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The Ubyssey Oct 3, 1975

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Array Doug clashes
with Phillips
BORING FOR BLEEDERS, eager rehabilitation medicine students
trundle their bed along east mall Thursday during race to publicize
annual Red Cross blood drive. Moving faster than a speeding bowel
—matt king photo
movement, rehab crew managed to defeat all comers for dubious
honor of having fastest bed on wheels west of Blanca. Blood clinic
continues in SUB today.
AMS exec performs Dutch shuffle
There's a new dance that's all
the rage in the Alma Mater Society
executive offices these days.
.  It's called the Dutch shuffle.
AMS president Jake van der
Kamp Thursday shuffled his
executive, replacing treasurer
Dave Theessen with Dave Coulson,
commerce rep on council, and coordinator Lake Sagaris with arts
rep Nadine McDonnell.
Theessen said he will announce
his candidacy for internal affairs
officer, the position vacated Sept.
15 by Jennifer Fuller.
Sagaris says she has filed
nomination papers for the position
of external affairs officer to
replace Stew Savard, who resigned
Sept. 10.
Elections for the two posts will
be held Oct. 15.
Janet Neilson, interim external
affairs officer, said Thursday she
would not seek election as permanent external  affairs  officer.
She said several executive
members have told her that her
positions as both a B.C. Students'
Federation staff member and AMS
representative to the BCSF constituted a conflict of interest.
She said she will continue as a
BCSF staffer.
Council meeting cancelled
Alma   Mater  Society   council's
Thursday meeting was cancelled
because of a lack of quorum.
Fifty per cent of voting council
members plus one are needed to
constitute the quorum.
As a result, The Ubyssey will not
begin publishing council attendance records until next week's
council meeting.
Sagaris said Thursday the
decision to shuffle the executive
was reached at Saturday's meeting
of Student Unity party members.
Six of the seven AMS executive
members elected last spring were
Student Unity members.
Theessen said the shuffle was
needed to match the job with the
person. He said he is running for
the internal affairs position
because "there's a big mess with
the clubs" and he plans to bring
club affairs into order.
Theessen is expected to present
the new AMS budget to council
Wednesday — his last duty as
treasurer.
Sagaris worked closely with
Savard over the summer and
helped establish the BCSF. She
said she thinks she can help keep
BCSF  affairs running  smoothly..
She said she would continue to
work closely with the new coordinator whether she is elected as
external affairs officer or not.
Theessen and AMS secretary
Ellen Paul divided the duties of the
internal affairs officer after
Fuller's resignation.
Theessen also said interim
ombudsperson Dave Johnson has
announced he will resign the
position at council's next meeting.
Nominations for the positions of
internal affairs officer, external
affairs officer and ombudsperson
close Oct. 9.
Nominations for the positions of
treasurer and co-ordinator have
not opened. The election is expected to be held Oct. 29.
Only three of seven executives
remain in the positions to which
they were elected in February.
Van der Kamp and vice-
president Dave van Blarcom are
the only two Student Unity
members still serving in the
positions they were elected to.
Ellen Paul, elected on a Students'
Coalition platform, remains as
secretary.
By CHRIS GAINOR
Vancouver city council should
"seriously consider" rezoning the
Point Grey and Dunbar areas to
allow self-contained suites for
students, UBC administration
president Doug Kenny said
Thursday.
Reacting to remarks on student
housing in a speech Monday by
mayor Art Phillips, Kenny said "as
a resident of Point Grey, I'm not
fearful of rezoning."
Phillips, speaking to commerce
students at UBC, said he is against
rezoning the Point Grey and
Dunbar areas to allow self-
contained suites. Students should
be content to live in spare
bedrooms, he said.
The city and university should
work together to improve the
student housing situation, Kenny
said in an interview.
Kenny said he has asked to meet
Phillips to seek ways to provide
more student housing but Phillips
has not responded. "The ball is
now in his court," he added.
If the city does not co-operate on
the student housing problem,
Kenny said the university administration "will have to start
pressing vigorously for more
student housing on campus." He
said he would take that step with
reluctance.
"The city and the province have
a problem providing reasonable
low cost housing for low income
people, including students," he
said.
Acting housing director Mike
Davis said Thursday the,city and
the university administration have
a "joint responsibility" to provide
student housing.
"The university has done a
pretty good job this summer on
housing," Davis said, referring to
the off-campus housing set up in
downtown hotels.
Student housing officials contacted Thursday slammed
Phillips' remarks on student
housing.
"Phillips doesn't care about low-
income people," Lake Sagaris,
Alma Mater Society co-ordinator
and student housing committee
member, said.
"He's really into protecting
single family dwellings."
Sagaris said Phillips was
shirking his responsibility when he
called on the university administration to solve student
housing problems.
Sagaris said students are not
transients and will be able to hold
onto suites in houses, contrary to
Phillips' claim that low-income
people would take over such suites.
Jeff Hoskins, another committee
member, said Phillips "thinks
student suites will lower property
values-and tax assessments, but
they won't do that "
Prof hits Dayan as 'travelling propagandist'
By SUE VOHANKA
The only difference between Zionism in Palestine and Nazism
in Germany is the number of people involved, a UBC sociologist
said Thursday.
Paul Cappon was speaking to about 150 people attending a forum
sponsored by a g r o u p opposing Moshe Dayan's v i s i t to UBC
Monday.
"Dayan himself is now perhaps of little more than symbolic
importance since his break with the ruling party in Israel," Cappon
said.
"His visit here is important because he represents the Zionist
movement and the practical implications of that movement for
Israeli expansionism and its victims.
"Why should Moshe Dayan be an honored guest in Canada and at
UBC in particular when in most countries he would be shunned as a
military aggressor and even a war criminal?"
Cappon said a large majority of United Nations members, with
the exception of North American countries, have repeatedly
condemned Israel's military actions and sympathized with the
Palestinians.
"Moshe Dayan has always been a hawk — as an army officer,
minister of defence and now as travelling propagandist," he said.
Cappon said Zionism is not specifically related to Judaism.
"A myth I want to destroy is that people who are against Israeli
CAPPON ... new perspective for Zionism
expansion are anti-Semitic. Zionism is not equivalent with
Judaism.
"Not all Israelis are Zionists and not all Jews are Israeli expansionists. Israel is not a monolithic state — not everyone is
pleased with Zionism," Cappon said.
He added that there is opposition to Zionism even within Israel's
military ranks.
Cappon blamed Zionism on Israel's "top class" of Jews from
Western Europe.
"Those who control the army, the parliament and the capital in
Israel are from Western Europe," he said.
"The immigrants going into Israel are not to blame directly for
what happens. Most people who came to Israel came with nothing
— they came from war-torn states."
Cappon said Israel's ruling class has played upon the fears of
immigrants and "manipulated" them into supporting Zionism and
Israeli expansion.
"There is an unnatural alliance between the ruling powers in
Israel and powers like the United States," he said.
"Supporters of Zionism in North America include those who
consider a strong, militant, expansionist Israel to be a stabilizing
force in the Middle  East,   eventually  a  force  which  can be
See page 2: ISRAEL Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 3, 1975
Israel 'becomes pawn'
From page 1
manipulated to reduce the political
or   economic   threat   of   Arab
states."
As a result, Cappon said, Israel
has become a pawn for the desires
of the big powers.
"Israel has become through its
own expansion a pawn for
American imperialism in the
Middle East."
He said Palestinians naturally
resisted Israeli expansionism,
beginning in the 1960s by appealing
to the U.N.
"But they failed to get any
support and then turned to their
own methods — this is what the
newspapers call terrorism."
Since the 1948 U.N. partition
declaration which created the state
of Israel, more than one million
Palestinians have been displaced
from their homes, Cappon said.
"They're everywhere uprooted.
It's easy to say why don't they go to
other Arab states — but it's very
difficult for them to get employment and to not be a burden on
those countries, not to mention the
social and cultural differences," he
added.
Cappon said one argument which
is often used to justify Zionism is
that Arabs are "incapable," as
shown by their limited development  of   land   occupied   by   the
Palestinians before the state of
Israel was created.
"This is not quite true," Cappon
said. "Arabs have never had access to the massive capital and
money which Israel has had. The
explanation itself becomes the
reason."
Cappon said he did not want to
say whether or not it would be
possible for the Palestinians to
revert to a self-determined state,
as they were before the creation of
Israel.
"But certainly the minimal
solution (to the current conflict)
would surely be restitution of all
the lands Israel has taken by
conquest," he said.
Dayan speech tickets sold fast as
security forces prepare for visit
General Moshe Dayan will be
addressing a full house when he
delivers a speech to UBC students
on Monday, Rabbi Marvin Hier,
whose synagogue is co-sponsoring
the event, said Thursday.
Hier said the AMS office has told
him 700 tickets had been sold by
Thursday afternoon. All non-
student tickets had been purchased
and about half those available to
students had also been claimed, he
said. "I would be very surprised if
there will be any tickets left for
anyone by Monday morning."
The general's presence is expected to set off demonstrations by
groups both protesting and supporting his visit. But Hier said
Dayan knows how to handle adverse audiences and that in a
recent confrontation in Tacoma
Dayan made the demonstrators
"come off like fools." ,
Hier thinks Dayan's visit will be
surrounded by "unusually tight
security." Indications are local
law enforcement agencies will be
contributing more than 30 men for
security for the visit. In addition,
Dayan brings his own squad of
bodyguards with him when he
travels abroad.
Dayan is speaking on Peace in
the   Middle   East   in   the   SUB
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
ballroom, noon Monday, a question
period will follow. Admission is 50
cents for students.
Sgt. Jim Barr, head of RCMP
security for Dyan's visit, refused to
expand upon security measures for
Monday's speech.
"This is going to be a medium
type of security arrangement, and
we consider it only as a routine
visit by a foreign dignitary," Barr
said.
WANTED
WRITERS
WITH
ARTICLES IN EDUCATION
FOR
EDUCATION
U^
Articles on any aspect of
education are wanted by
October 24, 1975 in Room 1
of Neville Scarfe Building.
Call 228-2623 for info
$50 REWARD $50
CORRECTION
TO
TRANSCENDENTAL
MEDITATORS
AD
OCT. 2nd
should read
OCT. 3
Room 125 S.U.B.
"This will be the usual type of
speech and demonstration,
probably similar to Mr. Turner's
visit a few years back."
"We don't consider him (Dayan)
a fanatic's target," said Barr.
"We will set our security network .up as we have done in the
past."
CORKY'S
APPOINTMENT SERVICE
731-4191
3644 West 4th Avenue
At Alma
FEMALE
TRANSPORT
by Steve Gooch
An M.F.A. Thesis Production
Directed By Kathleen Miller
OCTOBER 8-11   8:00 p.m.
Tickets: $3.00
Students: $2.00
Tickets: Room 207 — Frederic Wood Theatre
UBC DOROTHY SOMERSET STUDIO
George & Berny's
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REPAIRS
COMPLETE SERVICE BY
FACTORY-TRAINED
MECHANICS^
FULLY GUARANTEED
AT REASONABLE RATES
731-8644
2125 W. 10th at Arbutus
Jazz at UBC
LIONS GATE
JAZZBAND
UBC Graduate Centre
Friday October 3id.
900'tillOO.
Admission $150
Refreshments
Traditional Jazz Music
for dancing and listening.
GO FLY A KITE!
From The New KITE & CRAFT SHOP in Kits
GRAND OPENING SALE — 25% OFF ENTIRE STOCK
Oct. 3 Through Oct. 11
Giant Mylar Dragon Kites. Reg. $10.00
NOW $7 50
Durable Mylar Box Kites Reg. $7.75
NOW$580
Also, Fine Hand-crafted Goods from
California, Oregon, Washington & B.C.
2936 W.  4th (One Block W of MacDonald) TGI.  731 "7822 Friday, October 3, 1975
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
NDU plan termed madness
By MARCUS GEE
The B.C. government's plan to
jmake Notre Dame University a
fsatellite of the three established
B.C. universities is "madness," a
University of  Victoria   senate
member said Thursday.
Philosophy professor Charles
^Daniels said a UVic joint senate
and board of governors committee,
struck to study UVic's involvement
with NDU, will probably recom-
^mend that no UVic courses be
offered there.
"Frankly I don't know why UVic
is involved at all," Daniels said.
"Offering courses at Nelson would
be a bloody waste of money."
Daniels said the education
department's plan to have B.C.'s
three metropolitan universities
offer degree programs at a
revamped institution in Nelson will
fail because of lack of enrolment.
The model for the new institution
was formulated by UBC continuing
education head Walter Hardwick
after education minister Eileen
Dailly announced last spring Notre
Dame would become public.
B.C. Students Federation staffer
Janet Neilson said Thursday
enrolment will not be a problem
after Notre Dame becomes public
next September. She said
enrolment at the privately-run
campus rose to 468 this year from
351 last year.
Neilson said the Nelson region
can support a fourth B.C.
university, but said it should be
academically independent and
offer its own degrees.
"NDU should be developed as
B.C:'s interior college rather than
as a centre for Lower Mainland
universities. There is a great deal
of scope for growth there."
Students,  faculty and staff at
examined
WINNIPEG (Staff) - University and community college
students here, faced with a serious
housing shortage, are planning to
set up a student-run housing
corporation.
If student councils at the
University of Manitoba, the
University of Winnipeg and Red
River Community College approve
the proposal, the corporation will
be operating by the end of the
month.
The corporation proposal was
approved at a meeting Sept. 23 of
students from the three institutions. The meeting was held to
discuss ways of protecting students
from Winnipeg's current housing
shortage.
If established, the corporation
will buy existing homes in the
Winnipeg area and refurbish them
or build an apartment complex for
students.
U of M Student Union service
director Gwen Friesen said in a
telephone interview the housing
corporation will not alleviate
immediate housing problems but
termed it a "long term project."
Winnipeg's housing vacancy
level is currently less than one per
cent. Vancouver's vacancy level is
0.6 per cent, according to Central
Mortgage and Housing Corporation figures.
The proposed corporation will
likely be approved by the U of M
and Red River student associations
but the student association at the
University of Winnipeg where
there is adequate housing, may not
join the corporation.
The corporation's structure will
not be decided until the idea has
been approved. Corporation officials will then seek funds and
decide what type of housing will be
suBBiied-Jtoustudfints--..._....—
NDU must be allowed to participate in impending decisions
about the university's future,
Neilson said. She said these groups
have not so far been involved in
any decision-making about the
transformation of Notre Dame.
"They (the education department) were heavy-handed about
this and didn't consult anybody.
They made a bureaucratic decision
about how things are going to be at
NDU and they have every intention
of pushing it through."
NDU student services head Ron
Waldie said Thursday the
Universities Council, which is in
charge of studying the NDU
transformation, has not responded
to input by people at Notre Dame.
"We have sent briefs to them
(universities council). It is time for
them to respond."
Waldie  said  he   thinks   Notre
Dame should offer its own degrees.
But he said he has not seen enough
of the Universities Council's plans
for NDU to judge their effect on the
institution.
"Nothing I have heard seems
workable. I don't like the general
idea of the institution becoming a
colonial outpost of other universities. The government's plan
needs a lot of refinement."
Waldie said nobody  at   Notre
Dame can respond to the plans for
its future until the Universities
Council spells out what it foresees
for NDU.
"We need a major philosophical
idea about what kind of institution
it will be."
The council must make a major
statement by Nov. 1 at the latest,
Waldie said, or Notre Dame
planning for next year will be
"past the crisis point."
FASCINATED BY MACHINE, bunch of gawking gears stand around
in amazement as giant Tonka loader performs work it would take at
least 20 busy little gears with shovels to do. Big event was re-erection
—matt king photo
of engineers' symbol of concrete thinking that was toppled during
forestry week. Operation was supervised by contingent of campus
RCMP who had suggested that work would be good idea.
Rand formula workers' right-McLean
By HEATHER WALKER
The university administration's
opposition to a closed shop union
for the Association of University
and College 'Employees is "a
matter of personal rights," John
McLean said Thursday.
In a closed shop "people not
electing to join the union can't be
hired by the university, and anyone
who wants out of the union must be
fired," he said. McLean, director
of personnel and labor relations at
UBC, represents the university in
negotiations with AUCE.
But according to AUCE spokes
woman Nancy Wiggs the important issue is administration
interference in union affairs.
"I think it's disgusting for the
administration to stick its nose into
union matters," she said. "The
type of union we want is the union's
own business."
The administration's contract
with AUCE, local 1 expired
Tuesday. AUCE represents
clerical and library workers on
campus.
McLean said he hoped there
would not be a strike.
"Negotiations are going slowly
but they are progressing," he said.
"The union negotiating committee
has a constructive attitude."
Wiggs said she did not think
there would be a strike in the
foreseeable future, but "the
(union) membership is becoming
angry."
"We need more division
meetings and more massive
meetings to show the administration that we're interested,
and then negotiations should go
faster."
McLean said he hoped
negotiations would be finished "in
a week to 10 days."
Dale McAslyn, chairwoman for
AUCE's negotiating committee,
expressed surprise at McLean's
statement.
"We still haven't begun to
discuss wages," she said. "Apparently last year McLean said
negotiations should take two
weeks, but they went on for seven
months.
The administration is proposing
a Rand formula system for UBC.
Under this system, workers pay
union dues but do not have to join
the union.
—peter cummings photo
O.UASI-CQP .., demg his paper work
Quosis study eyed
The B.C. Police Commission is considering including UBC's campus
patrol in a province-wide study of private security organizations.
Commission chairman John Hogarth said Thursday he is inviting
letters from students and university officials about the possibility of
investigating the 30-member campus patrol.
Hogarth said an investigating committee will recommend ways of
restructuring the Private Investigators' Licencing Act to meet demands
imposed by a rapid expansion of private security agencies.
The campus police fall under partial jurisdiction of the licencing act,
but their activities are also regulated indirectly by the B.C. Universities
Act.
Areas to be studied include training and personnel standards of
security organizations and regulations about firearms use.
The study results from a concern by public police forces about the rapid
growth in the private sector. Hogarth said the new statute will be a
consensus of public and private police forces, and will not be a statute
arbitrarily imposed on the private security industry.
The commission, formed by the provincial government under its
recently passed Police Act, is responsible for standardizing police
training in B.C., handling complaints from the public and undertaking
research into different areas of police operation.
Last week the commission received four reports from students employed by the government to investigate different problems of law enforcement in B.C. fage 4
THE        UBY55EY
Friday, October 3, 1975
Money, money
So education minister Eileen Dailly is "very upset" about
pay raises to senior administrative people at the B.C. Institute
of Technology.
If this be the case, she shouldn't look with tunnel vision.
Take a peek at UBC for example. Administration
president Doug Kenny takes home a salary in the $60,000
bracket.
In addition, he has hired four vice-presidents, two more
than his predecessor Walter Gage.
That makes a total of four veeps each earning about
$54,000 annually.
The education minister has been told that BCIT prin ipal
Gordon Thorn's salary has reached $50,000 — a substantial
increase over the last man who held the post.
The message?
Queen Eileen: cast your eyes to UBC and look at our
salaries for top administrators. And while you're at it, how
about an investigation into how the big boys were selected
too.
Quasi cops
How much  do you hate
the campus quasi-cops.
Let us count the ways.
Better still write a letter
about the UBC patrol to the
B.C. Police Commission
which is investigating various
types of security firms in the
province.
They are currently
considering whether to
include university patrols in
the study. And so they
should.
Address all complaints to
Dr. John Hogarth, chairman
of the commission, 409
Granville St., Vancouver,
B.C.
^OOD oono
CLINIC r
Letters
Arlene
off base
Your editorial leaves me completely uninformed. But this is
probably a reaction to your
complete ignorance. You quote me
as saying students are "too stupid
to vote" and pass the judgement
that I'm snatching the decision
making from the students.
To this I will have to reply in full.
Neither you nor anyone from the
editorial staff spoke to me about
NUS. Instead, on an issue of such
great importance you sent a
reporter who began her interview
with "I really don't know what
goes on with NUS."
I never said anything to her or
yourselves "that students are
stupid." When she asked me about
the referendum I replied that
people were trying to kill our
contribution to NUS by requiring a
referendum which will fail if less
than 10 per cent of the total student
population votes.
I then added that we should
continue our monetary commitment to NUS and your article
on the front page quotes my
reasons fairly accurately.
From an editorial position, you
lecture me that I should "get out
and make sure people realize why"
NUS is important. It seems that
you have a piece of machinery
titled The Ubyssey and yet in three
years The Ubyssey has not gotten
out and informed people of
anything, never mind the basic
facts of NUS.
Every NUS conference is
followed by a mail out of suggested
headlines and articles about what
NUS is doing. You people don't
even have to get out and report. All
you have to do is read (which is
probably a difficulty) and print.
Every year NUS conferences
have been kiss-off vacation trips
for executive members of the AMS.
These people never submit written
summaries of the NUS conference
they attend, yet does The Ubyssey
chastize them?
Obviously executive members
are exempt.
The reason elections or
referendums in general do not get
the turnout they deserve is largely
the irresponsibility of the Ubyssey.
For people who cannot even read
or print NUS releases, imagine the
difficulty in composing an editorial
containing facts insteas of one
laying shit on someone, anyone,.for
some vague  uninformed  reason.
Since the editors never spoke to
me, perhaps I should clarify my
position on the proposed NUS
dollar. I told your reporter that
getting a dollar per student for
NUS from a referendum would be
as difficult as getting a dollar per
student from our budget.
Perhaps I should enlighten your
readership as to WHY. It seems
that the Fascist Ubyssey editors
believe we need only one student
organization, one which they and
the AMS can control and chastize.
A federal student organization
requires co-operation and a lot of
work. All other (except for Quebec
with different circumstances)
provincial student organizations
work with NUS.
Both are equally necessary.
I have been vocal only to make
sure no fascist or sadistic editors
color NUS with anteater's shit.
Propaganda such as you lay out is
the foundation of the very kind of
dictatorship which you pretend to
abhor.
In conclusion, I demand a
retraction of your ignorant, fascist
editorial. I do not like to see myself
or the issue of NUS dragged
through such shit. Next time get
your facts or personal opinions of
people straight before you
editorialize on them.
Arlene J. Francis
arts undergrad society president
AMS council rep
Arlene, you have skilfully
managed in a few short
paragraphs to distort the whole
issue here and put the blame for
your problems on The Ubyssey.
You seem to be somewhat
confused.
First the comments which
opened the editorial were not
direct quotes from you. Any reader
with a pea for a brain would know
that.
Rather, they were inferences
which any person would make
after reading your stupid comments on the front page.
In your letter you say that people
"trying to kill our contribution to
NUS by requiring a referendum
which will fail if less than 10 per
cent of the total student population
votes."
In your next paragraph you
affirm the substance of the story
MU8YSSIV
OCTOBER 3,1975
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout ■ the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the
AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly
commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are
located in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977. Editor: Gary Coull
A nickname masthead, he said knowingly. Gary "The kid" Coull, now
the staffer with the most seniority, except for Eric "The Red" Ivan "The
Coral Pink" Berg, who doesn't count. Doug "The Autocrat" Rushton.
That's obvious, sneered Sue "Don't tread on me" Vohanka. Chris "Just
back from a two-week sabbatical, ahem ahem" Gainor, "Number 3,"
Marcus B. Gee and Anne "Peppermint Patty" Wallace looked on. Len
"Spelunker" MacKave, Doug "No, not you, Doug Rushton" Field, Charlie
"Chuckles" Rendina and Greg "That's Greg with two g's" Thompson
looked kind of off. Gregg "That's Gregg with one g" Edwards, Matt "Ress"
King (size) looked away. Peter "Torch" Cummings, Mark "Go back where
you came from, frog" Lepitre, Lesley "The Red/Green Eminence"
Krueger, "Weed" Walker, "Buck" Buckshon and Patti-Reay "I listen to
CFUN" Stahl gaped knowingly.  Ralph " " Maurer wrote this
masthead, knowingly. See my lawyer.
and the import of the editorial.
You would rather have the
money for the National Union of
Students come right out of the
budget rather than be contingent
on the outcome of an election. The
point was made loud and clear. If it
left you "completely uninformed"
then it's your fault for being too
dense to let it sink in.
As for trying to shift the blame Onto
the paper for people being uninformed about NUS try again. We
don't print flack from anybody and
certainly not the "suggested
headlines and articles" from NUS.
That wouldn't be very critical now
would it?
As for "the fascist Ubyssey
editors" believing in only one
student organization, you are
wrong — again. The paper has
tried to raise the issue of how much
value these student organizations
have and, when all the relevant
material is in, we'll give an informed opinion. We've been
waiting for a long time for some
decent reports on NUS. Not
everyone is as enlightened about
the issues of the day as you are. —
Staff
Golf
Dear Mr. Bidlake (men's intramurals) :
As you know, last Saturday
(Sept. 27) youheld your annual golf
tournament, the only competition
of its kind held all year. From my
point of view, the tournament was
poorly run and disorganized.
A posted starting time of 1 p.m.
was later changed to 10 a.m. as I
was informed later. How well was
this change announced? No
mention of this change was made
in either Tuesday's, Thursday's, or
Friday's Ubyssey preceding the
tournament.
Upon arrival at the Musqueam
Golf Center on Saturday, at 12:30
p.m., there was no intramural
official present or anyone who
knew who this official was.
The only evidence that there was
a tournament being held was a sign
requesting signed score cards to be
placed in the supplied shoe box.
A large majority of golfers
started at 10 a.m., but there were
at least four other golfers, that I
know of, besides our threesome
who arrived just before  1 p.m.
Undoubtedly  there were more.
What were we to do? Go home or
take the chance that all we had to
do was submit our score card into
the shoe box. We took the chance.
After finishing our round of golf
4-1/2 hours later we were surprised
to see the sign and shoe box were
gone, leaving us no place to submit
our score card.
After visiting the men's intramural office on Monday morning I was told our score card could
not be accepted due to certain
regulations. Regulations which I
still do not think are valid.
I will be the first to admit, the
few people like yourself who are
trying to look after the intramurals
are short of staff and probably
overworked. I praise you for taking
up this difficult challenge.
However, if someone like
yourself or anyone else who
volunteers to referee or officiate at
a sports event, they should take it
upon themselves to be fair, on
time, willing to make allowances,
and make a determined effort to
see that the sports event they are
officiating is run smoothly.
If people are willing to come out
and support men's intramural, the
people who have volunteered as
referees should take their job
seriously enough to try to help
participants enjoy that sport
rather than demoralize them to
where they may become so
frustrated they quit participating
all together.
Jay Lazzarin
aggie 2
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be signed and
typed.
Pen names will be used when the
writer's real name is also included
for our information in the letter or
when valid reasons for anonymity
are given.
Although an effort is made to
publish all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
letters for reasons of brevity,
legality, grammar or taste.
' Letters should be addressed to
the paper care of campus mail or
dropped off at The Ubyssey office,
SUB 241-K. Friday, October 3, 1975
THE       UBY55ET
rage a
soa
Dayan: Menace or hero?
To some people Dayan        IWM
means Zionist aggression
By DAVID FULLER
Moshe Dayan, a leading military and
political figure of the Zionist state of Israel,
is speaking at UBC Monday.
Dayan's appearance in Vancouver is part
of a tour of selected Canadian and American
cities aimed at rallying support for Zionism
and Israeli aggression against the just
struggles of the Palestinian people for
freedom and independence in their
homeland, Palestine.
Canada is one of the few countries — along
with the United States, South Africa and
Rhodesia — which openly support Israel. So
racist and imperialist is Zionism that Israel
currently faces international rebuke in the
form of expulsion from the United Nations.
Fuller is a member of the committee to
oppose Dayan's UBC visit. The committee is
organizing a demonstration during the
former Israeli defence minister's speech
Monday noon in SUB.
Conscious of its own isolation, Israel is
engaged in a campaign to consolidate
Zionist support in North America. It was
Zionist, influence in Canada which was
responsible for pressuring the federal
government into cancelling the U.N. Conference on the Prevention of International
Crime in Toronto — on the pretext that
members , of the Palestine Liberation
Organization coming to the conference
would be a threat to Canadian security.
The real reason, of course, was Zionist
pressure, c,OiMed with the federaj goVgah-
ment's mTrefcfl^ isolating the |C,aiadia,n
people w>% the; forces of chahge*and
progres^Hi,rv;tHS ^orld to^ay. Representatives of"*!#ie *FjEO — 'jaw organization
struggling.'
to buifd «x_,...
-^algs*£ine ■—- are prohibited
'e'^riHflBne Dayan mean-
Vpf 'Zionist aggression —
■riftled b»t l&S^^extepsive
rgariizati6i
fi^C^acism and impeii&lism
 gibfcratic* state for both Jews
and'Arab:
frpmNsp^
wf" ^'
is itot
security
It is jJ^acq^^A^^^ Mosh<
speak inViancrli^SjTpls here
Habitat Conference; will be
and the PLQvtfll be in atti
Canadians hp$$fae Palesti
had to live inpentSy near
under constant?atta3i?Jyjy the
ever since being driven froro^
by the Zionists in 194S.    A.
No, Dape&4s not intere$te<
truth or ;;|he Justice ofcj&je'^a
struggle known tojCjoi^^^, ^,'%corriinj
to Vancouver to suppress  the truth an"
promote racism, imperialism, and genocide
under the ideology of Zionism.
From its beginning Zionisr,- has sought
and gained support from imperialist powers
— first Britain and then the United States.
The political philosophy of Zionism was first
developed in the latter part of the 19th
"century. Its founder, Theodor Herzl, made
clear the imperialist nature of Zionism from
the very beginning, when, at the fourth
Zionist Congress in London (1900), he
stated:
"It is of increasing importance to the
nations of civilization that on the road to
Asia —. the shortest road to Asia — there
would be set up a post of civilization which
would be at the service of mankind. This
post is Palestine . . . and the Jews will be
prepared to defend this post with blood and
substance. ..."
This "post of civilization" Herzl had in
mind was really a post of British and later
U.S. imperialism, and had nothing whatsoever to do with civilization.
The imperialist role of Zionism is further
clarified by Chaim Weizmann, the first
premier of Israel, when, in writing of his
negotiations with the British imperialists,
he states: "For a long time we have pointed
out to the English . . . that Jewish Palestine
would be a safeguard for England, particularly where it concerned the Suez
Canal."
The efforts of the Zionists to promote
themselves as supporters of British imperialism did not go unnoticed by the British
government. They too saw the strategic
importance of having a nation of people,
loyal and willing to die for British  im
perialism, situated in Palestine. The
Balfour Declaration of 1917 formalized the
mutual aims of both the Zionists and the
British imperialists.
This declaration came in the form of a
letter from the then British Foreign
Secretary, Arthur James Balfour to the
Zionist, Baron de Rothschild. The letter
openly declared that Britain "favors the
establishment in Palestine of a national
home for Jewish people."
The Balfour Declaration clearly contravened the legitimate rights of the
Palestinian people. It totally dismissed the
fact that at the time the Arab majority in
Palestine consisted of 93 per cent of the
population which owned 97 per cent of the
land.
The implementation of the Balfour
Declaration was greatly facilitated in 1920
by the granting of Palestirie to Britain under
mandate status by the League of Nations.
British control of Palestine under the guise
of mandate status lasted from 1920 to 1947,
and all through these years the British
imperialists did their utmost first, to aid in
See page 16: PALESTINIANS
Hillel
House
replies
Hillel House was given the opportunity to
reply to Fuller's article so both sides of the
issue could be presented together. This is
their response.
Palestinian freedom fighter.
Israeli students:
'Can't trust big powers'
Il> GKKGG THOMPSON-
TWO uiung Israelis-  currently on a road
tour ol Norm America, recently arrived in
Vancouver   and   offered   some   candid
opinions on themselves. I heir count r\ and
the I'lirrmt scene in the Middle Ea.-I
Both were burn and raised on a kibbutz in
northern   Isiaol.  near  Ihe  now contested
Golan Height
When al home round and jocular Ai'remi
Lipct/, 29. work> in the grupclruit orchards.
of Ihe Jordan \alloy. His more taut companion. 25 year-old Shimon Kfir. worked for
.a year on a desert construction site in order
to lurid ihe current trip
■•   Both Lipetz and Kfir have served » ith (he
gfcraeli   armed   forces   and   bath   have*
relinquished kibbutz membership in order
jthat Ihcy might spend an unlimited time
ibmad. ;
The recent Sinai accord signed between
3gypt and Israel was negotiated after the
iir lctt Israel. Lipetz is hostile to the
Dgeraent, feeling thai the only real
ficiary of the deal was the United
rs
Everyone  applauds   the  Sinai   peace
rd. Fine, it's belter than war. But
singer is a big asshole. The agreement is
good for Ford'and the 1976 elections. It's
good work for the U.S.
' '/Kissinger dues all the work and gets all
the glory. It's fine for hiiA ta negotiate sway
someone eUse's national interest. Look, we
got money and weapons Ml exchange ft
petroleum and strategic, military a<
.vantages. We paid fer Kissinger** peace."
Some Israeli politicians have advocated »
■return to the Geneva Peace Conference'as
an.alternative to the-step-by-step apneoach   „ T    t_. ,. „ .. , ._ ...
,i**forwardby Kissinger- Su&atitofeift*)' ^Jerw^,.a«rt)sa^ w*iJ •JaM&fe
JjNiuld Involve a aegotiafcidfctOement *ty#*imtomtil*lf^™*&
->fiweett Israel ami the confi««rfato$st**V ?*«w4^t«4sr Jfc*«^*ri*,l*S7. *t«*,
&0c4*rai*d be, m pert, rifled h* *fe ffe«e> Ar«b&.f«Wt. a#. tinraVflw world; have free
.?jfoan»te<s.'. ... -..■ '.-■■ ■ araec&to-jfetasfc«w-ftat4 c*|Pt see «ew
"£\j^\i&ev»*atL-^k9^^ . --.    .v.i.-.
^tuiofher "KisttageYJfeMr,'* tacaeidoeM . ■-' Ljpe&hasfwghup MbJtU&iStft wgr^ln'
want big power .pmquittea. fa* aavk,.. *SW.^* iwi He has fitted "«»iiiier'' oaAr
because they haw been V^S^ M^y'-fh^^ rebK ** the- IMRr4HK.br bis ej«n
t*:he kieftecUv*,    ■ ' ..'   .1 -.' ■■::",..     ....'   aOaass&ahefe "a poor shot'Ms fit,' ftiate
citizens both heAncj Kfir must serve in the
'.        <p days out of every year
„.   .    . TiranvTOuWiernAWopeatolsraell   intU M ag«.«f SS.
Raping. In IU67, who eespofided! whentfiey.    *'1H». Willy' is bAskaily a. bunch of shit,
were closed* Finland — or someone like-  like any army. Young people must enter the
Hitler despite the assurances of Great
Britain. France ar.ri the Soviet I mon to tight
Miller should ('/ochn^lovakiun sovereignty
be threatened
"Wecan't alford to trust somebody else's
guarantees,'  he sa>s
I.ipi'lz and Kfir think the he.-,I way of
reaching u lusting Middle Kasl agreement is
to hsirgain lace-to lace with Ihe Arabs They
i eler to the 'Kilometer IDI" negotiations at
the end of the 197.1 Yom Kippur war. where
the two sides negotiated * among other
• lungs' an exchange of prisoners Those
meetings however, were of a military
n.ituro
Direct political negotiations are more
difficult, they say. because to do so would
require that the Arabs accept and recognize
the stale of Israel. "This the Arabs are not
prepared to do," says Kfir.
With the passage of the recent Sinai
settlement, political and military strategists
now dwell on possibilities for future
territorial adjustments in the Middle East.
Primary interests focus on the Golan
Heights and the city of Jerusalem.
Lipetz says the heights are too important
a defensive feature to be bargained fer.
He adds that Jerusalem is an open c|ty
now, under Israeli administration, as it was
supposed to be after the 1948 ceasefire.'.-
"1 hope we don't give the Golan Heights
up. Before tySl, ihe Syria** used to shoot
fer«gi fanaersoiffiwtr tnfctfln:'
we can't.allow t$a(lo htfHen'«g
are MB Jaws Uaflaad.tif *yi*fcU
think we canglve tig ^heU$U e
would mea% B^,finnAom pf thssepaeirihr-
- "Par N^dersh>v« «a».thai e^cTittuRftf ia
mja^OaHe, -fieiiVl dbs^.tlmik ffieT - -
(•' "In i96«atter«j»Siiezertajssregavehaejfc ^.^
Mbe Sinai after reeeiviBg g^&«Bjriee«tiiai tl* --^^
.4wait«ofTiranwouW«mAUJoi>eatoIaFaeli   i"*!
Ifiat.   Nobody   came,
guarantees then4
Kfir cites the example of Czechoslovakia
in 1938, when that country was carved up by
Where   were   the' army at age IS and serve until they are 21—
the best years of your life No one place ia
See page 16: WE
Tell every soldier
Who   wears  the  Star  of David  on  his
uniform:
"Guard this corner of the earth
For your child who will be born tomorrow
So that he may roam
The valleys of freedom.
We are fighting for the right
To work our soil
Like all the other nations in the world."
[excerpted from May the Flowers Grow,
Lena Allen Shore]
Moshe Dayan.
Born 1915 in kibbutz (collective settlement) Degania in the Galilee. At an early
age he was brought to Nahalal, the first
Jewish co-operative village (Moshav) and
later studied at the agricultural school
situated there. .
In his early teens he joined the Haganah,
the Jewish underground defence force.
During the late 1930s he served under the
famous British military leader, Orde
Wyngate.
Arrested by the British in 1939 for
possessing "illegal" arms, he was sentenced to 10 years in the infamous Acre
prison. He was released in 1941 to work
against the Fascist Vichy French forces in
Syria and Lebanon.
He led a unit of scouts against the pro-Nazi
elements in Lebanon and Syria. A bullet
drove a telescope lens into his left eye and
made the eye patch necessary. Subsequently he served as liaison officer with
the British in Jerusalem until 1944, after
which he returned to farming.
During Israel's War of Independence
Dayan held the rank of lieutenant-colonel. In
1949 he was senior military representative
in the Israeli delegation to the armistice
negotiations in Rhodes, where he negotiated
with Jordan.
In 1952-53 he continued his army service.
In November, 1953 he became chief of staff
of the Israel defense forces. He left the army
in 1957 and became active in Mapai, the
Israel labor party.
In the years that followed he returned to
school part-time, receiving a degree from
the school of law and economics in Tel Aviv.
He enrolled in political science at the
Hebrew University in Jerusalem. In 1959 he
was appointed minister of agriculture;
resigning this post in 1964.
In 1965 he joined a splinter group from the
labor party. Several days before the outbreak of the 1967 conflict Dayan was invited
to become minister of defense in an all-arty
government of national, unity. He held that
post until just after the war of October, 1973.
Today he sits as a member of the Israeli
parliament.
Moshe Dayan — farmer, soldier,
statesman, leader.
Hillel House is pleased to welcome and
introduce this man to the UBC community.
Percy Spilberg
program co-ordinator
Hillel House
Fred Lepkin
Canada-Israel committee W      %rS       I       Sj
rnaay, wcTooer o,   «7/j
Alma Mater Society Budget
Schedules
SCHEDULE A
PROPOSED UNDERGRADUATE    SOCIETY ALLOTMENTS
No. of Students
Based on
■74/75
Enrolment
Agriculture
336
$    400.80
Engineering
861
558.30
Architecture
211
363.30
Nursing
416
424.80
Arts
4,287
1,093.05
Fine Arts
80
324.00
Music
255
376.50
Home Ec
370
411.00
Library
132
339.60
Social Work
148
344.40
Commerce
1,471
670.65
Dentistry
194
358.20
Education
3,388
950.70
Physical Education
529
458.70
Recreation
147
344.10
Forestry
328
398.40
Graduate Studies
2,666
849.90
Law
690
507.00
Medicine
321
396.30
Rehab Medicine
106
331.80
Pharmacy
347
404.10
Science
3,825
1,023.75
Total
11,329.35
SCHEDULE B
UBYSSEY
BUDGET
Revenue: (Net of Commissions)
Advertising Display
94,200
Classified
2,600
Subscriptions
400
Total
97,200
Expense:
Administration -
- Publications
20,
100
Promotion
200
Total
20,300
Printing
Photography
Mailing
Honorariums
Telephone and Telex
Stationery and Supplies
Staff Meals
CUP —Fees 2,170
— Conference 680
Misc. Salaries — Copy Runner
Distribution
Sundry
90,750
650
1,000
970
1,800
500
750
2,850
700
2,900
500*
90,750
Total subsidy from budget
Add 5 per cent General Administration Costs
Total Costs to AMS
SCHEDULE C
GENERAL ADMINISTRATION BUDGET
12,620
123,670
26,470
6,470
32,711
Salaries and Benefits
Salaries
84,000
Benefits
6,800
Car Allowance
2,000
92,800
Telephone
1,200
Postage
850
Professional Services
Hiring
600
Audit
3,500
Legal
4,000
8,100
Supplies and Stationery
4,800
Print Shop
Supplies and Stationery
1,000
Salaries
9,400
Benefits
500
10,900
Part-time Staff and Overtime
1,500
Sundry
100
Staff Relations
500
Staff Development
2,000
Accounting Machine Paper
700
Accounting Machine Paper
1,550
Total
125,000
Phillips Accounting Machine:
Amortized over
five (5) years on advice of Ph
Hips Co.
4,400
Total Administration Charge
to
be
Allocated:
129,400
* This is a suspense account to isolate administration
expenses to be charged to the following areas on the
following basis. These percentages are based on the
amount of work processed by this department on
behalf of the other departments or programmes.
1974/75     1975/76
Students' Council
25%
20%
Publications
5%
5%
Student Union Building
20%
25%
Undergraduate Societies
25%
25%
Clubs
20%
20%
Activities
5%
5%
Total
Contribution by Building
To be Allocated
25,880
6,470
32,350
32,350
25,880
6,470
129,400
31,350
97,050
The Ubyssey is
required by the
Alma Mater Society
constitution to
print its budget
each year.
Summary
REVENUE:
AMS Fees (based on 20,000 full time student enrolment)
—Regular (20,000 x $34) 680,000
—Extension 19,000
Undergraduate Society Fees 22,000
Graduate Class Fees 22,750
Investment Income 16,550
Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre 75,000
Total 835,300     835,300
EXPENDITURES:
Students Union Building Debt
(20,000 x $15) 300,
Graduation Class Fees 22,
Undergraduate Society Fees 22,
SUB Management Fund
(20,000 x .50) 10,000
Accident Benefit Fund
(20,000 x.10) 2
Registration Photographs 6,
Athletic Fee (20,000 x $5) 100,
Aquatic Centre Trust Fund
(20,000 x $5)
National Union of Students (Constitutional)
(20,000 x .30) t (4,000 x .10) 6
SUB Art Fund (Constitutional) 1
Constitutional Margin 5 per cent 30
Thunderbird Winter Sports Centree
Loan (See Revenue) 75,000
676,010
Amount Available For   Discretionary   Use:
000
750
000
000
000
000
100,000
400
,500
,360
Available for Discretionary Uses
Schedule A—Palmer Grants
Schedule B—Ubyssey Grant
Schedule C—Administration
Schedule D—Students' Council
Available for Other Discretionary Uses:
Other Requests for Funding:
11,330
26,470
97,050
24,275
676,010
159,290
159,290
160,037
165
SCHEDULE D
STUDENTS' COUNCIL
Honorariums
Treasurer
President
Co-ordinator
Secretary
External Affairs
Miscellaneous
Coffee
Flowers, donations
Social (BOG and Senate)
Publications and Info
Other Misc. Items
Conferences
Out of Province
In Province
Elections
Constitutional Revisions
Information
Stationery, etc.
Professional
Executive Salaries
Treasurer
Vice-President
Co-ordinator
Benefits
Salary Allowance — May 1976
Telephones
Stationery, Supplies, Postage
Information
Total
20 per cent of General Admin. Budget
Total Charges
PUBLICATIONS BUDGET
Expense:
Salaries
Stationery and Supplies
Postage
Telephone and Telex
Car Allowance .and Sundry
Conversion to A/M
Total
Proration of Expense:
Ubyssey (.75 x 25,200)
+ 1,200
Bird Calls (.25 x 25,200)
540
180
200
210
500
200
250
50
250
2,100
400
2,000
500
2,000
2,240
735
700
370
BIRD CALLS
Revenue:
Advertising
Sales
Total
Expense:
Administration and Misc.
Printing
Supplemental Staff
Net Profit
5 per cent Margin
Expected Profit
Notes
Part-time Students' Association
600
Intramurals
, Mens'
10,535
Women's
5,025
Co-lntramurals
1,360
16,920
Conference Grants
3,000
Special Projects
3,500
Campus Conferences
2,000
Legal Aid
1,000
CITR
Operating
2,925
Repair and Maintenance
2,000
Gage Expansion
500
5,425
AMS Art Gallery Committee
2,500
Speakers Committee
Speakers Grants
1,500
Committee Program
2,000
3,500
External Affairs
Travel
2,500
Telephone
500
3,000
Orientation
67S
Clubs Day
670
Newsletters
1,000
BCSF
2,000
Total Other Requests:
45,790
Total Projected Deficit:
45,625
Add 5 per cent
2,281
Total Deficit:
47,906
200
1,330
2,500
2,500
4,500
4,045
1,650
1,500
3,500
1,500
24,275
25,880
50,155
22,200
500
350
550
1,600
1,200
26,400
18,900
1,200
20,100
6,300
26,400
12,800
9,200
22,000
6,300
9,835
1,320
17,455
4,545
227
4,318
student union building debt
This is the $15.00 portion of the AMS fee to be used to repa,y
the capital cost of the building.
undergraduate society fees
This is the amount collected on the behalf of the undergraduate
societies by the AMS  as  shown   in   the   revenue  section.
graduation class fee
This is the $7 fee  levy collected on  behalf of the graduating
class.
sub management fund
- Constitution allocation of 50 cents per member to purchase
equipment at the discretion of the SUB management
committee.
accident benefit fund
Constitutional allocation of 10 cents per member to a fund
from which council may cover injuries to students not covered
by their medical insurance. All students must carry medical
insurance.
sub art fund
Constitutional allocation of $1,500 for the purchase of
Canadian contemporary art.
national union of students
This represents the 30 cents per member fee levy of the NUS
approved at the 1972/73 general meeting, and includes an
allocation for part-time students.
registration photographs
The cost of placing photographs on membership cards. (25
cents per student).
athletic fee
This is the $5 extramural athletic fee established by
referendum.
constitutional margin
The constitution calls for a 5 per cent operating margin to be
included in the budget as a safeguard. The 5 per cent is based
on the operating portion of the AMS: (.05) X [(available
discretionary) t (building's previous year actual) ].
ubyssey (schedule b-1)
The allocation will allow The Ubyssey to publish 3 times per
week until the budget is spent. This amount included 75 per
cent of the publications administration expense (schedule B-2)
which supplies the support services, such as accounts receivable
and advertising sales, that are necessary for the operation of the
campus newspaper.
intramurals
This allocation allows all students to participate in many
organized sports, through teams formed in clubs and
undergrad societies.
students' council (see notes attached to schedule D)
This is the budget on which the students* council operates
itself. Included in this amount is a portion of general
administration expense (schedule C) which supports the council
and its direct programmes and activities. Some services which
the council uses are auditors, solicitors, printing and general
bookkeeping.
conference grants
This is a special fund administered by the finance committee to
aid subsidiary organizations in sending a maximum of two
representatives to conferences, which will be beneficial to their
membership and/or to the AMS as a whole. Written reports are
to be submitted by the delegates for future reference of the
society's members.
speakers committee
This allocation is to cover publicity, travel and honoraria costs
of speakers invited to speak on topics of general interest to
students. Because of limited funds, the committee should avoid
large money allotments to securing individual speakers, and
instead concentrate on inviting locally available speakers, those
in Vancouver already or those willing to travel at their own
expense. In 1975-76 speakers committee will administer the
speakers grant fund.
special projects
This allocation is administered by the finance committee to aid
clubs and AMS designated special projects, i.e. Speakeasy,
Women's Office, with the cost of special projects. This fund
was established in the AMS code when clubs were no longer
given direct operational grants by council. This fund is
non-accumulative.
external affairs.
This allocation is to cover the cost of sending the external
affairs officer to BCSF and NUS conferences.
undergraduate society support
This allocation represents that portion of general
administration which is used to support undergraduate societies
(schedule C).
clubs support
This allocation represents that portion of general
administration which is used to support clubs (schedule C).
newsletters
This allocation will be administered by the restructuring
committee. It was established to aid those undergrad societies'
ad departments in developing a newsletter to facilitate
communication among its members.
citr support
This allocation is to be administered by the building manager
for the maintenance of the $50,000 worth of equipment which
was installed in the radio station when the building was built. It
is not feasible for the radio station to maintain this equipment.
In 1975/76 an allocation will be made to cover operating costs
of the radio station.
amsart gallery programme committee
This allocation is to allow for the showing of the Brock Hall art
collection in the SUB art gallery. The allocation will also allow
the presentation of other art exhibits throughout the academic
year. The main expenses of the programme are supervision and
publicity and the cost of an alarm system to be installed this
year.
undergraduate society  grants
The basis of allocation for 1975/76 is 300/30/15 which means
that a $300 grant is to be given to all undergraduate societies
and students' associations plus 30 cents per student for the first
1,000 students and 15 cents each student thereafter enrolled in
the faculty. These allotments are calculated on 1974/75 figures.
Based on Selling Price of $2.00 — Netting AMS $1.60.
The
budget
will be
presented
to AMS council
next
week for
first
reading. No doubt you are wondering what all those pictures above mean. And you probably
thought you'd read what they are below. Well, you're hot getting away that easily; you'll
have to turn the page to find out.
Doug Field took his camera along to the Vancouver Art Gallery to discover Electric
Machines. His article explains it.
The Zappa concert is reviewed on PF 3. Field took those photos while Bruce Baugh
wrote the story. Also on PF 3, Greg Strong reviews Bethune.
PF 4 features a twin review — from two viewpoints — of Woody Allen's movie, Love
and Death. Then, by Brenton Spencer, a look at the movie version of the play, Give 'em
Hell Harry.
The biggest coup of the week was accomplished by The Ubyssey's ethereal columnist
F.O'. He caught Frank Zappa for an interview before his concert Wednesday. The telling
pictures were shot by Peter Cummings. All of this on PF 5.
Robert Diotte does a review on a different sort of subject — a magazine. He lends his
thoughts to The Canadian Fiction Magazine on PF 6.
Along with Vista on the back page of PF, there is more. Have a look, but first turn the
page and find out what those funny pictures are all about. electricsmusicelectricsmusicelectricsmusicelectricsmusicelectric^
Blowing the clouds away
By ROBERT DIOTTE
Chuck Mangione was at the
Queen Elizabeth Theater last week
accompanied by Esther Satterfield
and the other members of his
quartet, Gerry Niewood on flutes,
piccolo and sax, Chip Jackson on
electric base and Joe LaBarbara
on drums. For those who know
Mangione's music, the concert
drew on the full range of his work
from his instrumental compositions through to his songs.
The show had its moments. In
fact, the entire first set was
beautiful put together with an
early Mangione composition, "The
Hill Where The Lord Hides,"
topping off a program of in-
strumentals which highlighted the
material from his latest album,
Chase The Clouds Away. Yet the
second set featuring vocalist
Esther Satterfield did not come off
quite as well. With the brief encore
that Mangione seemed to begrudge
the attentive audience the first set
had lost its impact.
There is a real problem with
Mangione's music because it is
about as insular as one man's
island can be. Mangione has but
out certain traditional values,
attitudes and themes from the
mainstream both socially and
musically. Among these is a hazy,
sentimental notion of love and a
sense of the family as a social unit.
His music seeks to develop
traditional themes in fresh ways.
The  Latin   influence  is  strongly
marked as is his use of electrical
amplification to keep a crystal
hardness in the sounds of the brass
and reed. A Fender Rhodes
Electric piano provides exciting
linear and chordal reverberations
to introduce and terminate themes.
There is also Chip Jackson's
electric bass though LeBarbera's
drums overshadow it a great deal.
The danger in Mangione's approach is that it has really nothing
new to offer. What he has been able
to do instrumentally is transform
his roots into a dreamy fluidity
which is held together by the crisp,.
brassy quality of his flugelhorn
alternating solo work with flutes,
sax and piccolo. "What's a song
but someone's dream." Mangione
wrote in "The Land of Make
Believe."
This is great in the context of his
musical compositions. The
strength and lyrical beauty of such
numbers as "Echano," "Chase
The Clouds Away," "Can't We Do
This All Night," and "Song of the
New Moon" is the fantasy rhythm
of Mangione's musical intelligence; counterpointed by
integral solo work from himself or
Gerry Niewood to give the thing a
ground in musical fact. To give the
compositions something for the
audience to relate to. This is fine.
This can produce some touchingly
beautiful music.
The problem with the music
develops out of Mangione's
inability to carry the same or a
Chuck Mangione Flugelhorner.
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similar dramatic interplay into his
songs. Here he becomes tolerable
when he is telling us about his
make believe land. Mangione's
insipid when he gets self-indulgent
and trivial. It was Mangione's
emotional excesses which marred
the second set badly making it
seem almost like a night with
Donny Osmond.
Esther Satterfield is one of these
black vocalists with an incredible
range and volume in her voice. Her
ability was squandered in the
rather paltry Mangione material
she sang. At times trivial and
repetitive,   at   times   blatantly
sexist,"Mangione's lyrics were, on
the whole, vacuous and flat when
sung by Satterfield. What success
they had owed more to Esther
Satterfield's talents than to
anything in the songs themselves.
Which brings me to the brief
encore. I felt very much patronized
by Mangione's perfunctory performance of what must be to him
the mandatory return. For an
artist who is calling on traditional
roots and values so strong to
support his work, Mangione's
attitude struck me as curiously
unfriendly. There is a very real
contradiction in this aspect of his
stage presence. At least, it seems
to me there is, though it would be
relatively pointless to harangue
the fellow. But an artist (any
serious artist) defines him/herself
both in relation to his/her work and
his/her audience. A good artist is
measured by any number of things
which are reflected in the work.
Steadfastness to his/her
definitions, the essential integrity
of these definitions, their
relevance, are all part and parcel
of the work itself. Mangione, it
seems to me, is questionable in
spite of the fact that he can be very
good at times.
Here's what the cover means
By DOUG FIELD
Norman White's "blatantly technical contraptions" show that modern technology, when united
with art, can succeed in having an esthetic value.
He works with kinetic structures that follow no
preset pattern, but, rather, follow their own course —
within the limits that he sets. In this way he is putting
the sophisticated tools of applied technology to, in his
own words," the most useless ends." Although of no
scientific value,~Norman White has, by combining a
few regular rhythms out of sync with each other,
created the random non-repetitive rhythms that give
his works such impact.
The rhythms, or patterns, appear to be constantly
changing, creating a different work of art every
second or two for the viewer. In this way, each of his
10 works are veritable exhibitions in themselves.
Some of the works are purely visual — Quand Meme,
First Tighten Up On The Drums, or Matrix Two, —
providing seemingly endless visual patterns.
Some are both visual and audio:
Kaleidoscope/Calliope, or State of The Art, providing
random computerized musical accompaniment to the
visual display. One work, Drvish, is purely auditory:
a small plexiglass box of circuits using eight speakers
to create the effects that its name implies.
While some works invite participation on the part of
the viewer in order to achieve their fullest, Cat's
Cradle is an appropriately named electric machine in
two parts. The viewer is invited (challenged) to
manipulate the machine's lighting effects with the
use of a console of push buttons. It is here that the
name holds true, for the buttons are as random as
anything else in the exhibit; and one is lucky not to
switch off more than he turns on.
After The Fact is one of the most ingenious forms of
graffiti to ever come along. A patch rack allows the
viewer to feed into the machine the letters of the
alphabet, which will then march across the screen
like a theatre marquee works. Gestalt Fish is a
machine in two parts that was originally created to
study the movement of a swimming fish, but was
found to be too hot to accommodate the fish. It consists of 91 photosensitive bulbs connected to a panel of
lights. The viewer may manipulate the image created
by the light bulbs by holding his hand over the
photosensitive cells.
This- is Norman White's first exhibition at the
Vancouver Art Gallery and will be continuing until
Nov. 2. White will also be giving a lecture on his work
at the VAG today at 12:10.
CUSO
INFORMATION NIGHT
TANZANIA
FILMS: "IN A NUTSHELL"—a humorous  look at
Western Aid Policies
"FREEDOM    RAILWAY"—the    building    of    the
Tanzania-Zambia railway with the Chinese Aid
Approval.
DISCUSSION
TUES., OCT. 7th 7:30 p.m. Room 404
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Page Friday, 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 3, 1975 mothersandbrothersrnothersandbrothersniotherssm
Zappa unit beams crowd
By BRUCE BAUGH
Ten years ago, on his Freak Out! LP,
Frank Zappa immediately established his
near legendary status with dead accurate
satires about the mores of society and of his
audience with such songs as "You're
Probably Wondering Why I'm Here" (which
was nothing less than a criticism of the
Mothers' audience) and absurd avante-
garde tableaus like "Help I'm A Rock.
People thought at the time that anyone who
deliberately alienates his audience must be
crazy. They were right. They also thought
that he would have no commercial potential.
They were wrong about that.
For ten years Zappa has acted as a sort of
conscience for the rock culture. Treading on
musical and social conventions, he has
stretched the limits of sanity to the breaking
point. He has also amassed a large following
due to his bizarre lyrics and guitar wizardry.
Part of that following packed the UBC
War Memorial Gym to hear and see Frank
Zappa and the Mothers perform two hours
worth of their patented blend of rock-jazz,
avante-garde musical theatre.
The band demonstrated its musical
competence in a medley of instrumentals
that opened the show. The first number was
a blues based piece that allowed each
Mother to strut his  stuff before Zappa
walked on stage in resplendent freakiness.
Playing short bursts of notes on his Gibson
guitar, Zappa proved that he is still one of
the finest rock guitarists, easily in the same
league as Clapton, Beck and Page. Then the
band leaped into "Apostrophie" the instrumental title cut from the only Zappa LP
to make the top ten. The fuzz-bass lines,
which were played by Jack Bruce on the
album, were handled authoritatively by Roy
Estrada, Zappa's original bass player.
During the pause after the first set, Zappa
introduced the current edition of the
Mothers, which consists of Napoleon
Murphy Brock on sax and vocals, Andre
Lewis on synthesizers, Terry Bozzie on
Core Ecstasy is about the pleasures of
masochism ("Was the object misery? No!
Carolina hard core ecstasy!"). The
narrative nature of the songs allows the
group to indulge in a bit of theatre, acting
out various parts of the songs and, here as
throughout the performance, to cavort
wildly about the stage. The theatre was
interspersed with solos, as the band plunged
through one number after another,
climaxing the set with the instrumental
Chunga's Revenge. Complex rhythm and
style changes show how incredibly tight the
band is, with Zappa, Brock and Lewis
layering matching melodic tines on instruments and vocals over the syncopated
Hello people...
drums, and Roy Estrada on bass. Brock was
particularly strong on lead vocals, while
Estrada's boy soprano enabled the group to
achieve some unusual harmonies. They are
all superb musicians.
The next set was a medley of some new
songs with old ones: Baby Don't You Want A
Man Like Me, Illinois Enema Bandit,
Carolina Hard Core Ecstasy, Take Your
Clothes Off When You Dance, Lonely Little
Girl, What's the Ugliest Part of Your Body
and Chunga's Revenge. Zappa's new songs
illustrated his current sexual concerns,
Illinois Enema Bandit being based on a true
case of a man who enjoyed forcing women to
have enemas at gunpoint (Zappa described
the process in detail), while Carolina Hard
.. .Here's looking at you.
rhythm section. It is impossible to pin down
the Mothers musically, but they manage to
incorporate influences as diverse as rock
and roll, Charlie Parker, Edgar Varese and
Jimi Hendrix, moving effortlessly through
the various styles.
Zappa then moved into what he described
as the "heavy-metal" portion of the show,
for which he dropped his Gibson in favor of a
Fender Stratocaster. The first song, entitled
Swallow My Pride, was described by Zappa
as having "pseudo-graphic significance,"
and was followed by a musical theatre piece
on the evils of downers, "Any Downers."
The first song rocked ferociously, with
Zappa using controlled feedbacks and
apocalyptic chord crashes on guitar during
.. .And listening to me
the solo break. Unfortunately, "Any
Downers" tended at times to be as soporific
as its subject matter, and Brock's theatrical
portrayal of a downer freak was what
carried the piece. The song about drugs
occasioned an extended rap by Zappa about
the customs hassles one encounters in
crossing the border, during which Zappa
alternatively laughed with and laughed at
the audience. "Americans are a bunch of
assholes anyway," Zappa said.
This was indeed Zappa, the near-legend,
living up to his reputation as anti-guru and
all-time freak.
The final piece of the show was a jazzy
flavored tune about a queen of the desert
that incorporated gypsy themes musically.
It was very sophisticated, but tended at
times to be uninspired. On the whole,4t was
far too long.
After an immediate standing ovation
(which appeared for once to be actually
spontaneous and deserved), the Mothers
encored with a song from their forthcoming
live album and "I'm the Slime" from Your
T.V., which was probably the strongest song
of the evening. When the house lights came
on, everyone seemed satisfied, having
enjoyed a performance that showed that
Frank Zappa and the Mothers have not
abandoned their tradition of musical excellence and bizarre nonconformity.
Bethune blessed 'people'
written by Rod Langely
directed by Ray michal
featuring Ken Kramer in
the title role
at the
Vancouver   East   Cultural   Centre
By GREG STRONG
Bethune, showing at the
Vancouver East Cultural Centre
until October 4, is one of the most
moving plays that I have seen
lately in Vancouver. It is a
significant step in the development
of Canadian theatre.
The play is based on our newly
discovered. Canadian hero, Dr.
Norman Bethune, dramatizing him
in a series of four acts representing
major periods in his life.
Originally, "Bethune" was
conceived by author Rod Langely
as a CBC radio documentary, then
adapted to the stage. It is the story
of a man whose sense of destiny
and humanism ultimately led him
to the war-torn China of 1938,
saving lives where there.were no
other doctors and serving the
common people whom he loved so
deeply. Dr. Bethune died less than
two years later of blood poisoning
and came to be revered as a
national hero by the Chinese.
The first act, "The Sirens of
Success and Wealth," taking place
in Detroit, operates somewhere
between humor and irony, juxtaposing the two to reveal Bethune,
played by Ken Kramer, as a cynic
and a fast, raffish man who talked
in tabloid headlines. Though
Bethune built up a financially
successful practice while in
Detroit, he was a social radical
who intensely disliked his role as a
member of the privileged society
of doctors.
He was trapped in this situation;
his wife an aristocrat, his
colleagues well-educated but
scarcely concerned about their
patients or fellow men, and
Bethune himself a man who loved
both luxury and humanity.
Kramer's Bethune is caught
between his higher ideals, his love
for humanity and the world of his
reality; one where money and
position were so very important.
In act two, "the Battle Has Just
Begun," the play reached an
emotional height which continued
throughout the remainder of the
performance. Bethune became "a
fighter" for which he believed that
which he believed in. He condemned his fellow surgeons as
"reputational surgeons" less
concerned with saving lives as with
keeping a high average of successful operations." In this act, the
audience was explicitly drawn into,,
the drama through the format of
the lecture hall, enabling Ken
Kramer as Bethune to direct
several polemics to the audience.
The result was that the theatre
audience felt less an audience and
more as participants involved in a
real situation with a real Dr.
Bethune.
Particularly striking was
Bethune's comparison of the then
emerging Communist Russia and a
woman in the labor of birth.
"Russia is an enigma. It is like a
woman during childbirth . . .
spouting blood and milk . . .
screaming in the pain of labor . .
Someone who did not fenow that
this act would result in the birth of
a child, would surely cry ^ut, 'Stop
this pain, help this woman' and yet
this pain results in a wonderful
creation, a new life, is it not to be
considered beautiful?"
The third act, "Madrid is the
Centre of the World," became the
climax of the play. It was here that
Bethune worked with the Spanish
Republican Army, caring for the
wounded soldiers at a time when
little medical aid was available.
He believed that at last he was
helping the poor, common people
and assisting in the birth of a
brave new socialist experiment.
But the experiment was failing and
Bethune was caught between
disorganized bureaucratic army
officials and the thousands of
homeless refugees who had been
abandoned by the Republican
forces.
In the dramatic highlight of this,
Bethune described the so-called
organized retreat of the civilian
refugees which he saw while his
medical convoy was on the road to
Mandalay; "A boy here, with only
rags, children of ten and twelve
years dying of dysentry and
malnutrition, the incredible depths
of deprivation that they were
suffering, parents calling for their
lost children, daughters, their
mothers . . . There were so many
who needed help, but so little the
doctor and convoy could do."
This act generated such an in-
tenseieeling that I felt emotionally
drained at its end, having experienced anger, frustration, joy —
the entire gamut of human
emotional potentiality.
The final act Wounds China, was
anti-climatical in comparison to
the third act. Bethune had finally
arrived at the place where he felt
he could do the most good for
people and contribute to the
development of the Communist
Chinese state. Kramer gives us an
excellent portrayal of the man who
finally fulfilled his destiny in
China, a place where his surgical
skills   and   unique   sense    of
imagination were so desperately
needed. Bethune died shortly afterward, technically of blood
poisoning, but actually of overwork. In the last few months he
was a burned out shell of a man,
nevertheless dying happily, his
dream complete.
There were few difficulties that I
encountered in the production. But
one very noticeable defect was the
weakness of the first act; there
were too many scene
changes,which produced difficult
breaks in action and consequently
it became hard to become involved
in the play.
Generally I thought that Langely
had made a well-written play, with
inspired dialogue, though perhaps
his chronological ordering of the
play was not the most effective
method to portray Bethune's story.
In the final analysis "Bethune"
is a very moving piece of theatre,
well worth viewing and a sensitive
portrait of a fine humanist.
BETHUNE
a vision of truth, keen and narrow."
—glen erickson photo
Friday, October 3, 1975
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 culturalculturalcultMralculturalcultural^
The short Russian idiot
By AUBREY HOLMES
Woody Allen does it again folks.
The royal screw. A Woody Allen
great. To a fan of Allan's, it is one
of his best. If you are, just getting
around to seeing him then this is a
good place to start.
Love and Death
directed by Woody Allen
written by Woody Allen
starring  Woody Allen and Diane
Keaton
There are few negative points in
this film; the editing is bad, so bad
in fact that it cannot be part of the
plot (my initial suspicion). There
are places where ends of the
dialogue are cut before blanking
and zapping into the next scene. If
the mechanics of this film do not
affect you, then the humor surely
will.
Here Allen is at his usual best.
The movie is a series of one liners
and longer streams of satirical
comedy. If you are at all interested
in or have any knowledge about;
Jews, Nature, Intelligence,
Russian History, Love, Audiences,
Weaponry, Wars, Blacks,
Business, Herring Fishermen,
Social Diseases, Film Criticism,
Foreplay, Death, Adultery,
Duelling, Marriage; Rabbis,
Suicide, Poetry, Fashion, Pastry,
Spaniards, Sex, Napoleon,
Psychology, Lawyers, Upper
Classness, Fathers, Angels,
Divorce, Analogs, The Bible, and
Endings . . . then Woody Allen has
something for you.
The humor is sometimes deep
and sometimes shallow, ranging
If
By JEAN RANDALL
you   have   considered
that
that
and
then
On flie other hand. . .
his portrayal of a nutty little guy
who was caught in that mess
against his will.
Consider further, someone
convincing you that he is morally
superior to God; and, at the same
time, just a loveable neurotic kid.
He's just a loveable zaney whose
childhood fantasies include
identifying with Christ crucified,
watching a surrealistic gathering
of homosexual waiters arizen from
the grave, stepping in and out of
the action of Tolstoy's War and
Peace in order to make anti-war
speeches to the troops on the front
and to expose overly dramatic
characters of nineteenth century
Russian novels. If you don't think
that has possibilities of being
funny, the film is more than a
plethora: of intellectual  humour.
Throughout  the  flick  Woody
from simple dirty jokes to attacks
on such great epics as War and
Peace. The situations that Allen
gets himself into are as impossible
as they are funny. No need to
worry if you are a coward or an
ugly reject, you will find your
social standing reversed as your
image in Allen rises to the top on
the screen. Who else in an
outlandish Russian garb would
dine on sleet and snow while
planning to kill Napoleon. And how
could a balding five foot six, hornrimmed idiot get to make it with
the most passionate looking
woman in the country. At the same
time he captures the love of his life
into a situation of marriage.
Come, come, Woody . . . The
walls of the impossible are scaled
with tickling agility. This is the
technique Allen uses to present his
humor, absurdity rather than the
existence is a cheap trick,
tragedy is for rummies,
neurosis may be healthy,
consider Love and Death.
America's best exponent of the
Jewish nebbish school (not Sonny
Bono), has reached a new level of
development with his inimitable
style and humour.
Woody Allen's grasp of twentieth
century philosophical and
psychoanalytic thought becomes
the testing ground for an analysis
of nineteenth century Russian
Society and literature. By means of
a filmed narrative, he casts
himself in the role of a Jewish boy
of that day, who must face the
Zeitgeist, and keep his sanity. If his
madness has a method, other than
to get laughs, its probably to prove
that Russian society at that time
was at least sicker in spirit than is
See PF 6: ALLEN
Movie shows Harry really
By BRENTON SPENCER
Give 'em Hell Harry
Directed by Peter Hunt
Written by Samuel Geller   ,
Starring James Whitmore
Harry Truman gave 'em hell alright. No one was spared. From college
students through music critics to a little congressman from California
they were all, to Harry Truman, "sons of bitches."
The movie, "Give 'em Hell Harry," was filmed during a regular
production of the stage play with the same name. The camera is in the
theatre audience and captures the spontaneous inter-reaction of audience
and actor Whitmore which is so hard to achieve in ordinary motion pictures.
James Whitmore is the only member of the cast. The set is sparse and
just barely functionable. Anything more, either extra actors or more of a
set would only serve to distract from the fine and at times the very subtle
characterization by Whitmore.
"HARRY" CONCERNS ITSELF WITH ANECDOTES AND
MEMORABLE INCIDENTS OF THE LATE U.S. president Harry
Truman. The set represents, almost abstractly, the pivot points of
Harry's life. The president's desk is stage center; the roll-top desk of
Harry Truman, county judge is there stage right; the lawnmower and
hometown Independence safe are on the left. §ee pp -. harry
duthie
books
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sharpness of the cruel knife, when
obtaining his laughs at the expense
of everyone else.
The acting in the film can also be
explained in two words; those of
the writer and the director. Diane
Keaton, who plays Sonja, Woody's
love in life, is a familiar face in
Allen's films. Though she blends in
well with the main character she is
so far away from matching Allen
that Allen steals the show. She is
entertaining in her own right even
if she does seem in a role subordinate to Allen. The rest of the
characters are to be found in quick
come-and-go skits and provide only
variety as opposed to substance in
the film.
Love and Death is a brilliant
example of Woody Allen's work.
The film is completely Allen
centered from beginning to end
around him. My only complaint is
that it is a bit too short for someone
who knows the type of thing that he
or she is going to get. On the other
hand, for the novice or mediocre
type, it can seem like too much of a
good thing. One should remember
that the humor is in the mfnd of the
viewer, and Woody Allen for all his
comic genius once described
himself with this quote; "two and
two are merely four and often less
and never more and I for all the
world's advance an upright
mammal wearing pants."
a different
set of jaws
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Page Friday, 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October 3, 1975 PF   INTERS
Page Friday gets to look at Frank Zappa
through both the lens of Peter Cummings9
camera and columnist F.O'.'s questioning. .
Who are you...?
By F.O'.
F.O.: What inspires you?
Zappa: Everything. I just like to do what
I'm doing. I just have a compulsion to do
what I do. I don't stop to figure out where it
comes from. I just do it.
F.: What is the most irritating thing about
being interviewed?
Z: Well the person doesn't usually transcribe accurately. I read things I'm supposed to have said, and they appear in
phrases and patterns that I don't use.
The only reason I submit to interviews is
because if my music doesn't get played on
the radio my only means of communication
is in the print, or some sort of broadcast
interview. I've been doing this for a long
time.
Interviewers get scared of me. They know
that I'm not going to tolerate any bullshit
from them. They also know that there is a
possibility that I know more about what they
are talking about than they do; especially if
they are talking about music. If it's in the
field of music, none of them know anything.
The first giveaway is when someone comes
into a room with a tape recorder like you
have there and spends an unbelievable
amount of time trying to work such simple
machinery as that ... I have never been to
an interview where the guy went boop! and
the machine worked.
Now that has always mystified me. I
mean I live with tape recorders and
machines, the knobs always tell you what to
do.
And there's always that preamble to the
interview, where the guy is jumping around
with his cassette recorder — now I'm not
pointing my finger at any particular person
in this room for jumping with a tape
recorder, it's just true to form: you come in,
sit down and the guy spends the first 10
minutes of the interview trying to get the
A.C. plug in the wall because his batteries
don't work . . .
F: That's fine ...
Z: Wait a minute I'm not done yet...
F: I'm hip. I'm hip...
Z: Then, after they're done tweedling
around with it, the person sits there and
apologizes profusely for his inability to
operate a piece of machinery that costs 39.95
or less. And then, after he gets done, the
machine was jammed all the time anyway.
F: Yeah. That is why I have this gentleman here; to make sure the machine
doesn't get jammed. Because I don't relate
to the machine that well.
Z: Fine take one home and play with it.
The trouble with you guys is you wrestle
with machines. You're supposed to play
with them. Oh, wait a minute and then, after
there's nothing on the tape, they say "would
you mind repeating that?" They really do.
F: What was the most ridiculous
misrepresentation of something you've
said?
Z: Yeah. One has to give the Rolling Stone
that award. I was very misrepresented in
that publication. What they do is they send
out these superchump interviewers, who
should not have been given access to a tape
recorder or typewriter or anything having to
do with any channel relating to, or including, or pointing in the direction of, mass
F: This is one of the ways that you create?
Z: Well of course. It's an intellectual
challenge where you say whatever comes to
you. The interviewer just wants you to
ramble on about anything you want. I
always tell them that I have nothing to say
unless they ask me the question. Which is
true. I will spend my time talking with you.
You got questions to ask me, I'll answer
them. Some people come in, show me the
mike and they go "here it is. Now is your
golden opportunity. Spew man, you know."
F: So, besides music, you enjoy talking?
Z: No, man I hate to talk. I hate to talk.
F: You enjoy responding to questions?
Z: Yeah, because that cuts the business of
talking down to a minimum. Usually the
questions are so simple minded that it
takes: yes, or, no, or, maybe.
.1 don't trust anyone.
. . .Who handles machines...
media. These guys are DUCKS. In the past
they sent a guy and he was too stoned to
transcribe, too dumb to operate the
machine, and when it came time to read the
thing in print, he had manufactured
quotations.
That's what pisses me off the worst. When
I find quotation marks around things that I
didn't even say, in a speech pattern that I
would never use, in a publication that I
hated to do business with, now that's the
kind of stuff that I...
F: Was there a specific example?
Z: The worst example of misrepresentation in print is the book that is supposedly
my biography. That's just a piece of shit.
F: What other forms of artistic expression
do you employ?
Z: Talking like this.
And I don't...
F: How is the family?
Z: Yeah, that king of thing. The family's
O.K.
F: How old are your kids?
Z: Let'ssee, one of urn's a year and a half,
one just turned eight, the other one just
turned six.
F: What sort of concerns do you share
with contemporary fathers?
Z: Well, lets talk specifically about the
eight-year-old. She was just tested for what
they call "the gifted program" at this
particular public school. Now, I have my
doubts about what a gifted program consists
of. One: I didn't see the questions that were
on the test. Two: education being what it is,
the difficulty of getting funds, and so on, I
found out that part of what they do there in
the test is consumer research, it makes me
wonder what the fuck's going on in the
public school of Los Angeles?
Its just too wierd. So that's one of the
things that concerns me as a parent —
trying to find out what they tell my kids in
school. I have to prepare them in such a way
that they'll be able to sort the bullshit out
from the other stuff.
F: In some of Dylan's lyrics he talks about
a fear to bring children into this world. Do
you experience any apprehensions like this?
Z: No. Not at all. As long as I can afford to
support them, and as long as I have the time
to help them plan for what they're going to
have to go through, just maybe the world
will be better because they're in it. Fear to
bring children into the world is a very
fashionable idea, as long as it has Bob
Dylan's stamp of approval on it.
F: That's early stuff.
Z: He hasn't rescinded that.
F: Yet we are in a state of social
upheaval, shall we say?
Z: No. I wouldn't say that.
.. .Ah, you had to be there.
F: Your children are going to survive you,
so you won't be there to protect them.
Z: I don't think that its going to be
necessary They're doing okay right now.
F: As you play on the stage do you find
yourself playing music that you've already
got in your mind just coming out through the
guitar?
Z: No. I make it up as I go along.
F: Do you give directions to your men and
say, like I'm going to be freaking, stand
back?
Z: No. No. That's not the way music
works.
F: No?
Z: No. Especially if you're working in a
harmonic situation, in a key, you just tell
them what the chord changes are in the key.
When you write something using a pencil
and a piece of paper you inscribe something
on the paper, that's the way the chord
changes are, its a blank piece of paper. Then
you use the guitar as an instrument to inscribe information on that blank piece of
paper.
F: What about the other musicians, are
they left to themselves to be spontaneous
within the progression?
Z: Right. It's pretty open. You say that
you're in the key of E Minor for instance,
you play in the one chord for a couple of
beats, the fourth for a couple of beats and so
on. What you do with it, the rhythm that you
ornament it with and all that stuff,
everybody gets to make it up as they go
along. That's the way improvision works.
Next: The Bulldozer
The Peer
Electrics
Intercontinental Absurdities
Wowie Zowie.
Friday, October 3, 1975
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Fridayt 5 puMicationspublicationspublicationspublicationspublicationspu
'Little' mag getting big
By ROBERT DIOTTE
The little magazine has played
a seminal role in the making of
modern Canadian literature.
Usually running to only a couple of
cheaply bound and printed numbers, it is rare for one of these
excursions into the field of letters
to make it big as a member of that
elite class, the literary journal.
The Canadian Fiction Magazine
(whose latest edition, number 18, is
now available) is that rare
example of a little magazine that
made good, that became a literary
journal appearing on a quarterly
basis. With a press run of 2,000
copies and subscriptions from all
across the country, it is the finest
literary journal devoted to fiction
in Canada.
One of its strengths is that The.
Canadian Fiction Magazine (CFM)
has always avoided ties with any
academic institution. This is a
policy which has kept its own
editorial principles unencumbered
with outside responsibilities. While
this has meant a few financial
headaches throughout its brief 5-
year history, the result is a
magazine dealing in fiction and put
together by writer-s of fiction. In
that sense, CFM is unique among
all other literary journals
operating in Canada.
It is only fitting, then, that the
first editorial by the new editor,
Geoffrey Hancock, should
acknowledge the work and the
dedication of retiring editor Wayne
Stedingh. A magazine of this type
with no ties to any academic body
could not have survived were it not
for the commitment of the people
behind it. Hancock writes:
Rather than grumble about the
painful lack of a decent outlet
for short or long fiction,
Stedingh brought along bandages and splints and put
together CFM. Stedingh had
heaps of problems; to create the
best fiction magazine in Canada
from Prince George, B.C., five
hundred miles north of Vancouver; to encourage, yet
criticize the best of serious
formal experiments; to do his
own typesetting, layout and
paste-up and then to sell the
papier mache monster and to
lug the magazine in his spare
time, without help and without
pay.
. ^inq of Loomed vSeef
Why not try
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Now situated in Vancouver, this
latest number of CFM (#18) is quite
possibly the strongest to date and
there have been some excellent
issues in the past. By presenting
the best fiction available, the best
that is written in Canada, CFM is
sponsoring fresh literary talent as
well as assisting in the formulation
of a culture.
In the latest issue, which is
visually enhanced by Pnina
Granirer's "A Silent Song of Joy,"
on the cover and eight additional
drawings by her inside, a full range
of fictional experience is
represented. Quebec's leading
playwright, Michel Tremblay,
appears in three modern fairy
tales which were translated from
the French by Michael Bullock.
These are done with the writer's
characteristic wit and feel for
dramatic simplicity.
A short story by Montreal writer
Hugh Hood and one by Toronto
writer Hugh Garner (winner of a
Governor General's Award for
fiction) respond to the traditional
roots of fiction in the realism of
Aristotelian unities of place, time
and character. Hood's story,
Thanksgiving: Between Junetown
and Caintown, is a light tale about
middle-aged urbanites- getting lost
while hiking in the Ontario countryside. Garner's See You In
September projects the fumbling,
stupidity of a man who has led an
insulated Canadian existence with
his father's wealth. The locale is
Paris and the situation is the man's
meeting an old girl friend who is
quite a bit more liberated than he
is.
In the same fictional vein are
Anne Bernard's Siblings and
Christopher Heide's Letter From
Matt Arthur's Fishpond. Heide's
work is a fine piece of regional
writing, the landscape of Nova
Scotia's coast re-created as a
background to a narrative about a
young man's decision between a
university education or no
university education. It is done
with an engaging character in the
figure of Matt Arthur who is every
bit as mad as Leonard Cohen's F.
Siblings is, without a doubt, the
finest short story, I have read in
some time. Set in a convent, the
drama centers around the life of
nuns teaching a school. In its brief
span, the whole issue of moral
authority is examined and brought
to a beautifully touching conclusion in the image of Compline or
"The Great Silence."
The issue demonstrates the
eclecticism of its editor with three
stories that toy with the roots of
fiction. Marilyn Miller Trinkhaus
has returned to the epistolary form
to write Loving Cousins, a simple
kind of story with its own charm
and humor. Alone In The Empire,
a story by young Thunder Bay
writer Diane Schoemperlin, uses
surreal images in the context of
traditional realism to achieve
some startling narrative effects.
Finally, Derk Wynand, a member
of UVic's creative writing faculty,
is represented with an excerpt
from his book One Cook Called
Once Dreaming. His distanced,
aloof analytics develop an effective
Gothic romance.
Topping the issue off is a quasi-
literary manifesto by Leon Rooke,
last year's winner of CFM's annual
contributor's prize for his satirical
story entitled Wintering In Victoria. CFM chooses annually the
best short story it has published in
the past year and makes a money
award ($250.) to that contributor.
Hancock, CFM's new editor,
brings with him impressive
credentials. A graduate of UBC's
creative writing department, he is
associated as well with the
Chronicle, the Alumni magazine of
the University of British Columbia.
Currently working on his first
novel, he teaches creative writing
in the Center for Continuing
Education. Clearly, there is
nothing lost in the change of
editors.
A magazine of serious writing
run by a serious writer, the
Canadian Fiction Magazine has
one real difference from the
academic journals of its class.
Committed neither to the avant
garde or the traditional, CFM is
immensely readable. The
magazine is more interested in
well told stories than in shaping
literary politics, something which
seems to make for the best
magazine of its kind going.
Allen
funny
From PF 4
Allen remains audience-conscious
(recall that this technique as used
by Albert Finney in Tom Jones).
His cracks to the audience about
people in the movie relieve the
somewhat onerous demands on our
concentration:
There aren't really any other
notable performances since no one
gets the chance of upstaging
Woody. However, I'm sure that
won't disappoint the inveterate
fans of Woody Allen, who will find
this latest effort well worth the
trip.
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Page Friday, 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October 3, 1975 Upcoming events on the cultural
calendar of the next week include
tonight's Lorita Leung Chinese
Dancers from Hong Kong performing classical Chinese ballet
movements at SFU's Theatre at
8:00 p.m. The 15 exotically
costumed dancers will dance the
folk and character movements too.
Tickets in general are $4 each at
the door but only $2 for SFU
students.
The National Ballet of Canada,
exported west from Ottawa,
highlights the Queen Elizabeth
Theatre this weekend. Saturday at
8:30 p.m. they perform "Don
Juan" followed by "Offenbach In
The Underworld." Tickets start at
$4.50 and the wild rumor is that
there are still some left.
On the same Wednesday (Oc
tober 8) SFU's Images Theatre
screens "Video Art In Canada;"
these are rather outstanding expert examples of North American
Video Art selected by Peggy Gale.
It's a freebie starting at 8:00 p.m
— no you cannot change channels
on this one.
•
Next Wednesday the Vancouver
Symphony Orchestra graces the
Q.E. Theatre at 8:30 p.m. with
Kazuyoshi Akiyama conducting
impressionist rifts lifted from
Saint Saens, Ravel and Debussy.
Pianist Leonard Pennario is guest
solosit while CP Air sponsors the
whole VSO affair.
Next Thursday (October 9) the
Vancouver East Cultural Centre,
1895 Venables, kicks up the
dramatic curtain on Simon Grey's
hilarious British import comedy
"Butley." Eric Schneider stars in
this Western Canadian Theatre
troupe's promising production —
the same play was rubbed out of
last season's Playhouse bill by that
forgettable horror story
"Frankenstein (a Canadian adaption, hence Canadian content,
hence Can Council money)!"
*
From PF 4
"Harry" opens with Whitmore writing a letter to
the first lady. He tells "The Boss" (Roosevelt) that to
be a successful president, among other things a
person must be a "liar and a whatever". But he tells
the Boss that he plans to be none of these things. Thus
starting his famous career as possibly the last honest
president of the United States.
Whitmore's physical portrayal of Truman is uncanny. The clothes and the posture are Truman's.
Every glance, twitch, and mucus snuffing snort of
Truman's is xeroxed by Whitmore. The actor
disappears with the opening applause and is replaced
by Truman, or rather the ghose of Truman.
It is now Truman talking the tough way he did as
president in the 40s and 50s. Harry sits in his desk and
talks to his audience. He is constantly being interrupted by imaginary phone calls and invisible
guests and newsmen. He takes the audience back to
the first war. They go with Harry to a meeting of the
Ku Klux Klan. He strolls with them, cap and cane in
hand jousting with unseen newsmen.
At other times he talks fondly of his landslide
victory over Tom Dewey. Harry was the underdog in
forty-eight. He didn't have a chance. But Harry
showed 'em. His whistle-stopping "give 'em hell"
campaign drew out the farmers and the rural vote.
He blasted the Republicans from the back of his train
and won.
By his own admission he was a rube. Cousin Harry.
When he found he was president he didn't feel he was
capable. But he would do his "damndest."
It was hard, he continually told the audience. His
monologue dealt with strikes and generals and a little
congressman from California. Besides the
Republicans and the Democrats being opposed to him
in the early fifties he had to handle Joe McCarthy and
friends. McCarthy and Nixon were, Harry said, "...
the enemies of Freedom." Truman knew then what it
took the rest of us 25 years to discover; Nixon was
simply "a no-good, lying son-of-a-bitch!"
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138  777  BEETHOVEN:   Piano  Cto   No.  5
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138 783 MOZART: Piano Concertos Nos. 17 &
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138 801 BEETHOVEN: Symphonies Nos. 1 & 2
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138  802  BEETHOVEN:   Symphony   No.   3
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138 803  BEETHOVEN:  Symphony   No.  4
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138  804  BEETHOVEN:   Symphony   No.   5
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138  805   BEETHOVEN:   Symphony   No.   6
"PASTORAL" Karajan.  Berlin  Philharmonic.
138 806   BEETHOVEN:  Symphony   No.   7
Karajan. Berlin Philharmonic.
139 004 MOZART: Eine Kliene Nachtmusik.
" Divertimento No. 15 K. 287. Karajan. Berlin
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139 005 J. S. BACH:  The  Brandenburg
Concertos Nos. 1, 2 & 3  Karajan.  Berlin
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139 006 J. S. BACH: Brandenburg Concertos
Nos. 4, 5 & 6. Karajan. Berlin Philharmonic.
139   010   RAVEL   Bolero   MUSSORGSKY.
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139 030 TCHAIKOVSKY: Nutcracker Suite.
Serenade   for   Strings.    Karajan.    Berlin
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139 037 LISZT: Hungarian Rhapsody No. 2
Les   Preludes.   SMETANA.   The   Moldau.
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139 038 MOZART: THE 4 HORN CONCERTOS.
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139 166 RODRIGO: Concerto de Aranjuez
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139 365 SPANISH GUITAR MUSIC OF FIVE
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139 366 SPANISH GUITAR MUSIC OF FIVE
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2530 027 J. STRAUSS: TALES FROM THE
VIENNA WOODS. Vienna  Blood.   Morning
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2530 505 ENGLISH MUSIC FOR ORCHESTRA.
VAUGHAN WILLIAMS: Fantasia on Greensleeves. The Lark Ascending and other works
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2530 069 BOCCHERINI: Guitar Quintets Op
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2530  070   CHRISTMAS   CONCERTOS   BY
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Karajan. Berlin Philharmonic.
2530  073  MONSERRAT   CABELLE   SINGS
FRENCH OPERA ARIAS from Faust. IMireille
Romeo et Juliette, Les Huquenots Louise.
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2530 102 HOIST: THE PLANETS. Steinberg.
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2530 135 BEETHOVEN Piano Sonatas Nos. S
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2530 142 BEETHOVEN: Symphony No. 6
"PASTORAL" Boehm. Vienna Philharmonic.
2530 144 ROSSI OVERTURES William Tell,
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2530 147 BEETHOVEN: "Archduke" Trio
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2530 216 SCHUBERT:Symphonies Nos. 1 & 2.
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2530 247 ADAGIO PACHEBEL: The Famous
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2530 252 STRAVINSKY:The Rite of Spring.
King   of   Stars:   Tilson   Thomas.   Boston
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2530 290 MOZART: "Haffner"  Serenade;
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2530 296 VIVALDI: THE 4 SEASONS Karajan.
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2530 308 ROMEO AND JULIET TCHAIL0VSKY
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2530 335 BRAHMS Variations on themes by
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2530 401 TCHAIKOVSKY: Symphony No. 3
"Polish" Atzman. Veinna Symphony.
2530 402 R. STRAUSS: ALSO SPRACH
ZARATHUSTRA (Theme from 2001: A Space
Odyssey) Karajan. Berlin Philharmonic.
2530 410 SCHUMANN PIANO MUSIC Forest
Scenes. Humoreske. Kempff. ..
2530 411 MOZART: Clarinet Concerto
Bassoon Concerto. Prinz Zeman. Vienna
Philharmonic. Boehm.
2530 422 SCHUBERT: Symphony No. 6
Overture and Ballet Music from Roasmunde
Boehm. Berlin Philharmonic.
2530 438 BEETHOVEN: Piano Concerto No. 5.
"Emperor" Eschenbach. Boston Symphony.
Ozawa.
2530 439 STRAUSS: Oboe Concerto (1945;)
Horn Concwrto (1942) Koch. Hauptmann.
Berlin Philharmonic. Karajan.
2530 456 MOZART: Piano Concerto No. 27.
Concerto for 2 Pianos & Orchestra K. 365.
Emil & Elena Gilels. Vienna Philharmonic.
2530 457 BEETHOVEN: Concerto in D for
Piano and Orchestra Op. 61 (arr. from Violin
Concerto) 1. BARENBOIM. English Chamber
Orchestra.
2530 459 HAYDN: Symphony Nos. 99 & 100.
"Military"  Jochum.   London   Philharmonic.
2530 461 J. S. BACH: Music for the Lute Vol.
1. Yepes (Guitar).
2530 467 PAGANINI: Violin Concerto No. 6
(World premier recording). Accardo. London
Philharmonic. Dutoit.
SOUTHERN COMFORT
Q£f6sound
556 Seymour St., 682-6144
Open Thursday & Friday until 9 P.M.
Friday, October 3, 1975
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 7 Page  14
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 3, 1975
Hot flashes
Goody
two shoes
A handicrafts fair featuring arts
and crafts from third world
countries will be held next week
in SUB 207-209.
Proceeds from the sale go to
the World University Service
Canada, a goody-two shoes
organization trying to equalize
world wealth through charity and
without causing any grief to the
first world powers-that-be.
The sale is open from 11 a.m.
to 4 p.m., Monday to Thursday.
A lecture examining changes in
people's attitudes toward building
projects  will   be  held 8:15 p.m.
Saturday    in    the    Instructional
Resources Centre lecture hall 2.
Robert Macleod, the new head
of UBC's school of architecture,
will explain how people's
attitudes towards new buildings
have changed in the last two
generations. Macleod claims
people are either indifferent or
hostile to the announcement of a
new building project instead of
being excited as they once were.
The lecture is being sponsored
by the Vancouver Institute.
Co-op radio
Vancouver Co-op Radio is
holding a public meeting for those
interested in joining the station.
CFRO-FM   is staging a public
information meeting, 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, at the Vancouver
Public Library auditorium, 750
Burrard. The purpose of the
meeting is to recruit new people
interested in developing programs
for the station.
The station, though licenced
by the CRTC, is a non-commercial
community service. Further
information can be obtained by
phoning 684-8494.
Coleman
Canadian poet Victor Coleman
will give a reading from his works
Wednesday at noon in Buchanan
202.
Coleman's appearance will be
the first of a series of poetry
readings at UBC this year.
Tween classes
TODAY
GRAD STUDENTS
Lions Gate Jazz Band, 9 p.m., Grad
Student Centre ballroom.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Panel discussion on housing crisis, 8
p.m., 1208 Granville.
INTRAMURALS
Sign-up,  all   day,   room   202A, War
Memorial gym.
MUSIC DEPARTMENT
Joanne   Dorenfeld,    8   p.m.,   music
building recital hall.
STUDENTS' INTERNATIONAL
MEDITATION SOCIETY
Organizational  meeting, noon, SUB
125.
CAMPUS CRUSADE
FOR CHRIST
Volleyball,      hot      chocolate     and
stickles,   7:30  p.m., gym B, winter
sports centre.
CAMPUS CYCLISTS
Preliminary  results  of   bike survey,
noon, SUB 211.
SKYDIVING CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 125.
EL CIRCULO SPANISH CLUB
Slide show, noon, Bu. 205.
NEWMAN CLUB
Meeting, noon, SUB 105B.
SPEAKERS COMMITTEE
Organizing  for  Philip Agee speech,
noon, SUB 224.
SATURDAY
WARGAMERS
Weekly wargame, noon,  SUB 216.
SAILING CLUB
Intercollegiate  regatta eliminations,
10   a.m.  to   3  p.m., Jericho Sailing
Centre.
NEW DEMOCRATS
Film:   The  Spanish   Earth,   8  p.m.,
Ironworkers'   Hall,   2415   Columbia
Street.
SAILING CLUB
Party,    8:30    p.m.   to   12:30   a.m.,
SUB 212.
VANCOUVER
INSTITUTE
lectures
prof, robert
macleod
director, ubc school
of architecture
THE INADEQUACY
OF BUILDING
There is worldwide
dissatisfaction with the way
we build. Indifference and
hostility often greet the
opening of new buildings.
Prof. Macleod will examine
this attitude and suggest some
responses by architects.
Saturday, Oct. 4
at 8:15 p.m.
Vancouver institute
lectures take place on
Saturdays at 8:15 p.m.
on the ubc campus
in lecture hall no. 2
instructional resources
centre
admission to the general
public is free
SUNDAY
SAILING CLUB
Novice training, 10 a.m. to 3:45
p.m., Jericho Sailing Centre.
MONDAY
PAKSING FUTGA KUNG FU
Practice, 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.,
SUB 212.
FEMINIST KARATE ASSOCIATION
Practice, 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m., SUB
212.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Multimedia slide show, 11:30 a.m.,
noon and 1:30 p.m., SUB
auditorium, 7:30 p.m., Gage
Towers.
wusc
Third World handicrafts sale, 11
a.m. to 4 p.m., SUB 207-209.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Joel Thorkelson speaks, noon, IRC
1.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Barbecue,       leaving      6:30      p.m.,
Lutheran Campus Centre.
HAMSOC-VE7UBC
Organizational meeting for cope and
theory classes, noon, Brock 358.
GAY PEOPLE
Special    women's    meeting,    noon,
SUB 230.
PRO-LIFE
General     meeting    and     elections,
noon, SUB 117.
WEDNESDAY
ENGLISH DEPARTMENT
Victor    Coleman    reads    from
poetry, noon, Bu. 202.
THURSDAY
MEDIEVAL SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, SUB 213.
DECORATE WITH PRINTS
his
o
U.B.C. GATE
BARBERS
Internationally Trained
Hairstylists ^f^
Open Tues. - Sat. ^^^
9 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. ^#^_
4605 W. 10th AVE.
■ II
228-9345
grin bin
3209 W. Broadway
738-2311
(Opp. Liquor Store and Super Valu)
Art Reproductions
Art Nouveau
Largest Selection
of Posters in B.C.
Photo Blowups
from Negs& Prints
Jokes - Gifts, etc.
'DECORATE WITH POSTERS'
DR. BUNDOLO
S.U.B.
12:30P.m.   THEATRE
FREE
LIVE RADIO COMEDY
a CBC production
TUESDAY
OCT. 7th
Broadcast:
Sat., 11:30 a.m.—CBU 690
LATE PAYMENT OF FEES
A late payment fee of $25.00 additional to all other fees will be assessed if
payment of the first instalment is not made on or before September 19.
Refund of this fee will be considered only on the basis of a medical
certificate covering illness or on evidence of domestic affliction. If fees are
not paid in full by October 3, 1975, registration will be cancelled and the
student concerned excluded from classes.
If a student whose registration has been cancelled for non-payment of fees
applies for reinstatement and the application is approved by the Registrar,
the student will be required to pay a reinstatement fee of $25.00, the late
fee of $25.00, and all other outstanding fees before being permitted to
resume classes.
RESIDENCE
SPRING TERM WAITING LIST
Students presently on the Fall Term Waiting List for
UBC residences who are interested in residence for the
Spring Term must come to the Housing Office between
October 1 and October 15 to re-confirm their place on
the list.
Rooms available for the Spring Term (to be occupied
January 4) will be offered to those students on the
Spring Term Waiting List daily at 1:00 p.m.,
commencing December 8. The residence fee must be
paid at the time of accepting a room assignment.
Office of the Director of Residences
September 30, 1975.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional fines 25c.
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $1.80; additional tines
40c. Additional days $1.50 & 35c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B„UBC, Van, 8, B.C.
5 — Coming Events
LEARN THE ART OF Turkish Oriental
Belly Dance. Tues. 7 to 9 p.m. Four
sessions, $16. 2947 West 41st. Enroll
any time. 433-8157 or 261-8044.
LIVE RADIO COMEDYI Dr. Bundolo's
Pandemonium Medicine Show this
Tuesday, Oct. 7, 12:30, SUB Theatre.
It's FREE!
10 —For Sale — Commercial
C&C SPORTS
Volume Discount Sale
$1 off for every $15 in puchases.
Save on squash racquets, ski jackets,
etc., etc. Open 4-9 Thurs., Fri.; 9-6
Sat.; 12 noon 6:00 Sun.
3616 WEST  4th  AVENUE
30 — Jobs
PART-TIME, SALES ORIENTED to sell
and demonstrate cosmetics. Phone
after 5 p.m., 946-9634.
35 - Lost
SR-50 CALCULATOR last Thursday
afternoon by The Barn. I will pay $10
for recovery. Phone John, 224-3444.
I need it!
LOST: BLACK BINDER with book in
Pit, Friday 26th. Please return. 263-
0762. Not mine!
40 — Messages
60 — Rides
"HOW   TO   CHOOSE   YOUR    BOOZE."
Best-selling paperback book on huw
to get best values in buying beer,
wine, and liquor. Pays for itself on
your next liquor purchase. Only $1.50.
Saltaire Publishing Ltd., Box 2003,
Sidney, B.C.
HOW   TO   ESCAPE   THE   RAT   RACE!"
Helps you choose a career and lifestyle where you can be really happy.
Only $1.25. Saltaire Publishing Ltd.,
Box 2003, Sidney, B.C.
STUDENT wishes to start or join car
pool from Langley. More info., phone
530-7518.
WOULD LIKE TO FORM carpool from
Richmond, vie. Blundell and No. 3.
Phone 278-6394.
65 — Scandals
ENJOY VANCOUVER
NIGHT LIFE
AND SAVE !
Send for entertainment pack of 25
money-savers. Includes 8 restaurants,
9 nite clubs, many other rttractions.
Save as much as half of your dining
& entertainment costs — some freebies too! The perfect way to enjoy
Vancouver on a budget. Send $3.90
& tax to Roadrunner Advertising,
Dept. B, 9—1035 Richards St., Van.
V6B 3E4. Your money cheerfully
refunded if not totally satisfied.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY LESLIEI Love
Green Hornet, Hip Helen, Mad Russians, Super Shell, Sweet & Sassy Sis.
THE SHOW THATS TOO ROTTON to
take off the air!! Dr. Bundolo's Pandemonium Medicine Show, Tuesday,
Oct. 7, 12:30, SUB Theatre. It's FREE!
11 — For Sale — Private
'68 CORTINA, 4.SPEED, new clutch,
generator, battery, snow tires included.  Best offer. Phone 324-0200.
SALE: GOOD USED women's clothing.
Sunday. Oct. 5, 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
1256 West 47th Ave., Vancouver.
1964   VW   STATION   WAGON.   Rebuilt
engine. City tested. $550. 736-1654.
15 — Found
20 — Housing
LARGE, FURNISHED s/c basement
suite. Very reasonable rent in exchange for some house work and
babysitting. Near campus. 224-4751.
ROOM AVAILABLE, St. Andrews Hall,
men's residence on campus. 224-7720
or 224-5742.
70 — Services
PERMANENT HAIR removal by Electrolysis Kree Method in my home.
Prices are reasonable. Phone 738-6960.
YOUR WEDDING professionally photographed. Call Kinzer Photo, 681-0315
daily — 873-5959 evenings.
85 — Typing
EFFICIENT     ELECTRIC    TYPING,    my
home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat accurate work. Reasonable rates —
263-5317.
90 - Wanted
ONE    MECHANICAL     ENGINEER,    un-
animal. Fair to good condition. Services not specified. Reply SUB message board.
SENIOR STUDENT who has resided in
Regina,  Sask. Phone 254-9596 (days).
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
TO SELL - BUY
INFORM Friday, October 3, 1975
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 15
Thunderbird to replace Brockton ?
Rugby talks tout stadium lights
By TOM BARNES
Thunderbird Stadium could
have its lights in the near future if
talks between UBC and the B.C.
Rugby Union are successful.
Lights for the stadium had been
looked to as a partial answer to
UBC's athletic financial woes for
some time. Last year, in a series of
articles by the Ubyssey sports
staff, several ways of increasing
the athletic budget without increasing the student paid athletic
fees were analyzed.
At that time it was recognized
that stadium lighting was a top
priority to obtain self-generated
athletic revenue. While both the
problem and the solution were
widely recognized, the matter of
financing ended anything but
dreams.
Stadium lighting would carry a
price tag of $70,000 to $200,000 for
lights suitable for television, a sum
that was hard to conceive of given
an athletic budget of less than
$150,000.
On top of the lighting it could cost
as much as $100,000 to rebuild the
field to a condition capable of
handling several games per week.
With the recent burning down of
Brockton Oval, the rugby union
was left without a suitable stadium
for its feature games. Empire
Stadium is too large for all but the
biggest of games and its artificial
turf does wonders for the knees and
elbows of the players. Swangard
Stadium has proven too costly to be
a viable alternative.
Thunderbird Stadium has accommodated over 6,500 people for
a rugby game, although it only has
seating for 3,200. There is plenty of
parking within a short distance and
its traffic problems will be
negligible in comparison to the
other stadia.
It is hoped that the rugby union
will enter into some sort of cost
sharing agreement with the
university. In return it will be
offered second choice for use of the
facilities.
UBC requires the stadium for
five football games of the year. The
other major tenant is the rugby
team. The soccer 'Birds also play
their league games in the stadium
but it would not be hard to work
around their schedule.
Lighting the stadium would
mean the Thunderbird rugby and
football games could be played on
Friday nights rather than the
present Saturday afternoons. This
time change would make it more
attractive for both students and
off-campus people to attend
games.
In conjunction with the games,
beer gardens, dances, or bar-
beques could be set up, for before
or after.
The combination of increased
attendance and coincidental social
events would add revenue to
athletics.
In addition, revenue could be
garnered by renting the stadium to
other organizations such as high
school football. With lights,
Thunderbird stadium would
become one of the most attractive
medium-size facilities in the
province. This is why the lighting
necessary for television should be
installed.
Buzz Moore, UBC athletic
business manager, took the idea to
both the Vancouver Rugby Union
and the provincial body this week.
If there appears to be a basis for
discussion the men's athletic
committee could address itself to
the question later this month.
Rugby, football 'Birds still winning
By TOM BARNES
With rugby at Clinton Park and
football in Edmonton, the Thunderbirds are out to extend winning
streaks in two directions.
A 26-3 win over the Trojans and a
21-10 victory over the Capilanos
this week have given Donn
Spence's rugby 'Birds a 2-1 record
in the first division.
This record is good enough to put
them in a second place tie with the
Rowing Club. The Ex-Brits and the
Kats are tied for first with 3-0
records.
The Ex-Brits will provide the
opposition for the 'Birds Saturday,
so UBC is already faced with a big
game.
When the two teams met in
exhibition action last season the
Ex-Brits were decimated by injuries and the 'Birds walked away
with a 39-3 laugher.
It was the first loss in eight
games for the Ex-Brits. This time
it is not going to be so easy.
Although Dave Eburne is back
following an injured knee in a rep
game in Victoria, Spence is still
faced with an injury problem.
Preston Wiley suffered a concussion and Robbie Grieg picked
up some torn ligaments in his knee
during the win over the Caps.
Wiley will be back after the
weekend game, but Grieg is going
to be out for a couple of weeks.
Rob Google, who looked impressive in a few games for the
'Birds last year, will be brought up
to replace Greig at fullback.
Wrestlers want third title
Frank Smith's football 'Birds
take on the third place University
of Alberta Golden Bears in Canada
West football action Saturday.
The Bears are 1-1 in league play
this year and trail UBC and the
University of Calgary Dinosaurs
by two points. The Bears' only win
is an 11-10 squeaker over the
hapless University of Manitoba
Bisons.
The Bisons are 0-3 and have
taken over the basement of the
league with a surprising thud.
"Alberta lost some very good
players to graduation last year so
they aren't as strong as they were,
but that doesn't mean they are all
that weak either," said Smith.
Smith expects a tough game and
concedes that his squad must come
up big for the second straight
week, if they are going to pick up
their first points on the road this
year.
. Last week the 'Birds edged the
Dinos in a 17-15 thriller to launch
themselves into contention. A road
win now would go a long way in
keeping them there.
Against the Dinos, UBC was
forced to go most of the way
without its two offensive standouts
— quarterback Dan Smith and
fullback Gord Penn. It is expected
that both will be ready to play this
week.
Alberta won both its encounters
with UBC last year by scores of 53-
10 and 46-0.
CCCM
STUDY GROUPS
beginning Oct. 8
MONDAY NOON-
Biography     as     Theology:
faith and ethical concerns
TUESDAY NOON-
Spirituality and Prayer Life:
a guided journey in
Spirituality
WEDNESDAY NOON-
What    am    I    to    believe:
exploration in what we
believe
THURSDAY NOON-
Issues in Poverty— with
Vicki Obedkoff-1st United
Church
FRIDAY NOON-
Issues in The Third World:
with John Conway, History
Dept.
to sign up: Phone 224-3722 or
come by the Lutheran Campus
Centre
"I don't see why we can't keep
the championship title for another
season," says 'Birds wrestling
coach Bob Laycoe.
Laycoe, who has coached the
team to two straight conference
titles, says the team has some
returnees who fared on top last
year and many new prospects who
will defend the title.
Although the team lost eight
members from last year, Laycoe
thinks the 'Birds have a young
team with lots of potential.
Returnees from last year are
George Richey (220) and Kyle
Raymond (heavyweight). Both of
them won both Canadian Intercollegiate and Canadian open
championships. Mike Richey (167)
is last year's conference champion.
Other returnees are: Jose
Machial (118), Ira Chidlow (142),
Rob Lang (150) and John Cipolato
(134).
New prospects are Bob Pickson
(190) and Clarke Davis (177), who
both won provincial championships last year; Dave Lim,
(190); Greg Lyons (158); Rob
Hanson (158); Mike Mann (142);
Eric Kolsrud (134); Jeff Davis
(134); Marty Lum (109); and
Barry Lam, (126), who last year
won the Western Canadian Summer Games championship.
First big event is on Nov. 14 and
15 when the UBC freestyle classic
is held here. This meet is one of the
highest quality in Canada.
The "NEW"
PONDEROSA
SNACK BAR
Now open from 8 a.m.
Mon.-Fri.
"BURGER & BOTTLE*'
SPECIAL $1.15
12 noon to 2 p.m.
'available to those
19 yrs. and over
Ask for
your styl
Corky
Leo
Ernie
Maryke
Carlyne
ist
Maintain that
"Just Been Styled Look1
at home
Here's how:
RK Hairdressing Gel.
( 731-4191)
3644 WEST 6th AVE., AT ALMA
Faculty of
Agricultural Sciences
NOTICE
That nominations for 2 student positions on the Advisory Committee to the
President for the selection of a Dean of Agriculture Sciences, are open as of
10:00 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 2, 1975 and will close at 1:00 p.m. on Thursday,
Oct. 9th.
These positions are open to any student registered in the Faculty of
Agriculture Sciences only.
Nominations and Eligibility forms available in room 64 of the McMillan
Building (Agriculture Undergrad office).
Polls will be open 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 16th in McMillan.
Bruce Rutley      President Ag.U.S. Page  16
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October 3, 1975
Palestinians Ignored' in Israel
From page 5
encouraging as much Jewish
immigration as possible to
Palestine, and second, to suppress
any national struggle for independence that the Palestinians
might attempt.      .
The desire for independence and
self-determination for Palestinians
in their own country led to Palestinian uprisings and revolts in 1921,
1929, 1933 and a long and intensive
struggle from 1936 to 1939 which
began with a six-month general
strike. All these rebellions were
ruthlessly crushed by British
troops with the help of paramilitary Zionist groups in
Palestine — such as Haganah, a
terrorist group organized by none
other than Moshe Dayan.
The Zionist notion of a Jewish
homeland and Zionist attempts at
establishing a Jewish "nation"
made it necessary for them to
totally ignore the existence of the
Palestinians. Their attitude toward
the Palestinians is illustrated quite
well in their slogan of the time "a
land without a people to a people
without land."
After the Second World War,
when U.S. imperialism replaced
British imperialism as the
dominant power in the world, the
Israeli Zionists began to act as
agents of U.S. imperialism. It was
the U.S. that was the decisive
factor in obtaining the agreement
of the U.N. General Assembly to
partition Palestine in 1947.
The Zionist state of Israel exists
today only because it is backed
financially and militarily by the
U.S.
Israel's imperialist nature
showed itself once again in 1956
when the Zionists joined with
Britain and France in an attempted invasion of Egypt to
regain control of the Suez Canal,
which had just been nationalized
by Egypt.
Another important aspect of the
ideology of Zionism is its racism.
Zionists feel that the "Jewish
problem" can only be resolved by
the formation of an exclusively
Jewish state where the Jewish
people from around the world can
gather, safe from anti-semitism. A
forerunner of Zionism, Moses
Hess, mystically referred to the
"racial instinct," argued for the
"Jewish cult" and saw a natural
antagonism between Jew and
gentile.
Moshe Dayan who is coming to
speak in Vancouver is a leading
Zionist. Dayan's activities began in
1929 when he joined the Haganah
whose sole purpose was to attack
and terrorize Moslems, Christians
and Jews in Palestine who
disagreed with Zionist aims.
In the Palestinian rebellion of
1936-39 for independence from
-British rule, Moshe Dayan served
with the special police force to put
down the rebellions. Dayan was a
leader in the 1948 war during which
the Zionists completely destroyed
385 Arab towns and villages, and
uprooted 1-1/2 million
Palestinians.
He was the Israeli army chief of
staff from 1953 to 1959, and as such
'We only have to lose once'
From page 5
any better or worse — than the
next to serve in.
"Wherever the bullets are I don't
want to be. No one wants war, no
one wants to fight. To be a soldier
in the occupied territories is
terrible. I don't want it. I say give
it up."
The general consensus these
days is that any dialogue on the
Middle East, no matter on what
level, must by necessity contain
some reference to the Palestinians.
Lipetz concurs.
"Eventually we are going to
have to negotiate with the
Palestinians. We are going to have
lo speak with them and their
leaders. That leader is represented
by Arafat. Hussein (king of Jordan) is out. Arafat got his
leadership through violence and he
has maintained it through
violence. But he has been to the
United Nations and we are going to
have to deal with him."
But Lipetz adds two important
qualifiers. First, the Palestinians
must recognize Israel's right to
existence. Without that concession
there can be no dialogue, he says.
Secondly, Arafat must give up on
his ideas of establishing a
"democratic secular state."
"Nowhere in the world has that
concept   worked,"   says   Lipetz.
"The current troubles in Lebanon
point to that fact. In Lebanon now,
Christian and Moslem are killing
each other in what is basically a
religious power struggle. The idea'
is impractical in Lebanon; it would
be equally unworkable in Israel."
The best settlement for all sides
would be a demilitarized
Palestinian state on the West bank,
says Lipetz. "It's good land, they
could produce a lot there and form
a viable state."
The point is being increasingly
made that Israel holds the key to a
Middle East solution and that her
prevarication has prolonged the
turbulent Mid-East situation. This
is beginning to hurt Israel, particularly in terms of international
prestige and significance.
Lipetz concedes that Israelis are
sometimes too proud.
"We are at times caught up in
our own problems and are unaware
of what's happening in the rest of
the world. A good example of that
would be the oil embargo. The
Western nations have been hard hit
by the oil price increases and we
shouldn't be so surprised that their
support for us today is not the same
as it has been in the past."
Yet Lipetz maintains that only a
fool in a position such as Israel's
would move incautiously.
"Remember," he says, "we only
have to lose once."
ALMA    MATER    SOCIETY
HILLEL HOUSE
present
GENERAL
MOSHE DAYAN
SUB BALLROOM
Monday, October 6th, 12:30 p.m.
Tickets now available at A.M.S. Office
LIMITED NUMBER OF STUDENT TICKETS LEFT
Students 50c
was a leader in the "Sinai campaign" with Britain and France
against Egypt. As Israeli
"defense" minister from 1967-72,
he was in charge of Israeli forces
invading Arab countries during the
1967 war.
So it can be seen that for his
whole life, Moshe Dayan has been
a leader of the Zionist's policies of
terror, aggression and expansion
against Arab countries and the
Palestinian people. In 1966 Dayan
visited South Vietnam as a guest of
the Americans.
In articles for the London Sunday
Telegraph, he wrote admiringly of
the Americans' military fire power
and aggressive spirit, and that the
National  Liberation  Front  could
not win against the Americans.
Needless to say, history has
proven him wrong!
Under the leadership of the
P.L.O., the Palestinians have
made great gains. The fact that
P.L.O. chairman Yasser Arafat
was invited by the U.N. General
Assembly to speak in November,
1974 is an indication of the respect
given the P.L.O. by most of the'
world's nations.
Arafat told the U.N. assembly:
". . .Since its inception our
revolution was not motivated by
racial or religious factors. Its
target was never the Jews as a
person but racist Zionism and
undisguised aggression.
"In this sense ours is also a
revolution for the Jew as a human
being as well.
"We are struggling so that Jews,
Christians and Moslems may live
in equality, enjoying the same
rights and assuming the same
duties, free from racial or religious
discrimination."
The Palestinian struggle against
Zionism is a just struggle and
should be supported by all
progressive peoples. It is clear that
the essence of Zionism is both
racist and imperialist and should
be exposed as such. On Monday the
Committee to Oppose Moshe
Dayan's Visit will hold a protest in
the area of SUB, where Dayan is to
speak.
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