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The Ubyssey Mar 25, 1983

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Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXV, No. 47
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, March 25,1963
228-2301
'HP^r*i ■.-.
RECYCLING RECYCLING RE
r RECYCLING RECYCLING R
VG RECYCLING RECYCLING
DVG JUST A WASTE OF TIME?
charles campball photo
By PAT MACLEOD
"I'm not interested in people
around here, I'm just interested
in bottles and cans," says Karl
peering through thick glasses
underneath the brim of a scrunched greenish cap. He obligingly
peels his eyes away from the
spaces between groups of
students to have his photograph
taken.
"This won't take long will it? You
know because I've got competition," he
says meaning the two or three other
gloved and running shoe-clad people
who cycle and walk around campus with
shopping bags full of tin cans.
Afterwards I speak to a student in a
fluffy pink track suit outside of SUB.
She is a science student; perhaps one day
she will find a career in resource
management.
"Recycling? There's just no time
anymore — I'm a student" she says and
extracts a clean white sheet of paper
from her binder with a crisp snap.
On campus and in society, those who
do have the time, live on the edge, like
Karl, in between old-age pension and
welfare,   like   the   mammals   in   the
dinosaur age. And designing a viable
recycling system at UBC — even for our
most dispensable resource, paper — is a
matter of designing around one entrenched routine after another, like finding
the quickest route through a herd of
sleeping dinosaurs.
But paper recycled at the University of
Alberta is estimated to save about 35
trees each day — and that's after collecting only 30 per cent of the total potential. And the three year old recycling
system at the University of Laval
recycles about ten tons of paper per
week.
"When I came to UBC I couldn't
believe there was no recycling," said
Helene Guay of the Environmental Interest Group's recycling committee.
Guay thinks ten tons per week is probably too low for UBC although it is difficult to evaluate the real potential in
terms of clean paper. The EIG has applied to the federal government for a
summer student employment grant to
find out just how much paper is
recoverable and to work out the logistics
of a collection system to present to the
administration in the fall.
One thing for certain is a recycling
project would not involve students at
first. "Just one orange peel or apple
core can ruin a load," said Ann Helbig,
Zoology 4 and chair of the committee
explaining how a recycling system
started two years ago in Angus failed
because students put garbage in the
paper bins. Paper must be clean and dry
and the EIG has opted to try the system
in an office setting first.
"At every desk there would be a file
holder which office workers would put
paper into," said Helbig describing the
"at-source separation" program
developed by Environment Canada for
federal office buildings. When the folder
is full, the office worker empties it into a
nearby bag made of reusable cloth which
is then picked up by the janitor on his
regular garbage route. No extra work
would be involved. After the janitor
puts the bags in a bin, the paper is either
picked up at the building or taken to a
central depot where the paper buyer
picks it up.
The champagne of the paper business
is the high quality paper used in large
quantities in the computer science
building and during exams. Strategies
are being worked out to separate the
higher priced paper from the mixed.
"If the administration agrees they
want to recycle, they'll save money,"
said Guay. "They pay $45,000 a year to
dump their garbage not including the
cost of the trucks. A similar program at
Western Washington University has
been running for ten years now, employs
12 people and is running a profit, she
said. The administration has sponsored
the summer project and is "looking forward to the report being done," said
Neil Riseborough vice-provost of student affairs. But Riseborough was
unable to say if the administration could
provide funds to set up the project in a
pilot building next fall.
"When you start to talk about recycling, a lot of people want to jump in and
do everything" he said trying to explain
why it's always student groups that try
to convince the administration to recycle
and not the other way around. But he
praised the EIG's thoroughness.
"Reading is a catchword but you
have to have a very hardnosed approach
to what you can do. If the economics
don't work out it won't succeed," he
said.
An investment of only three dollars
per office employee would be needed to
cover the costs of the bins and desk-top
folders for the pilot project, said Helbig.
The group is also hoping to hire a
publicity person to train the office
workers and janitors.
"If the janitors refuse we're cooked,"
said Guay who was hired at Laval to
show office workers and janitors a seven
minute demonstration slide show and
handle complaints. But the response at
Laval was enthusiastic.
"It was not part of their job to recycle
but we weren't refused once," said
Guay. "People were even cleaning the
paper themselves. The problem is not to
recycle. The problem is to get rid of the
paper."
Ten years ago at UBC a similar system
failed because the buyers lost interest.
But Helbig says they have buyers anxious to buy paper from UBC, although
the paper market in B.C. is still a big
problem. "The price of paper fluctuates
too much and paper buyers have to export paper to Mexico, Korea, and Japan
to survive," she said. There is only one
paper mill in all of B.C. that uses waste
paper as part of its fiber source: Community Recycling Ltd. in Burnaby, compared to 13 in Ontario and 20 in Quebec.
But while virgin fiber is much cheaper in
B.C., producers of low grade products
such as brown cardboard boxes that
don't need virgin fiber must often import recycled paper from the U.S.
Aside from paper, Helbig is optimistic
that recycling can be expanded on campus to include organic waste from the
barns and food services and a depot for
bottles, tins, and aluminum. "People
are coming in by car every day anyway.
If recycling depots are close by people
would do it" she said criticizing the
Greater Vancouver Regional District's
lack of initiative. "They have a $100,000
recycling budget and are spending it on
bumper stickers for municipal vehicles
that say "Recycle — it's a good idea."
But in a society where packaging
alone constitutes more than 35 per cent
of the garbage we produce, recycling is
like bailing the water out of a sinking
ship and ignoring the hole says Helbig.
"It's not bad will (that stops people
from recycling), it's just a trend in our
whole society" said Guay. "The North
American ideology of changing your car
every year is to make people work. Your
neighbour has a job, your father has a
job, I have a job.
"But its not just a problem of people
losing their jobs," she says tapping her
head where her brain is. "People are seeing that even in a large country our
resources are limited. The time is ripe
for change now because we are in an
economic crisis. Just give people money
again and everything will be like
before." Page 2 THE    UBYSSEY Friday, March 25, 1983
Student debt-load to increase
By ARNOLD HEDSTROM          are ,hc Socred government will of The provincial government is for-     look better handing out loans." officials are unaware of what will
With   poor  job  prospects and    fer only loan money instead of non- mulattng   next   year*-*d   policy        Learey said a decision has to be happen," charged Learey.
generally tight money, students may    repayable grants  The province also now.    according^jjjjj&j"'' 'ian     made   this   month   so  application Learey said a provincial loan pro-
soon   face  even   more  distressing    m*y  lie  s,udent  aid  to academic federation   o%^^^^B>   w 'ie p^'   ^   information   booklets gram   may   cost   the   government
financial news                                       standing.                     ^^ deputy chai''              ^m   Js^Jr Q *V J* *J4JUfd- more in the long run becuase in-
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IT DOESN'T HAVE
TO BE THAT BAD
JOB LINK and
@he Ifoncoiwer Sun
offer you a way to fight unemployment.
For $1.75 you can list your name for publication in the Alma Mater
Society's JOB LINK and in an April issue of THE VANCOUVER SUN.
That means that your name will be delivered to more than 260,000
businesses and homes.
WHAT HAVE  YOU GOT TO LOSE,  EXCEPT
MAYBE A SUMMER OF UNEMPLOYMENT?
Ad Forms available in ROOM 266, S.U.B.
DEADLINE IS MARCH 31st, 4:00 p.m.
im:
THE ALMA MATER SOCIETY
of the University of British Columbia Friday, March 25,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Graffito reveals job troths
By CHARLES CAMPBELL
"Get yourself a university degree
and God will grant you opportunity." So reads a graffito near the
campus Canada Employment Centre.
The humor would not be lost on
students scanning the job board in
the air conditioned, employment
free comfort of Brock hall.
One job posting for teaching
positions in Prince George informs
students interviews will be held Feb.
28. Underneath is a handwritten
note which tells students job interviews have been cancelled as of Jan.
21. Underneath that is a note saying
applications are still being accepted.
"They will screen, inform and hold
on file the applications of those that
would have been interviewed.
Those students may arrange interviews during the spring break," it
reads.
A student eyes the card with
distaste. "They'll screen, inform
and hold on file, but will they bend,
fold and mutilate?" he asks.
There are lots of postings for tree
planting jobs. Five to be exact. The
pre-screening application deadlines
vary: Feb. 24, March 7, Feb. 14.
A computer science student
laments the fact the only job that
meets his expectations requires
fluency in six computer languages.
One student said he saw a listing
at another employment centre that
asked for a dishwasher with four
years experience.
There are a fair number of
listings for low paying jobs in
recreation. There are two jobs
under forestry, three under commerce.
Of 12 students surveyed, only
two had ever found a job through
the employment centre before.
Commerce student Dave Kim worked as an usher at B.C. Place.
But the job wasn't posted on
the job board. He found out about
it from a poster in the UBC
counselling office.
Leo managed to get a job
through the office last year as a
hotel maintenance worker. At $8.50
per hour the pay was decent. "But
they're not hiring this year," he
says.
It's pointless asking Leo whether
or not he will get a job related to his
field of study. "A creative writing
degree really helps me get a job
pounding nails and sweeping
floors."
For some students a positive attitude is the only consolation.
"I'm going to get a job," said
one woman who declined to be
identified. She dismissed the
possibility of finding a job related
to her commerce studies with a
laugh. "But I will find a job.
There's always telephone
soliciting."
Employment centre manager Pat
Crakanthorp said they post between
15 and 25 jobs per week. In a good
week that's one for every 1,000
students on campus.
Outside Crakanthorp's office,
Franca has found a listing for a
local job as a cashier. But at the
desk she is told the employer
already has enough applications.
Leo is filling out an application
for a temporary job counting traffic. "It's a few bucks," he says.
Bob Dylan's words come to
mind: "Twenty years of schooling
and they put you on the day shift."
Bob was optimistic.
"Students eligible tor III insurance hunter
Students can't collect unemployment insurance, right?
Wrong.
Government unemployment insurance is available to all those who
qualify under UI regulations, a government official says.
And the good news is students may fit into one of two exceptions from
the usual eligibility rules to get benefits if they don't get jobs this summer.
The regulations state 20 weeks of eligibility are required to receive
government support while looking for work. But if a person worked 10
weeks of the last 52, and either worked 14 or the previous 52 or interrupted
a claim to return to school, UI will make payments.
To apply for benefits, a student should have all employment records
showing wages and numbers of weeks worked when the UI was deducted
from paycheques. Employers must supply these records on request.
With records in hand, go to a Canada Employment Centre, (excluding
UBC's) and apply for unemployment insurance benefits.
Keep in mind that a week of eligibility includes any week where $77 was
earned or more than 15 hours were worked, and UI was deducted. All temporary and part-time work that meets these criteria can be added together
— 10 one week jobs are the same as one ten week job for UI purposes.
UI will pay 60 per cent of the weekly average wage rate for the last 20
weeks worked. The length of the claim depends on the number of weeks
worked, the unemployment rate in the province and a government formula.
Students can apply for benefits after seven days of being "ready, willing and able" to work — or shortly after school ends in April. There is a
two week period before UI is paid.
Student snmmer jobs
depend on government action
By ROBERT BEYNON
Unless the provincial government
acts soon, students could lose possible summer job opportunities,
UBC's student counselling director
said Thursday.
Dick Shirran said the government
should tell universities how many
students they can hire this summer
before students leave campus.
He said last year the
government's summer youth
employment program created 535
study-related jobs for students.
"I phoned Victoria and spoke to
UBC's vice provost, but I have no
knowledge of the program (this
year)," Shirran said.
Deputy premier Grace McCarthy
and labor minister Bob McClelland
announced Feb. 22 that $10 million
was available to produce 8,300
summer jobs through a youth
employment   program.   But   they
have yet to release details.
Universities and colleges will be
told next week how much money
they will receive to hire students,
said labor minister manager Patrick
O'Rourke.
"Once they are told an amount
that will be the sum they receive,
with some possibility of an
increase," O'Rourke said. He added an increase was "just a possibility."
Labor ministry official Aria
Knight said universities will receive
$600 a month per student to hire
students for two months. Only $1.3
million of the tentatively allocated
$10 million will go to universities
and colleges, she added.
The government will subsidize
businesses and farms who hire
youths and also pay the minimum
wage to museums and tourist attractions that hire students.
But Knight added, "I cannot say
that the committee on employment
development has confirmed the
money for the program."
Alma Mater Society external affairs coordinator Lisa Hebert wrote
a letter to labor minister McClelland recommending that:
• Wages for university workers
be raised to at least $1,000 per
month;
• Students he hired for four
months, not just two;
• The   number   of   program
created jobs be doubled;
• The number of university jobs
in the program be doubled; and
• The program's particulars be
made public immediately.
In 1981, students in the university
job program were hired for four
months at $800 per month, making
$2,000 more per summer than
students will this year.
Grads face new employment barriers,
as traditional doors dose
Employment prospects look grim
for more than 600,000 graduates
from Canada's post-secondary institutions this spring.
The worst job market for
students in years plagues graduates
from liberal arts and science programs. But even graduates out of
traditional routes to employment,
from professional programs like
engineering, commerce and
forestry, face bleak job prospects.
"We've got 85 graduates and
right now four have job offers,"
said Rob Seversen, civil engineering
club student employment representative. He added there are about 15
more jobs which are in the interview
stage.
A similar situation exists in
forestry where less than 10 of 80
graduates have jobs. Pat Crakanthorp, Canada Employment Centre
manager says the number of
recruiters is down 50 per cent from
last year.
"Everybody has to come to the
realization that jobs are grim now
but things are going to pick up,"
Seversen said optimistically.
But this year's graduates are also
competing with last year's. The
CEC has 164 registered for work
and many will also compete with
undergraduates for temporary summer jobs.
"This year it's up to the individual to hustle and use connections," said Seversen.
A University and College Placement Association survey mirrors
UBC's situation. Employers plan to
hire only about half as many
graduates in 1983 as in 1982, the nation wide survey predicts.
Nationally the biggest percentage
drops will be for graduates in
agriculture, business administration, engineering, computer
science, forestry, and physical and
earth sciences.
But students from many of these
programs will still enjoy the best
job prospects, according to campus
employment centres.
The worst job prospects will still
be for students who have taken
general arts and science, social
sciences or the humanities, according to the report.
The reports also predict the
employers who will hire students in
1983 will be in the manufacturing,
oil and gas, banking, life insurance,
transportation, energy, public administration, personal services,
chemicals and chemical products
sectors.
Some professions are still holding
out for possible employment programs.
Forestry jobs depend on the provincial budget, said forestry faculty
placement officer Douglas Golding.
Commerce hiring is also behind
schedule. The trend is for
employers to wait until the last
possible moment a faculty rep said.
"They're (students) experiencing
the effects of the recession," said
Gerald Smeltzer assistant commerce
undergraduate programs director.
"I know its pretty rough out
there in the marketplace," he added.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 25,1983
i
All those
in favor...'
By CRAIG BROOKS
"All those in favor?" asks Alma
Mater Society president Mitch Hetman.
Hands go up.
"Wait, are we paying Greg Pelling (former physical education
undergraduate society president)
$500 to do a study?" asks finance
director James Hollis.
"I guess that's what the motion
says," Hetman replies.
"I move to table," says a concerned council member.
"Seconded," says another.
"All those in favor," asks Hetman one more time.
Hands go up again.
"Motion tabled,' Hetman says.
"What did we just decide?" asks
a first-time member.
And with that, council in-
definately tabled an undebated motion to pay a former student council
member for a study on establishing
a student-run house painting company at Wednesday's meeting.
♦ * *
Council passed a motion asking
the UBC board of governors to rescind the appointment of Polish professor Jerzy Wiatr, who has been
appointed to teach political science
courses this summer.
Council Briefs
Wiatr is an advisor to the Polish
government, and is intimately involved in policy making, solidarity
study group spokesperson Horacio
de la Cueva told council.
Eight council members voted for
the motion after five minutes of
discussion,   many  abstained,   and
one person voted against.
* * *
Anarchy is now illegal for AMS
clubs.
Council accepted a student administrative recommendation that
AMS clubs be required to elect at
least a president and treasurer by
March 31 each year.
Administration director Alan
Pinkney said many clubs cannot be
contacted during the summer,
necessitating the rule.
* * *
Even AMS executives need summer jobs.
So much so that all five are applying to be hired for the summer
by student council. A hiring committee will review the applications
of external affairs coordinator Lisa
Hebert, vice president Rene Com-
esoHi and administration director
Alan Pinkney.
* * *
Council tabled a motion asking
its programs committee to only
sponsor events where expected student attendance would be at least
50 per cent of the audience.
The motion came after councilors expressed concern about the.
recent D.O.A. punk concert, which
saw a minimal UBC student attendance, and resulted in several people being sent in hospital.
"We should be careful of sponsoring events where the building
might get burnt down," said one
obviously concerned council
member.
Oops! Oops!
In the March 8 issue (The Tuesday Ubyssey) we erroneously
reported that British prime minister
Margaret Thatcher intentionally
ordered a British ship sunk to elicit
public support for the Falklands
war. In fact, it was an Argentinian
ship that she ordered sunk. We
apologize for any discomfort our
mistake may have caused to our
readers. Now, if only Maggie would
apologize.
COMPUTER SCIENCE
COURSES
Winter Session
83/84
Enrolment Limitations will be in effect.
EARLY NOTIFICATION OF ADMISSION TO
COURSES 2XX, 3XX and 4XX IS POSSIBLE.
For information contact:
The Department of Computer Science
Room 333,
Computer Sciences Building Friday, March 25,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Wiatr class boycott organized
A group of UBC students is calling for a boycott of Polish
academic and communist party
member Jerzy Wiatr's summer
courses and plans to picket his
classes every day.
"Everytime Wiatr comes to class,
he'll find a pro-Solidarity picket
outside," said Fraser Easton,
spokesperson for the UBC Solidarity study group.
A petition is being circulated
demanding UBC's political science
UBC Tories
go bah, bah,
Mulroney
By CRAIG BROOKS
The UBC Progressive Conservative club will endorse Brian
Mulroney for the Tory party leadership, a Peter Blaikie supporter conceded Wednesday.
UBC student Steve Sorko said
Mulroney forces have successfully
increased club membership to more
than 200 people to ensure pro-
Mulroney supporters will be sent to
the June leadership convention in
Ottawa.
"Right now Mulroney has it,"
Sorko said. Mulroney supporters
are "sheep," he charged. "They
have never met Blaikie. They don't
know Mulroney."
Most club executives support
Mulroney, including current president Ray Castelli and former UBC
Tory vice president Jeff Kuwica.
I'm confident I will be going (to
the convention)," Kuwica said. He
called the process of increasing
membership "packing." "That's
the new buzz-word."
Sorko said youth members will
make up about one third of the convention's delegates. UBC sends
three delegates, while the Vancouver Quadra riding only gets six
representatives, he said.
Sorko said very few club
members, including former president Pat Gordon support Joe
Clark.
At Simon Fraser University,
commerce students have signed up
about 400 students, most of whom
support Mulroney, Sorko said.
Unlike UBC, the SFU campaign is
"more genuine," with less of the
"follow the leader mentality," he
said.
Blaikie, a Rhodes scholar, said
Wednesday he placed great emphasis on education funding.
"Education for me is one of the
highest priorities," he told 45 people in SUB 212.
Sorko said Blaikie is many
delegates' "second choice."
Gone hunting
It is summer job time at The
Ubyssey.
Now that Pathetic Press has
hired only three (blush!) of us
for the summer, the rest of us
have to find gainful employment. Therefore, Tuesday's
paper is being cancelled to give
the staff time to find other journalistic endeavors to spend their
summer on.
So whether it be Inside UBC,
the Nanaimo Daily Free Press or
the Spuzzum Chronicle, we are
out looking — so don't even try
for those jobs.
See you all next Thursday for
our final 1982-83 issue.
Deadline for letters, Tweens
and other stuff is Tuesday at 1
p.m.
department rescind Wiatr's appointment, Fraser said.
The university is paying for
Wiatr's travel expenses from
Poland and has asked him to teach
political science 201, foreign
governments, and 202, introduction
to political thought.
Two other student groups are
taking action against Wiatr's appointment. Student council at its
Wednesday meeting passed a motion endorsing a letter of protest
which will ask the political science
department to revoke its decision to
hire Wiatr.
And graduate students will likely
ask the department for a special
meeting to discuss the appointment,
according to graduate student Bill
Tieleman.
But most members of the department are silent on the issue. Only
two professors out of 11 contacted
Wednesday would declare their
views publically.
— noil luconto photo
SADISTIC STUDENTS stretch fellow compatriots to torturous heights as
part of experiment intended to expand minds and bodies of students suffering from rigours of impending exams. Experiment was commissioned by
Stretcherzize and Stretch UBC to acquire new techniques for upcoming
fitness classes, but experiment was halted when victims had to be carried
from site by stretchers.
Reforms abolished
By PETER BURNS
Polish student unions have been
forced underground as a result of
martial law, a Polish student
representative said Thursday.
Wojciech Jaruzelski's military
regime has outlawed unions and
crushed the reforms students had
achieved, Wiodzimierz Wlodek told
15 people in Buchanan 203.
Prior to martial law, 80 universities and one third of Polish
students were involved in
autonomous student unions, yet
only one state-run student union remains, he said. All thought except
state ideology has been repressed
said Wlodek.
The absence of student seats in
the university senate and the forced
indoctrination of Soviet thought
were cited by Wlodek as reasons for
the unions' emergence.
Military actions finally suppressed the students.
Army officers have been assigned
to each university to check for
ideological purity and Marxist-
Communist content in the university curriculum, Wlodek said.
The average Polish student
receives eight years of Russian prior
to university, while university Russian is compulsory, as is Marxist-
Leninist philosophy, he said.
The Polish students tought for
reform in order to gain intellectual
and cultural freedom, Wlodek said.
In the 1981-82 academic year,
new progressive university regulations were introduced to give
autonomy and student seats in the
university senate, Wlodek said.
Representatives of the education
ministry, Solidarity and the
students discussed the new regulations for several months. The
universities accepted the changes.
But the education minister decided
not to implement the new regulations, Wlodek added.
For five months students waited
for registration of their student
union. The registration should have
been a mere formality but when it
did not transpire new strikes broke
out, Wlodek said.
University in Poland life is now
unbearable, he said.
Professor Jean Laponce said
Monday protests against the Polish
academic are legitimate. "But
they're not concerns of mine," he
said.
"I would say I support Wiatr's
visit," he added, echoing acting
department head David Elkin's
comments March 18 that Wiatr is
"an excellent academic."
The only professor who has
spoken out against Wiatr is Wladec
Stankiewicz. He said he initially opposed the decision to hire Wiatr,
but added the department didn't
discuss the issue beforehand.
Wiatre has links to the central
committee which advises general
Jaruzejski and has denounced the
Polish trade union movement, according to local Solidarity groups.
He is also director of the officially
sanctioned Party Institute for
Marxism-Leninism.
Filmsoc brings
Silent Running
By CARY RODIN
An Alma Mater Society ombudsoffice committee presented its final
report on UBC's troubled film
society to a disinterested student
council Wednesday.
The investigation, chaired by om-
budsperson Gray McMullen, made
several recommendations to council
in answer to complaints from club
members. But most of the council
had not read the report before the
meeting. No councilors commented
on the report.
"I wasn't prepared for it, and
student council wasn't prepared for
it," conceded AMS president Mitch
Hetman adding the report will be
on next meeting's agenda.
McMullen was unhappy with
council's reaction to the report
which contained allegations of
fraud.
"Obviously Mitch Hetman
wasn't too interested in our findings. Unless someone is actively
interested in doing something
nothing will be done," McMullen
said Thursday.
The report's findings are:
• Ticket sales at Subfilms may
have been tampered with to illegally
increase club revenue;
• The $3,300 film production
Bond was written and directed by
non-student Peter Leung. Leung
also served as the club's chair until
the AMS forced his resignation last
month;
• The club executive (bigsoc) actively covered up the fact that
Leung was not a student;
• The club is split into two camps
— the bigsoc clique (composed
primarily of long-standing club
members and executive, and the
production clique (composed of
newer members interested in film
production);
• The production clique is
prevented from using club money to
produce films.
The report alleges some club
members re-issued Subfilm tickets
last year without accounting for the
double sales.  The result  is more
money was taken in at the door
than indicated in financial reports
to the AMS and film distributors.
Filmsoc paid the AMS 25 per cent
cut of their profits at that time for
use of SUB auditorium.
The report states extra money
produced by re-issuing tickets "was
rumored to have bought a Sony
record Player and a video
recorder." But the report clearly
states "there is no way to prove"
the allegations.
Filmsoc chair Karen Kristensen
denies any knowledge of the ticket
reissuing. But other club members
are willing to speak about the
charges.
"I knew a lot of people knew
about it, but no one will say
anything about it. I don't have any
hard evidence, but the day the ombudsoffice investigation was announced the recorder vanished.
You can't point the finger, but denying it ever happened doesn't
help," said production manager
Mike Werth.
But filmsoc members are also
divided over the validity of the investigation's findings.
"For the 200 hours they spent
preparing the report they should
have just stayed at home," said
Kristensen.
"I don't believe the report was
accurate. It needs to be rewritten
and I don't think it's worth
anybody's trouble."
Other members feel the report
provides a framework for resolving
the club's problems.
"I want to see the AMS take
some action. They should go
through the report recommendation
by recommendation. Unless these
recommendations are enforced the
report is meaningless. Filmsoc will
work all the problems out only by
learning from our mistakes, not by
forgetting the past as Karen
(Kristensen) suggests," said Werth.
Further investigation of the ticket
reissuing is unlikely, said AMS administration director Alan Pinkney.
These sentiments were echoed by
Hetman.
Yum, yum 200 Edibles
The Education, Buchanan, and Old Auditorium cafeterias will permanently close this summer.
And the Edibles, Arts 200 and Yum Yums cafeterias will open in their
places.
The three new names were announced Thursday at a gala Hawaiian
lunch for contest winners, food service committee members and one
perpetually hungry Ubyssey reporter.
Lucky Carol Nalanechny won $100 worth of food service food for her
Edible suggestion.
Arts 200, submitted by food service employee Clara Duuseip, won out
over agriculture student Nancy Campbell's Buch-nook for the new
Buchanan cafeteria name.
Fellow food service employee Mary Ip won the contest for auditorium
name Yum Yums, which means "good to eat, good to eat" in Chinese over
Kathryn Hazel's Soya Source suggestion, and Suzanne Stelle's The Aud
Spot.
Food service employee winners will receive dinner outside the food service chain of outlets, while runners-up got "I ate at UBC . . . and lived,"
t-shirts.
It is uncertain whether the quality of the Hawaiian lunch will be passed
on to the newly named outlets. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 25,1983
Guatemalan law 'unstable'
By CHRIS WONG
The Guatemalan army committed massacres even before martial
law was declared last year, a former
Guatemalan lawyer said Tuesday.
Enrique Torres told 30 people in
Law 178 martial law did not signify
the beginning of murder and terrorism in Guatemala.
"The truth is perhaps there were
more than 200 massacres (before
martial law)," he said.
"Why is it that they need martial
law now?" Torres asked.
Torres said he left Guatemala
after the "secret anti-communist army" condemned him to death.
"Thirty-three people were placed
on a hit list because they were working with unions," he said.
"I was number two and my wife
was number three (on the list).
Things were too hot for us to stay."
A policy of terror was directed
towards union organizers through
the use of scare tactics, he said.
"The effect they wanted was not
just to get rid of me, but to make
sure no one took my place," Torres
said.
He said the legal system in
Guatemala is unstable and inconsistent because the constitution
changes every time a coup occurs.
The last coup was in June when
Efrain Rios Montt came to power.
Torres, who specialized in labor
law before leaving Guatemala, said
the constantly revised constitutions
made a mockery of court trials.
He gave the example of six people
who were executed despite pleas
from the Pope on his recent visit to
Guatemala. "These people were
condemned to death by courts
which didn't give them a chance for
defence," Torres said.
Torres said the main opposition
to the Guatemalan government
comes from local landowners who
protest aid given to massacre survivors.
"They are opposing the fact that
the massacres are not done more
blatantly," he said.
Torres is now working in Canada
for the Guatemalan refugee support
committee.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
0
UNDER THE GUN
. examines arms race causes
Three Dog howls back
By DEBRA MILL
The Commodore Ballroom floor
rocked wildly Monday night under
hundreds of stomping feet.
Three Dog Night cranked out
their seemingly endless repetoire to
the delight of hundreds of fans. The
band played crisp renditions of
One, One Man Band, Joy to the
World, Shambala, The Family of
Man, An Old Fashioned Love
Song, Celebrate, Liar, Mama Told
Me (Not to Come), Black and
White, Pieces of April, The Show
Must Go On and Never Been to
Spain.
To polish off a great evening,
they played Eli's Coming for a
highlighted encore.
The fans thought the band was
terrific, and Three Dog Night seemed to enjoy the enthusiastic crowd's
antics.
After breaking up in 1975, the
Three Dog Night is back in style. In
fact, their gig in Vancouver is part
of a break from the pressing studio
schedule they have in Los Angeles,
where they are recording a new
album.
CFOX Electric Lunch Orchestra,
who opened the show, deserve a
pseudo honourable mention. David
Pratt pranced around in a
Napoleon cpstume and Dean Hill's
glasses flew off as he battled wildly
with the drums. It was entertaining,
but one can safely say the fans came
to see Three Dog Night.
AREYOUA
REGISTERED
VOTER?
In order to vote in a Provincial election
you must.be registered! To qualify, you must be
at least 19 years of age, a Canadian citizen or
British Subject, a resident of Canada for 12 months
and British Columbia for 6 months.
Registering is easy. Contact your nearest
Registrar of Voters or Government Agent.
And do it now!
Be sure you have a choice
in tomorrow.
REGISTER
Province of Chief Electoral
British Columbia  Office
Headlines offers relevant parody
By BRIAN JONES
Under the Gun can hardly be called disarming, although it is billed as
such. It lacks the punch required to
really overwhelm and inspire the
viewer. But is does succeed very well
in tying together several very important and complex political issues.
Under the Gun: A Disarming Revue
by Headlines Theatre Company
playing May 24 to June 4 at the
Vancouver East Cultural Centre
on community tour March 18-May 7
Headlines Theatre Company
does not rry to hide the fact that
they are politically motivated in the
creation of their art. They make use
of the theatre as a tool through
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which they can convey a pointed
message. Under the Gun is a candid
approach to the arms race and
disarmament.
It raises some very relevant questions, such as Cruise missile testing
in Canada, workers in defence production industries and Canadian investment in repressive Third World
countries. In this regard Under the
Gun is a welcome alternative to
mainstream theatre. It dares to explore a serious problem by analyzing its causes, instead of settling for
superficial explanations.
In the varied selection of skits,
David Diamond and Nettie Wild
are outstanding. Diamond is
hilarious in a two minute dance session with Uncle Sam, a Canadian
flag around his shoulders as a cape.
Wild lives up to her name with her
impersonation of Pierre Trudeau
rationalizing some of his
hypocritical policies.
Under the Gun is enjoyable but
at times it loses its appeal because it
leaves its skit format and tends to
preach to the audience. In these instances it stops being relevant
parody and satire and seems more
like a poorly dramatized leaflet.
When the actors directly address the
audience, reciting case histories of
various events, the production's
flow is interrupted and the unintentional condescension weakens the
rapport between actors and audience.
But Headlines Theatre should be
commended for its effort to bring
current politics into theatre.
"STRIP NIGHT" was
"PRIME TIME"
The UBYSSEY would like to
apologize for re-printing the,
KINGSHEAD ad for "STRIP
NIGHT" in our last Friday issue
(March 18thh Since this promotion
ended on the 16th of March and at
the time of print "PRIME TIME" was
in effect at the KINGSHEAD from
March 17. Sorry for any inconvenience to our readership and the
staff at the KINGSHEAD. .
Have a fine time at PRIME TIME
on now till March 30th.
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Queenie blues
Unemployment is standing five minutes before the desk of a secretary in
B.C. Hydro's gritty Vancouver office waiting for her to notice you so she
can tell you there are no jobs, especially if your father is hot an employee.
"Please come back," she beams, "maybe next year...maybe next
decade."
Unemployment is tensley sitting opposite an employment centre
counselor who wears a scruffy beard and a plaid shirt. He's flabby. He
belches, and then says, "Hey, sorry kid, but your not the guy for the job,
eh. I just phoned the employer — and he want a guy with a certificate.
Hey, but don't take it hard, you're still young."
But who cares if you're young and unemployed? the provinial government found $500,000 to spend on B.C. Place alone for the Queen's brief
visit, but found only $10 million to spend on summmer youth employment
schemes.
The message is obvious: a Queen's afternoon is more important than the
four months 15,000 British Columbian students will spend unemployed this
summer.
Although the figure has not been released, it can be assumed that the
entire visit of the Queen cost the provincial government equal to or more
than they will spend on job creation this summer.
Many of those unnoticed unemployed will not return to school next
year. Even this fall, it wasn't because of lack of interest that Totem Park
had trouble filling its women's dormitories.
Many students who do not return next year will never return.
But who cares? What is a pleasant afternoon for the Queen compared to
a person's career and life?
If you're curious, ask the provincial government. Maybe Bill Bennett
knows.
Who's to blame?
By ROBERT BEYNON
Last Friday, The Vancouver Sun
wrote a sterile editorial concerning
the jury's findings in the pesticide
poisoning of Jarnail Deol.
"The provincial government cannot responsibly ignore the jury's advice," the editorial concluded.
The Sun's editorial was responding   to   a   New   Westminster
(ireesryie)
coroner's jury's findings that ignorance and a lack of government
regulations were responsible for
farmworker Jarnail Deol's death
due to pesticides in Oct. 1982. The
jury recommended that both
federal and provincial governments
improve farmworker's working
conditions.
Reading The Sun's editorial, one
might assume the problem of
pesticide poisoning has just arisen,
like a wart. Actually, it is an ignored corpse putrifying.
The 1952 Sloane Report and
subsequent reports have recognized
farmwork's dangers and recommended workers receive full comr
pensation coverage. But farm
laborers will just begin to receive
coverage in April of this year — and
that'coverage will be limited.
Two weeks ago the provincial
government set up a safety agency,
one'farm owners control and the
worker's compensation board
cannot police. Some protection.
Meanwhile, despite the jury's
verdict, labor minister Bob McClelland says he will not intervene
in discussions between farmowners,
workers and the WCB.
This is a typical government
response to  farmworker's needs.
Despite another coroner's jury
stating in Aug. 1980 that no person
should have lived where a
laborer's child drowned and
recommending housing regulation
changes, the government failed to
act, for example.
Canadian Farmworkers Union
official Raj Cahoun says if BC's
people (like UBC students) demand
change, the government might act.
Cahoun makes the dichotomy between government and people we all
make. For if the people rule, we are
all responsible.
And maybe we are.
Just this year UBC removed labs
from the chemistry curriculum involving possibly dangerous
carcinogens, although no coroner's jury advised it.
But since the Sloane Report, the
verdict of this coroner's jury, the
provincial government has not
acted. No one has complained. The
Sun probably hit the nail squarely
when its news story mentioned the
poisioned worker was East Indian.
What if the worker had been an
Anglo-Saxon medicine student
picking broccolli to make money to
return to university? Would the
public and the government shrug at
a host of reports and coroner's
juries then?
Also, with an election coming
soon, the Socreds may be buying
the staunchly Social Credit
agricultural vote by ignoring the
issue. Buying votes with lives, as it
were.
The Sun was wrong when it wrote
the government cannot responsibly
ignore the jury's advice. It can ignore the advice. As for responsibility, that ended after the 1952 Sloane
report.
Robert Beynon is a Ubyssey staffer
who is afraid to write his own.
disclaimer.
Friday, March 25,1983
THE   UBYSSEY
Page 9
'Canadian bourgeois press aids Nazi vermin'
Letters
* Abortion/porn the same evil'
In recent letters to The Ubyssey
there has been a lively discussion
regarding choice on porn. Indeed, it
turns out that many who are pro-
choice on abortion are anti-choice
on porn. How can this inconsistency be justified in view of the fact
that pro-choicers on both abortion
and porn use the same type of
arguments to justify their respective
positions?
Let us begin with the tendency of
both these pro-choice groups to ignore blatantly all the evidence while
pursuing arguments calculated to
lead to the conclusion that will cater
to self-interest. Many pro-choicers
on abortion, for instance, treat the
preborn child as subhuman just as
pro-choicers on porn treat the victims of the reactions to pornography as less than human.
Other pro-choicers on abortion
admit that the fetus is indeed an individual but they claim that its
quality of life is so low that "it" has
only a reduced right to life;
therefore, "it" is expendable. Compare this argument with similar rationalizations about the quality of
life of those exploited by pornography. These porn victims are
considered to be so low that they
even want to be raped!
Another parallel between these
pro-choice groups is the tendency to
argue that abortion or porn must be
permitted in order to solve problems. At the outset we must realize
that one should never resort to injustices like abortion or porn to
solve problems, no matter how real
these problems may be.
Furthermore, such solutions
always create more problems for
society than they solve. For in-
stance.let us look at only one of the
societal problems created by the exploitation of the preborn child by
abortion to solve the problems arising from unwanted pregnancies.
How often it happens that a man
will pressure a woman he has put into trouble to go for the procedure
(abortion) at public expense so that
he can shirk more easily all the
responsibilities arising from parenthood, a shirking which society
should not allow. Then the man
disappears and forces the woman to
face, all alone, the psychological
and physiological consequences
that often result from an abortion
— consequences she may endure
for the rest of her life. In this way a
woman's right to choose becomes a
man's right to use.
Now isn't a man's right to use
what porn is all about? For instance, pro-choicers on porn try to
justify their brand of exploitation
by claiming that it solves the pro-'
blems of those requiring a sexual
outlet.
Indeed, since the type of
gratification provided by porn
tends to require ever larger doses of
stimulant, even soft porn may lead
to ever more perverse, bizarre and
violent types which, in turn,
sometimes urge the addict to live
out the behaviour he has been fantasizing, with often violent results.
Still another similarity between
the two pro-choice groups is the
claim that abortion or porn must be
legally available to prevent the
backstreet or underground variety
from taking over. This is about as
logical as saying that any other injustice (for example, child abuse or
wife beating) must be legalized to
prevent the clandestine variety from
becoming prevalent. In fact, legalizing any evil always leads to a great
increase in its occurrence.
Above all, the error of the pro-
choice position on both abortion
and porn is that it considers choice
to be an absolute right. On the contrary, civil society has a i grave
obligation to curb choices whenever
their exercise infringes on the rights
of others; in fact, society's failures
to curb choices for abortion and
porn are steps toward the law of the
jungle — might makes right.
L. Abello
Physics grad student
'For truth read The Sun'
The report, "Medicos: 'Fight
Nuclear Might' " in March 8
Ubyssey is a textbook example of
biased and inaccurate journalism
unworthy of a university newspaper.
Furthermore, you owe an apology
to Dean Michael Pentz, whose
remarks you have distorted in a
fashion which is patently libellous.
Your report in no way reflects the
tone of a symposium on the Prevention of Nuclear War which was extraordinarily dignified. Reading
only your article, someone who did
not attend might conclude that the
crowd was an angry rabble urged on
by a coterie of paranoid professors.
Nothing could be further from the
truth.
Any of your readers who are interested to know what really happened might consult the Vancouver
Sun's story of March 7, (page 3) or
view the videotape of the symposium in Biomedical Communications.
Also, the symposium's proceedings are to be publicized in May
by physicians for social responsibility- -
Do you have something against
nuclear weapons control, or are you
simply too juvenile to recognize an
important story when it stares you
in the face?
Thomas L. Perry Jr., M.D.
clinical fellow
By ANDREW LEWIECKI
An alleged Nazi war criminal
works at the University of British
Columbia. Jacob Luitjens (a.k.a.
Jaap Luitjens), a botany instructor
at UBC, was sentenced in absentia
in 1948 in Holland to 20 years imprisonment as a Nazi collaborator
responsible for the murders of a
perspectives
German army deserter and a Dutch
resistance fighter.
Luitjens — who the Dutch
authorities say is in the top 15 of the
52 most-wanted war criminals —
was a member of the Landwacht, a
para-military force of the Dutch
Nazi movement. These Nazi scum
served in the round-ups and mass
arrests of thousands of Jews,
workers and resistance fighters who
were deported to the death camps at
Auschwitz, Buchenwald and
Sobibor.
In a recent TV interview (28 Feb.)
a   former   leader   of  the   Dutch
resistance from the Roden area,
now living on Vancouver island,
told CBC's Harry Phillips that
Luitjens was on the top of the list
"of people who were the most
dangerous in our area." Luitjens
was first recognized in 1980 by a
former Dutch resistance member
who lived in Victoria.
The Dutch authorities demanded
his extradition but were turned
down by the Canadian government.
Now, famed Nazi-hunter Simon
Weisenthal is pushing for a second
attempt to have Luitjens extradited
to Holland.
Meanwhile the bourgeois press:
has been trying to pass off this Nazi
war criminal as a kindly, aging man
who is a christian to boot. Several
UBC students, faculty and administrators have been quoted
referring to Luitjens as a good
teacher and a tremendous man, and
one complained to the Vancouver
Province (27 Feb.), "It was all so
long ago and it was during the war.
Why don't you leave him alone?"
'fi
A"r» ♦•AVI
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O
"Polish prof must go'
The UBC Solidarity study group
protests in the strongest possible
terms the appointment of prof. Jerzy Wiatr to a teaching position in
the department of political science
this summer. We are calling for his
appointment to be immediately
rescinded by the university.
The facts regarding Wiatr's position in Poland as a political figure
are well known. He is a part of the
Jaruzelski regime and an energetic
opponent of Solidarity, the suppressed union. He is an advisor to
the central committee of the ruling
party, and director of the Party Institute of Marxism-Leninism in
Warsaw.
Wiatr has been quoted as explicitly opposing any trade union plurality in Poland, and he strongly supports the new government organized unions.
The regime Wiatr is a part of has
killed workers for their non-violent
union activities, violently suppressed academic freedom, crushed the
independent student movement,
and is currently engaged in the
persecution of Poland's leading
dissident intellectuals: Michnik,
Kuron, Litynski, Wujec, Lipski,
and others.
Not only is Wiatr implicated in
the anti-union, gangster tactics of
the Polish junta, but he is culpable
as a true enemy of intellectual
freedom and academic integrity. It
is obvious that the appointment of
Wiatr makes a mockery of the very
values that the university is here to
represent. Moreover, due to Wiatr's
political role in Poland, the appointment amounts to a statement
Reaganites root for nukes
Everyone knows that nobody wants a nuclear war. But did you know
that there are a number of influential individuals who believe that a nuclear
war could achieve certain political objectives? And did you know that a
group of such individuals formed an organization in 1976 dedicated to
elevating the American public's fear of the Soviet Union so that a president
could be elected who had a similar viewpoint?
The organization is called the committee on the present danger, and
members or sympathizers of the committee hold every important post to do
with foreign affairs or defense in the Reagan administration.
But don't get me wrong, these people would prefer not to have a
nuclear war. Reagan's close advisor Edwin Meese HI has explicitly stated
that "a nuclear war may not be desirable." And, they do not think nuclear
war is inevitable, so long as the Soviet Union completely changes its society. '""
Daniel Ellsberg, a former nuclear weapons strategist, will be speaking
on Saturday, March 26th at 8 p.m. in the War Memorial gym about how
each one of us can help prevent Cold War II from becoming World War
III. It is not anti-American to oppose the people who believe that a nuclear
war can be won, it is anti-extremist.
Gary Marchant
grad studies
of political approval of the Polish
regime.
Wiatr's appointifient is not a
matter of the freedom of speech,
since he is here to teach with university approval. We would not oppose
the right of anyone fo speak freely
at UBC, or, indeed, anywhere.
The issue is Wiatr's appointment.
In no way can it be said that UBC is
giving Wiatr the academic freedom
to espouse his views.
The Solidarity study group is
undertaking the following actions
aimed at opposing the appointment
of Wiatr:
Firstly, we have initiated a petition calling on the university to rescind Wiatr's appointment. We urge
all members of the UBC community
of this opinion to sign or otherwise
make your opinion known to the
administration.
Secondly, if the drive to rescind
Wiatr's appointment fails, we
strongly urge students %o boycott
Wiatr's courses this summer. What
if he gave a class and nobody came?
It would be a strong message in support of Solidarity and the silenced
Polish intellectuals.
Finally, if Wiatr actually does
teach, he and his class will be met
with pro-Solidarity protests. The
classroom will be picketed, and to
teach he will have to cross a
Solidarity with Solidarnosc picket
line.'
The UBC Solidarity study group
will ensure that this issue is not
allowed to be forgotten.
The UBC Solidarity study group
Bill Tieleman, Fraser Easton,
Horacrio de la Cueva, Alice Kim,
Arnold Hedstrom, Ewa Busza
Wiatr cool
I would like to comment on
Shaffin Shariff's article
(Visiting Polish prof draws
protest, March 22). The constitution of UBC states, "Each
university shall be non-
sectarian and non-political in
principle." To deny Jerzy
Wiatr employment because of
his political beliefs would
therefore not only be in violation of accepted academic
freedoms, it would also run
contrary to the intentions
outlined in the constitution.
Brad Munt
med 1
V.
Nazi vermin like Luitjens are not
harmless old men. Their crimes can
never be forgotten:
By 1945 four out of every five
Jews who had inhabited Holland at
the beginning of the war were dead.
Today, in response to moves for his
extradition Luitjens (who refuses to
comment on his activities in Nazi-
occupied Holland, to say whre he
was from 1945 to his 1961 arrival at
UBC or to have his picture taken)
Complained, "there is no justice."
Indeed there isn't. It is an
elementary matter of justice as well
as a measure of self-protection for
the workers movement and all the
oppressed that Luitjens be sent
back to Holland to be tried by a
jury of the families of his victims
and the survivors of Nazi death
camps.
No confidence can be placed in
the will or capacity of the so-called
Western democracies to bring Luitjens   to  justice.
As for Canada, even the staid
editorialists of the Globe and Mail
had this comment:
"Infamous Nazis such as Martin
Bormann and Klaus Barbie sought
sanctuary in tropical climes after
the Second War War. But among
Hitler's lesser henchmen, Canada
beckoned as a haven where they
might quietly live out their days,
unbothered by troubling
memories."
There are an estimated 1,000
Nazi war criminals living in
Canada, and not one has ever been
prosecuted or extradited. It took
the Canadian government nine
years after a 1973 formal West German request to move to extradite
Helmut Rauch, wanted for the
murder of 11,584 Lithuanian Jews.
That case is tied up on appeal.
Left completely untouched are
the likes of Luitjens and Dmitri
Kupiak, accused by the Soviets of
mass executions in the Lvov region
during WWII.
After   WWII   the   victorious
"democracies" actively recruited
Nazi war criminals to serve as intelligence operatives in their anti-
Soviet cold war drive. The case of
Klaus Barbie, the Butcher of Lyons,
hired by the U.S. government immediately after the war at $1,700 a
month and later smuggled out of
Europe on Red Cross travel
documents, is only the most recent
example of protection of and
counter-revolutionary collarbora-
tion with the Nazi killers.
Instead of serving the Third
Reich they continue their anti-
communist subversion on the
behalf of a so-called free world.
And their benefactors are not just
the U.S. ruling class but the "nice
guy" Canadian imperialists.
Only victorious workers revolution will bring justice by wiping the
fascist murders from the face of the
earth.
Andrew Lewiecki is a vocal
member of the Trotskyist league
club on campus.
;-.f-:-r/ ^. ••.;*.•■>•■ -7rr^( ■.'■:•.'..•:;■«'■•.-••.•>:.■
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■ !■■.'■' ■■■> ■■ O ■.••■-.••• v.-.,-. " ■ <...••   i .1. -.-.v.  :.t...'.•'• ,s
Letters
Ubyssey gets no complaints
Final results of the AMS Ombudsoffice of UBC's complaints day
held 19 January, 1983 were (3 = excellent, 2 = good, 1 = fair, 0 =
poor);
Art Gallery Lounge 2.10
Library 2.02
Games Room 1.67
Course Content 1.55
Dept/Faculty 1.50
Admissions 1.40
Course Scheduling 1.36
Food Services 1.32
Business Office 1.28
Student Awards 1.23
Exams               ( 1.21
Pit 1.16
Housing 1.16
Student Council 1.15
Employment Office .96
Bookstore .88
Program Counselling .88
Traffic and Security .76
Registration .73
A big apology goes to Dick Shirran of the Student Counselling and
Resource centre for a report in the
21 January 1983 Ubyssey that
his office was one of the worse stu
dent bitches; Student Counselling
centre should have read Program
Counselling.
Due to time constraints, not all
surveyed students have been con
tacted. Specific concerns should be
directed to the AMS Ombudsoffice
of UBC, Rm 100A SUB, 228-4846.
Gray McMullin,
AMS Ombudsoffice
r
THE UBYSSEY
March 25,1983
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday through
the university year by the Alma Mater Society of the
University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the
staff and are not necessarily those of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in SUB 241k, with
the advertising office in SUB 266. Editorial department
228-2301; Advertising 228-3877.
Look! Up in the skyl It's a bird — it's a plane — it's Craig Brooks??!? The myopic as'ian
club, Neil Lucente and Chris Wong, thought it was a goodwierd blimp. Charles Campbell,
Robert Beynon, and Cary Rodin got an ArmhoJd on Brian Jones' Headstrom, causing the entire structure to collapse despite Shaffin Shariff and his "coat". But who, or rather what, was
The Victor? "Its not whether you win or loose, bute how many votes you get" said Muriel
Draisma, and studied her chemical bonds with comment from Sean Lafleur, Peter Burns, Pat
Macleod, Debra Mills, and I..I.I...I.I..I mean Steve Wtseatall. Kerry Reiger and Sarah Cox
sang high and clear melodies to Robby R-o-b-e-r-t-s-o-n who wished he could think of
something to say on time. But-hark! The rising sun caused the staff to think of the future, and
it was known that the more things stay the same, the more they change.
^ Page 10
THE   UBYSSEY
Friday, March 25,1983
WARNING: Health and Welfare Canada advises that danger to health increases with amount smoked avoid inhaling. Average per cigarette:
Export "A" Regular "tar" 17 mg. nicotine 1.1 mg. King Size •tar" 17 mg. nicotine l.i. Export "A" Mild Regular "tar" 12 mg. nicotine 0.9 mg.
King Size "tar" 13 mg. nicotine 0.9 mg. Export "A" Light Regular "tar" 10 mg. nicotine 0.8 mg. King Size "tar" 11 mg. nicotine 0.8 mg. Friday, March 25,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
Jones keeps Pinter's Betrayal in check
By SHAFFIN SHARIFF
Much has been made of Harold
Pinter's flashback narrative structure in his play Betrayal, which is
now a movie. The film version retains the structure — it begins at the
break up of an affair and then
traces the relationship's origin, with
scenes that occassionally interrupt
the movement.
Betrayal
Starring Ben Kingsley, Jeremy Irons,
and Patricia Hodge
Directed by David Jones
Playing at Fine Arts
What is fascinating about the
play, which is intrinsically cinematic
in its use of flashbacks, is that it
works despite all odds. The backward
thrust becomes fascinating in its
own right as it uncovers layer after
layer of betrayals in the characters'
lives.
David Jones' current movie is a
straight adaptation of Pinter,
perhaps too straight and faithful.
Director Jones and screenwriter
Pinter have made subtle changes,
especially with a masterful opening
sequence that is impressive because
of the camera's location.
It stays outside a house, observing a couple having an intense argument. The closest it gets to examining the man and woman is through
the kitchen window. This itself is a
statement on how the director views
his   characters,    as   essentially
Fox's gotta be good
By SHAFFIN SHARIFF
The Grey Fox is a Canadian
western, and a reasonably inoffensive film.
It must be good because critics
across the country have been near-
unanimous in their praise. It has
also garnered several Genie awards,
including best picture.
And, dammit, it must be good
because even the Americans are interested in it.
That the Grey Fox does not
manage to sustain its own narrative
with pretty postcard pictures is
perhaps only a secondary criticism.
It must be.
It is commendable that The Grey
Fox has evocative period piece
scenes of life at the turn of the century, as it focuses on the release of
northwestern bandit Bill Miner.
Miner attempts to adjust himself to
a new age and its innovations that
are quickly passing him by.
The Grey Fox's images are more
expressive than anything the
characters can say, as in Terence
Malick's Days of Heaven (1978),
although The Grey Fox isn't half as
complex. The film has a memorable
scene in which Miner (Richard
Farnsworth) gazes at a locomotive
as it covers him with steam, and
stares at an automobile prototype.
The Grey Fox even has Miner going to  a nickleodeon  to see the
Great Train Robbery, one of the
first American films to use then-
innovative editing techniques.
But halfway through, The Grey
Fox crumbles under its own sense of
declamation and low-key treatment, as so many Canadian films
are prone to do. It tries to be
humble and restrained where it
should be bold, as it is at times
when director Phil Borsos and
editor Frank Irvine intercut scenes
from The Great Train Robbery with
their own footage.
The Grey Fox is really a letdown
at the end, but perhaps that
shouldn't matter at all.
The Grey Fox must be good, and
it opens today at the Stanley.
CORKY'S
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BOOKSTORE
CLOSED
Wednesday,
MARCH 30th
Thursday,
MARCH 31st
FOR ANNUAL INVENTORY
ubc
bookstore
unpenetrable, the same way Pinter
does.
When Jones was in town recently
to promote his movie, he said it
took some time to come to grips
with the male characters, Robert
and Jerry. But with the woman
character, Emma, who betrays both
her husband Robert (Ben Kingsley)
and lover Jerry (Jeremy Irons),
Jones said he was at a loss to
understand her completely.
That is perhaps the most
fascinating thing about the way
Jones has handled his actors. What
he lacks in innovative technique, he
makes up in his interest in the
characters. Robert, Jerry and Emma are middle-class and their concerns may be trivial (and even a bit
boring) but their interaction in their
close relationship makes them em-
minently challenging. The title
Betrayal refers not to one
doublecross, but several, which are
interwoven into the flashbacks.
There are quiet, expressive scenes
that make Betrayal worthwhile to
watch. As Jones pointed out recently, there is a wonderful scene in
which Emma, expecting a call from
Jerry, hears instead from husband
Robert first, and then Jerry. After
she arranges a date with Jerry, she
walks out of the room, only to find
her small child, and she says:
"Daddy sends his love."
Although both Ben Kingsley and
Jeremy have received praise for
their work, it is stage actress
Patricia Hodge who is the film's
revelation. Kingsley tends to
overact with his eyes — they seem
as loaded with hidden meaning as
Pinter's words and pauses.
In Richard Attenborough's recent Gandhi, the expressive facial
gestures were necessary to overcome the script and the limitations
of Attenborough's treatment.
Betrayal presents quite a different
case.
But Hodge has a screen presence
that refuses to overshadow her
character. Emma, like the others,
indulges in one betrayal after
another, but Hodge's portrayal
keeps her curiously sympathetic,
even as the character becomes increasingly enigmatic. All three ac
tors   are   helped   by  editor   John
Bloom, who cuts on closeups.
By the last scene — at the fatal
start of Emma's and Jerry's relationship — both Hodge and Jones
manage to turn the movie version of
Betrayal into an impressive
endeavour.
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AMS COMMITTEE OPENINGS
Nominations are now open for appointments to the following positions:
— 5 members of the Student Administrative Commission;
— Assistant Director of Finance;
— Ombudsperson;
— AMS representatives to the following Presidential Advisory Committees:
• Child Care Services
• Concerns of the Handicapped
• Food Services Advisory
• International House Board of Directors
• Land Use
• Men's Athletic Committee
• Safety, Security and Fire Prevention
• Student Placement
• Student Services
• Traffic and Parking
• United Way Campaign
• Walter Gage Memorial Fund
• War Memorial Gymnasium Fund
• Women's Athletic Committee
• Youth Employment Program
• Capital Projects Acquisitions Committee
rep
rep
reps
rep
rep
reps
rep
rep
rep
reps
rep
rep
rep
rep
rep
rep
Nominations are also open for one active member of the society other than a member of Council or
SAC for appointment to the Budget Committee of the AMS.
Recommendations for appointments will be made to Students' Council by the Selection's Committee.
NOMINATIONS CLOSE MARCH 25, 1983
All students are encouraged to apply for these positions.
Nomination forms are available in SUB 238. Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 25,1983
<*r
Vancouver
after Classes
Located in Lower Level S.U.B.
Need Food For
That Small
Gathering?
We can help with sandwiches, samosas
and snacks. Come in and see us to make
the arrangements!
or Phone 228-8121
Hours: 8:00 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
We Also Have Home
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Fri. & Sat.
ORPHEUS, LEGEND &
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Mar. 28-Apr. 2
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Monday
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Thursday
LADIES ROLLS
ROYCE NIGHT
Fri. & Sat.
First 50 Ladies
Admitted Free
879-4651
Not at all to imply that our
customers are hawgs.
Instead a tastefully unique fully
licenced restaurant where excellent
meals are enjoyably ingested by a
great clientele.
Espresso, etc.
11:30 a.m. to Midnight, Monday
to Thursday, and until 2 a.m. on
weekends. On Sunday we are open
for brunch and close by 10 p.m.
See You.
3431 W. Broadway
(not far east of Alma) 738-5298
4EATIE'S!)-
Please support the firms
who advertise in
The Ubyssey!
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Continuous Strip and
Rock from 7:30 p.m.
featuring Rock Video on big screen
"Depression new low prices in effect now."
Op«a Nob. - Sat. 7 p.at. - 2 a.m.
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Vancouver's #1
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1Z75 Seymour St.
RED LEAF
RESTAURANT
Luncheon Smorgasbord
Authentic Chinese Cuisine
228-9114
10% DISCOUNT ON
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LICENSED PREMISES
Mon.Fri. 11:30-9:00 p.m
CLOSED SATURDAYS     ,
Sundays and Holidays
i?3S2-U      4:00 p.m. 9:00 p.m.
2142 Western Parkway
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(Opposite Chtivron Stdtion)     '
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687-0575 Friday, March 25,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 13
Rotten horse play
By CRAIG BROOKS
The cast did their best, but
without a plot you can't do much.
Such is the case with Dry Rot,
which opened last weekend at the
Vancouver Playhouse. Although
the British comedy, written by John
Chapman, is performed with expertise and sensitivity, the play's extremely weak plot is a major
drawback.
Dry Rot
By John Chapman
Directed by Ted Follows
at the Vancouver Playhouse
The play revolves around an attempt by Alfred Tubbe (Jay
Brazeau) to switch race horses and
make 50,000 pounds off bets on the
favorite horse. This all occurs at the
country inn of retired British Colonel Wagstaff (Bill Buck, of Dr.
Bondolo fame) near the race track.
By adding two love affairs, a drugged horse and a secret passage,
Chapman thickens the plot.
The play's weak plot is offset by
the antics of Beth, a scatterbrained maid played by Camille
Mitchell and Flash Harry (Blu
Mankuma)   who   plays   one   of
Tubbe's assistants.
After the would-be-substitute
horse is drugged into unconsciousness, Tubbe is forced to
devise a new plan which eventually
back-fires on him. Although his
part is relatively small, Dana Still as
the French jockey Albert Polignac,
is superb in executing his entirely
French speaking role.
The play's lightly slapstick
nature becomes too ridiculous in
the third act when Sergeant Fire
played by Fran Gebhard arrives.
Her role was overdone, distracting
from the other actors performances.
But despite its weak plot, the acting quality salvages this farce and
makes it well worth seeing.
One of the scenes that help's
salvage the play is when almost the
entire cast is on set, chasing around
looking for Dry Rot.
Another unannounced scene
before the second intermission of
opening night provided a new twist
in the play's action. Just seconds
before the curtain was to rise on the
same scene (it doesn't change at all
during the show), one of the lights
located in the audience area caught
fire.
CONTACTS • GLASSES                                       ^^
SUNGLASSES •                                     &    ^^
SPORT EYEWEAR •                     <^>>^
EXAMINATIONS •             ^CW^C^'
<c^^
SUB BLDG.
MAIN FLOOR
222-2254
CALL  FOR NOMINATIONS
Graduate Student Society
Election of Executive
Officers to Council 1983-84
nominations are required for:-
President Finance Director
Vice-President House Director
Secretary
as well as:- 3 GSS Council Representatives
to AMS Council
NOMINATIONS CLOSE: FRIDAY, MARCH 25th, 4:30 p.m.
NOMINATION    FORMS:-    Available   from   the   GRADUATE
STUDENTS' CENTRE as well as the AMS BUSINESS
OFFICE, STUDENT UNION BUILDING.
The   elections   will   be   held   at   the   GRADUATE
STUDENTS' CENTRE, between APRIL 5th and APRIL
8th. The polls will be open 10:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. Tuesday through Friday plus 3:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. Wednesday.
An All-Candidates meeting will be held on Tuesday, March 29th, at
12:30p.m. in the Graduate Students' Centre, Garden Room.
Annual General Meeting will be held on Wednesday, April 13, at 12:30
p.m. in the Graduate Students' Centre Ballroom.
GSS is incorp. as the "THEA KOERNER HOUSE -
GRADUATE STUDENT CENTRE.	
INSIDE UBC
EDITOR
The AMS is now accepting applications for the
position of Inside UBC Editor.
Inside   UBC   is  a   student   handbook/magazine
published annually by the AMS. It includes campus
information and interesting feature stories of the
University.
The AMS offers four months' paid employment for
this position. Applicants should submit a resume to
SUB 238 outlining their related experience in addition to their ideas of direction and goals for this
year's edition.
APPLICATIONS WILL BE ACCEPTED UNTIL
MARCH 25, 1983.
ELECTROLUX CANADA
Offers highly rewarding summer employment for
students wishing to join the largest direct selling
organization in Canada.
• Flexible Hours
• Above Average Earnings Potential
• Scholarship Awards
Over 2,000 students across Canada will join the Elec-
trolux team this summer.
Find out how you can be one of them.
ON CAMPUS: Ron Girard
DATE:
TIME:
PLACE:
April 7, 1983
10:00 a.m. Company Presentation
Student Manpower Centre
Brock Hall
Room 106-C
U.B.C. Thunderbird
Winter Sports Centre
EASTER HOLIDAYS
CASUAL HOCKEY
CHILDREN   AND  YOUTH   SESSIONS   -   6-16
YEARS
Casual "Pick-Up" Fun Hockey for kids during Easter Holidays.
No previous hockey experience necessary. All kids welcome on a drop-in basis.
Protective equipment including helmet, shin guards, and gloves must be worn. No checking or
slap shots allowed.
ADULT SESSIONS - 17 YEARS AND OVER
Casual pick-up hockey on a drop-in basis. Some protective equipment must be worn. No slap
shots or body checking.
TIME SESSION     APRIL 4      APRIL 5      APRIL 6      APRIL 7       APRIL 8
9:30 a.m.-11:00 a.m. I Adults Adults Adults Adults Adults
9:45 a.m.-11:15 a.m. II Kids Kids Kids Kids Kids
11:15 a.m.-12:45 p.m.
11:30 a.m.- 1:00p.m.
1:15 p.m.- 2:45 p.m.
3:00 p.m.- 4:30 p.m.
IV
V
VI
Kids
Adults
Kids
Adults
Kids
Adults
Kids
Adults
Kids
Adults
Adults
Kids
Kids
Adults
Kids
Adults
Kids
Adults
Kids
Adults
COST: $2.00 for EACH SESSION. PAY AT THE RINK.
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 228-6121
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
6066 THUNDERBIRD BLVD.
U.B.C. CAMPUS, VANCOUVER, B.C. Page 14
U BY
Yiutic
Friday, March 25, 1983
Gavin Walker: cool jazz. Mar. 30, Hot Jazz
club.
Carae Sneddon: dixieland, Mar. 31, Hot Jazz
club.
Dan Pollock: folk, Mar. 26, La Quena, 1111
Commercial.
David Raven: shlock and roll. Mar. 24-26,
Darby D. Dawes.
AI Mathieson Jazz Quintet: a hot trumpet
player. Mar. 29, Classical Joint, 231 Carrall.
Dido and The Handpeople: latin jazz, April
1-3, Classical Joint.
50 Fingers: not of Dr. T, Mar. 25-26, Town
Pump.
Depeche Mode: the Euro-discoites strike
again. Mar. 28, Commodore ballroom,
VTC/CBO.
John Lee Hooker:  blues great,  Mar. 26,
Commodore ballroom, VTC/CBO.
Rockabilly Re-Bop: some of Vancouver's
greatest reboppin artists (not bebopping as
Shaffin thinks).
Purcell String Quartet: music by Mozart
and others. Mar. 27, 8 p.m.. Arts Club Revue
Theatre, Granville Island, 687-1644.
John Cage: an avant-garde lecture/chant/recital, Mar. 27, 8 p.m., Vancouver East Cultural Centre, 254-9578.
Kathleen and John Rudolph II don't know
if they're relatedl, Mar. 30, noon, recital hall.
Ridge Theatre (16th and Arbutus, 738-5112)
Mar. 25-27: Apocalypse Now. 7:30 p.m.;
The Long Riders, 10:15 p.m. Mar. 28-29:
Rebel Without A Cause, 7:30 p.m.; East Of
Eden, 9:35 p.m. Mar. 30-31: Casablanca.
7:30 p.m.; The Treasure Of The Sierre
Madre, 9:30 p.m.
Savoy Cinema (Main and 7th, 872-2124)
Mar. 25-27: Smash Palace. 7:30 p.m.; The
Cars That Ate People. 9:30 p.m. Mar. 28-29:
Enter The Dragon, 7:30 p.m.; The Big
Brawl, 9:20 p.m. Mar. 30-31: Heavy Metal,
7:30 p.m.; Wizards, 9:15 p.m.
Vancouver East Cinema (7th and Commercial, 253-5455) Mar. 25-27: Cabaret, 7:30
p.m.; All That Jazz, 9:45 p.m. Mar. 28-29:
The Last Wave. 7:30 p.m.; The Magus, 9:30
p.m. Mar 30-31: Cool Hand Luke, 7:30 p.m.;
Harper. 9:45 p.m.
Pacific Cinemetheque (1155 West Georgia,
732-6119) Mar. 25: Three Ivory Miniatures,
7:30 p.m.; Days And Nights In the Forest.
9:30 p.m. Mar. 26-27: Nine Months. 7:30
p.m.; Women, 9:30 p.m. Mar. 30: The
Golden Coach, 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. Mar. 31:
Bad Timing: A Sensual Obsession, 8 p.m.
Sub Films (SUB auditorium) Mar. 24-27: Annie, Thurs. and Sun. 7 p.m.; Fri. and Sat. 7
and 9:30 p.m.
Showcase of Films. (1155 W. Georgia St.):
Seven films from Nova Scotia. $12.50. Mar.
29, 7:30-9:30 p.m. 685-3841.
Romantic Comedy: by Neil Simon copycat Boringly Staid, Canadian sell-out, too. At
the Arts Club on Granville Island, Mon.-Fri.
8:30 p.m., Sat. 6:30 and 9:30 p.m. Wednesday two-fer-one at the door, 5:30 p.m. Phone
687-1644 for tix.
Ruth Nichol and Leon Bibb: Vancouver's
finest continue, at Arts Club revenue theatre
on Granville Island, Fri. 8:30 p.m. Closes
Saturday, 6:30 and 9:30 p.m. Call 687-1644.
Nurse Jane Goes to Hawaii: by Allan Strat-
ton, (Hope she stays there.) At the Arts Club
on Seymour, at Davie. Mon.-Fri. 6:30 and
9:30 p.m., Sat. 6:30 and 9:30 p.m. Thursday
matinee 5:30 p.m., 2 for 1.
Dry Rot: There is nothing dry about it; if s
just a rot through and through. A farce by
John Chapman. Mon.-Sat. 8 p.m. Sat. 6 and
9 p.m. Tickets VTC/CBO, 687-1818.
Dylan Thomas, Bach: one-person show by
Leon Pownall, about the destruction of the
poet. Vancouver East Cultural Centre,
Mon.-Fri. 8 p.m.. Sat. 6 and 9 p.m. Tickets:
VTC/CBO, and by calling 687-1818 and
254-9578.
Timestep: new play, part of du Maurier
festival, Waterfront theatre, 8:30 p.m.
685-6217. Pay what you can for unemployed
(including students?).
Bedroom Farce: by Alan Acneborne. Add
from last week Lear: add from last week.
Unit/Pitt Gallery: Open house installation by
a photographic environments class, 163 W.
Pender, 681-6740, Mar. 28-Apr. 9.
Glass 83: showcase of fine Canadian glass artists. Artists Gallery, 555 Hamilton, 687-1345,
to April 9.
Literary Storefront: Francisca Newton-
Moss/Warren Stevenson, Mar. 29, 8 p.m.,
314 W. Cordova.
Pacific Motion Dance Company: directed
by Janice Lelond, Mar. 25-27, 8 p.m., Paula
Ross Dance Co., 3488 W. Broadway.
Deadlines.
They are something even
student journalists face,
and since next week's paper
is our final edition for
1982-83, some deadlines exist.
You will only see this rag
once next week, on Thursday. Our Tuesday edition
has been firebombed to
give the staff time to
prepare one big, massive
(hopefully) and excellent
(for sure) final issue. And
because Friday is a holiday,
we have moved Friday's
paper to Thursday. Confused? Don't worry, so are we.
Anyways, to assist your
hard-working Ubyssey
staff, please have all Tween
classes, hot flashes and letters in by Tuesday at 1 p.m.
Those pages will be typeset
that day, so you will probably be out of luck if you
are late.
Ubyssey staff are reminded that Monday, Tuesday
and Wednesday are full production days.
TUESDAY
TROTSKYIST LEAGUE CLUB
Literature table, drop by for Marxist literature
and discussion, 11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m., SUB
hallway.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for spring classes, new members
welcome, 11:30 a.m. - 1:20 p.m., SUB foyer.
THE UBYSSEY
Edition cancelled. Deadline for letters, Tweens,
etc. for Thursday's paper, 1 p.m., SUB 241k.
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Film: Question of Balance, noon, Asian centre
auditorium.
OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS
General meeting, 12 - 1 p.m., Lutheran Campus
centre conference room.
BAHA'I CLUB
General meeting,  everyone welcome to open
discussion on the Baha'i faith 1-2 p.m.,  SUB
207.
WEDNESDAY
ANARCHIST CLUB
Literature table, noon, SUB.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Beer garden,   have a blast,  this is your last
chance before exams, 4-6 p.m.. Psychology annex (lower mall) 123.
PALESTINE EDUCATION COMMITTEE
Palestinian land day: Book table plus videos plus
related materials, 11:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m., SUB
concourse.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for spring classes, new members
welcome, 11:30 a.m. - 1:20 p.m., SUB foyer.
THURSDAY
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CLUB
Closing wine and cheese party, proceeded by
mass, noon, St. Mark's College music room.
Come one, come all to bid farewell.
EDUCATORS FOR NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT
Prof Maurice Levi, UBC Commerce dept.,
speaks on Economics and Arms, noon, Computer Science 200.
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Student
Storage
Neighbourhood
Mini-Storage
872-2822
TODAY
UBC NDP
End  of  year  bash,   8  p.m.   -   midnight,   SUB
207/209.
PALESTINE EDUCATION COMMITTEE
Book and information table, 11:30 a.m. - 3:30
p.m., SUB concourse.
MUSSOC
General meeting, everyone please, noon, SUB
212.'
THE UBYSSEY
Important staff meeting to discuss current proposal, 3:30 p.m., the office.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND
MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Benefit dance with John Doe, 8 p.m., SUB partyroom.
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Squash night, last of the year, all welcome, 8
p.m., Winter Sports Centre.
UBC MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Bzzr garden, new logo silkscreening, bring your
own t-shirts, elections, movie Road Warrior,
Westwood racing seminar, 4 p.m., SUB 125.
LATIN AMERICAN SUPPORT COMMITTEE
Linda Shuto of B.C. Teachers Federation speaking about her trip to Nicaragua, noon, SUB 209.
NEWMAN CLUB
Soup lunch, noon, St. Marks College lunchroom.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversation hour, apportex des biscuits,
gateaux, noon, International House, main
lounge.
SATURDAY
THUNDERBIRD ROWING
UBC   invitational   regatta   featuring   the   best
universities and club crews from around the
Pacific Northwest, all day, Burnaby Lake rowing
centre.
FAMILY HOUSING FILM SERIES
Walt Disney's Dumbo, 3 p.m., SUB auditorium.
$1.50.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND
MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Daniel Ellsberg speaking on Cold War II and
World War III, tickets AMS box office, 8 p.m..
War Memorial gym.
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
General meeting and election, all exec positions
are open, applications must be submitted by 1:30
p.m., Friday, 7:30 p.m., SUB 207-209.
LATIN AMERICAN SUPPORT COMMITTEE
Rally to protest U.S. intervention in El Salvador
and Central America, 1 p.m., Robson Square.
MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Sunday ride, 10 a.m., SUB cafeteria.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Diner final a un restaurant chinois, get info at the
meetings on the 24 and 25.
SUNDAY
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Practice, 10 p.m.. Aquatic centre.
ROCKERS CO-OP
Workshop/Jam bring equipment, noon-5 p.m.,
SUB 119.
ST. MARK'S FAITH AND
JUSTICE GROUP
Slide presentation and discussion lead by Mary
Ann Morris, member of reeent Canadian Health
Workers Solidarity mission on Nicaragua. 7:30
p.m., St. Mark's College music room.
MONDAY
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Slide presentation on Japan with A. Memon,
7:30 p.m.. International House, gate 4 lounge.
AQUA SOCIETY
Deadline for nominations for 83/84 executive,
the cage.
WADO-RYU KARATE CLUB
Annual general meeting election of new executive, 8 p.m., SUB partyroom.
THE UBYSSEY
Goon issue production day, noon onwards, SUB
241k.
Film: Way of Ancestors,  noon, Asian centre
auditorium.
DELTA KAPPA EPSILON FRATERNITY
End of classes party, 8 p.m., Deke house.
BAHA'I CLUB
General meeting, everybody welcome to open
discussion on the Baha'i faith, 1-2 p.m., SUB
212A.
THE UBYSSEY
Final edition hits the streets, about 11 a.m., 52
points on campus.
GRAD'S
Phone   now   for   com-
[ plimentary portrait sitting.
\      RESUME PHOTOS
AS LOW AS 75c
IN COLOUR.
Shidms LH.
3343 West Broadway
732-7446
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines, 60c. Commercial - 3 lines,
1 day $4.20; additional lins, 63c. Additional days, $3.80 and 58c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications, Room266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $5.00. Call228-3977.
5 — Coming Events
20 — Housing
DINNER IS SERVED AT THE Diner this
week in SUB theatre. (Sorry, all you ANNIE
fansl) Showtimes are Thurs., Fri. & Sun.
7:00 and 9:30. NOTE: no Saturday show-
ingsl
EXPERIENCING year end stress? Can I
help you? Geraldine Fordyce, M.S. W., experienced counsellor and member of the
Chaplaincy. For appointment 325-8291. No
charge.
35 - Lost
THE VANCOUVER
INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
PROF. JAMES PEEBLES
Physics
Princeton University
THE ORIGIN OF
THE UNIVERSE
Lecture Hall 2,
Woodward Building,
Saturday, March 26 at 8:15 p.m.
SUMMER SUBLET: July 1 - Aug. 31.
Large furnished two bdrm. apt. 3rd Ave. in
Kitsilano. Quiet, near beach. $900 for both
months. Ph. 736-7192, eves.
SUMMER HOLIDAY HOUSE Exchange;
College instructor living in rural setting outside Kamloops would like to exchange
houses. Consider quiet locations, U.B.C.
West or North Vancouver preferred. 3-4
weeks, July 15 - Aug. 15. Phone 573-3047
eves, or write Peter Peters, Dept. of
Economics, Cariboo College, Box 3010.
Kamloops, B.C. V2C 5J6
LOST: One pocket watch in a
light brown change purse on Mon. Mar. 21.
Contact 224-6656. Great personal value.
LOST: HP 41 CV calculator. March
21. $200 reward. 732-1630.
40 — Messages
ANDREW ARTHUR in 3rd Yr. Biochem.
Where Are You? Mike, Brian & Sue are
looking. Call Sue, 872-2900.
25 — Instruction
11 — For Sale — Private
1972 MGB Workshop Manual $7.
Custom headboard (double bed). 732-5008.
1972 PLYMOUTH FURY 4-door sedan.
Running condition good. Asking $600.
731-9857.
ELECTRIC BLUE 1979 SUZUKI A100 street
motorcycle, 6300 Km., good condition
$550. Call Peter at 228-9458.
FOR SALE: Two return air tickets, Vancouver
- Toronto. $199 & tax each. Lv. May 1
return May 23. 738-5857, 733-1987.
HOW TO PASS THE
ENGLISH
COMPOSITION
EXAM
Attend an afternoon seminar
especially designed for English 100
students and learn all the skills and
techniques necessary to pass. Full
notes provided. Preregistration, by
March 28th is essential due to
limited enrollment.
1:00-5:00 p.m. Monday, April 4, 1983
SUB 213, fee $35.00. Contact: L.A.
Johanson, B.A. (Hons.) Res: 732-1593.
Bus:434-4515.
70 — Services
FOR PROFESSIONAL SEWING, dress making, alternations, etc. at reasonable prices,
call btwn. 4-8 p.m. 224-0964.
MASSEUR TRAINEE studying for certification offers massage by appointment.
Phone 687-8282. Eves, or weekends. No
charge to students.
85 — Typing
20 — Housing
FOR RENT: room in anti-sexist co-op house.
Our house is large and comfortable. We are
politically concerned and friendly, looking
for same. Rent $180 per month plus share
utilities. 876-5609.
LEARN TO SAIL: Beginners Course or
Basic coastal cruising. 30 ft. cruiser /racer.
Hands on experience. Registering NOW
Feb. Mar. Apr. classes. Don't be left on the
beach. C.Y.A. Certificate 734-1675 after 7.
Sailcratt Ltd.
30 — Jobs
COCKTAIL WAITRESSES needed for
Thurs., Fri., and Sat. nights 10 pm - 2 a.m.
$4.00 per hr. & tips. Application forms
available at Marco Polo 682-2875.
PSST YA WANNA make a lotta money?
Home computers and multi-level marketing
are both hot items. This concept combines
them. Check it out! Phone C. Farnsworth at
736-1649, if I'm not at home please leave a
message.
GAY 32 will share furn. apt.
(near Alma) with n/s, n/d, student
$125/mo. Box 46364, Stn. G. Vancouver.
ROOM AND BOARD available May 1/83,
S. Granville area. Near bus. Ph. 266-6327.
SUMMER SUBLET: Gorgeous new 2 bdrm.
bsmt. suite 3 blks to UBC. $500/mo. May
1-Aug. 31. Call Janet/Sue, 228-9487.
WORKING FEMALE looking for same
or student to share modern 2 bdrm. suite
near UBC. 228-0182, eves.
HOUSING WANTED for 2 females
from univ. who are working in Vancouver.
May 1-Aug. 31st. If you have a place to
sublet please contact Renee at 731 -7251.
UBC GATES. 4 bdrm. Ivg. rm. dining rm. large kitchen, 3-pce. bath avail. May
1 to Aug. 31 or longer. $845/mo. 4487 West
16th. Eves. 228-9175.
BRIGHT,   ENERGETIC   INDIVIDUAL   for
small first class wilderness resort hotel to
take charge waiter/ESS and helping hand
in hotel operation. Must be equally adept at
serving wines as splitting logs. Waiting experience, love of outdoors, excellent manners, personable all essential qualifications.
Seasonal position early May to end October. School returnees will not be considered. Room & board included. Reply in
confidence to Little Gun Lake Lodge c/o
6650 Vine Street, Vancouver, V6P 5W5. Interviews in mid-April.
SUMMER JOBS part-time or full-time.
Call btw. 2 & 4 Mon.-Fri. 526-9552.
IDEAL OPPORTUNITY female student seeking part-time employment. Pleasant,
respectable young gent, 41 yrs.  requires
escort for dining, movies or possible short     	
trips while in the lower mainland. Generous
remuneration. Box 50, Room 266, SUB.
EARL JUST BOUGHT Trimble's.
He's turning it into an Earl's Place. He's 90—WANTED
looking for excellent cooks, waiters,
waitresses, busboys, bartenders and
dishwashers. Please apply in person Tuesday, April 5, 9:30 a.m. P.S. Earl gives good
food and likes to have a good time.
JUDITH FILTNESS. PUBLIC STENOGRAPHER. Special student rates. 5670
Yew (Kerrisdale). Phone 266-6814.
WILL DO FMT & regular typing - lots
of experience with macros (thesis, special
symbols) also have IBM Selectric. Will do
any kind of typing work on campus, excellent service, good rates. Erin. 228-9392
after 5:30 p.m.
NEW TO AREA. Adina Typing Service.
Student discounts. 4326 West 10th. Phone
222-2122.
TYPEWRITING: Minimal notice required.
UBC location. 24 hour phone-in, 224-6518.
TYPING. Almost-on-campus. Fast
and precise. $8.50 per hour. Also editing,
term paper tutorials, by M.F.A., phone
222-2589.
FAST, efficient typing, 41st and Marine Dr.
266-5053.
EXPERT TYPING essays, term
papers, factums, letters, manuscripts,
resumes, theses. IBM Selectric II.
Reasonable rates. Rose, 731-9857.
U-WRITE WE TYPE 736-1208.
Word Processing Specialists for Theses,
Term Papers, equation typing. Rate $12 on
correspondence. Days, Evenings,
Weekends.
TYPING. Experienced $1.10/pg. for term
papers, theses, etc. Call Gordon 873-8032
after 10 a.m. Visa/MC accepted.
MICOM WORD PROCESSING: Thesis,
term papers, equation typing. Rate $10 an
hour. Jeeva, 876-5333.
QUIET STUDENT needs 1 bdrm. apt.
$250-$300 per month. For May 1st. Phone
Corinna: 732-8302. Friday, March 25,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 15
Squashed
The home court advantage.
It worked for the volleyball teams
March 20 and it worked again last
weekend for the UBC squash team
as it hosted and won the first official B.C. intercollegiate championships.
Both the first and second teams
pushed UBC to overall victory over
the University of Victoria and
Simon Fraser University. The men's
first four defeated UVic by six matches to two, and the women's first
four took UVic 8-4.
In the Vancouver league, UBC
men remain undefeated in 22 matches and appear sure to win their
division, and the women's team has
been climbing in division standings.
UBC entered four competitive
teams in the tournament and this
depth will probably ensure continued T-Bird domination of intercollegiate squash.
QUALITY
SERVICE
AVAILABILITY
LovE
QuicheS
ACTIVE, YOUR
NUMBER ONE
CHOICE
>i«tcttvt-Component*■'' ' * ■ \v" -x------v--^
'   fittest variety of fartoryj \.   W.
t- - Yrtsh^eferfr/fruc component*  *   \ '   " . "   \. "\   X\!"
- Extensive Product Offering        \   \   \        \\ ^
-^ Sgfnlcondacto/5, TrttegraTeal ClrcultsilvTtr3ro-v    \   \   v /N
corrrputf'r Boards, Microprocessor arid     \       \     \    \
— Support Circuity Tramisto^s, Oferde*.»       \      \     \     \- --
Capacitor^, Resistors, Optoelectronics^        \       \      \       \^ I
^   PoVentiymete/s, Refftys, rV)ultimaters,   ^ \          v      \      _
/SVvitcr->es. Knobs, C/bnnecpors, Sotkets/f.C \        \      \
/ Boards, Enc/osures; Data and Reference, \         \        \
'    Books, Soldering ftids, AND MUCH MOrjE        V \ —
Superior Service ; \ \ \
/  reliable deliveries. Active s all piEW comprehensive     \
Fall/Winter Catalogue is now availableY— FREt\OF
CHARGE. _J i J . \ \	
3070 Kingsway, Vancouver,
(15 min. from Downtown, straight up Kingsway)
Tel.: 438-3321
Open Friday Night — Saturday until 5 pm
SPRING SKIING SPECIAL
The Whistler Mountain Ski Corporation and the U.B.C. Alma
Mater Society are pleased to offer
U.B.C. students Whistler Mountain
full day lift ticket certificates (good
any time this season) at a specially
reduced price of $16.50 per certificate versus our regular lift ticket
price of $19.00. Tickets can now be
purchased through the A.M.S. box
office in the S.U.B. Building any
time between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m.
Monday through Saturday. This
sale continues until April 9, 1983.
i-Sne ^/t&no/ L//a <J~£/ltnA cfdne Jy&iedn
O  S O <3
<3  O °
The one and only
Southern Comfort.
On the rocks,with orange juice or in your favourite cocktail, enjoy the taste of tradition.
Send for a free Recipe Guide: Southern Comfort Corporation, P.O. Box 775, Place Bonaventure, Montreal. Quebec    H5A 1E1.
VANCOUVER SURF SAILING LTD
PARKING LOT SALE
at DESTINATION SKI RENTAL
ArKIL lStj tlltl & ^rCl H60 Marine Dr. North Vancouver
g0ARD§**<*    Demos*Fit. Damaged ^695°°
89500
• j   )) Including:
NEW Surf Sailing "Maxi's g?Kf^roi. 1,095.00
NEW Dufour "250s"
AND MORE!
Including: ^fe^*^****
2 SAILS QQCkQO
+ wetsuit Reg. 1,200.00DDU
(Shortie)
WETSUITS - SAILS - BEACH WEAR
LEASE A BOARD - Just $395.00 for your own board.
The SEA & SKI LEASE-Top Quality Ski Equipment for Winter,
A brand New board for summer. $599.00
FOR INFORMATION CALL 732-3611 or 732-8122 Page 16
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 25,1983
DRIVE
A BETTER
DEAL
Custom Auto Review Specials
March 25th, 26th, & 27th
ALPINE • PIONEER • BOSE • JBL • INFINITY • BECKER • LINEAR POWER • FAS by LUXMAN • EPI • CRAIG • KRACO • AUTOTEK • DAVID
AM/ FM cassette dock with auto-reverse & bi-level capat#ty, 6206
6x9 2-way speakers are highly efficient & high power handing
Package
369.
95
/ILPINE
7327
7307
7204
7205
$349
AM/FM cass, dolby, pre-amp 	
AM/FM cass, dolby, pre-amp,
music search       $449
AM/FM cass, 40w total, best buy      $339
AM/FM cass, 32w total, presets     $349
EQ722
HP150
T614
T617
T624
T681
T667
CZ/eAIC
150 watts total, eq/booster     $119
100 satts total power amp     $99
AM/FM cass best buy    $125
AM/FM cass, auto-reverse   $184
AM/FM cass, auto-reverse   $139
AM/FM cass, dolby, auto-reverse    $169
AM/FM cass, top-of-the-line, digital
power amp included   $376
DAVID®
50 watt 2-way speakers, shallow mount      $149
50 watt 2-way speakers, shallow mount       $129
Bi-Level AM/FM cassette with auto-reverse gives   tflAA K
superior autpsound performance. 4" 2-way speakers   * J*Rm *"
deliver big, full range, clean sound.
Hidden Radar Detectors
Visor Mount
^
Find them
before they
find you.
Remote
Grill
Mount
■*%
ETR1089 Er THP692
AM/FM cassette with time/fr?
quency digital display, see/scan
tuning & preset tuning. 6x9 2-way
speaker handles 100 watts.
$
Package
429.
AM/FM indash
cassette, 40 watt
booster plus 5"
speakers
$149.
95
J1069 6x9 coaxial, 40 watt
J1065 6x9triaxial      $119
J1201 5'/4" coaxial, 50 watt    $99
J2033 6x9 triaxial, 100 watts    $164
J2037 6x9 coaxial 90 watts       $167
CO PIONEER
KP5500 AM/FM cass, super tuner,
auto replay    $189
KP4600 AM/FM cass, auto-reverse,
loudness control       $169
KE5100 AM/FM cass, auto-replay
clock, presets, digital     $339
UKE7100   AM/FM cass, digital, dolby,
auto-reverse, quartz     $339
KEX50   AM/FM cass, component series,
auto-replay    $349
KP404   Underdash, music search, dolby     $169
KP2500 AM/FM cass, locking FF/rew, rewind      $149
KP7210 AM/FM cass, music search,
loudness, fader      $249
«55
FTC2     AM/FM cass, auto stop, mini      $69
FTC26   AM/FM cass    $139
FTC18   AM/FM cass, dolby, automatic
music select      $129
PLUS MANY MORE SPECIALS
BASF
CR02 C-90 Tape
Box of 10 for
Cassette Case
Holds 30 cassettes
»
95
True Chrome
Tape
Discojjnts_qn Installations During Custom Auto Review
CUT ALONG THIS LINE

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