.00
85  mm/f3.5  Auto  Nikkor  (u)
$139.00
200 mm/f4 Auto Nikkor  (u)
$129.00
135  mm/f3.5  Auto  for
Pentax   (n) $49.88
200  mm/f5.9  Tamron
(fits most)   (n) $28.88
Telextender (Pentex Auto.)
(n) $16.88
Komura 105   &  135   (n)
Half price
ELECTRONIC   FLASH
Honeywell Strobonar (u) $29.00
Strobonar   66A   (n) $39.88
Kakonette   (n) $15.00
Braun f65   (u) $49.00
Metz N.C.  117  (n) $47.88
TAPE  RECORDERS
Ciphyr VII Stereo $229.88
Paros   707   Stereo $289.88
Chord   (full A.C.) $79.88
Ciphyr V  (A.C.) $69.88
Craig Pocket Corder $59.88
Mayfair  batt.   Port. $39.88
AM 6-2622
This weekend don't be left out . . . join the crowd
Dance to Terry and The Viscounts
featuring fhe dynamic Bud Currie
Friday and Saturday Night at the
EMBASSY    BALLROOM
1024 Davie
Dancing from  10:00 until  1:00 a.m.
"The Place With the Dancing Lights"
Admission only $1.50
Classical Guitar
Instruction  in   Technique
rind   Repertoire
W.  Parker, 682-1096  or  874-3547
Studio   at   2695   W.   Broadway
RE   3-4022
WHY BE GRAY ?
HAIRCOLORING TREATMENTS
-   HAIRSTYLING  -
UPPER TENTH BARBERS
4574 W. 10th Ave. by the Gates
SPECIAL
EVENTS
COMING ATTRACTIONS
San Francisco
Mime Troupe
. . insulted and embarrassed by a display of obscenity . . . Whan I
left at intermission my stomach was in a turmoil . . . disgusting erotic
and auto-erotic pantomimes . . ." The Seattle Times
"The myths, fears and distortions — from both Negro and White viewpoints — are stripped away with varying degrees of satirical cleverness/
insight and brash humour. And with frequent earthiness as well."
The Nation
2 Shows - 12:30 and 8:00 p.m.
Advance tickets fqr evening performance on sale at the
A.M.S. and Vancouver Ticket Centre. (Students $1.25,
others $1,75). Tickets for afternoon performance at door
for 75c.
NOV. 10 - AUDITORIUM
MARC & ANDRE
FRENCH FOLK SINGERS
t*     ...'
This expressive pair have a special brand of French wit and charm. They
present chansons of France, some poignont and sad, come gay and frivi-
lous, others edged with biting satire.
Advance Tickets at A.M.S. Students $1.50, others $2.00.
NOV. 8-8 p.m. - AUDITORIUM
Maharishi Mahesh
Yogi
Spiritual  Leader of
Over Five Million
Indians
WED.#  NOV. 9-
BROCK  HALL
FREE Thursday, November 3, 1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11 Page  12
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 3, 1966
Students pay high prices;
faculty picks up dividend
You lose
PANGO   PANGO   (UNS)   —
Green   hairy   blorgs    and
smooth puce blorgs battled it
out in the middle of the village square in this island capital today. Nobody won.
LONDON (CUP)—University
of Western Ontario's campus
bookstore loses money on books
sold to faculty, but recoups its
losses on sales to students.
A book costing the student
$1 is available to faculty members at 90 cents. Since the book
costs the bookstore 95.2 cents,
the store makes a profit of 4.8
cents on the student's purchase, but loses 5.2 cents on the
faculty member's purchase.
"Students are subsidizing
faculty purchases to the tune
of 5.2 per cent," said Terry
Sulyma university students'
council finance commissioner.
In 1963, it was decided that
bookstore operations should
contribute $150,000 to the university building fund over a
10-year period, Sulyma said.
"Although the  bookstore  is
'English ways unfit
for African culture
A   UBC   education   professor  recently   returned   from
Africa   Wednesday   blasted   the   continent's   "transplanted
English school system."
Money given
for writers
STANFORD (UNS) — There
is money for would - be
journalists down south.
Stanford department of communication is offering 25 graduate scholarships worth from
$1,770 to $4,770 to university
students preparing for careers
in editorial journalism, mass
communications research, and
broadcasting and film.
A Ford Foundation grant also
provides 12 National Honors
Fellowships reserved for news
paper and broadcast journalism
students working toward an
MA.
Applications can ibe made to
the Executive Head, Department of Communication, Redwood Hall, Stanford University,
Stanford, California 94305.
January 15 is application
deadline.
Professor G. H. Cannon said
the English system does not fit
the African culture.
"Education is associated with
culture and society. It is a
sociological problem in a changing society.
"Fees for the elementary education of one child consume approximately one-half of the
average man's wages. The gross
domestic product ranges from
$18 to $69 per capita," Cannon
said.
To continue his education, a
student must sit for secondary
school exams similar to the
English system, he said.
'The success in this exam is
going to affect their whole lives.
But only one-seventh pass,"
Cannon said.
Those who don't pass are too
educated to return to the
"shamba", the small, family
farm.
Western Canada's Largest
Formal  Wear   Rentals
Tuxedos White & Blue Coats
Full   Dress Shirts   &.  Accessories
Morning   Coats Blue  Blazers
Directors'  Coats 10%   UBC   Discount
2500 GARMENTS TO CHOOSE  FROM
E. A. LEE Formal Wear Rentals
623    HOWE    (Downstairs)   MU    3-2457
2608  Granville   (at 10th)  4691   Kingsway (Bby.)
RE  3-6727 (by   Sears)   HE  5-1160
EYEGLASS FRAMES
TO CHOOSE FROM    &#%   QC
WITH YOUR ^S____l«7 J
PRESCRIPTION FOR GLASSES
Priced from only
Money Back Guarantee
EYE EXAMINATIONS
No Appointment Needed
Contact Lenses 5n«y.c.ob_or._ $49.50
Check For Yourself. Lowest Prices in Townl
THEE CREDIT TO STUDENTS
Granville Optical Ltd.
L
861 GRANVILLE, VANCOUVER, MUtual 3-8921
Opwi daily including Saturday — No appointment naadad
J
supposedly a break-even proposition, 65 per cent of the profits go towards the building
fund."
Two other organizations—the
Mustang band and the undergraduate lecture series — also
benefit from book store profits.
Last year the student council
undertook a study assessing its
chances of taking over the book
store's operation to reduce costs
to students.
Officials estimate that all required books could be sold at
an average of 12 per cent bellow universtiy bookstore prices.
G.   A.   P.
(Guaranteed Anti-Freeze  Protection)
WINTERIZE NOW WITH:
• Chevron  Anti-Freeze
• R.P.M. Winter Grade Oil
• Complete Cooling System  Check
FIRST LINE UNIROYAL SNOW TIRES UP TO 25%  OFF!
» Point Grey Service |
TED DASH ROB QUESNEL
16th and Dunbar Phone 228-8621
WE TAKE BETTER CARE OF YOUR CAR
If you can help
us move faster
we need you
(An open letter
to '67 grads)
Northern Electric is moving faster today than any self-
respecting 70-year-old should. Away back in the late 1800's,
before autos or airplanes, or radio, or television were invented,
a few men started a business that later grew into Northern
Electric. For years we relied upon American sources for
most of our technical development. But back in 1958 a
rather disturbing thing occurred: Linus threw away his
blanket. Northern began to do her own research and
development: began to plan aggressively for technological
change and an active penetration into world markets.
The last eight years have been exciting ones. A new air has
permeated the atmosphere at Northern and developments
are taking place that present a challenge in every sphere of
our activity. To meet this challenge we need university
grads—top-notch university grads!
We need engineers—electricals and mechanicals especially,
but we've room for civils, metallurgicals and chemicals. None
of our departments has asked for a mining or forestry man
yet, but don't bet on it!
We need B.Comm.'s—mostly for accounting and business
administration, but our Marketing, Production and Personnel
departments are always coming up with requirements for a
good B.Comm.
We need B.Sc.'s—not only honors grads, but those
majoring in chemistry, maths, physics and related disciplines.
And because we're pushing into so many experimental
areas, in the pure and applied sciences, we need Master's
and Ph.D.'s, people who can spearhead the attack on the
more complex problems that face us.
If you want to become part of Northern's exciting future,
see your Placement Officer. He'll give you more detailed
information and arrange an interview for you with one of our
recruiters who will be on campus soon.
Horthern Electric
COMPANY LIMITED
6066-11A
'•t'fi
Vf.v*. Thursday, November 3, 1966
THE     UBYSSEY
Page   13
WARD TELLS AUCC
Universities are chaos
OTTAWA (CUP) — The so-
called "community of scholars" is not a community but
a chaos, the Canadian Union
of Students president told
delegates at the Association of
Universities and Colleges of
Canada meeting here.
Addressing the university
administrators, CUS president
Doug Ward attacked society in
general and administrators on
the nation's campuses in particular for making students
"clients or apprentices and not
citizens" in the area of university life.
Students are there, he said,
to prove to future employers
that they can get degrees.
He compared students to
"raw man-power units" being
mass-produced on a crash system to fill the needs of corporations.
The blame, he said, can be
put on the fact North Ameri-
DOUG WARD
. . . 'mass-production'
can   universities   are   modeled
after    corporations,    and    students  are   willing   to  get   "to
and through university".
A   suggested   approach   for
Regain brains'
AUCC resolves
OTTAWA (CUP) — The Association of Universities and
Colleges of Canada Friday called for increased efforts to
entice some of the 1,200 students abroad to return to Canada
to combat the increasing brain
changing all this could conceivably come on the classroom level where "students
and faculty still meet."
Speaking on behalf of university presidents were Dr. J.
F. Leddy of the University of
Windsor and Dr. L. Lemay of
the University  of  Montreal.
"It is only logical student-
faculty relationships are better at small universities than
at the larger ones," said Dr.
Lemay. "The prime responsibility of the academic world
is to educate and that is what
students have come to university for."
Dr. Leddy stressed that
there has to be a separation
of students and faculty administration since this is the only
way campuses can be run efficiently.
Alan Solly Pullovers ...
English  Double Weight
Lambs Wool
11 new Fall shades
$16.95
759 Granville
and Oakridge
Shopping Centre
drain.
Other resolutions passed at
the AUCC conference advocated greater collaboration
between universities in Canada and Latin America and
a study of recent university
construction projects, to assist
administrators in campus
planning.
Canadian university executives wound up the annual
week-long conference Friday
with a further appeal to Prime
Minister Pearson for increased
research grants.
Investment in research increases productivity and acts
as a bulwark against inflation,
the resolution pointed out.
It called for annually-
increased grants to the National Research Council, the Medical Research Council, and the
Canadian Council.
Dr. Walter H. Johns, president of the University of Alberta, was elected AUCC president succeeding Rt. Rev. L.
A. Vachon, Laval University
rector.
See
FELIX GREEN'S
CHWB
A Revealing Look
Behind the
Bamboo Curtain
A Film Society
Presentation
TODAY at
12:30 p.m.
2:00 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
6:00 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
9:00 p.m.
Auditorium
50c
S
Chevron Standard
Limited
CALGARY, ALBERTA
offers careers in
Petroleum Exploration
and will conduct
CAMPUS INTERVIEWS ON
November 7, 8 and 9
POST GRADUATES - GRADUATES
UNDERGRADUATES
ENGINEERING — (Chemical, Mechanical, Civil)
—Permanent employment in engineering.
HONOURS GEOLOGY
—Permanent and summer employment in geology.
GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING — -(Options 1, 2, 3)
—Permanent and summer employment in  geology
and/or geophysics.
GEOPHYSICS
—Permanent and summer employment in geophysics.
PHYSICS AND GEOLOGY
—Permanent  and  summer  employment  in  geology
and/or geophysics.
MATHEMATICS AND PHYSICS
—Permanent and summer employment in geophysics.
HONOURS PHYSICS
—Permanent and summer employment in geophysics.
ENGINEERING PHYSICS
—Permanent and summer employment in geophysics.
Arrangements For Personal Interview
May Be Made Through The
University's Placement Office
Former appeal director
named alumni giving head
Ian Malcolm will take over as new director of UBC
Alumni Annual Giving on Jan. 1.
Malcolm has been with the special services branch
of the RCAF, the public relations and development
branch of Associated Medical Services, and recently the
Toronto United Community Fund. He was the appeal's,
campaign director the last two years.
Gordon Thorn, present giving director, has been
named vice-principal of evening classes at B.C. Institute
of Technology.
AVANT
<;amm_
from  the  style  centre . . .
RICHARDS & FARISH LTD.
786   GRANVILLE   STREET
ALSO
THE COLLEGE SHOP
802 GRANVILLE STREET
IfalVL Shop-'
mam
$$-'■'■:^'^r^M'^:
'i!fflllfte*^;;
;|P:##^
<*w-v
m Page  14
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 3, 1966
'No alternate council'
says pro-CUS advocate
EDMONTON (CUP) — David
King, chairman of the University of Alberta's now defunct Pro-CUS Committee, has
emphatically denied he stated
he wanted to set up "an alternative to student government"
on campus.
King's statements appeared
in a story in a recent issue of
The Gateway, U of A's student
newspaper.
In a letter to The Gateway
editor-in-chief, King said, "I
did not propose a second government. I am opposed to the
very idea."
He said he spoke to The
Gateway reporter "as a private   individual"   and   not   as
ISSUES MIXED
CUS head knocks
Acadia council
WOI_FVILLE (CUP)  — Acadia University's students'
council lacks initiative and involvement, Canadian Union of
Students president told council members, Oct. 24.
"I'm not sure to what extent
chairman of the defunct Pro-
CUS Committee, formed when
Alberta withdrew from the
Canadian Union of Students.
"What I did say was I
wanted to present an 'alternative philosophy to that being
espoused by student government on this campus'. The two
statements are different," he
said.
King also denied a report
from Ottawa indicating CUS
president Doug Ward had offered the Pro-CUS group CUS
benefits at no cost in an effort to woo U of A back to
CUS.
"They offered to put us on
their mailing list so we would
receive their publications. But,
as every other student on this
campus, we are denied all
other benefits, except as our
council may be able to negotiate them."
SKIN DIVING
Tuesday, 7:30 - 9:30 p.m., Term 1 Pool.
SCUBA DIVING
Tuesday, 7:30 - 9:30 p.m. in Term 2 Pool
and downtown pools.
A Great Opportunity to Learn
Instruction Free — Charge for Personal Equipment
Faculty  Welcome — Grads,  too
School of PE & REC,
Voluntary Rec. Program — Phone 22&-2401
TONI SAILER    -    ART FURRER
JIM McCONKEY
in person skiing on the Queen E. stage
c_fi   ia/cctTtlrillin9   90   minute   movie   of  skiing   in   the ....   Dirc
5M   WtSI Northwest   personally   narrated   by Jlffl   Kite
FASHION SHOW
Elmer  Gill plus  II
A hobby full of displays, ski
equipment, fashions, c I u b s ,
shops, and ski areas.
November 3—Q.EJ.
Vancouver   Ticket   Centre,   all   Eaton's   Stores,   Town   ■
TICKETS:   Country   Home  Furnishing  —  Kerrisdale and   Richmond
$1.50 and  $2.00.
DOORS: 4 p.m. to midnight. SHOW TIMES: 6 p.m. and 9:15 p.m.
you are dealing with matters
concerning university government and education. You
should ibe confronting issues relevant to the needs of the
student," Doug Ward said.
Acadia, like many other universities across Canada, has
recently been re-examining its
role in CUS. A committee has
been formed to discuss the pros
and cons of the Maritime University's proposed withdrawal
from CUS.
The 29-year-old student
leader pointed out he was not
in Wolfville to "sell" problems
on a national scale.
Commenting on CUS's top
priority — universal accessibility, Ward said, "If Acadia is
going to be more than a middle-
class ghetto for those who can
afford it, council must become
involved in wiping out the
social and economic barriers
to higher education."-^
Fifty years ago we only made 'aeroplanes'.
(See what's happening now!)
Holiday Film
Tours Unlimited
presents
FOUR FACES
of
GALIBALDI
featuring the year round
activities   in   the  Alpine
wonderland of Garibaldi
Provincial Park.
Nov. 16th
8:30 p.m.
Q.E. THEATRE
Tickets 1.50 & 2.00
Vancouver Ticket
Centre
& All Eaton's Stores
NASA Saturn V
Engineers & Scientists:
Campus Interviews, Thursday and Friday, November 17 and 18
In 1916 The Boeing Company's career
was launched on the wings of a small seaplane. Its top speed was 75 mph.
Now, half a century later, we can help
you launch your career in the dynamic environment of jet airplanes, spacecraft, missiles, rockets, helicopters, or even seacraft.
Pick your spot in applied research, design, test, manufacturing, service or facilities engineering, or computer technology. You can become part of a Boeing
program-in-being, at the leading edge of
aerospace technology. Or you might want
to get in on the ground floor of a pioneering new project.
You'll work in small groups where
initiative and ability get maximum exposure. And if you desire an advanced
degree and qualify, Boeing will help you
financially with its Graduate Study Program at leading universities and colleges
near company facilities.
Often it will be sheer hard work. But
we think you'll want it that way when
you're helping to create something unique
—while building a solid career. Visit your
college placement office and schedule an
interview with our representative. Boeing
is an equal opportunity employer.
Divisions: Commercial Airplane • Missile &
Information Systems • Space • Supersonic
Transport • Vertol • Wichita • Also, Boeing
Scientific Research Laboratories Thursday, November 3, 1966
THE     UBYSSEY
Page     15
—derrek webb photo
BUT YOU CANT be pregnant, says Joe Galahad to disgruntled brother. Scene is from
Gheldrode s Red Magic, to be shown at noon today in the Freddy Wood studio. It is first
play to be produced as a theatre master's thesis by a student.
McGill campus dry;
grog rule tightened
MONTREAL (CUP) — New
liquor regulations at McGill
University now require organizations serving liquor at functions to have a licence to both
serve and sell alcohol.
The new regulations are designed to prevent violations of
the provincial liquor code, said
students' society internal vice-
president Ian McLean.
In future, when an organization plans a function where
liquor will be served, it must
guarantee that everyone present will be over the minimum
legal age of 20 before obtaining a licence to serve from the
provincial government.
In addition, the sponsoring
organization requires a licence
to sell — more difficult to ob
tain than a serving licence —
if it plans to sell the liquor.
Under the present liquor
code, alcohol may not be
served without a licence.
Canada's Role in
World Affairs
HOWARD
JOHNSTON
Socred M.P. — Okanagan-Revelstoke
Friday Noon • Brock Lounge
ATTENTION:     CREATIVE     STUDENTS
DESIGN CONTEST
U.B.C. Open House Committee For Theme
Symbol For Open House 1967
to be constructed on Main Mall
THEME OF OPEN HOUSE
PRIZE: $25.00
SUBMISSIONS: TO PROFESSOR LIONEL THOMAS
LASSERE 210 BY NOV. 9, 1966
ALL SUBMISSIONS BECOME  PROPERTY OF OPEN  HOUSE COMMITTEE
PACIFIC PETROLEUMS LTD.
"A  COMPANY WITH A FUTURE"
This rapidly growing, progressive Company requires individuals with ideas and with
initiative and ambition to achieve the objectives of an optomistic and confident
management.
In 1967 there will be attractive openings for graduates and undergraduates in the
following faculties:
GRADUATES
Engineering (all patterns)
Honors Geology
Honors Geophysics
Honors Physics
Honors Mathematics
Commerce (all patterns
excepting accounting)
Arts-Economics
UNDERGRADUATES
2nd and 3rd year students
Engineering (all patterns)
Honors Geology
Honors Geophysics
Honors Physics
Honors Mathematics
Company Representatives will be on campus November 7, November 8, November
9, and we would invite you to arrange an appointment to discuss the opportunities
with our Company. Please see the Company Brochure available now at your Student Placement Office.
SUIT   SALE!!
Last 3 Days Only 25 Suits Left
40 TO 50%   OFF!!
Regularly 59.50 to 125.00 - Sale 39.50 to 68.50
SALE ENDS NOVEMBER 5
^%W        4445 '
MENS WEAR
4445 West 10th Ave.
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
STUDENT'S COURT-
NOTICE OF HEARING:
Take notice that the Student's Court will hear charges
of the eligibility of the Arts Undergraduate President,
Don Wise, to hold office under the Arts Undergraduate Society Constitution in Room 25 of Law Hut G-l
at 12:30, Friday the fourth day of November, 1966.
Clerk of the Court, Murray M. Hanna.
HIGH  SCHOOL VISITATION
COMMITTEE:
Students interested in participating in a joint U.B.C.-
S.F.U. student high school visitation committee are
asked to apply in writing (stating interest, experience,
faculty, and year) to the Secretary, Box 54, Brock
Hall. First and Second year students are particularly
encouraged to apply.
T967 CANADIAN UNION OF
STUDENT NATIONAL SEMINAR
CO-ORDINATOR:
Applications are now being received for the Co-ordinator of the 1967 Canadian Union of Students National
Seminar to be co-hosted by the Universities of British
Columbia and Simon Fraser in August^September,
1967. Please state interest, experience, faculty and
year. Further inquiries and applications should be
directed to Miss Daphne Kelgard, Chairman, Canadian
Union of Students Committee, Box 153, Brock Hall.
STUDENT ADMINISTRATION
ADVISORY COMMITTEES:
Applications are now being received to select students
to sit on joint student-Administration advisory committees concerned with:
1. Food Services
2. Traffic and Parking
3. The Bookstore
4. Student Residences
Applications in writing stating interest, experience,
faculty and year should be submitted to the A.M.S.
Secretary, Box 54, Brock Hall.
C.U.S. CONFERENCES and SEMINARS:
Letters of application for the Laval Seminar on "La
Greve" (the Strike) to Ibe held on November 9-12 are
being received by the CUS Committee, Brock Extension 258. Applications must be in by November 1.
Applicants must speak French. Further information
from the CUS office 224-3242 (local 43).
Letters of application for the 7th Annual Conference
on Commonwealth Affairs, Jan. 24-28, 1967, will be
received until Nov. 3. The top will be Independence.
Instability and International Tension. Further information from the CUS office Brock Ext. 258.
Letters of epplication are toeing received for the McGill
Conference on World Affairs, The New China and
International Community. Nov. 9-12th. Applications
must toe in by Oct. 28. Further information at the
CUS office, Brock Ext. 258.
Letters of application for St. Paul's College 3rd Annual Conference on Canadian Affairs, "A Critique of
the Canadian Press", to toe held Jan. 27, 28, 29 will
be received until November 7. Further information
from the CUS office, Brock Ext. 258.
EDUCATION -
FACULTY COMMITTEE:
Applications will be received until Fri., Nov. 5, to
select ten students in the Faculty of Education to sit
on a student-faculty advisory committee to recommend
adjustments and/or improvements in curriculum,
practice teaching and general administration. Applications should include personal information and qualifications as well as reasons for desiring inclusion on
this committee, and be sultomitted to the Secretary,
Education U.S., Room 1, Education Building.
B.C. ASSEMBLY OF STUDENTS
The first meeting of B.C. students — from the four
universities, nursing schools, B.C.I.T., Vancouver City
College and B.C. high schools — will take place at
Simon Fraser University, Nov. 11-13. Students wishing
to attend as delegates should apply in writing, stating
faculty, year, interest, and experience, to Pete Braund,
Box 50, Brock Hall, before Wed., Nov. 9, 1966. Page   16
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 3, 1966
TWEEN  CLASSES
Dead debate resurrected
SCM. LSM
Jack   Shaver   discusses   the
Death of God theology, Friday
at noon in B.E. 350.
PHRATERES   MIXER
Dance   to   the   Organizations
and    the    Cumberland    Four,
Saturday from 8 to 12 p.m. in
Brock Hall.
CAMPUS  CAVALIERS
Square  dancing  today  at
noon in hut L^5, near the field
house.
PRE SOCIAL WORK
Coffee   party   at   school   of
social work. Meet outside Bu.
203 at 1:30.
FILMSOC
Filmsoc presents Felix
Green's China today in the
auditorium. Six showings from
12:30 to 9 p.m. Admission 50
cents.
NEWMAN CENTRE
Rev. G. F. McGuigan discusses What Economics has to
say about IT, tonight at 7:30
in the St. Mark's music room.
SOCREDS
Howard    Johnston,   MP,
speaks   on   Canada's   role   in
world  affairs Friday  at  noon
in Brock lounge.
KOERNER   LECTURER
Professor    Eugene    Vinaver
discusses   Arthurian   Romance
Friday at noon in Bu. 106.
UNION COLLEGE
Brewster Kneen discusses
Conflict  and  Peace,   Christian
Vietniks set
protest week
Next week is Viet Nam Week
at UBC and university campuses across Canada.
The UBC Student Viet Nam
Committee, New Democratic
Youth and Student Christian
Movement plan the week of protest Nov. 7th to 11th.
The AMS has also asked that
classes devote a period of discussion next week to the war
in Viet Nam.
Films will be shown Tuesday
followed by a guest speaker
Wednesday.
Approach at noon in UC  103.
CHINA   TEACH-IN
Prof. Morton Brown speaks
on  Chinese   Aggression   today
at  noon  in Brock.  Admission
10 cents.
SLAVONIC   CIRCLE
Meeting at noon today in Bu.
2205.
CUSO
Judy Ransom speaks on
CUSO Friday at noon in Ed.
100.
THEATRE  DEPT.
Student   performance   of
Ghelderode's Red Magic, today
at    noon    in    Freddy    Wood
Studio. Admission  75  cents.
CRUSADE
Mac Renshaw speaks to College Life tonight at 9:01 in
Nootka House lounge, Lower
Mall.
FULL GOSPEL STUDENTS
Sonny Arguinzoni speaks on
his cure from narcotics addiction today at noon in Ang. 110.
SAILING CLUB
Meeting   today  at   noon   in
STUDENTS !
UNIVERSITY     READING     LIST
TITLES
AVAILABLE!
891   Granville St.
OPEN DAILY
From 10 a.m.
to MIDNIGHT
(Noon to Midnight Sunday)
Out-of-towners:
Send for
catalogue.
Tel. MU 5-5814
^m *wr>v ".
ALL OUR SKIS ARE
GUARANTEED  AGAINST
BREAKAGE FOR ONE
SEASON.
10% Student Discount on
Presentation of Student
Card.
336 West Pender St.
681-2004
The House of Seagram
Interviews
will be conducted
NOVEMBER 7th
for students graduating  in
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
BACTERIOLOGY
BIOCHEMISTRY
CHEMISTRY
FOOD TECHNOLOGY
See The University Placement Service
for Information and Interview Appointment
Bu. 106. Slides will be shown.
GERMAN  SPEAKER
Dr. Katharina Holger speaks
on Heinrich Heine: Ein Dich-
ter zwischen Deutschland und
Frankreich Monday at noon
in Bu. 320.
SCC
Meeting today at noon in
Chem. 250. Films will be
shown. Announcement as to
time and place for skull session for hapless rallyists Friday.
China Teach In
TODAY
Prof. Morton Brown speaks on
Chinese Aggression
FRIDAY
David Crook from China
"The Cultural Revolution"
AUDITORIUM
12:30
10c
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
LOST. STAPLE GUN OUTSIDE
Engineering Building, Homecoming Day. Finder Please phone 224-
9045, Rm. 491, evenings after 7:00
p.m.   Eric.
WILL THE PERSON WHO BOR-
rowed my keys and wallet from
the '56 Chev. in C-lot please return them to the same. I can't
drive my car without them. Phone
738-1755.
FOUND THREE WEEKS AGO
Thursday in hut L-5 a pair of
men's black reading glasses Apply
Publications Office.
LOST KEY RING WITH THREE
keys including one UBC key return to key clerk buildings and
grounds.	
FOUND :PLUTE IN BROCK HALL,
Oct. 31. Claim in Publications
Office.
HELP! — WOULD THE PERSON
who took wallet from glove compartment of white '56 Pontiac, return papers, AMS card, etc. —
Reward if everything returned—
Contact R. E. Townsend,. 327-7077.
Greetings
12
HAPPY    NINETEENTH    TO    THE
ethnic factor of the group.
Coming Dances
12A
ED. U.S. INVITES YOU TO THE
Blue Grotto formal, Commodore
Sat., Nov. 5th, $5.00 ($4 with Ed.
card). Tickets in AMS office and
Ed  Building,   B.Y.O.B.
Special  Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20
and have a good driving history
you quailify for our good driving
ates.   Phone  Ted Elliott,   224-6707.
GEOLOGY MUSEUM — P & G-116
open Monday-Friday 12.30-1.30.
Students Faculty and  Staff Wel-
PIZZA PATIO CONTINUES TO
expand, specializing in Pizza
take-out and delivery. Pizza Patio's normal policy of making
part-time employment available
to those students over 21 with
clean drivers' licences to work
one or two evenings a week is
again in effect. Openings are
available at any one of their six
locations. For further information contact 681-2822, 10-4. P.S.—
For   campus   delivery,   736-9422.
ANYONE WITNESSING ACCI-
dent in "B" lot Monday, Oct. 31
at 9:10 a.m. Please contact Alex
at 224-7235 between 5:00-6:30
p.m. or 224-9088 between 10:00 -
5:00   p.m.	
ASIAN STUDIES STUDENTS SEE
Felix Green's documentary on
Communist China today in the
Auditorium. Six showings from
12:30.   50c.
RE-REELECT LOCKIE FOR MR.
Gullible of 1966. He has a
PROBLEM.
BLABNIGHT AT THE ADVANCE
Mattress Coffeehouse (10th &
Alma). Make your own harangue
or comedy on stage tonight and
every  Thursday.
10% OF UCLA DOES IT YOU CAN
do it to Brock Hall Nov.  9.  12:30.
WHERE WAS THE THOUGHT
before you thought it? Brock
Hall Nov. 9, 12:30.
Transportation
14
RIDE NEEDED FROM 54th AND
Victoria. 8:30 Monday and Wed-
nesday.  Call Barb  327-7453.
RIDE    WANTED   NORTH   BURN-
ay,   298-3452.	
WANTED DRIVER FOR CARPOOL
West Van.  Phone  922-6860.
NORTH VAN. RIDER WANTED
vicinity Lonsdale and 13th. Phone
987-7934.
RIDE HOME URGENTLY NEED-
ed M.T.W. - 5:30. Friday after
2:30. Vicinity Edmonds and Kings-
way. Please call Lorraine 521-
4189.
RIDE NEEDED TO ENGLISH BAY
(Chilco and Beach) Friday evenings 6:30. Call Carta 685-9797.
Travel Opportunities
16 Help Wanted (Con't.)
SAVE ON AIR FARES
Group fares via Air Canada DC 8
to Toronto and London, Ontario.
$196.00 return economy, leaves on
December 19 and 21. Return any
time any flight within one year.
Phone Mr. Paul Bourke for further   information.   521-6496.
A.M.S. CHARTER FLIGHT TICK-
et for sale —■ one way only —
London to Vane. Aug. 25. Phone
Derek 224-9769.
A REVEALING FILM ON THE
new Communist China today In
the Auditorium. 50c. Six showings.
AUTOMOTIVE   &  MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
FOR SALE. 1962 M.G.A., BLACK,
glass slide windows, $1,260.88.
733-4858.
1950 PLYMOUTH. GOOD. CONDI-
tion. Recent engine overhaul.
Radio.   Offers.   738-8180   after   6.
1964 TRIUMPH SPITFIRE: RE-
built engine, radio, new tires, one
year guarantee. Only $1,050. Ph.
224-6857.
1952 HILLMAN MINX 22,000 MILES
guaranteed. New paint, tires.
Good engine, trans. Call Bob
324-0600.
EXCELLENT BUY — 1963 DAT-
sun Sports Mechanic owned. Must
sell. Leaving for Australia $1000.
Phone day 521-1700. Nite WE 9-
5333.
1958   FORD
FAIRLANE  500
4-DOOR   HARDTOP
$200.00
Auto.  Transmission, Power Steering,
Radio,  Heater,  Snow Tires.   (Now
for the  catch)   Car  won't  run   as
it needs a ring job.
Call AM 1-6841 after 8:30 p.m.  or
all day Saturday.	
FOR SALE 1952 MORRIS, ONE
owner 30,000 original miles. $150.
Phone 224-4788 after 5.
Accessories 8c Repairs
22
IMPORTED CAR PARTS! SPORTS
car accessories! Metric tools! Get
them all  at:
OVERSEAS    AUTO    PARTS
12th   &   Alma 736-9804
(10%    Student   Discount)
Automobiles Wanted
25
BUSINESS   SERVICES
Miscellaneous
34
Scandals
39A
TAKE A PEEP UNDER THE
Bamboo Curtain today in the
Auditorium. 50c. See display ad
for showtimes.
Typing
43
Professional Typing
ARDALE   GRIFFITHS   LIMITED
70th   &  Granillevwwvvvvsbb A R
70th   &  Granville  Street        263-4530
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
FEMALE OFFICE MANAGER RE-
quired for UBC Alumni Association to supervise a small office
staff and manage all aspects of
office operation: — accounting —
stock — payroll — mass mailing
—■ records. Address all applications In writing to: Mr. Tim Hollick-Kenyon, Alumni Director, 252
Brock Hall, U.B.C, Vancouver,
B.C.
FEMALE:     APPLICATIONS    ARE
invited  for position  of
PROGRAM   DIRECTOR
of the
UBC    ALUMNI    ASSOCIATION
This   position   requires   a   young,
energetic    person    to    service    a
v^ide range of alumni committees
and programs, on a full-time year
round  basis.  This person,   preferably a UBC graduate, must have
organizational  skills,  and be  able
to work under pressure.  Applications In writing to: Mr. Tim Hollick-Kenyon, Alumni Director, 252
Brock  Hall,  LTBC,  Vancouver 8.
OFFICE MANAGER
MALE: REQUIRED FOR UBC
Alumni Association to supervise
a small office staff and manage
all aspects of office operation:—
accounting — stock payroll —
mass mailings — records. Address
all applications in writing to: Mr.
Tim Hollick-Kenyon, Alumni Director, 252 Brock Hall, U.B.C,
Vancouver 8.
HELP! HARRASED MOTHER OF
4 small boys urgently requires
help. Two half-days per week.
$1.25  per hour.   Phone  224-1297.
BABYSITTER TUESDAY-THURS-
day afternoon weekly. 14th and
Sasamat $2.50 per 4 hour afternoon. CA 4-5042.
Music
63
CHINESE FOLK MUSIC WILL BE
heard in Felix Greens "China"
today. Auditorium. Six showings"
50c.  See display ad  in  this paper.
INSTRUCTION
SCHOOLS
Instruction-Tutoring
64
ENGLISH, FRENCH, HISTORY
lessons by tutor, B.A., M.A.,
B.L.S. Also pronunciation lessons in French, Spanish, German, Russian, qualified tutors.
736-6923.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR  SALE
71
BIRD CALLS—the most useful book
on the campus. Student telephone
directory available. Now. Limited
Number. Buy now, only 75 cents
from Publications Office, Brock
Hall,   or  the  Bookstore.	
STUDENT COUNCIL HAS VOTED
to discontinue Campus Life so
we are selling 1964, 1965 and 1966
issues for only 50 cents — Publications office in Brock.
FOR SALE: 2-SPEED TAPE RE-
corder $45.00; several 5-tube electric radios $9.95 each. Phone TR
4-5025. 	
ROBERTS 1600 RECORDER, Philips
portable record player, Pentax
35 mm camera; as new. Bryan,
after   6   p.m.   261-2831.	
LEAVING FOR EUROPE MUST
SELL!! Ladie's dresses coats
British Woolens. Call Carol sizes
9-12-14.   685-7765.	
TWO PAIRS LADY'S SKI BOOTS
size  six  to  seven  phone   261-7026.
FOR    SALE    LARGE    OAK   DESK
top with legs.  738-7400.
RENTALS   & REAL  ESTATE
Rooms
81
FOR RENT TO MALE STUDENT:
Single basement room near University Gates; basement entrance
and bathroom; $30 monthly. 224-
4209  evenings.	
FOR RENT: FURNISHED ROOM
and bathroom facilities. Close to
gates. Female pref. Call 224-4088
(after  4:30   p.m.).	
TWO SINGLE BEDROOMS $30
each $45 with breakfast, close to
everything. Mrs. Mainfroid, 2210
Macdonald.Phone   733-2069.	
ROOM AND HOME PRIVILEGES
for one student. Three blocks
from  bus.  CA 4-5905.
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD PLUS JOVIAL
companionship at Zeta Psi Fraternity House. Reasonable rates.
Phone Sandy Sandilands 224-0897
or 224-9662   after five  p.m.
Furn. Houses 8e Apts.
83
WANTED SR. FEMALE STUDENT
to share apartment. Quiet non-
smoker with two of same. Phone
731-8832 after 10 p.m. Granville
and Mathews, car pool.
CLASSIFIED
BUY  -  SELL  -   RENT
WITH
UBYSSEY

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