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The Ubyssey Jan 27, 1984

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^jBC Archives Serial
o
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVI,No.31
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, January 27,1984
:-&«■ 48
228-2301
Beijing
University:     J
getting by
in China's elite
X'">
'4
r
MAO...statue guards entrance to Beijing University Library.
By ROSS MEEK
Canadian University Press
Lin Fushao lives in a damp, 10 by 16 cement-floored room with
five other women and some rats. Bottles, dishes, books, clothes, in fact
all the worldly belongings of six people overflow the one shelf, two tiny
tables, and six bunks. Lin must carry her own dishes to the cafeteria,
purchase food with ration tickets and return to her room to eat. The
cafeteria has no space for tables and no money for dishes. After a 10
hour day, Lin falls asleep surrounded by mosquito netting with only a
thin quilt between her and a wooden mattress.
Lin Fushao is an elite student attending China's premier university, Beijing Daxve (Peking University).
Any Canadian student would be appalled
at these living conditions, and certainly
distressed by the academic facilities. Only
two at a time can study in the dorm, others
must line up outside the library a half an hour
before it opens, hoping to find a seat.
Books are held in locked stacks. Students
can borrow only those books that apply to
their field — by appealing to the overworked,
unsympathetic librarian.
Lectures are constanly interrupted as stray
students walk back and forth through the
classrooms. Revolutionary exercise music
plays periodically over loudspeakers outside,
drowning out the professor.
Yet to some 10,000 students at Beida (an
abbreviation for Beijing University), this is
the best of all possible worlds. They are
among the highest class in a classless society.
"A few years ago, thinkers and scholars
were 'stinkers'; today, they are desperately
needed," said Theodore White in a recent article in Time Magazine. In the wake of the
Cultural Revolution, a decade of chaos bet
ween 1966 and 1976, the aging communist
leaders now know they must find young
talent to carry forward their tired government. They must create a new mandarin class
of scholars and bureaucrats to administer
their experiment in modernization.
Who are these new mandarins? And, what
role will they play in their country's future?
For the new mandarin, dawn breaks early.
It is 5:30 a.m. and a heavy haze hangs over
the tree tops. The sun has yet to break
through but the campus is alive with morning
exercise. It is strangely quiet. Individuals
beside the path, or on the dusty knolls perform the ancient art of Tai Chi. The slippered shuffle of joggers rounding the lake is
deadened in the still air.
This early morning ritual provides
breathing space, and a mental escape from
the regular crowds of 25,000 residents on the
50 acre campus.
Zhang Bofan finishes his breakfast of rice
gruel, preserved dofu, ammonia risen bread
with bean curd, and collects his books for
class. He is a geography graduate student
specializing in quantitative methods.
As Zhang approaches his class down the
poorly lit hall of the dilapidated Russian
Language building, four young women giggle
and chatter like elementary school students.
He impresses them. He has been selected to
study at Stanford University next year. A
great honour.
To receive this opportunity, Zhang holds
important qualifications.
He is near the top of his class. He speaks
English well. And most importantly, he is a
member of the Communist Party. Proud of
his accomplishment, he feels "40 per cent
Western."
Yet when visiting Canadian students show
him a women's fashion magazine he is silent
and blushes at the lingerie ads. Later, overcoming his shyness, he asks how they know
which costume is for sunbathing and which is
for underclothes.
Zhang's female classmate Xu Meidong
dresses in thick blue cotton pants, a plain
polyester blouse, a blue cotton jacket and
sandles. Emerging from her American
literature class she walks toward the campus
shop and bookstore.
She passes other students playing tennis
below Mao's statue. The statue marks the entrance to China's largest university library.
She walks through a parking lot filled with
200 Flying Pigeon bicycles — Beijing's main
mode of personal transport. Rounding an
old, discarded, rusty boiler marking a fork in
the footway, Xu enters the store.
The large single room is dimly lit by a str
ing of florescent tubes. The cement floor is
ringed with display counters and shelves. Attendants chatter in the corner and pay scant
attention to the exasperated students, who
are trying to get their attention.
The store offers everything from pencils
and paper to cookies, thermoses, hats and
slippers. A Beida T-shirt is seventy-five cents
(Canadian), or less depending on the size.
Pop is eight cents, shoes two dollars. No tax.
Xu needs a pen and notebook. A cheap
pen is fifty cents. This is a major purchase on
Hsu's twenty-five dollar a month government
allowance. From this she must pay for
everything but board. As a student she is not
allowed to work in the summer and save
money.
Another student, Ding Bilan, is fortunate
to lunch at the foreign students cafeteria with
her Canadian friends, 22 students from
UBC's geography department. The UBC
students are spending six weeks of their summer at Beida in the first student exchange
with China at the departmental level.
This cafeteria has tables with dishes and
chopsticks, and is attended by serving girls.
During the conversation, Ding fills up on the
rich food that is unavailable to regular
students. She gestures with her chopsticks,
and her pigtails bob up and down while she
searches for the correct English words to
describe her country's customs.
Explaining the superior treatment of
foreign students Ding says, "it is our
tradition to treat our guests with the best
See page 7: CHINESE Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 27, 1984
THE
SHADOW BOX
by Michael Cristofer
Directed by Claire Brown
JANUARY 31-FEBRUARY 4
(Jan. 30 Preview Benefit)
8:30 p.m.
Sat.Mat./Feb. 4 @ 5:00 pm
Student Tickets: $4.00
Box Office Room 207
Frederic Wood Theatre
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So we're offering a special incentive to
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DRI 8400 Friday, January 27, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Fear of foreigners boosts tuition
By ROBERT BEYNON
UBC introduced differential fees
for foreign students because of
public and political pressure, rather
than financial need, two board of
governors admitted this week.
"Differential fees won't provide
much money," administration
president George Pedersen said
Monday.
The provincial government sent a
letter  last   fall  to  the  university
Gage cools
students
By MARK NIELSEN
Students in Gage residence who
have been without hot water for
months are not likely to wake to a
warm shower in the near future.
Residence administrators say the
chance that the improved hot water
system will work is only 30 per cent.
The current system cannot cope
with demand for hot water in the
mornings when most residents
want to shower. So maintenance
crews are making adjustments
costing $11,000.
Students started to complain
about the lack of hot water a few
weeks before Christmas, said
residence facilities manager Ken
Simpson.
Housing sent a questionnaire
about the problem to residents in
late November prompting administrators to examine the faulty
system within a month.
But the project was delayed during the Christmas break because
maintenace crews had to concentrate on repairing the heating
system at Acadia Camp, leaving
residents in the cold.
Students living in Gage are still
complaining, a month later.
"It takes about 20 minutes to
wash the shampoo out of your
hair,'' said Kelly Lawson, commerce 2.
"It turns cold in about five to ten
seconds," said Keith Haler, science
4.
Instead of replacing the entire
system at a cost of $25,000, the
crews are adjusting the present
system. The boiler, formerly heated
by water, will be heated by steam. If
this system fails, another heating
system will be put in place, starting
in May 1984.
Simpson said the problem is due
to changes in the bathing habits of
the students.
outlining its support for differential
fees, Pedersen said. This pressure
prompted the board to set fees for
foreign students to 1.5 times higher
than those of Canadian students at
its Jan. 17 meeting.
Margaret Copping, retiring student board representative, said the
revenues generated will only raise
about one-third of one per cent of
UBC's $18 million expected deficit.
Only 257 students — one per cent
of UBC's total undergraduate
population — are foreign students,
she said.
The public pressured the universi
ty to implement the differential fees
because of misconceptions, she
said.
"I'm sure a great deal of pressure
comes from, if not racism, then
xenophobia (fear of foreigners)."
When the public is economically
strapped, people become wary of
"UH OH! CAPTAIN KIRK, I've forgotten rny mental wave decoder again at the Enterprise!"
materializing on left. "That's okay Spock. I don't think we'll need it this time," says Captain Kirk on
see a typical true blue (and red and white) AMS politico saunter by. "You're right!" responds Spock
Scotty, there's no sign of intelligent life here," they cry in unison.
says Spock,
right as they
"Beam us up
Enrolment limits alarm school principals
By VICTOR WONG
Lower mainland high school
principals are worried some
graduates will not be accepted into
UBC next year because of the
recently imposed first year enrolment restrictions.
"What some principals are concerned about is the degree of uncertainty over the minimum average
required for admission," said
Dante Lupini, Vancouver school
board superintendent and UBC
senator.
"Obviously, a Ct average may
not be good enough anymore."
Calling the enrolment restriction
of 3,250 first year students "immoral," many high school principals said students planning to attend UBC now are thinking of going to community   colleges.
"Students who are getting C's
and B's are going to be left out in
the cold because of this," said Bob
Knowles, Maple Ridge Secondary
school principal.
"I'm afraid they're going to have
to go to one of the community colleges such as Douglas College or
Langara first before trying to enter
UBC at the second vear level."
John Oliver principal Robert
Brett said the restriction is creating
a feeling of apprehension among his
students.
"I understand that when the
B.C. government cuts the funding
to the university, fees will naturally
go up and enrolment will have to be
cut somehow. But some of my
students are worried they're not going to get in, and they wouldn't
have any worries if there was no
limit."
St George's principal Alan
Brown said the enrolment restrictions discriminate against schools
Research vote ends
Today is the last day for UBC students to vote in a referendum on
arms research.
The referendum calls for the administration to ban nuclear, chemical, biological, and outer space weapons research on campus and to
establish an ethics committee to evaluate all UBC research.
But while students go to the polls, the administration refuses to
comment on the issue.
Asked if the administration will heed the recommendations of the
referendum, vice-president academic Robert Smith said: "Next
you'll ask me if I beat my wife."
Smith refused to comment further, saying Peter Larkin, associate
vice-president of research, already responded publicly in a Jan. 20
letter to The Ubyssey.
Rick Spratley, research services office director, also declined to
elaborate on the issue or the 12 defense research projects outlined in
the letter.
"I'm in charge of deciding whai kind of research is allowed and I
•■•von't approve an> research *hat hasn't the right to pualish," he said.
with higher standards. "What may
be a low grade in one school may be
a high grade in another."
Brown said the university should
institute some form of entrance examination to eliminate this bias.
"We think the provincial government exams (covering 50 per cent or
more of a student's grade) will be a
help. Students here do better on the
government exams than our own
exams."
But some first year professors at
UBC said the limit will make classes
easier to manage. English department head Ian Ross said the limit
will increase the quality of education in English 100, a requirement
for all first year UBC students.
"Given that we have no more
resources, the limit has definite
benefits. We can handle a section of
23 students or less, and class
discipline would be easy. Anything
over 25 would be less easy."
Art one coordinator Roger
Seamon said the restriction was a
political move by the university. "I
think this is being directed towards
the government and towards those
people who want their kids to go to
UBC."
students not Canadian born using
the university system, she added.
Every time Pedersen appears an
open line T.V. show, this attitude
presents itself in the form of questions about why foreign students
receive support, she said.
The board complied with student
board representative Dave Frank's
suggestion that fees only be raised
1.5 times, not 2.5 times because it
realized the pressure is political,
Copping added.
But board chair David McLean, a
social Credit appointee, said Thursday neither public or political
pressure influenced the board's
decision.
"It was a question of equity."
The board looked at UBC's
financial problems and decided to
increase revenue or decrease expenditures wherever possible, he said.
"How can they say the fees are
racist when they deal with foreign
students from English-speaking
countries like Britain and the
U.S.?" MacLean asked.
Pedersen also said the fees are
not racist.
UBC faster
finishes 40
day ordeal
By CHARLIE FIDELMAN
Politicians ignored him and an
engineer mocked him, but Andre
Sobolewski who ended his 40 day
fast for human rights Thursday
claims his protest succeeded.
Despite letters and attempts to arrange meetings with government officials about the lack of human
rights protection in B.C., not one
cabinet minister or MLA contacted
Sobolewski or acknowledged
receiving his letters until the benefit
lunch held on Day 31 of his fast.
The liquid lunch prompted labor
minister Bob McClelland to offer to
meet Sobolewski last week. But McClelland failed to make further arrangements.
"I was hoping I could touch my
own MLA Garde Gardom, anyone
involved, cabinet ministers, but
heard only, 'I'm too busy, we'll talk
later,' " he said.
"It's sad for British Columbians
that the people elected to represent
us won't even listen."
Sobolewski said his intention was
to apply political pressure to the
government and he considered sitting outside the Victoria legislature
until officials spoke to him.
But he said he remained in Vancouver because he wants the
government to act out of a desire
for true human rights, not out of
political expediency.
"If you stand up for what you
believe, eventually you will
triumph. Unfortunately, eventually
can take a long time and involves
much suffering."
Sobolewski's fast concluded with
another media gathering at the
Lutheran campus centre, which included members of the B.C. human
rights coalition, the UBC campus
community alliance and students
against the budget.
"I feel good about what I've
done, I stood up for my beliefs
from a spiritual understanding of
what human rights are. And I hope
that my personal strength could
pass on to others to strive to right
what is wrong," he said.
"The torch must be passed on to
achieve a just society without suffering."
Sobolewski, who lost 10 kilos,
will remain at the Lutheran centre
until he regains his strength. He will
recover under the care of a dietician
who will supervise the reiniroduc
tion of food into his system. He wiil
then return to his graduate studies
in biologv. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 27,1984
McGeer unshaken
by dip in quality
By PATTI FLATHER
Have no fear — universities
minister Pat McGeer isn't worried.
He says the quality of UBC's
education need not decline due to
its financial crisis.
"Quality of education depends
on   the   quality   of   professor,"
McGeer   said   Monday.   He   cited
UBC   faculty  wage  increases  two
"ars ago which supposedly made
iem the highest paid in Canada as
n example.
"If money is what counts, UBC
should have the best faculty in the
world."
But faculty association president
David Pavlich disagreed. "It's not
true. Even if it were true, it couldn't
continue to be true."
Pavlich said UBC is the only
university in North America to
freeze its faculty's wages this year.
"Every other group of faculty
got increases. Some of them fairly
high," he added.
McGeer and UBC's faculty have
had continuous quarrels about
faculty wages, Pavlich said.
David Balzarini, chair of the
economic benefits committee of the
Canadian Association of University
Teachers, said of McGeer: "He
makes statements of this sort quite
frequently. It's not unusual for
politicians to make statements
without having their facts straight.
"Even two years ago UBC faculty weren't the best paid in Canada,
but they should be better paid than
most in Canada, Balzarini said.
"Nobody would argue that UBC
and the university of Toronto aren't
the two best universities in
Canada." He added that faculty of
mediocre universities are better paid
than those at UBC.
"Even in Manitoba where the
cost of living is much lower, salaries
are as high as UBC."
Balzarini said McGeer may be
looking at particular figures and
not the whole situation. UBC's
average faculty salary might be
bloated because of its professional
schools, he said.
"Many of these disciplines bring
up our average salary."
Balzarini predicted morale
among academics and quality of
education will suffer as a result of
the freeze.
"UBC's status has increased in
the last 20 years. Certainly it'll go
the other way if this keeps up," he
said.
Balzarini argued faculty salaries
across Canada have fallen in the last
10 years compared to the average
industrial wage.
"The average academic can expect to make less than
school teachers or tradespeople."
He said universities have stopped
growing. Each year the average age
of an academic increases and the
average salary should represent a
more experienced faculty, but
salaries don't reflect this shift, he
said.
"I could probably make more as
a mechanic."
ARTS
UNDERGRADUATE
SOCIETY
GENERAL MEETING
3:30 - 4 p.m. Feb. 3/84
BUCH. LOUNGE
Posting of new Constitution
Followed by refreshments
WESTERN
MBA
School of Business Administration
The University of Western Ontario
London, Ontario, Canada N6A 3K7
Professor E.F. Peter Newson,
Chairman, MBA Program,
will Host a Discussion
of the Western MBA Program
DATE: February 2, 1984
TIME: 6:00 to 9:00 p.m.
PLACE: Bayshore Hotel
ROOM NUMBER: Please check at the front desk
ADDRESS: 1601 West Georgia Street
Vancouver, B.C.
Anyone Interested in Discussing
The Western MBA Program is
Invited to Attend.
FREE BOOK OFFER*
GROWING TO SERVE
ANNUAL CANADIAN
STUDENT CONVENTION
JANUARY 27-28
(Friday 6 pm - 9 pm; Saturday 8:30 am - 9 pm)
Held at Royal Heights Baptist Church, 11706-96th Ave. Delta, B.C.
SPECIAL APPEARANCE:
FAYE BURGESS
Blind Vocalist & Pianist from Nashville, Ten. on Friday night
at 6:30 and Sat. 7 p.m.
Program:   Discipleship;   Leadership;   Marriage  Preparation;
Christian Growth; Christian Vocation; Mission and more.
for ride, meet at Bank of Montreal banking machine entrance at
SUB at 4:30 pm Friday. Come and meet students from other provinces.
*BRING THIS AD TO CONVENTION AND
RECEIVE    A    $8    WORTH    BOOK    ON
DISCIPLESHIP
FREE
(Friday night only)
Sponsored by Baptist Student Union - U.B.C. Friday, January 27, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Government waffles on student aid decision
By GORDON CLARK
The provincial government has
not yet announced what it plans to
change in the present student grant
program, and as students and
university administrators await patiently, all the government will say
SOCREDS
dump aid.
is   that   it   has   an   "iron-clad"
commitment to student aid.
Although the government refuses
to say how the changes will be implemented, there are three suggested scenarios.
• The government may scrap the
entire program and ingest the funding set aside for it.
ANALYSIS
• A provincial loan program
could be set up to reinforce the current federal program.
• The money could be sent to
the universities and colleges for
them to use for bursaries.
UBC awards office director
Byron Hender said he was aware of
these possibilities, but pointed out
the government may not change the
program at all. He also discounted
the possibility the Socreds would
cancel the whole program.
"There seems to be two alternatives. To continue with the present program, or to have a prvincial
program on top of a federal program," he said.
Hender doubts that the govern
ment will set up the program by
September. He said the banks are
already unhappy with the student
loan program, and a lead time
would be required for proper consultation with banks and credit
unions before a new program could
be implemented.
Hender and other are concerned
that changes .to student aid would
have a disastrous effect on university accessibility, especially for
students from low income families,
and those who leave home to attend
school.
Canadian Federation of Students
pacific region chair Stephen Leary
said one third of students in the
province use student aid.
"The changes mean the rich get
to go and the poor can stay on
unemployment insurance," he said.
Additionally, low income
students are less comfortable with
the loans, and they shun them,
Leary said.
Hender said an analysis had
shown that students who took out
the largest available loan this year
would owe $10,000 at graduation.
If the government removes the
grant allowance from student aid,
that sum could more than double,
Cooperative Christian
Campus Ministry
(Anglican-United Student Christian Movement)
"How to Read the Bible as if it really Mattered" — Led by George Hermanson.
To sign up, phone 224-3722. Starts Mon., 12:30 p.m.
Wed. Night Pot Lucks, 6 p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre
Program: Baptism & Eucharist — World Council Study
The Campus Centre has room for you to eat your lunch — study — just be out of
the rain. You don't have to take part in any activity or be part of any group to
use the Centre.
Fri., Jan. 27 12:30 p.m.
Eucharist to Celebrate end of Andre's fast.
6 Months Warranty
6,000 miles
Very Competitive Rates
WE
ALSO
DO BODY
WORK
ERIC'S BUG STOP
n 1505 West 3rd 731-8171
(umm •■anvilu si. ■■»•■)
Finance minister Hugh Curtis,
major contributor on the intended
award program alteration is consistently unavailable for comment.
A deputy minister stated that it was
not his job to be quoted by the
press.
Education ministry information officer Dick Melville has said
repeatedly that any decision to
change the grant program is a
political matter that is only discussed in the cabinet.
"We hope that they make a decision soon," he said. "It isn't fair on
students and institutions."
Leary urged students to organize
against any new changes to the
grant program. He thinks the
government is using the same old
arguments to take yet another step
away from their responsibility to
education.
"The   government   makes   you
throw up. They talk of high tech
and then cut back in education," he
"said.
COMING SOON
Rt. Rev. Stephen Barham
PH.D
LECTURE SERIES
Psyohology
and the Bible
Feb. 28 - March 2
at noon hours
Charismatic Christian Fellowship
Maranatha Christian Club
+ QUALITY
+ AVAILABILITY
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Queen's University at Kingston
Master of
Business
Administration
Queen's University at Kingston offers a modern,
discipline-based approach to the study of management in
the complex organizations of today and tomorrow. The
learning atmosphere in the School of Business *s lively,
informal, intimate and flexible. Persons from almost all
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Financial assistance is, available.
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X    Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6
Please send information concerning Queen's MBA to
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Program Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 27,1984
INTRAMURAL STAR
Intramural Office
Room 203
War Memorial Gym
'^v
* TOP UNITS TO JANUARY 20, 1984 *
MEN
Pts         WOMEN
Pts
1. Engineers
3785           1. Forestry
2100
2. Phi Delts
2789          2. Phrateres
1841
3. Dekes
2268           3.  Engineeresses
1599
4. Forestry
1683          4. Nursing
1243
5. Betas
1593           5. Phys. Ed.
1116
6. Fijis
1357          6. Pharmacy
610
7. Chariots of Manure
941           7. Education
573
8. Alpha Delta Phi
866           8. Alpha Gamma Delta
544
9. St. Andrews
858           9. Agriculture
543
10. Science
814         10.  Rowing
543
WHAT A CHALLENGE!
i'Jfe ■ .^SXIIIlill::-:'''':-*:'"
.   A&4-A ^v^^^J^:if^^^^^Ay^'^A'--
The 3rd ANNUAL UBC INTRAMURAL GROUSE
MOUNTAIN SKI CHALLENGE was a roaring success,
due to the efforts of the UBC Ski Team and the Salomon
Ski Company.
Bright sunshine and crisp snow conditions greeted the
racers as they negotiated their way down a dual slalom
course. Each racer had two timed runs, and were eligible
to place in one of three categories — novice, intermediate
or advanced. All the racers managed to complete their
runs, — backwards, forwards, upright . . . any way they
could!
Following a well organized and eventful day on the
mountain, everyone enjoyed an awards presentation, a
buffet dinner and dancing by the fireside, at the Canyon
Gardens Restaurant. Be sure to wax your skis for next
year's INTRAMURAL SKI CHALLENGE!
3rd ANNUAL GROUSE MTN.
SKI CHALLENGE RESULTS
NOVICE - WOMEN
TIMES
1st
Sharon Young
E.U.S. (Minor2
) 29.24,
29.31
58.55
2nd
Colleen Pew
Alpha Delta Pi
29.96,
30.50
60.46
3rd
Gillin Watt
Agriculture
28.53,
32.75
6.28
NOVICE - MEN
1st
Colin Chin
Phys. Ed.
29.71,
30.28
59.99
2nd
Rod Samson
Phi Delts
30.16,
30.31
60.47
3rd
Paul Fang
Sigma Chi
39.24,
42.20
81.44
INTERMEDIATE - WOMEN
1st
Sue Sherbaniuk
Phys. Ed.
29.93,
28.90
58.83
2nd
Heather Snell
Phys. Ed.
30.36,
28.67
59.03
3rd
Diane Farrel
Phrateres
29.93,
30.06
59.99
INTERMEDIATE - MEN
1st
Mike Serink
Phi Delts
23.77,
32.49
47.26
2nd
Neil Munroe
Engineering
23.76,
23.59
47.35
3rd
Ross Laird
Phi Delts
24.16,
23.38
47.54
ADVANCED - WOMEN
1st
Martina Rust
Ski Club
24.41,
24.90
49.31
2nd
Deb Delong
Forestry
24.17,
25.44
49.61
3rd
Lise Gawthrop
Ski Club
26.22,
26.59
52.81
ADVANCED - MEN
1st
Mike MacDougall
Sigma Chi
21.41,
21.26
42.67
2nd
Kent Rideout
Recreation
22.43,
23.02
45.45
3rd
Tom Broddy
E.U.S. (Minorz) 22.95,
22.67
45.62
* SPORTS TIDBITS *
LEISURE SPORTS
Co-Rec Broomball Night was a complete success this past week. Over twenty
teams competed throughout the evening, completely occupying the Winter
Sports Center. The event was full of laughs, good times and competitive broom-
ball. In the end, the Alpha Gamma Delta / Dekes 1 team emerged victorious.
The Co-Rec Volleyball League began Sunday at Osborne. There are ten teams
who play every Sunday afternoon. Let's see if CSA will play up to their winning
performance of last term! For great action, come out and watch Co-Rec
Volleyball at Osborne, Sundays from 3:30 p.m.-5:30 p.m.
The drop-in times are back again. Drop-in Badminton is Tuesday nights,
6:30-8:30 p.m. and Sundays from 6-8 p.m. at Osborne. Drop-in Volleyball is
Thursday nights from 4:30-9:30 p.m. at War Memorial Gym, and Sundays from
8-10 p.m. at Osborne.
Come out to practice your skills and meet new friends with Intramurals!
RUN WITH INTRAMURALS
Despite the c-c-cold weather, 150 runners participated in the FROSTBITE
RUN, on Friday, January 20, 1984. The winners were:
MEN WOMEN
STEVE McMURDO ROSALIND PENTY
6.5 km - 22.03.8 - Phi Delts 6.5 km - 26.38.0 - Forestry
TIM RICHARDSON KAREN KELLY
3 km - 13.38.0 - Gerox II 3 km - 16.53.7 Forestry
We are pleased to announce that RUNNER'S WORLD, on West 4th Ave., is
sponsoring the noon hour runs. They are providing us with super KHDDEN
PRIZES every week ... so come out and participate!
* PROGRAM UPDATE *
TRIATHLON II
Cycle 20 miles, swim 1 mile, run 10 miles! Registration and training clinics will
be held prior to the event day — MARCH 1st. All participants MUST attend the
conditioning clinics as they are COMPULSORY.
The next clinic is FEBRUARY 7th, Room 211, W.M.G. at 12:30 p.m. Registration for the Triathlon will occur between FEBRUARY 6-1 Oth. 1984. Anyone who
does not attend the 2nd clinic will be unable to participate! Good luck! (15.00 Entry Fee includes — a pre-event dinner and awards luncheon.)
CENTIPEDE ROAD RUN
Modelled after the San Francisco World Centipede Championships. This unique running race is a team event consisting of 11 plus 1 members for the men and
7 plus 1 members for the women. The team must be assembled (ie., tied
together!) to span 50' for men and 30' for women. The entire run is 7 km for men,
3 km for women. Registration is limited ... so don't wait too long! (Registration
deadline February 3rd.)
EVENT DAY - FEBRUARY 9th. 1984
APRES SKI WEAR!
This season the Intramural Sports
Program is offering comfortable,
casual & colourful sportswear designed to compliment your wardrobe and
to lounge in during the ski season.
Practical sportswear for leisure time
and library study, indoor/outdoor
shirts . . .
ALL AVAILABLE AT
__££.
BOOKSTORE Friday, January 27, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Chinese
hospitality
From page 1
we have. When I told my family that we had
taken you to the student's dining hall, they
blamed me for being 'ridiculous'; for
'whoever heard that guests could be entertained in a student's dining hall?' My grandma likes to tell me about a village tradition: if
one receives a present of cakes or vegetables,
they usually preserve it as long as possible incase any guests might come. They would not
eat the best food themselves. So you see,
there is nothing extraordinary."
Ding's Canadian friend noticed quite a
separation between male and female
students. She asked Ding about her male
classmates. "Where are the boys in my class?
To tell the truth, they are so 'tiny' (both in
size and in ambition) that they escape
our notice. First of all, girls are the majority in my class. Secondly, most of the
girls study harder and are better than the
boys. I do not mean they are not smart. They
are. Only they are not intelligent enough to
bear the title of 'men'. Lastly, girls are more
bold and outspoken. Actually, being of a
more generous sex, we treat them well
enough," explained Ding.
This did not coincide with reports of campus security flushing many young lovers from
the bushes above the small man made lake.
But it did make an interesting contradiction.
Not lucky enough to eat at tables in the
foreign students cafeteria, Lin plods back to
her dorm, dinner in hand. Most of it is eaten
by the time she arrives. She hungrily swallows
the slippery noodles, nibbles the crisp lotus
root, and crunches the deep-fried rice cake.
The scrambled egg and tomato will wait, and
her roommate would bring rice for all to fill
up on after the meal.
Although there is now plenty of food, it
never seems to supply enough energy. The
students tire quickly, probably because their
diet supplies only 1800 calories a day, on
average. A Canadian consumes close to 3000.
Lin smiles and nods at the elderly lady sitting at the entrance to her dorm. She is the
housemother, a Party member, and Lin is
always polite to her.
After her meal Lin must line up, waiting
for the library to reopen after the supper
break. Beida's library is reputed to hold some
three million volumes. Other libraries suffered vandalism during the Cultural Revolution. They were gutted by the Red Guards
and the books sold for fuel. Beida was Mao's
favorite library, so it survived.
When the library doors open, she smiles at
the doorman (also a Party man) and enters to
find a seat in the crowded hall.
During the evening, Zhang has the rare
pleasure of attending a party at the Canadian
students dormitory, a new building with two
students per room.
Checking in with the doorman, he explains
his presence and how long he will stay.
It is a night of laughter, a song and much
talk. The bottle is passed, but like most of the
Chinese, Zhang declines.
Describing his impressions of Canadians,
Zhang honestly replies, "at first, I thought
all you did was play all the time." He then
adds, "but now I think you work so hard,
and play even harder. I don't know how you
keep it up." Indeed, it is after 10 p.m. and he
is exhausted. The calories from tonight's
meal are already spent.
The Canadians are heading out to the bar.
Zhang accompanies them as far as his locked
dorm entrance. The Canadians yell for the
doorman, who comes running, bobbing his
head and smiling outwardly. He gives Zhang
a long look. Zhang will have to explain this
one to his party superior.
The tension between Zhang and the doorman, and Xu's difficulty with the bookstore
attendants and the unsympathetic library
workers are a lingering reminder of the
persecution felt by scholars during the
Cultural Revolution. "Work. Work is
good," says a campus maintenance worker.
This statement has clear overtones suggesting
'my work is good, but what students do is no
good.' He is old and can no longer shift his
values with China's zig-zagging policies.
The tormented decade of the Cultural
Revolution was a time of terror and persecution. It resembled civil war, not culture.
White describes it as a "sweep of terror,
China under the Cultural Revolution was the
equivalent of Nazi Germany. Thugs, Red
Guard bands and  idealists  fought  in the
cities, all rivaling one another to show loyalty
to Mao thought...so millions suffered."
White quotes a one-time student: "'My
brother was at Beijing University; he was
beaten to death; then my mother committed
suicide.' Anyone with an education...could
be sent down...Being 'sent down' or
Xiafang, as the Chinese call it, was a very
simple punishment. 'Stinking intellectuals'
were supposed to learn from the peasants
what life was like when one must stoop for
hours transplanting rice seedlings in the wet
muck."
Students must live in the wake of such
chaos, resentment and persecution. But the
damage has not been just psychological.
Beijing University, like so many other campuses, was converted to factories during the
Cultural Revolution. Thousands of workers
were housed here. Now, because of the severe
housing shortage in Beifing, the administration has been forced to keep these workers.
Some are used as support staff, maintenance
workers, and librarians, but many others still
operate small factories, like the tiny sawmill
outside the foreign students dormitory.
Now after the universities have been closed
for a minimum of 3 years, and some as long
as 10, China is re-establishing the importance
of education. Students and professors have
been restored to a position of esteem. When
some young shce factory workers found out
the Canadians were students, their attitude
changed. Students are important people and
should be treated as such.
China has lost a generation of students,
professors and knowledge. Consequently,
the country has fallen behind, and is struggling to catch up.
Beijing.University's geographical department is still maily concerned with descriptive
techniques, identifying landform regions,
and climatic zones. They did not show off
their equipment. Nanjing University (considered progressive in China) has a computer
centre consisting of one Chinese computer,
and a Radio Shack 'home computer'. The
later is the more impressive.
Yet, there is progress.
Nanjing University has a image projector-
manipulator in its urban studies department.
By buying satellite images from the U.S. they
can plot city expansion and traffic flow.
To quicken their re-education, China has
encouraged exchange with western countries.
On many campuses they have constructed
quality housing for visiting professors and
technical personnel. They also send an increasing number of professors and graduate
students abroad. But as yet, mainly because
of financial difficulties, undergraduates have
been restricted from studying abroad.
They want western knowledge put prefer
to limit the inflow of western culture.
Still, the odd student wears jeans and western
style sneakers. This is especially prevalent in
the south, where ties to the central government are stretched thin.
Despite all their hardships, the Chinese
students are intelligent, ambitious, and surprisingly patriotic.
When Fang Zhou Min tried to enter
university she had to be better than average.
All students must pass difficult entrance exams to get one of the few available openings.
But many also have help from parents
holding prominent positions in the government, the Party or the military. Fang does
not have these advantages. Fang is from
Suzhou where her father is a tea tester. She
enjoys living in the dorms because they are
more spacious than home. When she returns
home for the summer, she must travel 30
hours by train on a wooden seat where often
more tickets than seats are sold.
This American literature student exemplifies all the best qualities of Chinese
students. At 23 she has just been appointed
instructor at a prominent university.
Bubbly yet reserved, her quick wit reveals
her keen mind. She took great fun in disarming people in games of repartee and counter,
even in English. Fang's personality is lively
and bright, it pulls you in.
But her patience is limited. When the conversation slows or she finds a more interesting discussion, she is gone.
Yet she is generous. She loves giving,
whether explanations of her country or small
gifts that she can ill afford.
With serious conviction she considers her
country and her future. This is very appropriate since they will be wrapped up
together. Fang explains, "Leaving home is an
unbearable thing to me, and yet it is good for
my future. My future is not so ideal, but I
can say it's very plain. Perhaps life is not so
romantic as we think — many young people
dream someday they will become very important men in the world. Anyhow, I want to
contribute my tiny energy to my people."
In a country where no one chooses their
own job, and where university graduates
make up less than two per cent of the population, she is off to a good start.
Like Fang, many of China's university
students will become instructors. These new
mandarins are the first of a new breed. If
China can control it's radical political shifts
and prevent another Cultural Revolution
these students will be the first string in
China's fight to modernize. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, Jc
Gun Club shot blanks
By PETER BERLIN
Trashy was the only word to
describe the Gun Club concert at
the Commodore last Thursday.
This may not be a bad thing
because some believe trash is
modern America's only original art-
form. Certainly Jeffrey Lee Pierce
and the band gave every sign that
they belong to that school of
thought.
The band apparently drove sixteen   hours   non-stop   from   their
native Los Angeles and arrived in'
Vancouver just in time for the concert, with Pierce feeling very ill.
This might explain their lifeless
performance and the obviously out-
of-tune guitars for most of the
show. It would also explain Pierce's
painfully flat singing and his refusal
to move around the stage at all or
otherwise expend any more energy
than was absolutely necessary.
On the other hand true trash connoisseurs in the crowd insisted that
in their previous show in Vancouver
Gun Club had been, oh ecstasy,
even worse!
The band performed some of
their best known album tracks including Fire of Love, Death Party
and Love Ivy, though it was difficult to tell whether they were trying to send them up or do them to
death.
It is also alleged that they covered
jazzman John Coltrane's seminal
piece Love Supreme, though why
on earth these hard core punkers
should want to do a thing like that
is difficult to fathom — perhaps it
was out of malevolence.
The concert was a pity because
Gun Club's records are universally
excellent and they are one of North
America's most popular post-new
wave bands.
It was also tough on promoter
Peter Carr who keeps bringing important non-commercial bands to
Vancouver only for them to pan out
live. Last summer's Burning Spear
gig is an example.
The back up band was Vancouver's very own punk throwback
House of Commons who played for
50 minutes but would have been
twice as good if they'd played half
as long.
Dance reveals joy and pain
By ALESSANDRA CALLEGARINI
Daniel Leveille, the fascinating
young choreographer known for his
thought-provoking and sometimes
shocking dance creations, lived up
to his reputation with his recent performance at Firehall Theatre.
Leveille, from Montreal, creates'
controversial dances which deal
with social taboos such as homosexuality, nudity, incest, voyeurism
and violence.
Daniel Leveille
Firehall Theatre
But such daring has made him the
recipient of the Jacqueline Lemieux
Choreography Award and top place
in the Montreal Place des Arts
choreography contest in 1982.
The uniting theme of the three
works presented at the Firehall is
the lack of communication in our
society. The focus of the evening
was on Leveille's acclaimed
choreography of Igor Stravinsky's
Le Sacre du Printemps. The work
represents the two or three days it
would take for the deadly radiation
of an atomic bomb dropped in
Europe to reach North America.
Yet the audience is unaware of this
meaning.
The tortuous, relentless
movements of the four dancers
(Ginette Laurin, Johanne Madore,
Janet Oxley and Gilles Simard)
seem to convey to the audience the
treadmill-like and uncommunicative existence that many
people live.
The dancers are dressed androgynously in black jumpsuits
with black gloves and skull caps,
and they continually move in circles
— never looking at or getting close
to one another.
Stravinsky's music arranged for
two pianos assaults the listener. The
dancers move like robots to
rhythms, slapping the floor with
their feet, holding their heads and
interacting periodically only with
the walls of the stage. Their faces
are unhappy and their bodies are
awkward; difficult dance technique
SIMARD, LAURIN...dancers find voice, say nothing.
is limited to pirouettes and attitude
turns.
The piece is agonizingly long and
ultimately drains the viewer. One is
tempted to call the work
monotonous yet the feeling of the
work stays with you, a sign that
Leveille is successful.
The other two works also deal
with the lack of communication
between people, but they are portrayed with humour.
"My favourite topic is an emotional and sensual relationship between people and the difficulties of
that relationship," says Leveille. "I
choose an emotion and I create a
theatrical setting showcasing it: real
life is the source of my choreographies."
But I Love You is a work focusing on a couple (Laurin and
Simard) and all the situations and
emotions they experience.
Leveille takes a radical departure
from conventional modern dance
by allowing the dancers to speak.
The couple finds it easiest to communicate by talking on the
telephone, yet they always miss one
another. And to make maters
worse, they speak in four different
languages.
In between all the humorous
theatrics, the dancers perform some
wonderfully graceful leaps and catches.
Keeping with the themes of the
other works, Ecris-moi n'importe
quio! depicts three characters
struggling to endure the pains and
joy in life. Again, the three
characters (Laurin, Simard and Jacques Lussier) speak in many different languages, mainly expressing
their unrequited love and their own
frustration. They all shriek and giggle uncontrollably while running
and falling haphazardly around the
stage. Whenever they approach one
another, they voice the inherent sexual tension with curious groans.
This work is perhaps the most
difficult of the three to interpret
and yet it is the most understandable because the audience
recognizes itself in all the crazy antics, which form the root of the
work's humour.
Like the other works, there are
no high kicks and flashy technique
in this dance — Leveille clearly
prefers a more theatrical style.
Despite the humour, Leveille's
choreographies examine the
depressing aspects of individuals.
This is well expressed in the last
work when Laurin spits on herself
and Lussier exclaims that he is only
walking around in circles so he
might as well roll in his own shit and
spit. Daniel Leveille's choreographies definitely make the viewer
stop and think.
TERENCE KELLY...faces death on w
Climbers fact
By CHARLIE FIDELMAN
The highest peak in the northernmost part of the Himalayas goes by
the rather unglamorous title of K2.
But the tower of rock and ice is also
called Savage Mountain, and many
veteran climbers consider it less accessible and more perilous than the
more-commonly known Mt.
Everest.
K2
By Patrick Meyers
Starring  Terence  Kelly   and  Tom
McBeath
Directed by John Juliani
The Vancouver Playhouse
Until Feb. 11
Patrick Meyers' play, K2, is
about two men struggling to vanquish that mountain. This is not a
simple task, even on a theatrical
stage. The set is a forbidding model
of a difficult section of mountain,
and is resilient enough for actors to
climb with actual climbing equipment.
But the play is not a story abou
mountain climbing so much as a
intellectual excercise.
Harold (Terence Kelly),
physicist, and Taylor (Tor
McBeath), a lawyer, have made it t<
the top of K2, but have had an acci
dent on their descent and are no\
trapped on a ledge 27,000 feet in th
air. Harold has a broken leg, and ;
piece of their rope is missing.
K2 begins with shouts of joy b:
the climbers because they hav
reached the summit, and frenziei
assessment of the equipment whicl
is so vital to their survival.
A broken leg cannot descend K2
Taylor makes three attempts t<
retrieve the lost rope, jabbing spik
boots and an ice axe up the vertica
cut of the mountain. There is neve
any doubt the ice is treacherous
Taylor even falls and hang
suspended on a tight rope.
Harold entertains Taylor wit!
stories of his life and loves througl
each climb. Each descent i
characterized   by   humorous   con
Woody Allen acces;
By JUSTIN WYATT
Woody Allen's latest comedy
ranks as one of his best films.
Broadway Danny Rose manages to
be amusing, and also a little sad and
reflective. But unlike all his previous films, Broadway Danny Rose is
amazingly accessible: its jokes don't
depend on the viewer living in New
York or being Jewish or an intellectual.
Broadway Danny Rose
Directed by Woody Allen
Capitol Six
Allen's latest effort tells the story
of a small time talent agent (Danny
Rose) who sponsors zany acts such
as a blind xylophonist, a one-legged
tap dancer and a skating penguin.
The film centres on a group of comics reminiscing about Danny Rose's
infamous career. One comic
believes he has the definitive Danny
Rose story, and the film chronicles
one day in Rose's life and his laboring search for success. Danny's
client Lou Canova (Nick Apollo
Forte), a second rate lounge singer,
has been given one shot at stardom,
thanks to Danny having convince
Milton Berle to screen Lou's act a
a possible Vegas back-up position
But Danny faces many problems
Lou's scolding lover Tina (Mia Far
row) who won't attend the perfor
mance, an Italian banquet fre
quented by Mafioso ready to ki
Rose, a drunken star who mus
sober up for the show and a trip o
a tugboat that proves to be
nauseous experience.
Allen develops the crazy situa
tions in a controlled manner in
dicative of his mature talent. Th
film isn't interrupted by inconse
quential one-liners, but insteai
Allen allows the humor to aris
from his clearly defined character
and their pathetic situations.
One feels Allen really sym
pathizes with the 'loser' figures h
creates. He is expecially careful witl
the Danny Rose character whon
many would dismiss as small-tim
and infantile. Allen realizes Rose'
real virtues. In a revealing moment
Allen expresses Rose's attitudi
towards life: "Acceptance
forgiveness and love."
For comic effect he contrasts thi:
feeling with tough Tina's motto aryZ7,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
rld's second-highest mountain.
selves on K2
flict. The two ice groping mortals
have divergent attitudes and ideas
towards life and particularly
towards death.
Taylor's steamy four lettered colloquialism lend realism to his
philosophy. He is afraid of death
and the unknown. Harold says
"Life is about holding on without
understanding. It goes on whether
we understand or nor. Blind faith
has meaning." This comes from the
scientist.
Harold discovers Einstein's
theory doesn't have the answer,
neither does quantum mechanics.
He concludes he is god, quarks are
god, everything is god. This theory
from J. S. Bell implies that "at a
deep and fundamental level the
separate parts of existence are connected in an intimate and immediate way." That is the language
of poetry and mystics. How else can
one talk when confronting the
unpleasant face of death?
Harold gives a quick run down
on "gizmos", naming as many as
possible in one lung of high altitude
air. From calculators, clock radios,
and microwave ovens to the yet to
be discovered 'suck-off vehicle, a
car that "makes you", satisfaction
guaranteed. The best gizmo, the
ultimate gizmo, the one that protects all other gizmos ... It's the
Bomb that destroys only people and
leaves things intact.
K2 is a metaphor. The play addresses issues that are central to
human existence. Through Harold
and Taylor's struggle for survival,
for sheer physical existence, we see
the struggle between body and
mind.
The two climbers depend on each
other for physical, mental and
spiritual support. Together
they form a tough fibre to withstand the savage mountain and
possible death.
That fibre is a personal quest left
unfulfilled by exact science, the
quest for the fabric that connects
meaning to life and death with
meaning.
ible in Danny Rose
"Do it to the other guy before he
does it to you." Allen sides with
Rose's view, and part of the film's
success comes from its clear expression and demonstration of this
philosophy.
The small cast is competent, except
Mia Farrow who is transcendent.
Farrow has been improving and
testing her skill with each film. As
the nervous doctor Eudora Fletcher
in Zelig, Farrow perfected her frail
and beautiful persona. Now boyfriend Allen has cast her against
type as a loud, obnoxious interior
decorator with an affinity for purple fabric, bamboo and zebra skins.
Hidden behind huge sunglasses and
a bouffant wig, Farrow is a delight
in her comic exchanges with Danny
Rose. Forte also stands out as the
boorish lounge singer.
As usual with Allen's films, the
technical credits are first rate. Gordon Willis' black and white
photography is beautiful, without
being too distracting. Susan
Morse's fluid editing contributes
greatly to the comic pacing of the
film.
Allen has scored two consecutive
triumphs. Broadway Danny Rose is
a minor comedy classic, and like
last year's Zelig, is a detailed but
slim comedy, rich in talent, design
and texture. At this point, one can
only hope Allen remains prolific
since his recent films regularly mark
the high points of the cinematic
year.
John Doe remembers
his past and future
Jack Tieleman of The Ubyssey
talked with X bassist John Doe on
the telephone from Elektra studios
in Los Angeles. X will soon be starting a four week tour of the Pacific
northwest and will be appearing at
SUB ballroom Feb. 6 with the Actionals.
How was the band formed and
what did you do before that?
I met lead singer Exene at some
workshops. Billy Zoom (guitarist)
and I got together and put ads in local music classifieds to round out
the band. Before X was formed I
worked at a lot of shitty jobs and
played in some bar bands in Baltimore. Billy had his own band called
the Billy Zoom Rockabilly band
and Exene was in Florida, writing.
Where did the name X come
from?
It seemed like a good idea at the
time and still does. Those that are
not somebodies or somethings are
X.
Where has the late 1970s punk
scene gone?
It's very diversified. There are so
many groups (that have come from
that period: Gun Club, Joan Jett,
Black Flag, a large hard core following rhythm and blues revived
and a renewed country rock scene.
Where is X headed next musically
as the band has continually changed
its sound?
Basically we'll know when we get
there. There's no conscious progression, we arrange a song the way
it tells us to. For example, True
Love Part Two screamed out to be
played in a funk style, while Painting the Town Blue called for a hard
core country sound.
Is there a meditated change to
make the music more accessible?
The more records you make, the
more you grow and experiment.
This album, More Fun in the New
World, has a nationwide feel while
Under the Big Black Sun (their last
album) had a personal feel. We
didn't want to repeat ourselves.
What political stance does the
band represent?
We're socially political. We believe that ideas are more political
than tsilking about it. Politics are
screwed and you don't have to force
i
X's DOE...socially political.
people to relive the nightmare (of
politics).
What is your opinion of feminism?
I think Wendy O'Williams is a
terrific feminist. She doesn't take
any shit. She goes out and says she
can do anything a man can and
does.
How do people react to a woman
leading the band?
No, Exene isn't a front person,
not in the traditional sense. People
don't have a negative reaction to
Exene and I think that is something
new music has helped people get
away from. Everybody has their
own part in the band.
How did Ray Manzarek (the keyboard player for the Doors who
produced X's last two albums) get
involved with the band?
He saw us playing at the Whis-
key-a-Go-Go. We found out that
we shared a lot of ideas and started
working together.
What approaches and effects has
Manzarek had on the band?
His foremost objective was to
make the band sound spontaneous
and live on recordings. Then he set
out to make the songs realized on
vinyl; this was done by his arranging and producing.
Has Time magazine's choice of
More Fun in the New World as a
top album of 1983 had much effect?
I was flabbergasted. It's flattering, I suppose. Time is pretty lame.
I just hope people don't associate
Time's lameness with us.
How do you get inspired to write
songs?
Drinking and staying up late. Inspiration from aspects of our lives
and if they translate to others' lives
we construct a song around it.
Otherwise it just stays as an idea or
a poem.
Is the West Coast a conducive atmosphere to your music?
Los Angeles is still the heart of
the beast. If America didn't have so
many faults it wouldn't be nearly as
much fun living here.
SEX COMES IN CYCLES
New lifestyle locks in lovers
By ROBERT BEYNON
Society produces sexual attitudes
like machines produce nuts and
bolts, and a change in attitudes is as
easily accomplished as producing a
new form of bolts. This is a common theme in our modern society,
and Kevin Wade's first play, Key
Exchange, explores this theme's implications.
The implications the cast and
director of The Arts Club's production find in the play reveal pertinent
and amusing truths.
The play itself is a collection of
meetings   between   three   trendy
ALLEN, FORTE...new comedy a minor classic
cyclists in Central Park, New York,
over a period of months.
The cyclists converse about sex
and relationships, and how these
topics relate to one another.
Key Exchange
By Kevin Wade
At the Arts Club at Seymomr
Directed by Mario Crudo
Until Feb. 18
Advertising executive Michael
(Michael Bianchin) has just married
a dancer, after living with her, and
questions his wisdom. And
photographer Lisa (Gillian Barber)
and hopeful novelist Phillip (Jon
Bryden) are enmeshed in an iffy
"no strings" relationship, which
both view differently.
As the story develops, Michael's
wife leaves him, and just possibly
he will "see" Lisa. And just
possibly Lisa will leave Phillip, or
Phillip will exchange keys to their
respective apartments with her,
because she wants a closer relationship.
But later Michael agrees to his
wife's return because "I love her
and I know she loves me." The
results are unexpected, but
forseeable. And anyways, he can
always return to the redhead with
red silk panties he attempted to
seduce the night before she returned.
And Patrick, after breaking off
from Lisa because she wants him to
meet her father at a restaurant supper (which he thinks is getting too
close), returns to Lisa and agrees to
a closer relationship, only to find
Lisa has changed in his absence.
The characters want to fit people
into their lives like digits into an
equation, but the equation is too
complex for them and results in
unexpected results.
The implications of Key Exchange too are complex, and
somewhat ambiguous. There is no
hero, no villain, no moral.
It justs shows sexual attitudes are
changing, like it or not, and they
are easy going, and nobody really
gets hurt if you just take it easy,
purportedly.
The play is set in New York and
the people, situations and settings
are not from Vancouver. Director
Mario Crudo has organized the production well and makes it immediately relevant.
Subtle and witty, the play's many
lines could easily lose their
significance in a poor production.
Although the play starts slowly, it
builds to a powerful climax that
surprises the viewer due to the in-
nocuousness of the plot.
The play is obviously American
and studies a group of people who
represent only a small portion of
society, but despite this it manages
to skillfully expose the nature of
sexuality in our modern North
American society. Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 27, 1984
Yahoos
It is not often that former Socred cabinet minister Rafe Mair makes
sense. But Thursday morning, on a nationally broadcast CBC radio show,
he pointed out that racist thinking underlies UBC's differential fees for
undergraduate visa students. Mair told the country the administration was
shamefully bowing down to the wishes of the bigoted minority who are
prejudiced against foreigners.
It is a charge the administration will find difficult to refute.
They justify the increase on the grounds it will bring in more money.
But that just isn't true. Given UBC's current number of undergraduate
visa students, the administration will probably save less than $40,000 next
year. This is less than one half of one percent of the projected deficit on
$18 million. Pedersen himself has admitted that the move is insignificant
financially, and that he "is under a great deal of public pressure."
As final proof that the government doesn't believe it's own flack, universities minister Pat McGeer sponsored a study a couple of years ago concluding that B.C. does not in fact lose money from visa students because
the foreign capital they bring in approximately equals the subsidy they
receive by enrolling in UBC.
Mair said that many of the more outrageous callers to his phone-in show
insist that "half of Hong Kong" is out here lapping up cheap education at
the expense of the B.C. taxpayers. In fact, there are only seven Hong Kong
students at UBC. Three quarters of the 257 visa students are from the U.S.
and Britain.
The administration appears to believe the Socred attack on higher
education is inspired by the rednecks amongst their supporters. And the
introduction of differential fees is an attempt to placate them. "Look" UBC
is saying, "we don't like foreigners (read orientals), East Indians or blacks
either, and are trying to make life difficult for them; we can't be all bad."
The whole maneouvre is an attack not only on foreign students and the
principles of excellence and sharing the knowledge in education, but also
an implied slur on the Chinese Canadian population at UBC.
The classic reaction of an extremist to a slight recession is to ask for
more. Far from trying to reduce the foreign student population at UBC
with discriminatory fee structures, the administration ought to be asserting
to«the yahoos in our community that a university should be an international
place where racial tolerance and mutual understanding are encouraged.
Looks like you were right, son. You shouldn't have bothered.
Anonymous smear a sign of things gone wrong
I am not writing this epistle
"more in sorrow than in anger" as
a former collective member should
because I am still too damn angry
over the crap your agents of social
change passed off as fair journalistic writing in the Friday, Jan.
20 issue.
To keep this brief, I will not delve
into your factual errors (although
the $6 million saving through enrolment restrictions cited by Chris
Wong on page one comes as a sur- >
prise to us who thought it was due
to the tuition fee hike — and this is
but one of many), your personal
slurs, your inanities in the editorial
(unfortunately, some of us in the
paying public do read them) or even
your inability to adhere to Ubyssey
layout style (remember, flush right
on the letters signatures and ID);
what upsets me most is the abundance of "name withheld's" and
"who wishes to remain
anonymous" lines which positively
bloomed throughout the paper and
allowed the publication of hate letters and libellous smear jobs.
Anonymity was rare in the past
but not so this year. Now it seems
that anyone with an axe to grind,
particularly a nasty vicious one, can
have the sanctuary of "name
withheld."
"Geers   (sic)   to   get    Black
Plague?" is a case in point. Maybe
you haven't noticed it yet, but by
granting "Michael" anonymity you
allowed him to perpetuate exactly
what he was calling the BP'ers
down for. Maybe you thought it
was good satire. On the other hand,
I understand you believe the
Ubyssey to be a model of
democracy and good journalism.
But the number you did on James
Hollis, "Money man seeks record
fourth term," is simply inexcusable. Presumably this was written by Craig Brooks, since Arnold
Hedstrom has the good sense to
stay clear of such shit.
Rescind DTUC closure decision
Dear Jack Heinrich:
As the representatives of the students at UBC, we must communicate to you the following resolution
which passed unanimously at the
Jan. 18, 1984 meeting of student
council:
"The Alma Mater Society students' council urges the provincial
government to rescind the decision
to close David Thompson University Centre. The $2 million saving is
insignificant in comparison with the
detrimental effects on the Nelson
community, culturally as well as
economically. We oppose the fact
that the provincial government gave
no notice to the students, faculty or
staff, and call for a reassessment of
the disastrous impact of the shutting down of the university. "
Already, British Columbia has a
disastrous record in terms of rural
participation. We must remind you
that of all the OECD (western industrialized) nations, including Japan , Canada has the lowest per capita participation rate in post-secondary education. British Columbia
has the worst participation rate of
any region in Canada. Closing the
only university degree granting institution outside of the Lower
Mainland and Victoria metropolitan regions will do nothing toward
increasing participation throughout
this province.
The funding formula the ministry
I
THE UBYSSEY
January 24, 1984
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout the
academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British
Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are nol
necessarily those of the university administration or the AMS.
Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is
SUB 241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
"Don't pick out the boat nuts." warned Robert Beynon. "Eapecially the chestnuts." proclaimed Peter Berlin. "Forget the trivial stuff. I'm protesting for hunger," stated Gordon
Clark. "Where should we go?" asked Justin Wyatt. "Bopping," yelled Eric Eggertson. "The
ambience suggests partying," .... "Who said that?" asked Keith Baldrey and Tom Hawthorn.
"Verne MacDonald, the everpresent eminence," Nancy Campbell and Kelley Jo Burke
screamed. "I'm going to be malade," stated Victor Wong and Alessandra Callegsrini.
"Women are definitely seated first." declared Muriel Draaisma and Sarah Milltn, as we
entered the restaurant. "Tha hawaiian music completes the ambience here" jibed Robby
Robertson. Patti Flather and Jack Tieleman gobbled down the chow mein, but couldn't
match Mark Nielsen as he exclaimed, "Anything is better than residence food." Charlie
Fidelman was going Bananas over the shrimp chips, as Debbie Lo wes still typing? "Don't
worry, it'll all be over soon" sighed the thick skinned Stephen Wisenthal.
has implemented to determine
"cost effectiveness," discriminates
against DTUC's liberal and fine arts
programs with studios and workshops. Also you disregard the centre's library facilities which extend
to all four Selkirk campuses as well
as the community areas. Clearly
you can not read the situation on
only a cost-per-head basis.
Further, the impending closure of
DTUC appears to continue the ministry's value judgments on the type
of education that is desirable and
offered. On several occasions we
have heard statements from Victoria which favor professional programs over the arts and humanities.
This attitude is not only utilitarian
but dangerous. It may be impossible to revive the cultural and social
fabric in this province when this period of "restraint" has passed.
Since the university centre is the
second largest employer in Nelson,
common decency should have motivated the government to discuss the
impact of axing of the centre with
the parties involved, namely the students, faculty, staff, administration
and the community.
It is for these and many other reasons the AMS student council calls
on the provincial government to reverse the decision to close David
Thompson, and that this decision
be rescinded with the utmost expediency.
Lisa Hebert
AMS external affairs coordinator
Any staffer who wishes to remain
anonymous has two options:
become an ex-staffer or rewrite his
material so it won't have the
lawyers calling on his door.
What is the point of slapping an
analysis logo on something that
even its author doesn't have the
courage to identify as his own opinion? Adding the drivel about "not
reflecting the opinions of the
Ubyssey" is nice sleight of hand,
but since you (hopefully) had a staff
meeting about granting Craig his
anonymity you are all tarred with
the same brush, like it or not.
I am sure Hollis will be writing in
with a spirited defence, but I'd like
to point out a few facts. #1 —
Brooks was an Aquasoc executive
member when director of administration; it is delicious irony to
see him lambasting another for the
same crime. #2 — Brooks of all
people should know there is more to
the SUB films story than what he
chose to report, since it began when
he was in office and continued well
into his career at The Ubyssey. #3
— Really, Craig, student council
has to defeat the entire budget to
remove grants? — your constitutional knowledge seems to have
slipped drastically since you
represented The Ubyssey at budget
committee talks. #4 — So the AMS
pays for summer work and tuition?
So what? I didn't notice Brooks
refusing the money when it was offered . . .
And the list goes on. What seems
obvious is that anonymity allowed
this author to charge into the journalistic wasteland unfettered by
facts and recriminations. It is a trip
taken with increasing regularity in
the pages of The Ubyssey and one
which, more than any other, has led
to the new-found depths of
mediocrity the paper has plunged
into this year.
I hate to be so depressing. The
Ubyssey has, and is capable still, of
achieving the ranks of good campus
newpapers. You have intelligent
reporters, some capable writers and
facilities the envy of western
Canada.
Yet by subscribing to the
anonymity code, you are allowing
yourselves to take the easy journalism route — one which means
you don't have to check your facts,
research your figures, prevent your
misquotes or even think about the
impact of what you are printing.
You hurt a lot of people Friday
— the candidates who were ridiculed not for their politics (as we did
three years back with such stinging,
o-so-vicious lines as "Janice Morrison stands defiantly in the middle
of the road") but for their age, their
eating habits, even their appearance; their friends; your supporters; and even yourselves. Campus people are not big-league politicians who have money, lackeys
and status to help them weather the
smear jobs. They are students first,
people who most often are just trying to do the best they can to right a
few wrongs, get something done
and, yes, maybe get a few personal
kudos in the bargain. The only real
power-mongers I have seen these
last few months hide behind the
anonymity of the editorial collective
of the only rag west of Blanca.
I know the paper is having tough
times this year. As you well know, I
too have experienced the joys of
putting out the paper with a handful of staffers, council trouble and
weird power struggles on The
Ubyssey. But never, ever had we to
resort to the tactics displayed Friday in order to fill the pages or, one
may suspect, get our rocks off. The
Ubyssey was never a paragon of virtue — God help us if we were — but
we maintained as best we could the
ethics of good journalism and
Canadian University Press principles, especially the lines about
agents of social change ( who
screamed about Pit prices? AMS
surpluses? women's issues? tuition
fees?) and fair journalism.
Anonymity is a serious decision
no matter what the size of the
newspaper. The Ubyssey has abused it to its peril. I don't know if
CUP will have the guts to deal with
you lot or not on this matter, but I
do know the fallout from Friday's
issue will haunt you for months,
maybe years to come, like a bad
spoof story that never is forgotten.
Good luck. And if you can't be
good, be careful.
Nancy Campbell
Ubyssey collective member 81-82
agriculture 3 Friday, January 27,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
Letters
Nanaimo bunker is an elitist, schizoid solution
Well, it certainly warms the
cockles of one's heart to know that
our esteemed politicians will be able
to keep up the business of government, in the event of a nuclear war.
I am referring now to that last
wonder of the world — the bunker
for big wigs — one of which was
unveiled recently in Nanaimo.
It is true that B.C. is rather close
to Bangor Wash, where the Trident
first-strike target is located. It is
true that the Russian nuclear
arsenal dropped on Bangor would
be a top priority payload. It is true
that the immediate and longstanding after-effects of such a
blast would penetrate deep into
B.C. (And this says nothing of a
Russian attack from our Northern
borders).
It is true that the fallout would be
so thick that if you were left alive
and not blinded, you would not see
the sun for weeks. It is true that the
implosion of our ecological system
due to the destruction of its supplies
of oxygen, ozone, water, food,
natural climactic warmth and
shelter would spell certain death for
whoever was so unfortunate as to
"survive". It is true that those
smart fellows — our government
leaders — would emerge to govern a
glowing radioactive ash pile in
which the only movement would be
the slow, agonized writhing of the
"survivors".
In short, the "Nanaimo Bunker"
is irrefutable proof that our leaders
have a pre-Hiroshima fantasy of
what such a war would be like. The
"Nanaimo Bunker" signifies that
our leaders have lost contact with
reality, that their reason is slipping
Funeral march for fees
was a terrific success
The Jan. 19 march and rally to
oppose fee increases was a great
success for students against the
budget and all UBC students.
About 350 spirited protesters shouted slogans, so riled they could have
throttled the board of governors
right there and then.
Discouraging any adventurism,
SAB organizers controlled their impulse to crash the old administration building. So keen were these
students that SAB had to eventually
convince them to pack it up late in
the afternoon. So much for the student apathy theory!
And about 6,500 students signed
a petition against the planned tuition hikes. With all these facts in
mind, greater opposition to the
UBC budget will no doubt mount.
SAB succeeded in educating, rousing and organizing the first show of
opposition to the board's daring
and unjust dictate that we pay
higher fees.
The attention given by the media
to this single protest is a sign of rising political reaction. You can expect community support on this issue to surge. But all education
problems in B.C. — fee hikes, en
rolment restrictions, funds cutbacks, staff layoffs, reduced financial aid and so on — are primarily
concerns for students. They must,
and will, organize right here on
campus to deter higher fees. After
all, UBC is their university.
Student power is strong. An official decision to raise fees, flagrantly
made despite protests and compounded by recent announcements
of other attacks against students
(e.g. enrolment restrictions and tuition increases at other institutions),
can be easily denounced and
beaten. It only amounts to a meaningless scrap of paper if masses of
students oppose it. The board
knows this: George Pedersen and
others shook visibly in front of the
angry crowd. Furthermore, the media felt compelled to undermine the
protest, citing only 100 demonstrators and omitting coverage on SAB,
and the protest's organization and
content.
SAB encourages students to continue fighting against the unjust tuition increases rather than despair
over the board's "final" decision.
Barb Waldern
students against the budget
Blame should fall on students
The main mall conversation rarely strayed from the topic of 33 per
cent fee hikes on Thursday, Jan. 19.
Students were heard to say, "We
can't let these bastards do this to
us." But painting a canvas of bitter
rejection from first years and sighs
of relief from graduating seniors,
an artist would be obliged to use the
EDUCATION...dead weight
unconvincing colors of black and
white to match the sincerity of the
students parole to battle fee hikes.
Is it that the 75 per cent of the
student population who did not sign
the accessible AMS petition against
over-inflationary tuition increases
wanted to see UBC become a
"pseudo-Harvard," where entrance
applications are accompanied with
a parental income statement?
I recognize the fact that some
students vehemently oppose marches and "moch funerals," but I
ask, "would it have been such an
arduous task to sign a petition?"
Honestly, what were the board of
governors to believe when they were
handed a petition against the tuition
increases that less than 25 per cent
of the student population supported?
No transfer of blame is deserved.
The blame should weigh heavily
upon the shoulders of the student
body. David Beaulieu
science 1
r
At least candidates can write
No wonder The Ubyssey's budget has been cut lately. Its consistently low quality and biased reporting has proven it not worthy of
the money it does get. Considering the fact that almost all election
candidates felt insulted by the articles written on them, it is not likely
The Ubyssey will fare any better this year.
Next year, The Ubyssey's should just print 200 word statements
written by the candidates — at least they can write, an ability the
reporters and editors seem to lack.
Doug Dosdall
pre-commerce/computer science 1
into denial and repression of the
facts, replacing then with fantasy.
The facts are that each side together
now have the nuclear capacity to
wipe our the entire planet 40 times
over. Now this is 40 times over!
Madness is another word for both
the existence of such facts and for
the denial of these facts. The
Bunker, therefore, is an elitist,
simple-minded, schizoid
"solution" — about as effective as
using a garden watering can to
douse a blazing gas station. (Just
because  the   Swiss  are  doing  it,
t,U**
**i    ft ^
sue mcilroy
Politicians try to help
After reading your issue of Friday, Jan. 20 I felt I should respond
and hopefully clear up a few points.
In your editorial, you state candidates cannot possibly represent students, due to a meager 7 per cent
vote turnout. What is the solution?
Should we simply abandon the
democratic process at UBC, because the greater majority of students are so ignorant, or so apathetic about campus issues, that
they can't take 30 seconds to cast a
ballot? Surely you can't blame the
candidates for the annual farce that
is the UBC electoral process. Ask
most students who they're voting
for, and they will likely be unaware
that there is even an election, let
alone who's running.
You also erroneously state that
"the fact that the Alma Mater Society scheduled the (all candidates)
meeting during such an important
student protest illustrates how out
of touch with students and issues it
is." I scheduled that all-candidates
meeting last October. The fact that
neither the protest organizers nor
yourselves bothered to check for
conflicting events is not my fault
and certainly not the fault of the
AMS.
This meeting was properly advertised, yet fewer than 40 people
showed up to watch. Again, is this
the fault of the candidates? I think
not.
Finally, I would like to address
the letter of Mark Fenton (Poor
candidates cause low turnout, Jan.
20). Fenton states that ". . .few
people are willing to stand up and
speak publicly about their
views. . ." Was he in attendance at
the all candidates meeting, at which
he would have had an opportunity
to question the candidates present?
Fenton questions and criticizes
the qualifications of the candidates,
yet I failed to see his name when
nominations were released. It is always easy to sit on the sidelines and
criticize the efforts of others.
Granted, these people don't do a
perfect job. Sometimes they simply
"screw up." This, however, is because they are not politicians, but
students trying to contribute to
their student society. Having established that these student politicians
sometimes do in fact screw up. Fenton must also realize that students
such as himself who do "dick all"
never do.
Simon Seshadri
AMS elections commissioner
doesn't necessarily mean they will
live to emerge from their bunkers
someday. They to could be
smothered in the deadly winds.)
Finally, I would just like to ask
Bill Bennett and co., what about
the rest of us? While our leaders
might find the children expendable,
we, at least, want Our kids to live
and flourish.
What are you doing Bennett, to
prevent the outbreak of a nuclear
war? j. Hearne
Simon Fraser University
Student
Reply by Gays
and Lesbians
We, the gays and lesbians of
UBC, are rather concerned about
some of the comments made in the
Friday, Jan. 20 issue of The Ubyssey by one of the candidates for finance director, Doug Dosdall. His
comments were misinformed, and
although they were self-contradictory, they were almost believable
and may have been taken as fact by
some readers.
Furthermore, his statements were
inaccurate regarding the whole club
structure at UBC and the membership policy of these clubs. Firstly,
the Alma Mater Society does not
"finance" clubs at all, per se. Clubs
are financed through their own
membership fees and fund-raising
events for the most part. The AMS
will provide funding for special projects and the like, but that is all.
Only service organizations such as
Speakeasy or the Ombudsoffice are
directly funded.
Secondly, Dosdall does not show
an understanding of the very basis
of a club: a special interest. By being comprised only of people interested in the activity or topic at
hand, clubs are automatically selective about their members.
Thirdly, groups such as ours do
not discriminate. We have always
welcomed the presence of non-gay
people or non-members in any of
our activities; most other "special
interest" clubs on campus will welcome non-members to their activities. Check them out for yourself:
the AMS does not allow groups to
discriminate on the basis of any prejudice.
We would like to welcome Dosdall or anybody else to any of our
fifth annual Gay and Lesbian Week
activities from Feb. 6 to 11, and I
would like to extend a personal invitation to Dosdall and any other person uncomfortable with the concept
of Gays and Lesbians of UBC to
come speak with me.
Bob Summerbell
president
Gays and Lesbians of UBC
Journalism seems jaundiced
To say that most students are disappointed with The Ubyssey is putting it very mildly, but I would say
that this is the consensus on campus. The recent "analysis" of the
candidates running for office in the
upcoming student elections is only
the latest in a series of biased attempts at journalism.
Instead of presenting to the student body an objective report on
each candidate, The Ubyssey gave
us a jaundiced spread that can only
have hurt those who do not meet
the approval of Ubyssey staffers.
Responsible journalism is an anathema to The Ubyssey, which is too
bad for the rest of us who pay for
such drivel with our Almai Mater
Society fees.
The "trendy leftists" who run
what they proudly call the "vile
rag" are laughable not only to those
"fascists" on campus, but also to
those who do hold left-wing views.
Childish rhetoric will never win the
support of the majority on campus,
and the sooner The Ubyssey recognizes this the better it will be for
everyone concerned.
I object to the fact that my AMS
contribution is being used to produce such a paper. If The Ubyssey
wants to see more student activism
perhaps we should have the AMS
transfer the paper's annual funding
to others who would be more representative of UBC. In a time of budget shortfalls and cutbacks we can't
afford to waste money.
Claudia Ouang
arts 3 Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 27,1984
^^
Vancouver
mm,
after Classes ...
THE KEG
* AND
Introduces
A Dinner and Dance Special
Wednesday's
Student Night
Enjoy Caesar's for Dinner
20% OFF ALL FOOD
Afterwards visit Brandy's
Featuring:
- Great music
- Friendly Atmosphere
- ALL NIGHT STUDENT PRICES
/Bring Student I D.)
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Brunch — Sundays & Holidays
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RESERVATIONS
682-1831
Enjoy the live entertainment
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. VMEUE POREpoHISOVriAWlO. Friday, January 27,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 13
Some like it hot
No one, I'm sure, wants to hear
yet another residence horror story.
Nor do I feel like telling one. But
tonight I snapped.
The day started off as usual. I
didn't get a morning shower
because I wasn't prepared to get up
before seven. And like I have done
since September, I boiled water in a
kettle to do my lunch and supper
dishes. I waited all evening for the
water to warm up enough to have a
shower. It is now eleven p.m. The
water is still cold.
I have signed two petitions. I
have read seriously the official-
looking notices posted informing us
that our hot water supply will be
temporarily interupted while they
work on the system. After t five
months I finally do not believe
them.
I feel that the very least that the
housing department owes its
tenants is honesty. They should admit that they are not fixing, and will
never fix, the hot water problem.
And like any respectable landlord,
they should inform the students
before they sign the rental contract
that the place they are renting does
not have hot and cold running
water.
Well, it is now almost midnight.
Maybe this time...
Rosemary Finkle
south tower gage residence
Sign it or shut up
As a working journalist (i.e. I sell
my soul to see my name in print), I
was disappointed that The Ubyssey
ran an unsigned opinion piece
(Money man seeks record fourth
term, Jan. 20) attacking a political
candidate. Anonymity should rarely be used in newspapers, except for
straight news coverage. Otherwise
readers cannot judge the credibility
of the author and judge whether the
author has a particular axe to grind
that might affect impartiality. I
don't know the author of this par
ticular piece (for that matter, I
don't know the subject of the piece
either) and so I cannot judge how
much faith I can put in it.
Anonymity should only be allowed in letters to the editor, and then
only when harm might come to the
letter writer from having her or his
name published. Everybody else
should have the courage of their
convictions. Come on, 'fess up,
whoever you are. . . .
Terry Lavender
agriculture 2
ALL
STUDENT CARDS
SHOWN
AT HAIR COMMAND WILL
RECEIVE 5.00 OFF ON OUR
45 MINUTE NO RUSH PRECISION
HAIRSTYLES
FOR MEN & WOMEN
Our exclusive shop offers • Privacy • Stylists
with years of experience • A spacious waiting
area including pool table • Comfort for our
clients and a high degree of perfection by our
stylists.
HAIR COMMAND 815 W. Hastings St. (at Howe)
687-6265
APPLICATION
FOR GRADUATION
Application for graduation cards have now been mailed to
students registered in the graduating year of the following
degree programs: B.A., B.F.A., B. Mus., B.Com., Lic.Acct.,
B.Ed.-Elem., B.Ed.-Sec, B.Ed.-Spec, B.P.E., B.R.E. and
B.Sc. All students who expect to graduate this May or
November are requested to complete and return both cards to
the Registrar's Office (Mrs. Donna Anderson) as soon as
possible, but no later than February 15, 1984 for graduation
in May and September 15, 1984 for graduation in November.
Any student in the graduating year of these programs who has
not received cards in the mail should confirm with the
Registrar's Office (by phone at 228-4455) that his/her local
mailing address is correct.
Students in the graduating year of all remaining degree programs, except Graduate Studies, may obtain their "Application for Graduation" cards from the Dean's Office of their
Faculty. Students on Graduate Studies programs may obtain
their applications from their Graduate Advisor or Departmental Secretary.
"Application for Graduation" cards are also available in the
Office of the Registrar, 2nd Floor, General Services Administration Building.
PLEASE NOTE: It is the responsibility of the students to apply for their degrees. The list of candidates for graduation to
be presented to the Faculty and to the Senate for approval of
degrees is compiled solely from these application cards.
NO APPLICATION - NO DEGREE
PANGO PANGO (UNS) —
Hairy puce blorgs on this tiny island
kingdom rose yesterday to find that
most of the granola blorg fascists
on the Daily Blah had resigned.
The resignees announced that
merit dictator Moral Dogma ate
her granola with milk, a granoloid
faux-pas and that she ruled her corner of the bunker with an iron pen.
"This place is infested with
squishy liberals and all the squishy
peaceniks feel left out," they
lamented. "Ooga booga, we vote
no to Blah, we vote no to Blah,"
cried dear departed Paira Cox and
Dog Shit from sunny land across
the sea where they are sheepishly
hiding to escape a blizzard of flying
phone books.
Greying blorgs referred to a
similarity between an ancient pitched battle of yore between Nazi
Can'tspell and Drool Feelsalright
and current momentous events.
All was peaceful and nice
in the happy rolling hills of Pango
Pango.
i .ftMeSe New vear   i
.. red loox I
and CeUbw flu
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Tut* Jam, il" & fn fy. J", »W4
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CPA • SPEED READING
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EDUCATIONAL CENTER
1107 N.E. 45th Street
Seattle. Ws. 98105
(206I 6324)634 	
FILM
THE GOD MAKERS
THE MORMOM QUEST
FOR GODHOOD
Followed by discussion.
ANGUS 104
January 27th
at 7:30 p.m.
MARANATHA
CHRISTIAN CLUB
Dual CS-515
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The key to
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Financial management is an
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When you combine your diploma
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CGA students earn a living while
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Learn more about the CGA program and how you can combine it
with your existing qualifications.
Contact the Director of Admissions,
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Vancouver, B.C., V6J 1T5.
Telephone: (604)732-1211.
Certified General
W| Accountants
^y Association
of British Columbia Page 14
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 27, 1984
Ytutic
SUBfilms (Sub Auditorium, 228-3697) Jan.
26-29: Diva, 7 p.m.; One From The Heart,
9:30 p.m. Feb. 2-5: Trading Places.
Cinema 16 (SUB Auditorium, 228-3696) Jan.
27-30: Ivan The Terrible, Part 1, 6:30 and 8:30
p.m. Jan. 30-Feb. 5: The End of St.
Petersburg, 6:30 and 8:30 p.m.
Pacific Cinematique (1155 West Georgia,
732-61191 Jan. 27: Man of Marble, 7:30
p.m.; Jan. 28-29: The Fiancee. 7:30 and 9:30
p.m.; Feb. 1: Lucky Luciano. 7:30 p.m.;
Feb. 2: You Have Seen Nothing At
Hiroshima, 7:30 p.m. Hiroshima Mon Armour. 9:30 p.m.; Feb. 3, Why Does Herr R.
Run Amuck?, 7:15 p.m.. The American
Soldier, 9:30 p.m.
Surrey Art Gallery (13750-88 Ave. Surrey)
Jan. 29, Off The Wall, 2:00 p.m.
Ridge Theatre 116th and Arbutus, 738-6311)
Jan. 27-Feb. 2: La Nuit de Varsnnes (The
Night of Varennes), 7:30 and 9 p.m.;
Vancouver East Cinema (Commercial and
7th, 253-5455) Jan. 27-29: Hammett. 7:30
p.m.; The Maltese Falcon, 9:20 p.m. Jan.
30-31: Mahler. 7:30 p.m.. The Music
Lavers, 9:30 p.m. Feb. 1-2: Night of The
Shooting Stars, 7:30 p.m.. Night of The
Hunter, 9:25 p.m. Feb. 3-5: Barry Lyndon.
7:30 p.m.
Savoy Cinema (Main and Kingsway,
872-2124) Jan. 27-29: My Favorite Year,
7:30 p.m., The Ruling Class, 9:15 p.m. Jan.
30-31: Blow Up, 7:30 p.m.; Zabrisky Point.
9:30 p.m. Feb. 1-2: City Lights, 7:30 p.m.;
Room Service, 9:15 p.m. Feb. 3-5: Zelig,
7:30 p.m.; Risky Business, 9 p.m.
Hollywood Theatre 13123 W. Broadway,
738-3211) Jan. 30-Feb. 12: First Blood, 9:20
p.m.; Lone Wolf McQuade, 7:30 p.m.
Durmen: a mysterious local jazz group
featuring the mysterious Mr. X on piano, Jan.
29, Classical Joint, 231 Carrall, 689-0667.
Sands of Tyme: experience this rare opportunity to hear Bill Runge on bass, Jan. 31,
Classical Joint.
Phoenix Jazzers: a perpetual entry in Vista
continues in their perpetual style in Vancouver's top dixie club, Feb. 2, Hot Jazz Club,
36 E. Broadway, 873-4131.
B.B. King: the blues king rounds out his stay
with Lucille, Jan. 27-28, Plazazz, International
Plaza Hotel.
Wynton Marsalis: the trumpet prodigy is
back in town with his brother and a hot band,
Feb. 1-11, Plazazz.
Noon-hour concert: chamber music with
Robert Silverman and others, Feb. 1, noon,
Recital Hall.
Corsage: led by the demonic, twister, infamous Phil Smith, in my opinion
Vancouver's best alternative band, Feb. 3,
SUB Ballroom.
Hl-Lo's: a male jazz vocal quartet featuring
Gene Peurting, Jan. 27, 8 p.m., O.E. Theatre.
The Kitchen Syncopators: Vancouver's
own country band, Jan. 27, 8:30 p.m.. Oddfellows Hall, 1720 Graveley.
Beverly Sisters: a benefit dance for the
Pacific Reforestation Workers Association,
Jan. 28, 9 p.m., 3102 Main, tickets at Highlife,
Zulu.
Louis Andrlessen: the innovative composer
presenting two of his divergent works, Jan.
29, 8 p.m., Vancouver East Cultural Centre,
254-9578.
Roy Orbison: another faded rock star trying
to make some bucks, Feb. 1, Q.E. Theatre,
VTC/CBO.
Jim Byrnes/Jack Lavin/Wailin' Walker: a
benefit concert for the multi-talented Byrnes
who needs financial assistance, Feb. 3, Commodore.
War Baby: the Belfry Theatre and New Play
Centre present this play by Margaret Holl-
ingswirth,    until    Feb.    11,    Waterfront
Theatre, Granville Island, 685-6217.
Tons of Money: a nineteen-twenties farce
directed by Morris Panych, Feb. 2-18, Studio
58. Langara, 324-5227.
She Stoops to Conquer: a classic English
comedy of manners, until Feb. 25, Arts Club
Granville Island, 687-5315.
Key Exchange: starring Kevin Wade as a
wordly bachelor and an aspiring novelist, until
Feb. 18, Arts Club Seymour.
Sister Mary Ignatius Explains It All For
You: a play by Christopher Durang, opens
Feb. 1, City Stage, 751 Thurlow, 688-1436.
North  Shore  Live:  a spoof on  live T.V.
shows until Feb. 4, Vancouver East Cultural
Centre.
The  Textile  Art  of   East   Indonesia:  83
superb pieces of Indonesian art, UBC Fine
Arts Gallery, Main Library, 228-2759.
Hans Holbein: The Family of Thomas More
— folio of portraits, books, catalogues and
related material.
The   Price   of   Poker   —   Gambling   on
Solidarity:   a   video   installation   by   Chris
Creighton-Kelly,   Unit/Pit   Gallery,   163  W.
Pender, 681-6740.
Three  Figurative   Painters:  featuring  the
work of Leonard Brett, Colette French and
Wendy Hamlin, Surrey Art Gallery, 13750 88th
Ave., 596-7461.
La La La: an audacious modern dance company performing Businessman In The Process
of Becoming An Angel, SFU Theatre, Feb.
2-3, 8 p.m., 291-3221.
TODAY
UBC LIBERAL CLUB
Speaker: Ron Johnston, minister of slate for
economic development, science and technology, everyone welcome, noon, SUB 207.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Tennis night, 8:30-11:30 p.m., Armory.
CCCM
Eucharist for Andre's fast, noon, Lutheran Campus Centre chapel.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Bzzr garden, everyone welcome to enjoy bzzr
and music videos, 4:30-6:30 p.m., SUB 207/209.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Open gym — volleyball, 4:30-6:30 p.m., Osborne
gym A.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Special Friday class featuring the Viennese
waltz, noon, SUB ballroom.
UBC CANOE CLUB
Kayak indoor rolling practice pool sessions,
10-12 p.m. evenings, UBC aquatic centre indoor
pool.
MUSSOC
Opening night — Oklahoma, 8 p.m. curtain. Old
Auditorium.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Film: The God Makers, 7:30 p.m., Angus 104.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for winter session ballet and jazz
classes, noon, SUB 216E.
AGRICULTURE
Great Race (costumes mandatory), barrel bucking, noon, outside MacMillan.
BUY OFF CAMPUS
SAVE 20% &
GET NEXT DAY SERVICE
 AT THE	
WESTERN OPTICAL EYE LAB
With your prescription and
STUDENT I.D. CARD -
ChOOSe ANY FRAME
IN OUR STOCK.
WESTERN OPTICAL
 EYE LAB	
Mon.-Fri. 8:30-5:00
2nd & Burrard
(1742 w. 2nd Ave.)
731-9112
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL UBC
Bzzr garden, 4:30-7 p.m., Buchanan lounge.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
Varsity men vs. Alberta, 8:30 p.m., varsity women vs. Alberta, 6:45 p.m., War Memorial gym.
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
Eucharist to celebrate end of Andre's fast, noon,
Lutheran Campus Centre.
SATURDAY
THUNDERBIRD RUGBY
UBC vs.  Meralomas, weather permitting, 2:30
p.m., Thunderbird stadium.
UBC HIGH SCHOOL
WRESTLING TOURNAMENT
500 of B.C.'s best high school wrestlers meet in a
pre-B.C. championship tournament, all day, finals at 7 p.m., Osborne Centre gym A, B and E.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
Varsity Men vs. Saskatchewan 8:30 p.m., Varsity Women vs. Saskatchewan 6:45 p.m., War
Memorial gym.
HILLEL
Coffee house party, card holders free, non-
members $1, 9 p.m., Hillel House.
AGRICULTURE
Farmer's frolic dance, 8 p.m., Armory.
MARDI GRAS 1964
Annual masquerade ball/party, tickets $9 at
AMS box office, 8 p.m. to 1 a.m., Commodore
Ballroom.
UBC STUDENT LIBERALS
Organization seminar, election campaign and
political organizing technique, 9:30 a.m.-3:30
p.m., SUB 207d, political boat race and cheer-
leading championships, good music and cheap
bzzr, open to all, 7:30 p.m., SUB 212.
SUNDAY
UBC SAILING CLUB
Work party, 10:30 p.m., Jericho beach.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Praise, worship, and teaching, 7 p.m., SUB 212.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Republic  Day of India show, 7:30 p.m.,  SUB
ballroom.
MONDAY
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Chris Christenson in concert, 7:30 p.m., Angus
104.
8ALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for ballet and jazz classes, noon,
SUB 216E.
FORESTRY UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Red Cross blood drive, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m., SUB
207/209 and SUB 215.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Choir practice, 8-10 p.m.. International House.
COOPERATIVE CHRISTIAN
CAMPUS MINISTRY
How to read the bible as if it really mattered,
noon, Lutheran Campus Centre.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Kung Fu class, 5:30-6:30 p.m., SUB 207/209.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Fill up those pledge forms for the dance marathon on Feb. 11.
TUESDAY
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Executive meeting, noon, SUB 212A.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for ballet and jazz classes, noon,
SUB 216E.
FIRST YEAR STUDENTS' COMMITTEE
General meeting, all first year students welcome,
noon, SUB 215.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Planning meeting, 4:30 p.m., SUB 239.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Lecture on Pathology by Dr.  D.  F.  Hardwick,
noon, IRC 1.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Film series:  People and Cultures of Canada:
Maritimers, 7:30 p.m.. International House, Gate
4.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Aerobics class, 4:30-5:30 p.m., SUB 207/209.
HILLEL HOUSE
Home-cooked  Shefa  Dairy lunch,   noon,   Hillel
House.
WEDNESDAY
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for ballet and jazz classes,  noon,
SUB 216E.
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
Vote   on   constitutional   amendments,    noon,
Chem. 150.
CHINESE STUOENTS  ASSOCIATION
Mandarin   class,    noon,    Asian   Centre   lower
lounge   area;   Cantonese   class,   noon,   Buch.
B250; Chinese calligraphy demonstration, noon,
SUB 212.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Lounge caucus, 4:30 p.m., go to SUB 239 for
location.
UBC BRIDGE CLUB
Hallowe'en   tournament   (postponed  from  November), members free, non-members $3, 7-11
p.m., International House Gate 4 lounge.
HILLEL
Lunch available, noon, Hillel House.
JEWISH STUDENTS' NETWORK
Israel information table, 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m., SUB
main hall.
The Forestry undergraduates' society
is sponsoring a blood drive from Jan. 30
— Feb. 3 from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. in
SUB/209.
ams    tout ens piescnis
rJ„   A
flmKSerblitl arena
aiAMSUttolTiiv f I!CI HlllllirS
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines, 60c. Commercial - 3 lines,
1 day $4.20; additional lines, 65c. Additional days, $3.80 and 60c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC,  Van., B.C.  V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $5.00. Call 228-3977.
COMING EVENTS
U.B.C.
RUGBY
DANCE
Sat. Jan. 28
14 Karat
Sub ball room
Tickets $5.00
at A.M.S. Box Office
8:00 p.m.
M/F TO SHARE 2 bdrm. hse. 33rd & Main.
$242/mo. & V4 util. pref. n/s with interest
in Humanities. Gary. 874-3396.
M/F WANTED TO SHARE fully renovated
2 bdrm. ste. w f/p, partially furn. near
Broadway &• MacDonald. Available mar. 1
734-3309.
25 - INSTRUCTION
LSAT, GMAT, MCAT preparation. Call
National Testing 738-4618. Please leave
message on tape if manager is counselling.
ESSAYS, term papers, reports etc. Writer
with extensive academic exper. can assist
with research, writing editing. 682-1043.
50 - RENTALS
CLOSE TO SILVER STAR.Spacious self-contained kitchen suites w cable, color TV. 4 pers.
$307day - 2 pers. $20/day. Tel-A-Friend Motel,
1501-32nd. St. Vernon, B.C. (112) 545-1779.
70 - SERVICES
THE VANCOUVER
INSTITUTE
free public lecture
THE YEAR OF ORWELL
AND HUMAN RIGHTS
Gordon Fairweather, chief
commission, Canadian Human
Rights Commission.
SATURDAY, JAN. 28
at 8:15 p.m.
Lecture   Hall   2,   Woodward
Bldg.	
EXPERT research help for hire. 224-5802 or
224-6518.
HOME DAYCARE Bilingual Fr./Eng. 14th
& MacDonald. $12/day. Lunch & 2 snacks.
Christiane 732-5669 or 736-1684.
FORMER UNIV. PROF. (10 yrs. exp.)
will critique & edit term papers, theses,
manuscripts. Reasonable rates. Fast turnaround. 669-1284.
30 - JOBS
SKI INSTRUCT children while vacationing in
Switzerland (See ad on page 2.)
35 - LOST
REWARD — lost women's wallet - black with
gold initials V.M.M. in or around Woodward Library on Friday Jan. 20 Great sentimental value - 4368 West 14th Ave.
224-5855.
40 - MESSAGES
HALF PRICE SALE1 at OLD MEETS NEW
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SUPERB SHOW of initiative Rob (M.J.)
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'84 booklets $35   Ph. Murray 731-0373
45 - PERSONALS
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Christiane. 732-5659 or 736-1684.
85 - TYPING	
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers,
factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses, IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose, 731-9857.
DOTS WORD PROCESSING service
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U-TYPE Micom word processor available
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WORD   PROCESSING   SPECIALISTS:   U
write we type theses, resumes, letters,
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ARE YOU ADOPTED? Am looking for male,
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THESIS TYPiNG on UBC Computer. Experienced with Data Analysis, FMT, SPSS,
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 15
Debaters evolve to create resolution
What promised to be a lively, interesting and intelligent discussion
of the theories of creationism and
evolution turned instead into a hatchet job on both theories as the
UBC debating club and the campus
crusade for Christ began their
"great debate" series Wednesday in
JRC2.
The debaters — Fred Edwords of
the American humanist association
for the evolution theory and Earl
Hallonquist of the Canadian crea
tion science association for the creation side — did not defend their
own theories as much as they cut
down the others.
Edwords began the debate by attacking creationism as "not being
science at all. People who study creationism eventually have to accept
the truth of evolution," he said.
Edwords said the creationist concept of a young earth is false because of the distances between the
stars. "We can see stars from more
than 10,000 light years away, and
yet they (creationists) claim the universe is less than 10,000 years old,"
he said.
Hallonquist avoided the theory
of biblical creationism. "Creation
science can be defined without using biblical terms," he said, and attacked evolutionism as being an unfounded philosophy.
In his rebuttal, Edwords tackled
the observation that evolution vio
lates the second law of thermodynamics (order unchecked will become disorder).
Hallonquist, in his rebuttal, cited
several UPI and Gallup polls showing that 50-80 per cent of Americans believe creation science should
be taught in schools,
The debate attracted a large
crowd, some of whom spilled into
theatres 1, 3 and 4 and watched the
debate on closed circuit television.
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SUBJECT TO APPROVAL. Page 16
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 27, 1984
Manic media inflames herpes stigma
By MURIEL DRAAISMA
With its flashy yellow cover, The
Truth About Herpes (Grosvenor
House, $8.95) takes a startlingly
frank look at a much maligned and
feared genital disease.
Author Dr. Stephen Sacks,
founder of UBC's herpes clinic and
a specialist in infectious diseases,
explores the causes, symptoms and
transmission of the nasty and often
painful sores appearing around the
vagina, penis, anus and mouth.
Sacks battles the idea that herpes
is a modern plague, the Scarlet Letter, as touted by an infamous Time
cover story in 1982. The commercial media has created a furor about
what is really a common blistering
infection, Sacks argues.
"To a large extent, we're talking
about a mild skin nuisance that has
now become an international
event," he said in an interview at
his tiny UBC office.
"Herpes has taken on connotations that just aren't appropriate."
Sacks carefully explained that the
majority of sufferers confuse primary herpes with the disease's recurrent version. Primary herpes is
often accompanied by headaches,
urinary discomfort, swollen lymph
nodes and muscle pains. An outbreak can last three weeks.
Recurrent herpes, however, is usually much milder. The outbreak of
blisters — including the wet-ulcer
stage, drying and scabbing — is
shorter and less discomforting. In
stead of a distressing three-week infection, recurrent herpes tends to
heal quickly.
But because the media has stigmatized the disease, those afflicted
fear they must endure the same severe symptoms each time the sores
appear.
"Once a person gets primary herpes, you know, they can't walk,
they can't pee, they have fever and
are in horrible pain, and they think
this is going to recur over and over
again. But what recurs is a mild
sore, a tingling or an itch or a small
amount of discomfort in an area
smaller than a dime."
Many journalists writing about
herpes spend too little time researching the issue and trying to understand the medical facts involved,
Sacks said. Faced with time constraints and the constant pressure of
deadlines, they merely scratch the
disease's surface.
Sacks contends the media's intent
in sensationalizing the issue is not
malicious. They only employ melodramatic headlines, frightening anecdotes and personal tragedies to
increase sales, he writes.
But reporters and headline writers
are beginning to demystify the disease, he said. A recent Canadian
Press review of his book calmly
and accurately states herpes is a
common disease that is not as debilitating as most people think.
And although the temptation to
inject inflamed elements into stories
is subsiding, the media still seizes on
the occasional opportunity, Sacks
said. A recent newspaper story said
a University of Saskatchewan researcher could find a herpes cure if
better funded, but the professor
had made no such claim.
"The (pharmacology) professor
is not even claiming he had a cure
— the word hasn't even entered his
vocabulary," he said. "Largely, the
media has listened to people in the
field saying 'hey, stop!', but to
some extent they haven't."
Sacks primarily blames media for
creating the herpes stigma, but in
The Truth About Herpes, he fails to
address the philosophical questions
surrounding the issue.
The book does not grapple with
the relationship between the stigma
and our consumer-oriented culture.
It fails to mention how our consumer society places a heavy emphasis on a person's ability to be
sexually appealing, or describe in
detail how herpes psychologically
alters our perception of those afflicted.
Sacks admits the media exploits
our conditioned fears about appearing less desirable, but he does not
explore the idea that people's natural sensitivity toward their genitals helps to create the herpes hysteria.
And his book fails to examine the
role North American attitudes toward sexuality play in this development. While the sexual revolution
of the '60s helped to create the atmosphere where free love and sex
are acknowledged and even condoned, many people still hold fast1
to Victorian values. These inhibitions, coupled with the threat of
contracting herpes, means anyone
unfortunately suffering from the virus will be a sexual outcast, whether
or not the media makes it an issue.
Sacks says the philosophy behind
the herpes stigma could be the subject of another book. "We are suffering from a number of these conflicts in our culture and it creates
problems for those trying to give
health care to people with sexually
transmitted diseases."
The director of UBC's herpes
clinic is open and engaging, like his
book. Dressed casually in blue
slacks and a sweater, he speaks patiently and authoritatively. He occasionally runs his hand through his
black, curly hair and smooths over
his moustache for emphasis.
Apart from the media, other institutions and people are trying to
capitalize on herpes, he says. Because physicians estimate 500,000 to
one million new cases are found in
North America each year and her-
pes affects all classes of people
equally, companies offering relief
and cures are springing up overnight.
"There's so many people around
trying to benefit from herpes in
terms of making an extra buck.
Anything in the news is going to be
useful for somebody who wants to
sell drugs for it or who wants to sell
God," Sacks says, citing the big evangelical bible thumpers in the U.S.
as prime examples.
Middle and upper classes are particularly vulnerable to the crusade
for cash. "In a way people from
higher socio-economic groups are
more stressed by herpes. When you
have a hard time putting food on
the table, herpes is not so much of a
problem to you," he added.
But everyone with the virus — be
it simplex I (oral) or simplex II
(genital) — should take steps to understand and avoid transmitting the
disease, Sacks says. Currently physicians have no cure for recurrent
herpes, but clinics such as UBC's
are conducting research trials in the
hope of combating the disease.
"Herpes researches are looking
at new drugs, new ways of diagnosing and what causes the virus to go
belly up. In the next five years we'll
have a whole array of anti-viral
drugs available."
Meanwhile, those suffering from
outbreaks should avoid contact
with infected skin. If the symptoms
are bothersome, soak the infection
with a hot, moist wash cloth for 10
to 15 minutes, and dry the area with
a hair dryer set at low temperature.
An oral form of the drug Acyclovir, which cuts the length of an
outbreak down by 36 hours on average, is to be released in the U.S.
within two months and soon after
in Canada. Although the drug is expensive, it might prove useful to
some people with money to spare
and important dates, Sacks says.
"If you cut down the virus shedding and you're making love for the
first time, this drug may be real im-
portant to you."	
GAYS AND LESBIANS AT U.B.C.
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GRADUATE STUDENTS
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P.O. Box 3
FORT SMITH, N.W.T.
X0E 0P0
(403) 872-2052

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