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The Ubyssey Nov 12, 1982

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 THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXV, No. 18
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, November 12,1982
228-2301
AMS asks $20 question
Priorities reviewed
Next week's Alma Mater Society fee referendum, while not offering every organized group on
campus something, will certainly
attract a high, positive turnout
from the campus' traditional
voting population.
That is the way AMS president
Dave Frank and his advisors
designed the all or nothing vote.
The less popular ideas for
capital projects — like an art
gallery to replace the poor
facilities in the basement of Main
library, or drama and film studios
— are conspicuous in this referendum by their absence.
But the list which students are
being asked to support contains
enough vital projects to justify
passing the referendum.
The real choice facing students
in this refendum, whether they
vote Yes or No, is what priority
they will give the eight projects
listed on the $15 portion of the
ballot.
All together, the capital expenditure projects total about $14
million. The projects range in
value from about $50,000 to
about $6 million. The $15 fee
can't fund the entire package. At
best the fee can pay for a few
small projects and provide seed
money for a few more.
If the referendum passes, Frank
says council will follow the
priorities given to them by
students. Frank won't be on council next year.
No doubt the referendum will
attract a high turnout of people
interested in intramurals and
athletics. The $3 for UBC's mammoth intramurals program will
assure that.
And also, the capital portion of
i the ballot promises more athletic
facilities.
But these projects are among
the most costly. An artificial field
costs about $1 million and a
fieldhouse around $6 million.
Competing against these costly
recreational facilities are projects
which in the short term should be
high priorities and don't cost as
much.
Daycare needs $217,000 to
keep operating on the UBC campus. The childcare facilities are a
fire hazard. The sliding doors
don't meet fire standards, nor
does the wiring in the dilapidated
huts of World War II vintage.
Daycare is a valuable service
for the growing number of
students with children returning to
upgrade or start their education.
Another small investment of
$70,000 would mean $400,000
worth of cabin on four acres of
land in Whistler municipality
wouldn't be forfeited. The
Whistler cabin, while it primarily
serves the members of the ski
club, is an asset which adds
strength to the AMS's financial
position. It is good collateral to
take to the bank if student council
wants a loan.
Students should consider short
term needs and assess priorities
with that in mind.
For example, the barn proposal
— does the AMS really need
another recreational facility? The
barn is of immediate concern, but
$250,000 worth of coffeehouse
and "a party room" bar is a large
price to pay in the short term
when it may block other more
valuable projects.
The fee will be in place until
students vote it out. Priorities
should reflect immediate and worthy needs first not luxuries that
can be accommodated in the
future.
One may have another reservation about the referendum. Council is not bound by the priority list.
Students have a responsibility to
support a strong free press to remind councils of their priorities
through the years.
Students also must take more
interest in AMS elections to insure
these unprecedented sums of
money are not squandered by irresponsible councils.
The team
It takes resiliant individuals   to   research
nothing but AMS activities for two whole
days.   These   are   the
hardy reporters:
—Robert Beynon
—Craig Brooks
—Kelley Jo Burke
—Arnold Hedstrom
—Cary Rodin
—Shaffin Shariff
They are responsible
for the stories on this
page and the centre
spread where our
coverage continues.
Daycare needs cash
Referendum
starts Monday
From Monday, Nov. 15 to Friday, Nov. 19 students will vote on
a proposed $20 Alma Mater Society fee increase, and to priorize fee
usage.
This referendum will have far
reaching affects on future AMS
directions. For the referendum to
be valid 10 per cent of eligible
voters must vote 'yes with the majority casting votes in favor.
Day polls will be open from 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. in SUB, CEME,
Computer Science, Woodward
library, Sedgewick library, Angus,
Buchanan, Scarfe, War Memorial
gym, MacMillan, Law, Lassare,
Hebb theatre, Macleod, Gage
residence, and the daycare coordinator's office.
Evening polls will be open from
4 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Monday,
Nov. 15 only in SUB, Sedgewick,
Woodward, and in Place Vanier
Gage and Totem Park residences.
Without required fire renovations, nine of the 12 on-campus
daycare facilities will lose their
community service licenses,
childcare co-ordinator Mab
Oloman said Tuesday.
The university administration
has extended a loan of more than
$200,1300 to daycare groups that
must be repaid, she said.
The daycares on campus are independent registered societies,
formed by UBC students, faculty
and support staff parents.
UBC loaned those groups ^army huts, built in the 1940s for
daycare facilities, but has no
responsibility for the structures,
except to ensure they remain standing.
"The wiring in those huts
hasn't been updated since 1940,"
Oloman said. "And fire regulations have become much stricter
since then."
The walls must be fire proofed
— smoke and flame detectors
have to De put in and many of the
buildings have sliding glass doors
which can stick, and are not acceptable fire escapes.
"These are not cosmetic
changes. This is just to comply
with fire safety regulations. It's
very basic."
The licenses expire Dec. 31 of
this year. Oloman hopes that if
the daycare societies can show
that renovations are underway,
they can get an extension to
March, 1983.
Oloman said faculty and support staff make up only a quarter
of the parents in the daycare
societies. She added that most
university daycare facilities
around the country are partly or
completely funded by student
societies.
"I'm hoping that if the AMS
makes us a gift of funds, the
faculty and administration will
match it," she said.
"The demand for child care on
campus is gigantic," Oloman
said.
The number of children on this
year's waiting list was greater than
daycare's legal capacity, she said.
The problem lies, Oloman said,
in the lack of any daycare facilities
in the Vancouver west side.
"There are quite a few," she
said, "but except for a couple in
east Vancouver, they're all full."
The daycare societies are seeking off-campus funding, through
grant applications, and alumni
funding drives, Oloman said.
"But you know," she added,
"with the economy the way it is,
that just doesn't work."
Escalating costs hit AMS
The Alma Mater Society cannot
afford its present expenditures,
finance director James Hollis said
Tuesday.
"Our costs are escalating,"
Hollis said. The AMS requires increased funding to maintain its
services, he said.
"If a majority of your revenue
is fixed, you must create new
revenues."
Two dollars of the $20 referendum question is earmarked for the
AMS, raising the AMS's yearly
take from fees to $12.50 per student.
The majority of the increased
fee will pay for increasing AMS
business office employee's
salaries, Hollis said.
"The big cost is the staff, and
their wages increase every year,"
Hollis said.
He said he could not specifically
state the other uses the increased
fee would be put to.
If students defeat the referendum, the AMS budget committee
and student council will discuss
cuts, Hollis said. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 12, 1982
NOTICE OF $20M FEE REFERMII
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If the referendum passes:
• Intramurals will be able to maintain & improve its programs.
• The AMS will be able to continue
its grants to campus clubs,
societies, media, and groups.
• Students can initiate needed
building and service programs.
Don't forget, a survey sheet at the
polls will allow you to priorize the
proposed building projects!
VOTE VOTE
Monday, November 15 —
Friday, November 1 ™
Pay Polls 10 a.m. ■ 4 p.m.
S.U.B.
C.E.M.E.
C.P.S.C.
Woodward Library
Sedgewick Library
Angus
Buchanan
Scarfe
War Memorial Gym
MacMillan
Law
Lassere
Hebb. Theatre
MacLeod
Walter H. Gage
Day Care Coordinator's Office
Evening Polls 4 p.m. ■ 8 p.m.
Monday, November 15 only
S.U.B.
Sedgewick Library
Woodward Library
Place Vanier Common Block
Totem Park Common Block
Walter H. Gage Common Block
Poll locations and times are subject to change
r—————————————i
VOTE
FOR THE
FUTURE
•------—_-_.----..-.____-___-J Friday, November 12, 1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Coppola's new
musical 'startling'
One from the Heart breakthrough
in revolutionary electronic cinema
By SHAFFIN SHARIFF
The curtains in the cinema part, only to
reveal another pair of curtains — blue ones
— on screen. They too part, and suddenly on
screen is a full shot of the moon. We are now
in the Heavens of Francis Coppola's One
from the Heart. In a continuous tracking sequence, the earthbound stedicam glides over
a desert. No attempt is made to disguise the
fact that the desert and the emerging city —
with its flashy marquees and neon signs — is
not real.
The god's eye view is over a miniature set,
which dissolves into the real thing — a full
scale model of Las Vegas. Created in the confines of Coppola's American Zoetrope
studios, One from the Heart is the first film
to be made completely on a soundstage.
What Coppola has demonstrated in One
from the Heart is nothing short of startling
— although it may take a few years before his
film is appreciated for its experimental attempts in video filmmaking and narrative
structure.
One from the Heart
Directed by Francis Coppola
Opening today at the Vogue
One from the Heart has such a smooth
non-narrative form, that the self-styled
modern musical — described by Coppola as a
"fantasy about romantic love, jealousy and
sex" — may strike you as fantastically luxurious and baroque. In the story of Frannie
and Hank, two characters who have grown
tired of living together for seven years, Cop-
COPPOLA . . . image-sound controller
pola has patterned an old fashioned love
story that used to be the staple of MGM
musicals.
But Coppola isn't interested in recreating
old musicals. Rather, what is at the heart of
One from the Heart is Coppola's attempt to
reduce old scenarios, conventions and
characters by overwhelming them with music
and color. Coppola diminishes the importance of his characters by making them
secondary to the beauty film technology
creates around them.
The alienation techniques in One from the
Heart are purely formal. When characters get
angry and cannot communicate with one
another, they don't break into songs to express to their feelings. One from the Heart
doesn't draw you in the way old Fed Astaire-
Ginger Rogers movie musicals did; you can't
get lost in the escapist schmaltziness of the
lyrics. What you get instead is background
songs — by Tom Waits and Crystal Gayle —
and thoroughly jazzy soundtrack dominated
by solo saxaphones.
Coppola has made his lead characters,
Hank (Frederic Forrest) and Frannie (Teri
Garr) American types — there is nothing extraordinary about them. She works in a travel
agency, he is an automobile junkyard dealer.
Having been together for seven years, they're
itching to separate. Frannie dreams about
escaping to locales depicted in her window
displays "to paradise." Hank can't understand her because he at first is content with
their relationship.
When Frannie walks out on Hank, One
from the Heart becomes a full-fledged fantasy — 24 hours in the minds of Hank and
Frannie. The new partners each finds have no
other function than being fantasy companions who satisfy unarticulated needs. Frannie finds Ray (Raul Julia), who works as a
waiter and plays the piano. What differentiates him from Hank, musically, is that Ray
is accomplished, while Hank cannot play his
sax. Ray takes Frannie on a tour that makes
Las Vegas come alive. Hank, for his part,
finds Leila (Nastassia Kinski), a circus
acrobat.
There is a magnificent scene in which
Hank sees Leila for the first time in a large
martini glass. The shot of Kinski in the glass
is audacious, and there are other surprises in
the movie. Earlier, when Hank comes to the
junkyard, which looks like a deserted space
statin filled with Earth's oversized possessions, including three foot ruby rings, you
appreciate the joke Coppola is playing on his
GARR . . . leaving for new paradise
characters   (and   us)   by   calling   the  place
"Reality Junkyard."
The characters act realistically, but the
overall style of the film is neither realistic nor
naturalistic. The actors are placed in locales
that suggest city-size, three-dimensional
stages connected by the camera movements;
even the bystanders, look as if they were out
there by some casting director.
"You know what's wrong with America?
Nothing's real," says Hank. But what Hank
takes as a deficiency in his relationship with
Frannie is true of external conditions — the
soundstage that represents Las Vegas. But
One from the Heart isn't a critique of what
Las Vegas says about America; it is about the
state of mind of the characters and how Las
Vegas reflects it.
The scenes in most of One from the Heart
are connected with quick dissolves and
superimpositions. It is startling that you're
not aware of any cuts during the first act
of the movie. The steadicam sequence that
opens the movie never seems to let up. The
actors, whose characters paths criss cross
several times on the stylized Las Vegas
soundstage with its shiny woodwork floors,
have adapted themselves to the complex
camera movements; they seem to fit into ths
sets and movements set up by the
technological innovations around them.
Because the characters cannot express their
truest emotions unless the songs come onto
the soundtrack, you have to pay attention to
the lyrics. But the music isn't the only external component that tells you what the
characters are feeling. Like a 70mm screen-
sized mood ring, One from the Heart gives
off colors that you're supposed to respond
to. For example, Las Vegas is bathed in
bright yellows, reds, and whites. When Frannie opens the house doors, the red Las Vegas
glow comes through it and seems to affect
her.
Frannie has outgrown what Las Vegas
represents until Ray enters her life. And
costume director designer Ruth Morley has
KINSKI ... in heartfelt martini
fitted Frannie with a wardrobe that is punctuated with reds, including a flaming red
dress that established her affinity with the city she is living in. Hank is dressed in stable
blues.
The contrast between Frannie and Hank,
expressed in contrasting color schemes, are
intentional. According to cinematographer
Vittorio Stararo, (Reds, Appocalypse Now,
1900), "colors . . . intensify, starting a con-
tinuos conflict of personality; they could very
well co-exist, but they fight because of the
fear of being overwhelmed by the other . . .
We are expressing subliminaly the emotions
of the characters — expressing them in a
more theatrical way."
The whole approach to One from the
Heart is theatrical, stylized. Although the actors were taken to Las Vegas to rehearse
movements, the movie was shot in totally
controlled environment created by Zoetrope
studios. The script was previously
storyboarded on videodisc and stored in a
large video bank, incorporating the original
Las Vegas footage.
On set, Beta and film camera rolled
simultaneously, with Coppola giving instructions from the Sound and Image Control
Centre, a vehicle equipped with latest video
technology. In the centre, first impression
edits were made each shot to improve and
revise the script. All the cuts and edited shots
were stored on disc for instant viewing by the
crew at any time.
Called electronic cinema, Coppola's attempts are the first step in a new direction for
film. Electronic cinema not only decreases
need for post production work — especially
because special effects can be stored on video
tape and incorporated instantly with other
footage — but also because the process blurs
distinctions between traditional definitions of
writing, directing and editing.
One from the Heart is being released in
Vancouver after being pulled from distribution in early 1982. At the Vogue, One from
the Heart wi'l be shown in 70mm.
Amateur production devilish pain in proverbial seat
By KELLEY JO BURKE
From a kindergarten pageant to a
master of fine arts thesis production, amateur theatre can be a painful thing to watch. The sight of
potentially fine actors, thrust into
intimate scenes with patently
mediocre ones, for the benefit of a
small group of family and friends,
may spark sympathy, but cetainly
not appreciation.
The Devils
By John Whiting
At Dorothy Somers studio
The play is an adaptation of
Aldous Huxley's essay The Devils
of Loudun. The study of the self's
relationship to God, love and society is nothing new. Imagine Murder
in the Cathedral, with definite
Crucible overtones, all rounded off
by a Man for All Seasons, and you
have a handle on the priest Gran-
dier's conflict.
Still it's not a bad play; it's witty
and at times quite lyrical. That unfortunately is all but lost to the audience   due   to   lead   actor   Keith
Gordy. He is unable to make protagonist Grandier's spiritual
journey an evently paced and genuine one. His transition from a
self-centred egotist to an individual
of courage and integrity is more of
a Lear jet jump than a gradual learning process.
It's not that he doesn't work
hard. He screams and suffers and
shakes, and even shaved his head
for the part. More's the pity.
But such sympathy is hard to
maintain. When he plays opposite
John Abbot, Grandier's proletariat
philosophical counterpoint, or Ann
St. James, as the schitzophrenic
nun who precipitates Grandier's
downfall. Their professional performances, right down to excellent
voice control and physical presentation, makes the imbalance of quality in the play very hard to stomach.
The supporting cast was just that,
to varying degrees. Special mention
must be made, however, of Rory
Mandryk, whose horrendous
overplay of a local surgeon had all
the sensual qualities of fingernails
dragged over a backboard.
Baylis' direction must be questioned. A marvelous scene of a circus of group hysteria involving an
egotist exorcist and a bunch of
bored nuns indicates that she does
know what she is doing. But her inability to bring Gordey's performance up to an acceptable level, her
choice of choppy lighting changes,
and an annoying habit of carrying
on major interchanges with all the
principles' backs to the audience,
must suggest a greater
schizophrenia going on off stage
than on.
Oversexed and underpaid missionary
deserves to try another position
By FATHER JACK TIELEMAN
Celibacy never had it so good.
Only a priest could handle the
responsibilities of having 28
women of the London night, one of
England's richest women and a
minister's daughter.
The Missionary
Starring Michael Palin
Playing at the Odeon
And people say Monsignor had
problems.
Charles   Fortesque,   played   by
Monty Python's Michael Palin, is
recalled from deepest, darkest
Africa — where he has been asking
children about signing of the
Magna Carta — to deal with a more
serious problem: "fallen women"
and "lady tramps."
On his way back to England, he
meets Lady Ames, played by Maggie Smith. Once home, his bride-to-
be confronts him with a classified
catalogue of the more than 600 letters he sent her.
Palin, who wrote The Missionary, exhibits pythonesque
qualities throughout, but does not
quite reach Monty Python's comic
crescendos. He plays Fortescue ir-
reverantly.
Another impressive performer in
the movie is Maggie Smith, whose
Lady Ames bleeds true English
blood, only to reveal that she was
once a "fallen woman."
At the Odeon, The Missionary is
preceeded by a National Film Board
of Canada short called Zea. The
cinematography is incredible, and
the film itself imaginative —
perhaps even more so than The Missionary. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 12, 1982
Multiple personalities baffle
By VICTOR WONG
In 1977, Billy Milligan was arrested in Ohio for raping three
women. Ordinarily, this would have
been treated like other rape cases,
but there was a novelty to this one:
Billy has a split personality, and a
body which houses twenty-four
other "people."
It is this man (or group of people)
who is the subject of Daniel Keyes'
book The Minds of Billy Milligan,
Readers may recall a previous Keyes
work, Flowers for Algernon, which
became the basis for the movie
Charly. Unfortunately, this new
book does not match his previous
standard.
The Minds of Billy Milligan
By Daniel Keyes
Bantam Books
426 pages, $3.95
Keyes divides the book into three
parts. Part one describes Milligan's
capture and initial hospitalization;
part two concerns his childhood
and the formation of his "other"
selves; part three is about this
rehabilitation. During that time, we
meet several of Billy's personas: Arthur, the British intellectual; Ragen,
the Yugoslavian giant who acts as
"protector"; Christene, the three-
year-old; Danny, who becomes the
recipient of Billy's punishments;
Allen, the con-man and fast-talker;
Tommy, the escape-artist; Adalana,
the lesbian believed responsible for
the rapes; and a host of others.
Keyes treats the personas not as
imaginary ghosts, but as real people. That in itself is a big problem
for the reader. This treatment
makes it difficult to believe that
physically, only one man exists. The
other characters see one person
while we see someone else.
Instead of sticking either to factual reporter-style journalism, or a
personal viewpoint of Billy, Keyes
tries to combine the two, and it
doesn't work very well. In Flowers
for Algernon, Keyes stuck to one
viewpoint and that is what made the
work a classic. We saw Charly's
progress from mongoloid to genius
and back again — and all through
Charly's eyes alone. It heightened
the impact of the story. Keyes
should have used the same idea for
Milligan's tale, sticking to the viewpoint of each of Billy's personalities.
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Another problem with this book
is its timing. We are led to believe
this is a "success" story; it is not. It
is as if Keyes had not finished watching Billy and just mailed in half
manuscript to the publisher.
The travel company of CFS
TRAVEL CUTS VANCOUVER
UBC. Student Union Building
604 224-2344
The author could at least have
given a final prognosis to his case,
instead of leaving us hanging about
his recuperation. It would be better
to wait until Billy is either cured or
dead to relate the story.
ATTENTION
B.C. STUDENT ASSISTANCE
PROGRAM GRANT RECIPIENTS
The Ministry of Education has recently mailed multi-part forms headed "Notification of Award/Enrolment Confirmation" to students
who qualified for B.CS.A.P. grants. To ensure that a grant cheque
will be available on the indicated disbursement date, the student
must have the confirmation form endorsed by the Registrar's Office,
located on the second floor of the General Services Administration
Building. No confirmation, no cheque! Do not delay! Confirmations
received by the Registrar after December 1 may result in delayed
grants for those concerned.
AWARDS & FINANCIAL AID
Room 50 - G.S.A.B.
hair studio inc.
Make an appointment today
and give your head a rest.
5784 UNIVERSITY BLVD.
In UBC Village next to Bank of Commerce
224-9116
THeUoIBLUE
EVERYTHING YOU EVER WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT BEER
Lesson #4 "The pour"
There are many theories regarding this particular facet
of the beer mystique. The one we favour builds a beer
head from the bottom. Start by keeping the glass
upright and pouring down the middle until a head
begins to form. Stop, let the foam build, then tilt the
glass to a forty-five degree angle and continue to pour
down the side. As the glass fills, bring it back to the
upright position leaving a head about two fingers tall.
The beer pour is nearly always followed by the ever
popular beer "unpour", an exercise in which many of
you are already well-versed.
Lesson #4 from the College of Beer Knowledge Friday, November 12,1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Berton's latest act 'typical bullshit
By ROBERT BEYNON
Canadian author Pierre Berton's
new book is a typical Canadian
anachronism, a Canadian history
book written for a past Canadian
society.
Berton said recently he took 30
years writing Why We Act Like
Canadians — but Berton forgot to
mention the book is written to
Canadians who lived 30 years ago.
Why We Act Like Canadians
By Pierre Berton
McClelland and Stewart
113 pages, $10.00
(lower than Berton's usual)
The book purports to be a collection of letters Berton wrote an
American friend, Sam (where is the
uncle?) between April and
September 1982. The letters supposedly explain why Canadians act
like Canadians, why our politics are
Canadian, and why our culture is
Canadian.
The method Berton utilizes is to
string historical arguments together
like a chain gang, forced by complying.
But the book is not written to an
American, but to Canadians. The
flyleaf is explicit on this point:
"(The book) shows just how our
history, geography and climate
have contributed to a unique Canadian manner".
Berton told Boyd it is his own
"quirky look at Canadians."
In a recent column Vancouver
Sun columnist Denny Boyd says
Berton's book helped him shelve
doubts and guilt he had because he
is Canadian. In short, he says the
book justifies being a Canadian.
Bullshit. Boyd's remark is like
the smug self-assurance of the
book. It is a typical Canadian
literary institution to feel guilty but
affirm we are okay after all.
For example, "We live in a
climate where it is usually just too
damned cold to mount
revolutions," Boyd says. Bullshit
again. Is Boyd implying the
U.S.S.R. and northrn China, sites
of this century's major revolutions,
are warm enough for revolutions,
unlike Canada?
Berton is not so blatantly insipid
but much of the same type of faulty
logic can be found in the book.
And for a book purporting to explain Canadians, it too easily circumvents any contentious Canadian issues. Sexism, aboriginal
rights, blatantly stupid bureaucracy
and other issues are only poked at.
A good book is an act of communication which assumes
something should be communicated. A good book attempts
to change the world by the act of
communication.
Berton's book dawdles rather
than communicates. Why We Act
Like Canadians is a collection of
historical anecdotes that fail to connect with the present (in a typically
Canadian way).
The style of the book is picked
without regard to communication.
Berton writes to an imaginary
American hoping Canadians will
read his letters. Imagine a friend
speaking to an imaginary person
hoping you listen and take his advice.
It makes no sense.
A friend told me this is a conventional literary device and is okay.
Bullshit. Convention is not
necessarily okay.
Berton refuses to address us
directly, and speaks in a past
period's jargon. He continually
utilizes archaic words like epic, hero
and myth, and he attempts to make
us view the world on these terms.
"The job of writers is to
perpetuate myths," Berton said
when he spoke recently at a Great
Trek dinner.
Only the blatantly politically pro
stituted literature of China and
North Korea speak of heroic myths
today. The point is obvious: only
authors attempting to fool readers
speak of myths.
Myths are old. Times have changed.
The book is not actually bad, just
more of the typical Canadian
bullshit.
Art show 'refreshing respite'
By CORINNA SUNDARARAJAN
If the term "Canadian Art" immediately evokes the image of
washable Group of Seven
silkscreens common to banks and
hotel foyers, then Canadian Drawings From the Art Gallery of
Greater Victoria, on display at the
UBC Fine Arts Gallery until Dec.
18, provides a refreshing respite
from this national cliche.
In a collection of 46 drawings
ranging from hasty charcoal impressions to meticulous ink studies,
the talents of such Canadian artists
as Jack Shadbolt (whose acrylic on
plywood mural Emergent Image
hangs permanently in the Main
Library card catalogue room),
Ernest Linder, Arthur Lismer and
the inevitable Emily Carr and A.Y.
Jackson are shown at their fundamental best in just black and
white technical skill.
Canadian Drawings From the Art
Gallery of Greater Victoria
UBC Fine Arts Gallery
on display until December 18, 1982
Although most of the drawings
are independent pieces, many seem
a paper skirmish in preparation for
the real battle on canvas. A.Y.
Jackson's St. Luce is a particularly
interesting sketch in this respect
because the artist has annotated his
graphite strokes with notes for later
refinements.
Emily Carr's tiny Tree Study
serves as a similar exercise, except
that its rapid whorls for trees and
scattered daubings for underbrush
achieve a striking stylization of their
own. In contrast, Ernest Linder's
The Birch is a large and consumate-
ly crafted depiction of the trunk
base of a birch whose thick spongey
moss coat has been partially
scraped away to reveal a layer of
brittle scales of bark, which in turn
is stripped to reveal tender raw
pulp.
In fact, contrast is the unifying
theme of this Canadian collection.
The heavy busy outline of a Jack
Shadbolt cityscape opposes the
light, almost ethereal snowscape of
L.L. Fitzgerald's prairie sketch,
and two staid graphite drawings of
a bespectacled H. Mortimer-
Lambb, Esq. face two whimsical
cartoons of Arthur Lismer.
But the two most stylistically opposed works are Shadbolt's Portrait
of Jack Ritchie and Ronald
Spickett's Cowboy.
The collection is divided almost
evenly among landscape and portrait sketches, and perhaps the most
appealing work on display is a
curious combination of the two,
Bruno Bobak's Porcupine. This
large charcoal beast bristles like a
crisp winter forest, staring out from
its harsh jagged bodyscape with a
bemused expression that endears it
to those who share Margaret Atwood's preference for the porcupine as a national symbol.
With its contrasting textures of
soft eyes and sharp coat, heavy
bristles and light expression, this
porcupine is an apt symbol for the
Canadian Drawings exhibit itself.
sn, HAL HOLBROOK • ADR1ENNE BARBEAU ■ FRITZ WEAVER • LESLIE NIELSEN
CARRIE NYE • EG MARSHALL „. VIVECA L1NDF0RS . Aunt Bddu
A LAUREL PRODUCTION "CREEPSHOW: A GEORGE AKOMERO FILM
e—f^SALAH M. HASSANE1N ^^STEPHEN KING ^RICHARD P RUBINSTEIN ,,„*,
mi^.f^S]" [S.mfiTAx\urESfSjratjjiiJE&^] ■<•*■" <<
fcchrauVT^ [K<'-k1 .ht' Plume Paryrtad •* ■■■
GEORGE A. ROMERO
o
WARNER BROS
STARTS WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 10th
The black sheep of Canadian liquors.
Yukon
Jack
Concocted with fine Canadian Whisky.
Soft-spoken and smooth,
its northern flavour
simmers just below the
surface, waiting to be
discovered. Straight, on the
rocks, or mixed, Yukon Jack
is a breed apart; unlike any
liqueur you've ever tasted. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 12, 1982
Early music concert
full of dull profs
By KERRY REGIER
Gustav Leonhardt wrote "if one
is convincing, what is offered will
leave an authentic impression. If
one strives to be authentic, it will
never be convincing."
On Sunday night baroque
violinist Jaap Schroeder and harpsichordist Colin Tilney, playing for
the Vancouver Society for Early
Music at the Granville Island Arts
Club, showed the truth of
Leonhardt's comment.
As the two entered the stage the
immediate impression was of two
dull professors with few facial expressions and rather stiff
movements. Their playing, not their
appearance, distinguished them.
Schroeder played almost savagely, ripping sound from his violin. In
his phrasing and dynamics, he
followed the true bel canto manner
common until this century, bending
all the modern rules of nice playing,
making the most of every detail and
never detaching himself emotionally from the music.
In one passage in the first movement of the Bach B Minor Sonata,
the violin has only a few long-held
notes while the harpsichord carries
the tune. But Schroeder upstaged
Tilney here, starting his notes in-
audibly and bringing them up so
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subtly that the transition became a
miniature drama in itself, and then
holding the singing note and fading
it away again.
Or in the Biber Passacaglia for
violin unaccompanied, where
Schroeder blasted out the music as
if he were Liszt playing his own
transcription for grand piano of
Bach's great organ passacaglia.
Tilney's presence at the harpsichord behind Schroeder was barely noticeable at the best of times. At
worst, he dragged out his solos
endlessly, epitomizing the detached
academic style of playing: calm,
elegant, infinitely precise, and very,
very boring.
While Tilney was invariably in
perfect time, Schroeder wildly bent
the rhythms continually. While
Tilney never got a wrong note,
Schroeder seemed unable to do
without wrong notes. While Tilney
was always completely consistent in
his ornaments and tonal quality,
Schroeder restlessly shifted from
moment to moment.
And while Tilney was precisely,
pedantically dull, Schroeder with
his mannerisms produced a knife
edge of excited tension, and maintained that tension almost painfully, terrifically, until it was his
pleasure to give release.
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE CECIL H. AND IDA GREEN
VISITING PROFESSORSHIPS
1982 AUTUMN LECTURES
Lewis Thomas
Dr. Lewis Thomas is the chief executive officer at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer
Center in New York. During his career he has held the position of Dean of Medicine
at Yale University and at the New York University School of Medicine. Dr. Thomas
has a broad range of interests within the areas of science and medicine, and is widely regarded for his ability to synthesize current trends in medical and scientific fields.
His wide popular appeal derives from his effective scientific writings of which
"Medusa and the Snail" is probably the best known.
MATTERS UNSETTLED BY SCIENCE
Saturday,   NOVeiTlber   13   In Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional
Resources Centre, at 8:15 p.m. (A Vancouver Institute Lecture)
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE - PLEASE POST AND ANNOUNCE
Occasionally unadvertised seminars are presented.
Please call Mrs. R. Rumley at Local 5675 for information.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Football aired on CITR
How will the Thunderbird football team do this weekend against
the St. Francis Xavier X-Man?
Well, you can get the complete
story on Saturday morning starting
at 8:45 a.m. on CITR radio. That's
102 fm and 100 cable.
"It's definately the top
technological project that this station has had since the inception of
the fm license," chief engineer
Richard Anderson said Wednesday.
The voice of the Thunderbirds
will be play-by-play announcer Joe
March, with color commentary by
Philip Kueber and Monte Stewart.
"It's a major step forward for
campus radio" said March, "and
we're setting a precedent by being
the only electronic media to cover
the Atlantic Bowl game." The
Ubyssey will have a reporter and
photographer present.
If the 'Birds win they will stay in
the east to practise for the nationally televised College Bowl next
Saturday.
SFU wins classic
By MONTE STEWART
Pathetic.
That best describes the officiating
in the final game of the Buchanan
Classic basketball series at Simon •
Fraser University Tuesday night.
The Clansmen defeated the 'Birds
73-58 taking the series two games to
one.
"We lost in the first ten minutes
of the game," said UBC coach, Bob
Molinski. The rookie coach became
extremely irate when Pat West, who
led the 'Birds with 18 points, and
Mark Marter got into early foul
trouble.
Actually, the contest was not
decided as early as Molinski suggested. The Clansmen jumped out
to an early lead but the 'Birds
rallied and took control of the
game. The score was tied 29-29 at
the half, but after that, it was obvious that SFU would win. The
Clansmen quickly took the lead and
never relinquished it.
"We played a lot more aggressively in the second half," said
Simon Fraser coach Mike McNiell
in an effort to downplay the 'Birds
effective first half.
c
♦r»«
Birdwatch
)
Despite the quasi-long weekend,
UBC teams are still active.
Women's volleyball plays today
and Saturday at the University of
Manitoba Invitational in Winnipeg.
Mens basketball plays Saturday
in the grad game in the gym at 6
p.m.
The women take their amazing
winning streak into a game against
Brandon Saturday at 8:30 p.m. in
the gym.
Men's ice hockey goes to Saskatoon to play the University of
Saskatchewan today and Saturday.
And in Halifax (that's in the east)
UBC plays in the Atlantic semifinal. See story above.
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in
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* All applicants must have a valid university photo
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* Clansman Invitational Ski Challenge Jan. 28-30
Howza 'bouta Sauza?
Numerouno
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^MC
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THE BOTTLED ROMANCE OF MEXICO Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 12,1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
AMS gages future demand for student housing
Simply described as "development of on-
campus student housing?' the proposal
could cost the society the most and it may
bankrupt them.
The University of Alberta Student Union
is more than $1.5 million in debt, after the
student society went into the housing
business.
Not satisfied with government actions,
the association built the massive Housing
Union Building, a mall and student
residence.
The society faces foreclosure from the
University administration if the debt is not
repayed before January 1985.
UBC housing director Mary Flores said
Wednesday the university has plans to build
125 more residence spaces in the form of
another Gage lowrise building.
The second low-rise, from the same
design as the original, would cost $5 million
in today's dollars, according to Flores. The
entire Gage complex, including the high-
Cabin fever strikes council
UBC's answer to Lake Tahoe is in danger
of being forever lost. Unless the AMS
accepts the municipality of Whistler's offer
to purchase the land on which the Whistler
cabin sits, the land lease will skyrocket to
$35,000 per year, said Alma Mater Society
president Dave Frank.
The cabin land is owned by the
Municipality of Whistler and is leased to the
AMS which in turn rents it to the ski club.
The cabin is currently worth about
$400,000, but the municipality is willing to
sell the land to the AMS for only $70,000,
said Frank.
"If we don't buy it now we've got to be
crazy," said Steve Porter, UBC ski club
chairperson.
"The difficulty lies in the fact that the
AMS can not afford to buy the land," said
UBC ski club president Rob Burhoe in a recent club newsletter.
If the referendum is defeated it is unlikely
the AMS will be significantly compensated
for the cabin by another purchaser of the
land, said Frank.
"If the referendum doesn't come
through we will lose about half a million
dollars worth of cabin," he said.
The 55 room cabin is open to all UBC
students, ski club members or not. Rates
are $9 per night for UBC student's and $2
per night for ski club members.
KIDS
slip slidin' away from daycare
Bored board Barn-again amid B-lot
Old McDonald had a farm.
But he didn't have UBC administrators
who wanted to rip down his barn for
political reasons, or the desire of the
agriculture undergraduate society to save
the heritage building.
Students will be voting next week on
renovating the white wooden barn, built in
1919, which now has fields full of cars
around it instead of cows.
The referendum proposes to convert the
barn for AMS use.
The barn is ideally suited for student activities, agriculture undergraduate society
president Alistair Winter said Tuesday.
Winter said the AMS has renovation
plans drawn up and approved by the board
of governors. Included in the plans are a
coffee shop/pub, storage, a woodwork/metal shop and a 6,200 square foot
dance hall/party room.
The university would be responsible for
the majority of maintenance costs, Winter
said. This would include heat, light and
some cleaning. The administration current
ly has a similar agreement for SUB.
The UBC board of governors decided
against a request from administration president Doug Kenny in April to demolish the
barn.
Kenny said the barn should be demolished to prevent future building grants being
jeopardized, since the space was counted in
the university's space inventory.
Alma Mater Society president Dave
Frank said the society could lease the barn
from the university, and hence remove it
from the inventory.
The renovation would cost approximately $200,000. Winter said.
"It's a facility we could use," he said.
"It would take pressure off SUB
bookings."
The distance away from other campus
buildings does not bother Winter. "It's
close to the parking lot," he said.
Winter said the barn would be for the
whole campus,, and not just those at the
southern end of campus.
Proposed building plans are currently
posted in SUB's main concourse,,
rise towers and low-rise cost $7 million to
build in 1971, she said.
"Inflation has had a tremendous effect
on construction (costs)?' Flores said.
The new building would be fully accessible to the handicapped, she said.
A plan to replace Acadia camp, a group
of World War II army huts near University
village, is currently under study, Flores
said. "We don't have any plans to take to
tender (on Acadia)," she said.
The Gage low-rise proposal is feasible if
$1 million can be found, she said. Rental
payments would pay off the remaining $4
million mortgage, she said.
"Contributions from the AMS would be
greatly appreciated."
Flores said the Canadian Mortgage and
Housing corporation, a Canadian government corporation, has said it won't give
UBC money. But Flores said she will be
consulting CMHC again this month.
Flores said the University of Victoria
went to the open market to get money for
their recently constructed residences, and
UBC may have to do the same.
AMS president Dave Frank said the AMS
may also purchase off-campus houses to
turn into student-run cooperatives, despite
the referendum specifying on-campus accommodation.
Fire safety found SUB standard
The University Endowment Land's fire
chief is recommending a complete sprinkler
system be installed in SUB.
In an Aug. 13 letter to Alma Mater Society general manager Charles Redden, H. A.
Crawford states "the fire department is
now becoming concerned with the lack of
adequate fire separations within the
building."
Crawford recommends a sprinkler system
be phased in over the next three years
throughout the building.
In an interview Wednesday, Crawford
emphasized the letter, actually written by
the provincial fire marshal, is a recommendation rather than an order.
"It's purely a recommendation," he
said. "It's not a requirement at this time."
A change in building occupancy ratings
could require the system be installed in the
future, he said. If the AMS was to renovate
the area under SUB plaza, a sprinkler
system in the new area, and the original
building near the renovated area could be
required, Crawford said.
The result of this would be a satisfactory
degree of fire safety within the building and
far more freedom and fewer restrictions
when ■ engaging in renovations and alterations," Crawford states in his letter.
AMS president Dave Frank said Monday
the system would only be installed if absolutely necessary because of other renovations, or if the fire chief's enforcement of
national building code regulations required
that the work be done.
Students ponder going underground
GAGE
$1 million seed money would sprout project
Quest for more funds
A yes vote in next weeks fee referendum
will deliver future student councils with a
precedented amount of control over funds
at UBC.
In addition to about $50,000 in increased
funds for general AMS operation and
$75,000 for intramurals, council will control $350,000 in capital funds. These funds
will flow into the AMS coffers annually
when students pay fees.
The additional fee levy of $20 per student
each year, $15 for capital projects, $3 for
intramurals, and $2 for general AMS operations, will continue until students vote by
referendum to stop the fee.
In effect, student council will dictate how
funds are allocated through its budget. For
major capital projects, never before have
students given council discretionary spending power.
But when students vote, they will also be
asked to set priorities to direct this and
future councils, on how to spend increased
fees by ranking projects one to eight.
The ballot will be a simple yes-no vote.
The only options are to either accept the entire package or reject it. A seperate form
will be given out at polling stations to rank
projects.
Students don't need to vote yes to rank
the various projects on the ballot.
"Financially the ranking will not be binding on council but you know as well as I
do, that if a council did number six before
number one priority, it would be politically
unwise," said Alma Mater Society president Dave Frank.
Frank admitted there is no control over
councils in the future except for the campus
media which will keep students for years informed about what priorities council
should be persuing, he said.
"I trust me and my council," said Frank.
"But I wouldn't trust a council four years
down the road."
Frank said he plans to start as many of
the capital projects as possible during his
term of office.
But Frank and this council leave office
after the AMS's annual general meeting
which happens sometime in February.
So January's student council elections
will be crucial if the fee referendum passes.
"January elections are going to be very
important — perhaps the most important in
the history of the AMS," said Frank.
Council's efficacy will determine not only
the priorities but whether or not funds are
spent at all.
"It puts pressure on council to perform.
It puts pressure on councils now and in the
future to start working on problems and
stop worrying about candy machines."
If the referendum does pass Frank said
council will start working on the top priority items immediately. Frank said the worst
case scenario will be if the top three
priorities are for athletic facilities (which includes a field house), housing and the
parkade.
These projects together could cost as high
as $14 million.
But Frank says even under the worst case
funds would be allocated in stages so all the
top priorities would get attention. In addition, the AMS will try to get funds from
other sources to help build facilities, Frank
said.
Frank would not say what his priorities
are but he said that day care, the Whistler
cabin and the horse barn need immediate
attention. If they turn out to be low
priorities the AMS will try to use other
funds to meet these needs, he said.
The cost of developing 16,000 square feet
of space under the SUB plaza will be
between $500,000 and $1.5 million, according to Alma Mater Society president Dave
Frank.
But, if construction is delayed the cost
could increase with inflation, he added. The
underground area of SUB is currently an
empty concrete shell with a dirt floor. The
referendum proposal is to develop the
space for use by AMS clubs.
"There is a crying demand for permanent
club space," said AMS finance director
James Hollis.
However, not every club is entitled to office space, Frank said. Which clubs get
space is determined by the students administrative commission, he added.
SUB was originally designed to accomodate 60 clubs, but there are about 200
clubs on campus.
Various clubs said the following about
SUB expansion:
• "We are in constant competition with
other clubs and organizations for space in
SUB." — Julian Narayan, UBC dance club
president.
• "We could use more space and are en-
Last  week  student   council   approved
spending $6,000 to cut a double doorway
into the area.
The door is located in the south-west corner of SUB's lower floor, near the Pit and
the pay telephones. Students may enter the
empty space, which is partially lit.
A separate area, directly behind the outdoor club cages and stretching to the end of
the bowling alleys provides another 2,000
square feet for possible development. It is
currently left unused, since fire regulations
limit the size of the outdoor club are to its
Cheap UBC council lowest of low in Canada
High costs put brake on parkade
Would UBC students pay $110 per year in student society fees?
Queens' university students are willing to do so, because that is
what they pay each year.
Student association fees at other major Canadian student universities range from $23 at the University of Waterloo to Queen's
$110.
UBC Alma Mater Society fees are currently $24.
However, when non-discretionary fees are removed, UBC has
the lowest student levy in Canada.
After subtracting a $7 athletic fee, a $5 pool fee, and a $1.50 intramural fee, UBC's student council gets $10.50 per student each
year. Other discretionary fees range from $12 at Guelph university
to $29.50 at Simon Fraser University.
SFU charges $60 per year, while University of Victoria students
pay $63 annually.
Some other university student fees across Canada are:
• Saskatchewan — $60,
• York — $40,
• Western Ontario — $35.50,
• Manitoba — $39.50,
• Carleton — $70,
• Humber College — $50,
• Guelph — $27,
• Dalhousie — $73,
• Calgary — $38.50,
• Ottawa — $25.
• Alberta — $50.
Carleton students voted 55 per cent in favor of a $20 increase in
discretionary funds in February, Carleton student association vice
president Mike Hughes said Tuesday. "Revenues remained constant, and costs kept rising, there was no choice," he said.
AMS fees have seen their ups and downs over the years.
Until March 1981, full-time UBC students were paying $39 in
fees. After an unsuccessful building referendum, students voted to
remove a $15 SUB building levy. The money was used to pay for
the mortgage on SUB.
Before SUB was built in 1966, the AMS discreationary fee was
$14 — higher than today's. Students directed five dollars of the fee
to the SUB building levy, and in two $5 increments, added another
$10.
The last capital project funded by student fees was for the swimming pool.
A $5 pool levy was levied in 1973. Students get free swimming
each school day, and half the management of the centre for their
contribution to construction costs. The fee ends in just over three
years, but facility privileges continue.
But not all universities have followed UBC students' example by
building anything the government or university won't.
"We have all the same problems (with deficiencies in student
facilities) here," said Antoineatte Layoun, finance commissioner
for the University of Ottawa student federation.
"We solve it differently than UBC. We put pressure on the
university to build the facilities."
Ottawa students feel their tuition is already high enough, she
said. "The university should put pressure on the government to
provide facilities."
The AMS last saw a discretionary fee increase in 1979, when
students voted to add $1.50. In the same package, the intramural
program got $1.50 per year.
The AMS fees varied before 1966, mainly to fund various student initiated building projects. Such projects have included parts
of Place Vanier residence, War Memorial gym, Brock hall and annex, Thunderbird Winter Sports centre, SUB, the Aquatic centre,'
and others.
The proposed parkade between Gage
highrise and SUB could take a long time to
complete, even if the referendum passes,
the traffic and parking committee chair said
V/ednesday.
Ken Denike, professor of geography,
said the committee has been considering a
third university parkade in that area,
because it is definitely needed, and could be
safely managed, but funding it is a large
undertaking.
"We're talking about $4 to $5 million for
a parkade that makes sense," he said. "If
you get even five dollars from each student,
that's still only a $100,000. The committee
has a parking fund accumulating as,well,
maybe $200,000 a year. That's still a long
way from $4 million."
The traffic and parking committee is
comprised of representatives from the
faculty, support staff and students. It is not
an administration body, but makes recommendations.
Denike thinks alternative ways of funding a new parkade have not been fully explored. He also said it is unlikely the administration will participate in the funding
of the third parkade, since they completely
funded the Fraser River lot at the northwest
end of the campus.
Alma Mater Society president Dave
Frank said the financial approach towards a
new parkade is flexible. He said construction funding is not impossible.
"We can make the thing pay for itself.
We can charge a standard rate for occa
sional parkers, with special discounts for
club members, student housing tenants,
AMS members, all the people who literally
or virtually live around SUB," he said.
The amount of generated revenue from
the parkade that would go to the AMS
would depend on other university groups'
participation in its financing, he said.
Technically, any building on campus
belongs to the university proper. For example, SUB is leased to the AMS for a
nominal fee of $1 a year.
present capacity. Additional fire exits at the
east end of the void would allow for the
areas' development.
couraging members to vote for the referendum." — sailing club member Monica
Coulson.
• "We have sufficient space for us, but
we know there are some clubs that could
use office space." — debating club member
Sylvia Berryman.
• "Many people see the line up for space
bookings and just give up in dismay
without even asking for space," said Hollis.
In the previous two years two referendums on SUB development have failed.
Unlike the current referendum the past ones
were poorly planned and presented, Frank
said.
Jocks court for
new racket funds
"There is a pathetic lack of athletic
facilities and the only reason we have any is
due to students," AMS president Dave
Frank said.
Frank said students' priorization of the
sports facilities on the referendum would
dictate where and how much funds will be
spent on it.
"Racquet sports facilities can be built immediately because they pay for
themselves," Frank said. Courts would be
attached to War Memorial gym or built in
the vicinity of SUB he added.
Justin Marples, physical education
facility manager supports the development
of sports facilities but said his department
would probably not provide funds.
Intramural director Nestor Korchinsky
said new facilities are required. An all-
weather field in place of Mclnnes field
and a tennis pavillion with squash, racquetball and handball courts is necessary, he
said.
"Due to a shortage of fields, students
must play on lawns and boulevards," Korchinsky said.
Marples said two all-weather fields are
actually justified.
One would cost approximately a million
dollars, he said.
"A million dollars is easily financed,"
Frank said.
Pay some more, play some more
The UBC intramural program is underfunded, intramurals director Nestor Korchinsky
said Tuesday.
"If we don't receive increased funding we'll cancel programs," Korchinsky said. He said
they had to cancel programs last year due to insufficient funding.
If the referendum is approved the intramurals program could expand, satisfying
students' wishes, Korchinsky said.
AMS finance director James Hollis said, "When you consider 8,000 people participated
last year, you realize intramurals' importance."
Three dollars of the $20 referendum package is earmarked for intramurals. Students now
pay a $1.50 per year for intramurals.
If the referendum passes, 66 percent of the increased intramural revenue will hire two
full-time staff, Korchinsky said.
The remaining 33 percent would subsidize sports and build new facilities Korchinsky
said.
Korchinsky said the expense is justified. "There is a boom in intramural participation,"
he said. "We have turned people away at events due to lack of funding."
.    Korchinsky said Mount Royal college in Calgary employs more intramural staff than
UBC, playing fields are becoming dangerous and racquet sports facilities do not exist.
Hollis said the AMS will cut its intramural funding if the refrendum is not approved. Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 12, 1982
■ „ referendum ballot.
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Drop
Grey morning rape not a love story at all
My first worry, after I'd been
raped, was my hands. Now I suppose if I'd been beaten, or cut up,
I'd have had more pressing things
on my mind. I'd have had to
swallow my nausea, and astonishment and guilt, and other impossible things like that, and crawled off
to a hospital, if I could have found
one that would take me.
But mine was a grey morning
rape. I knew there wasn't much I
could do. I'd trusted somebody,
and it hadn't panned out, and what
more could I expect? Meanwhile,
my hands were driving me crazy.
They smelled of him.
(freestyle)
I was lying, with them over my
mouth, so that I wouldn't scream,
trying not to move. If I'd moved,
his arm, which was thrown over me,
would have brushed against me.
I'd been like that for hours, eyes
never leaving the window, I was
waiting for dawn, and the subways,
and escape. He had insisted on
sleeping in an embrace. It was all
very romantic to him.
He's done so well. He'd killed the
dragon, and carried off the maiden
in fine style. But I was the dragon.
Someone I'd never met, but he'd
obviously enjoyed, was the prize.
The sun, which I thought had
forgotten me altogether, finally
came; and I pulled away from him.
I slunk into the bathroom,
desperate not to wake him, and
began to dress.
Weeks after, I would remember
dressing, and the wrinkled clothes
that smelled of him too, and would
begin to shudder, and retch. It was
all my fault, you see. I was a bad
girl, not a nice girl. Things like that
didn't happen to nice girls. Only to
stupid, bad, improper women like
me. A women I worked with, upon
hearing what had happened to me,
shook her head dubiously, and said,
"You were kind of asking for it."
It's only now, after a year of
anger, that I can say, no, nothing I
did justified a rape. There was
nothing I could do to justify a rape.
And if actually trusting a human
being of the opposite sex is
justification, for such an act of
blindness and senseless violence
and cruelty, then I reject from top
to bottom, the sickness of a society
so regulated.
A male friend asked me how I
dealt with that rage. I told him, if I
ever let it out, if I for one moment
lost control, I would smash
everything I could get my hands on,
until I didn't have the strength to
smash anymore. But what would I
have then? A lot of broken glass.
You see, the man that raped me
wasn't a bad man, with greasy hair,
and a Hawaiian shirt like the shows
on TV. He was an intelligent and,
for his time and place, fairly mature
man, who had firmly convinced
himself that something beautiful
and gothic had happened that long,
atrocious night. Rape is not the act
of a sick or deviant individual, from
the fringe of our so civilized society.
It is the logical result of a terrifying
fantasy that permeates, to one
degree or another, the thinking of
every man. It is the physical enactment of the sado-masochism that
our society calls the romantic male-
female relationship.
He did wake up, just before I got
away. He rolled lazily on to his
back, and called out to me, "Wait.
Where are you going? Where can I
reach you?"
The anger that I would need so
badly in the next months filled me
and I yelled, "Come and find me,"
and slammed the door, and ran out
into the cleansing shower of rain.
Name wit held by request
Letters
Aggies say don't close historic
barn door before it's too late
I would like to draw your attention to the old horse barn on B-lot.
Since it is now one of the items on
our $20 student fee referendum, it is
worth serious consideration.
This barn was built in 1919 to
house the horses that cleared and
plowed the fields for agricultural
studies way back when our Point
Grey campus was in its infancy.
Last year, when the barn was falling into disuse, some of us decided
that we liked the barn and didn't
want to see it torn down by the administration. Inspired by Dr.
deVries and his petition to save the
barn, the Aggies put up a bit of
money for paint and brushes and
we spent a Saturday painting one
end of the barn.
We wanted to clean up the
building to dispel the opinion of the
administration that it was an
eyesore and should be torn down.
We like it. Personal taste in wine,
food and architecture cannot
always be explained; we just find it
to be a handsome structure.
The building's practical attractiveness lies in its sound construction of rock and heavy wood. The
second floor is really a barn with a
large floor area equal to the party
room in SUB.
As an Alma Mater Society administered facility you can imagine
the potential uses for a room this
size for dance classes, martial arts
classes, fitness classes, square dance
club, art shows and student dances
and social events.
There is room on the main floor
for a coffee shop to get that early
morning caffeine fix on your way to
classes and for a small pub to meet
and relax after classes.
I urge you to vote yes on the $20
student fee increase referendum
next week. B-lot barn plans are
already drawn up and can be seen in
SUB concourse. You can also ask
Dave Frank, our AMS president,
for more information on the barn
and on the referendum.
Alistair Winter
president
agriculture undergraduate society
Mouthing off again
Just a note to let you know that
our Supermouth tournment begins
today. As a tournament opener we
will be debating AMS president
Dave Frank and student board rep
Dave Dale on the referendum. Any
students who are undecided on the
issue should come to the auditorium
today (Friday) at noon.
The official opening of Supermouth will be at lunchtime on Monday, when we will parade around
the campus; singing, carrying
placards, looking like fools, and ac
ting silly.
Our debating schedule has not
been finalized just yet, but we expect to have debates with the
political clubs, peace and mutual
disarmament, the gays and lesbians,
the Commerce undergrads, and
others in the next two weeks. The
tournament finale will occur Friday, Nov. 26, when we debate the
gears that "scientists succeed and
engineers fail".
John Drayton
supermouth chair
THE UBYSSEY
November 12, 1982
The Ubyssey is published every Tuesday and Friday
through the university year by the Alma Mater Society
of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of
the staff and are not necessarily those of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in SUB 241k,
Editorial phone 228-2301/05. Advertising 228-3977/78.
"Go hog wild" Shariff said.
The Ubyssey orchestra conductor had resigned so Shaffin Shariff agreed to keep time
snapping his fingers. Keiley Jo Burke said this was authoritarian, so the orchestra agreed to
sit in a circle and nod heads in time together. Triangle player Robert Beynon agreed to the arrangement but Tuba player Craig Brooks claimed discrimination. Brooks said tapping toes in
time was ideal. Jack Tielman dissented. "Musical time is a repressive capitalistic institution,"
Tielman replied when asked. Brian Jones agreed, stating each player should play in his own
time. Corrina Sundarajan disagreed. Fearing cacophonic noise, Sundarajan said time was an
essential element of melody. Donna Sanford said melody was a capitalist institution. Jane
Bartlett said the discussion was a Bolshevik conspiracy. "Thje destruction of the orchestra is
the next step towards anarchy," Bartlett said. Arnold Hedstrom agreed. Victor Wong agreed.
Shariff played his fiddle quietly in the background. Cary Rodin said that music is pinko conspiracy. Arnold Hedstrom agreed. Victor Wong agreed. Frances Lew disagreed. She began
to quietly play her kettle drums. The rest joined in in co-operative fashion and composed
together by ear. Cary Rodin said co-operation is a pinko conspiracy. Shaffin Shariff continued to play his fiddle quietly. Friday, November 12, 1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
'The Ubyssey screwed us' — TA union
The article in the Friday Nov. 5
Ubyssey on the TA Union contract
negotiations ("Talks stalled")
seriously misrepresented both the
Union's position and the
breakdown of contract talks.
First of all, the article produced a
garbled version of an interview with
the TAU president in which words
and phrases are combined to form
nonsensical statements: e.g. "They
(the Administration) want to have
total discretion without recourse
when it comes to hiring people"
(when it is the union which would
have no recourse on hiring decisions), or "They (the Administration) are deploying (?!) those people
of essential information . . ."
Incidentally, because of faulty
pronoun references, the article
also makes the administration
spokesman, Bob Grant, sound
ridiculous. He is reported as calling
the administration's final wage offer "laughable", although in a
subsequent paragraph he calls it "a
damn good offer".
More importantly, the article
passes on false information
disseminated by the administration
negotiator, and gives the union no
chance to counter or correct. The
article depicts the union as refusing
to negotiate further ("Oh, negotiations   have   broken   down,   have
they?" chortles Bob Grant) when in
fact the administration gave the
union an ultimatum.
According to our minutes of the
last two negotiating sessions on
Nov. 1 and Nov. 3, Bob Grant said
several times: "We are not prepared
to go any further." There were only
eight negotiating sessions. The
union did not even have the chance
to offer our wage proposal or our
package for settlement.
In reference to wages, The
Ubyssey reports Elob Grant's statement that the final offer of six per
cent is in line with what the other
campus unions received. In fact, the
average settlement for the other
campus unions was 8.1 per cent.
Furthermore, because of the low
yearly salary of TAs and markers,
the administration offer of an
average of 6.35 per cent would
mean an increase of at most $47 per
month. Undergraduate TAs and
markers would get much lower increases.
The other areas of grave concern
to the union which were not clearly
explained by The Ubyssey are job
security and union security. If the
administration has. its way, rehiring
of TAs will be totally discretionary,
which means that there will no
longer be job security for a second
year for Masters or a third year for
Ph.D. students.
The other hard won basic right
being threatened by the administration is the union's access to our
bargaining unit members through
information sheets and orientation
Words from our sponsor:
take future in your hands
This university has been shaped
by students more than any other
campus in North America. Brock
Hall, the Armouries, Totem,
Vanier, Gage, SUB, the Old
Stadium, War Memorial gym,
Winter Sports Centre and the
Aquatic Centre all exist for our use
because of students who were here
before us.
In fact, our campus only exists
because of the student's Great Trek
to the campus in 1922. The result of
this investment by the past benefits
us today. Not only do we get the use
of these buildings, but since money
talks we get the benefit of the
resulting political weight.
Next week, Nov. 15 to 19, we are
asking people to continue this by
voting   yes   to   major   $20   Alma
Mater Society fee increase. This
money would be, in fact can only be
used for, the following: $3 to Intramurals, $2 to the AMS and $15
for these large projects only —
athletic facilities near SUB, SUB expansion, daycare, land under
Whistler Cabin, sprinkler system
for SUB, on-campus hosing, B-lot
barn renovations and a parkade
beside Gage.
We have tried to make this
referendum as ironclad as possible
so the money cannot be used on different projects unless it is approved
by another referendum.
How  will  the priority of these
projects be set? You will set them.
When you vote you will rank these
in the order you want them to occur. Each of these ideas is the
number one priority of a major
group on campus. There is no way
students council by itself would
even want to go way out on a limb
and set the priorities.
Finally, why one large package?
Most of the projects would get a
majority of yes votes but to reach
quorum we need over 2,500 yes
votes which is very difficult to
achieve. This $20 question is designed to be big so students will notice it
and look into the various parts of it.
So 1 encourage you to look closely at all items so you can determine
how to rank them. Look at the condition of our fields, look at the
Barn drawings in SUB, talk to
daycare and housing, talk to Intramurals or any athlete about the
lack of athletic facilities, try to park
by Gage, see V.O.C. or the Ski
Club about Whistler Cabin, talk
with any club about space in SUB,
look through the new door on the
lower floor of SUE! and see the huge
undeveloped area and talk to me
about the AMS. I'm in SUB 256,
telephone 228-3972.
The answers you'll get will probably make you wonder, as 1 do,
why this wasn't done long ago.
Dave Frank
AMS president
I'd like to thank .
I would like to thank all of those
undergrads, grad students and
alumni who, over the years, have
contributed to campus projects
such as SUB, the Aquatic Centre,
the Armouries and Gage
Residences, to name a few.
I have made considerable use of
these facilities during my years at
UBC as, I am sure, have most other
students.
During the week of Nov. 15 to
19, the Alma Mater Society will be
holding a referendum asking for a
$20 increase to the annual AMS stu
dent fee. This money is to be used
for a number of very worthwhile
projects specified in the referendum
question.
The student opinion survey accompanying the referendum will be
a guideline to the order in which the
projects are undertaken.
Twenty dollars seems little to ask
of people who have, for years, enjoyed the generosity of former UBC
students.
John C. Lee
mech club president
applied sciences 4
meetings. Clearly the administration is threatening the very survival
of the TA Union.
These then are the issues at stake
between the TA Union and the
UBC administration. In future we
would appreciate more clear, fair
and   detailed   reporting   by   The
Ubyssey.
Yorgus Papatheodoron
president
Joanne Dolhanty
recording secretary
CUPE local 2278
Jobless resume positions
I went to drop off a couple of job
applications at the Campus
Employment Centre this morning.
Since there were already 20 or 30
applicants for every job, I realized I
would have to hype up my resume
to stand any chance at all.
To cope with students flooding
an oversaturated market, the
employment centre gives out job-
hunting guides full of excellent advice on how to sell oneself in
resumes and interviews. Certainly
makes sense to me. It's nice to hear
that as individuals, some of us can
always succeed where collectively
we clearly cannot.
Resume artistry seems an
eminently sensible criterion for
picking job applicants. I used to
agonize over my qualifications, but
now I found a better way. 1 simply
make a list of descriptive phrases
that companies use in display
listings for their perfect applicant,
juggle them around a bit, sprinkle
them liberally with adjectives from
my thesaurus and finally blend
everything into an alluring self-
appraisal. (For only $25, others too
can benefit from my newly
established resume writing
business.)
Getting jobs has become an absurd scramble in which even the
meekest among us must dredge up
their minutest assets to get a competitive edge and snatch that job
away from others. We preen
ourselves like breeding bulls, compromise our pride and values, lick
the boots of company representatives, feel triumphant about shov
ing aside rival applicants — and
what for? To grow ulcers in the rat
race, to become cogwheels in an industry of adjuncts to computer terminals, to plod away at one
dehumanizing task or another, just
because we need money.
Luckily I'm in a solidly utilitarian
field like geology and not some
"measly arts type." But even in my
own field I see the swollen ranks of
job-hungry students running scared
and turning into compliant hirelings
of big corporations which, in their
blind profit-seeking, fuel the
growth obsession of a consumer
society already spiralling toward
disaster.
Yet fitting into this society has
become very complicated even for
those who desperately want to fit
in, because socio-economic status
requires money, and money usually
requires a job. To get a job today,
you must not simply be an able and
willing worker, but have patronage
or make inflated promises about
doing harder, more brilliant work
than everyone else. The warm
welcome which the average student
gets from the employers of this
country, after years of strenuous
study, is a little worse than the hug
of a porcupine.
"To get that all-important interview," the glossy job-hunting guide
says, "your resume should tell who
you are." As I set out to add spice
to my prosaic old resume, stressing
things like my superior teamwork
and leadership skills, the question
keeps haunting me: Who really am
1? Basically a pleasure-seeker.
Daydream a lot. Given to secret
despondency. Socially often an outsider. Subject to fits of introspection. A drifter, totally devoid of
career ambitions. Hate to give or
take orders. Overwhelmed, at
times, by a sense of insignificance
and futility. Pessimistic about
world affairs. I value nature, peace,
books, love and friendship.
The blank job application is sitting on my desk. So I write: "1 am a
vigorous go-getter who thrives in a
competitive setting. Deadlines and
similar pressures mobilize my best
energies. My cool-headed realism
allows me to appreciate both
technical and economic aspects of
the industry. I am a strong believer
in reward according to merit, and 1
can assume leadership roles with
confidence and integrity, drawing
upon exceptional research and communication skills. If you seek people to contribute to the dynamic
growth of your company, you will
find in me a keen, achievement-
oriented self-starter who enjoys
meeting challenges aggressively."
1 read this self-appraisal over
again, half convinced myself. In a
surge of perhaps unwise courage I
add: "And 1 have a propensity for
critical thinking, reinforced by five
philosophy courses."
Hell, no — better not mention
the philosophy courses: they could
cost me that all-important interview
with an oil company.
Kurl Preinsperger
geology 4
7 do not require daycare but.
I consider myself an average participant in scholastic and extracurricular activities. In the years
that I have gone to UBC, I have
never needed day care, the Whistler
cabin, the Barn converted or many
of the other items mentioned in the
Nov. 15 to 19 referendum. But not
needing these things didn't and
doesn't mean that I feel that the
other students at UBC shouldn't
have them.
Sixty years ago the university was
built because the students collectively supported the creation of
UBC. The benefits from this group
of concerned students are felt to
this very day.
Later students helped pay for
building student residences, the
Aquatic Centre and the present Student Union Building.
The students who voted to be the
initiators of these and other pro-
AMS election regulations prohibit the running of opinion pieces
during polling week.
Therefore, The Ubyssey will not
accept any letters pro or con for
publication next week under any
circumstances.
Although The Ubyssey does not
always blindly follow the AMS, this
regulation provides us with a good
excuse to stop this rather one-sided
debate and barage of letters.
*?
jects are for the most part gone
from the campus. They left behind
them benefits which we and future
students will enjoy.
We can spend the $20 on beer,
movies, restaurants, records, etc. —
or we can invest our $20 to help the
present and future students obtain a
more fulfilling life once here at
UBC.
Tuum Est. It is up to you.
Come Nov. 15 to 19, each student
must decide what extra-curricular
activities will be available to benefit
themselves and future students.
Please vote yes Nov. 15 to 19.
Mitchell Hetman
president
Gage communit) council
Poster roaster: on the
contrary says student rep
Some of you may dislike and
question our poster entitled The
Facts Are. Realizing that some people would resent what they perceived as scare tactics and would question the validity of our statements,
we debated the relative merits of
mincing our words or accurately
representing the situation. A
straightforward, honest, simple approach was decided to be the only
reasonable alternative.
The AMS referendum (Nov.
15-19) is not designed to deal only
with the several present situations
we are facing today, but to also
build and plan for the future. We
see this philosophy as being crucial
in averting and preventing other
potential problems becoming as
serious as today's problems.
Most    people   react    negatively
when initially exposed to the concept of a $20 fee referendum, but
when the issues are clearly explained they are usually very supportive.
Personally, 1 was very cynical
about including daycare. 1 was
more interested in pushing for
athletic facilities and the development of the barn. I decided,
however, to keep an open mind and
to look into the daycare problem.
Please look into the referendum
so that you can make an intelligent
decision. We want to know what
you think about how our campus
should be developed and the leadership and participation students
should have in the university's
future.
Dave Dale
student board rep Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 12, 1982
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Oct S-Oct 16 'JIM FOSTER
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Sundays: 11:00 a.m.-11:00 p.m.
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1184 DENMAN ,6i-b:'.2
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after Classes ...
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Nov. 15-20
Monday—Battle of the Sexes
Tues.—T & A Night
Wed.—Ladies Night
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Ladies admitted free
Mon.-Thurs.
Open 8:00 p.m. to 2:00 a.m.
Mon.-Sat.
Nightly from 8 p.m.-lO p.m.
M.T.V.   live   from   N.Y.   on
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Located at the back of the Village
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CITR & THE PIT
Present
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HOT
AIR
SHOW
ABORTED
PRODIGIES
THE SLIP
Nov. 15. 1982
- NO COVER -
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WOODWORK
Monday
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Tuesday
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Wednesday
LADIES NIGHT
Thursday
MR. PHYSIQUE
Friday & Saturday
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Shows 6:00 p.m., 9:30 p.m.
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We even take care of the Cake!
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Live entertainent nightly.
Mon. to Sat. Open 'til 2:00 a.m.
Reservations recommended
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at Trafalgar Friday, November 12,1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 13
Letters
Frat rat bites back against referendum remark
This is directly concerned with
Chris Fulker's letter about the AMS
and its upcoming fee referendum in
Tuesday's Nov. 9 Ubyssey.
'Fulker is stupid'
I have just read Chris Fulker's
letter "Money Belongs to
Students" in the Nov. 9 Ubyssey
and have been moved to something
approaching violence by his obviously uninformed opinions.
Certainly times are hard, but as
far as twenty dollars out of my
assessment of over one thousand
goes, it simply does not matter.
Twenty dollars spread over the
course of a year wouldn't even buy
a busride a week. And this is only
the least stupid of Fulker's
arguments.
In response to his statements
questioning the character of the
AMS and their relevance to the
average student, I submit to him
that he either open his stubbornly-
closed eyes or do something positive
about the AMS. The average student at this university is, I would
venture to guess, not some
troglodytic swot who never attends
a party, concert, film, pub or
lounge, who never swims or plays
intramurals. This is what AMS does
for us, and why fees are important.
If Fulker had the intelligence to
look into his subject, something
which he is apparently loath to do,
he would understand, or at least
realize, that the only way for AMS
to do anything is to act like a
business — in these "hard times"
only a well-run business can survive.
When the AMS has control of a
substantial amount of cash the
board of governors will be much
more likely to listen. That is when
things get done. He would also see
that it is not possible to obtain a
quorum on any individual issue, let
alone on a series of issues spread
over the year.
As a member of my
undergraduate society's council, I
can appreciate the difficulty of getting people interested in anything,
even once. To hold several referenda would not only be self-defeating,
but would also cost a good deal
more.
This campus has been built on
student foresight and involvement
more than any other you care to
name. That is something to be proud of. If it had not been for what
Fulker terms "kiddie politicians",
it is doubtful if SUB, the pool, and
the Winter Sports complex (to name
a few), would exist in their present
form. Perhaps Fulker does not
swim, or like the price of beer in the
Pit, or have a need for day-care —
neither do I. But for goodness sake
man, at least be big enough to help
someone else.
Mark Drage
agriculture II
FEATURING TOM
Tom Hawthorn, former B.C. bureau chief for Canadian University Press, former Vancouver Sun staffer,
former Ubyssey co-editor, former short person, and
current Vancouver freelance reporter, will give a feature
writing seminar today at 4:00 p.m. in The Ubyssey office.
All students are welcome, especially Ubyssey staffers.
The seminar will be followed by a drunken party.
:<H;i;ittij;M:
CAMERAS
263-2114
COLOUR ENLARGEMENTS
from slides   „_.,„ y 00
-mm.
\n
8x10
>H 10
MINUTES       5x8
499
12170 W. 41 Ave * West Van, North Van, Burnaby, Richmond, Coquitlam
LAW
and the
UNIVERSITY
OF VICTORIA
If you are interested in learning more about what
our Faculty of Law can offer to you as a student,
you are invited to meet with:
Dean Lyman R. Robinson and
Mr. Garry Charlton, Admissions Officer
DATE: Tuesday, November 16th
TIME: 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
LOCATION: Room 114, Brock Hall
THANK YOU FOR YOUR INTEREST!
To put things mildly I think your
attitude stinks. It's not only the narrow minded viewpoints about the
referendum that are so bothersome
but also your hypocritical attitude
you have taken towards the AMS
that makes everything so upsetting.
First of all, I cannot see how you
can say that the AMS have no
relevance for the average student. If
this is so then why did you use this
newspaper to voice vour opinions?
When was the last time you have set
foot into SUB, or attended a social
event   on  campus,   or  even  par
ticipated in some form of sport at
the university? The very fact that
you are holding this newspaper
more than justifies the absurdity of
your statement. Besides, the only
groups I can immediately think of
to which none of the above applies
are door knobs, tomatoes, and fire
hydrants.
I am also surprised to see someone like yourself who has not
only been a candidate in a recent
by-election for AMS administration
director but also has expressed interest   in   student   government
'I agree with you, Chris'
I'm going to vote no in the referendum next week. You see, I hate
little kids and feel they should have to play in the traffic, not in
daycares. I also live in my parent's home just outside the gates and
don't understand why everyone else doesn't. I get a ride to class
everyday so I don't need parking. I volunteer to help tear down the
Whistler Cabin because I think we should waste $400,000.
I don't want to play with any of the 8,000 people in Intramurals
and I think the fields are great for moto-cross the way they are. I
don't care about keeping SUB open because I hate clubs, parties,
movies and pubs so why should I even care about the barn? And
athletic facilities are just a place to sweat.
That's why I'm with you Chris Fulker. People like us should
always vote no on referendums.
Carl Marcks
arts 9
through involvement in past elections to make such a hypocritical
accusation against the AMS. You
have criticized the "calibre of the
student government" and said how
it is run by a bunch of "kiddie
politicians" and yet you still fail to
command even ten per cent of the
total votes in the recent by-election.
So what does that make you?
Answer that one.
As for the referendum itself it is
redundant to emphasize its
significance towards the future of
student services and facilities. Only
someone of Neanderthal thinking
would moronically perceive the
referendum as a "scheme to raise
dollars" under a "sugar-coating of
supposedly desirable projects."
Many of the proposals and projects have been conceived in the
past directly as a result of complaints and suggestions from the
student body and have been
vegetating for a couple of years.
It think it's about time that someone has finally decided to take
action, rather than the usual
regurgitation of complaints and excuses, to solve some of the AMS's
past and present problems, our problems.
Urey Chan
Inter-Fraternity Council
WARREN MILLER PRESENTS
SikMoikIoi'
A FEATURE LENGTH SKI FILM
COLORADO • SWITZERLAND • CHILE
CALIFORNIA • IDAHO • UTAH • AUSTRIA
Back by popular demand
THURSDAY, NOV. 25
8:00 P.M.
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE
Reserved tickets at VTC/CBO
outlets and Can-Ski Sportshop
Presented by Can-Ski Sportshop
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
presents
THE TROJAN WOMEN
by Euripides
NOVEMBER 19 - 27
(Previews - Nov. 17 + 18)
8 p.m.
Student Tickets: $4.50
BOX OFFICE * FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE * Room 207
Support Your Campus Theatre
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE CECIL H. AND IDA GREEN
VISITING PROFESSORSHIPS
1962 AUTUMN LECTURES
Normal Daniel
Dr. Norman Daniel, a distinguished scholar of medieval Islamic studies, is the author
of four major works that explore the historical relationship of Arab Islamic and European Christian culture. His lectures will be of interest to those in the fields of
religious studies, medieval studies, history, anthropology, Hispanic studies and
literature. Dr. Daniel's talks should also provide significant insights into the present
tensions within Islamic nations.
WERE THE. FRENCH EPICS SERIOUS? HOW FAR WERE THEY INTENDED TO OFFER AN AUTHENTIC BACKGROUND?
Monday, November 15 In Room 106, Buchanan Building, at 12:30 p.m.
POLITICS AND RELIGION IN EGYPT TODAY
Wednesday, November 17     In Room 106, Buchanan Building, at 12:30 p.m.
CHRISTIANS AS SOURCES OF INFORMATION AND MIS-INFORMATION ABOUT
ISLAM 9th to 13th CENTURIES
Friday, November 19 In room 106, Buchanan Building, at 12:30 p.m. (Medieval
Workshop Lecture)
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE - PLEASE POST AND ANNOUNCE
Occasionally unadvertised seminars are presented.
Please call Mrs. R. Rumley at Local 5675 for information. Page 14
U BY
Yiutic
Friday, November 12, 1982
Faculty  Recital:   Peter   Hannan,   recorder,
12:30 p.m., Nov. 12, Recital hall.
Academy Symphony Orchestra: classical,
8   p.m.,   Nov.   12,   Orpheum.   Tickets   $2
students.
Wednesday noon-hour concert: classical,
Nov. 17, Recital hall.
Student Recital:  Dina  Corrado,   Nov.   18,
Recital hall.
University   Singers:   James   Fankhauser
director, Nov. 19, 8 p.m., Recital hall.
Vancouver Chamber Choir: music of the
Americas,   8:30   p.m.,    Nov.    19,    Ryerson
Church (God bless theml.
Shawn Phillips: versatile soft rocker, 6 and
9:30  p.m.,   Nov.   16-18,   Soft   Rock   Cafe.
Tickets $6.
Rock Sock Hop. Maurice and the Cliches: a
Province-CITR extravaganza,  Nov. 19, Soft
Rock Cafe.
Rockabilly Bop: Buddy Selfish, Herald Nix
and morel Nov. 19, 8:30 p.m., Commodore.
Tickets $6.95.
Peggy Seeger and Ewan MacColl: British
folk music, 8 p.m., Nov. 14, Vancouver East
Cultural Centre.
Dave Foley jam session: a razzmajazz, Nov.
18, Hot Jazz Society.
Chicago: at the Metro Theatre, 1370 S.W.
Marine, 8:30 p.m.
The Wolf Boy: Firehall Theatre, 280 E. Cordova, 8:30 p.m.
Snoopy: a Peanuts family musical, Presentation House, North Van., 8 p.m.
Theatresports Hamlet: held over to Nov.
13, at City Stage, 751 Thurlow St., 8:30 p.m.
Atom and Eve: saving man from nuclear
destruction, Nov. 13, Centennial Theatre,
North Van.
Talking Dirty: a sexual satire, at the Arts
Club, Seymour St., 8:30 p.m.
The  Trojan  Women:   their  fate  after  the
Greek   conquest,   starts   Nov.   17,   Frederic
Wood Theatre, students $4.50.
White Boys: contemporary comedy of manners. Van East Cultural Centre, 8 p.m.
Crimes of the Heart: Arts Club Theatre,
Granville Island, 8:30 p.m.
*»
HpVL£6
SUB Films: Nov. 11-14: Cat People. 7 &
9:30, Nov. 18-21: Quest For Fire.
Vancouver East Cinema: (7th Er Commercial 253-5455). Woody Allen triple bill, Nov.
12-14, starts at 7 p.m., Phantom India, Nov.
15-16, 7:30 only, Who Has Seen The Wind
plus Lies My Father Told Me, Nov. 17-18,
7:30 & 9:25, Marx Brothers triple bill, Nov.
19-21, starts at 7 p.m.
Ridge Theatre (16th Ef Arbutus 738-6311):
Mephisto. Nov. 12-18, 7 & 9:30, The Phantom Tollbooth, Nov. 14, 2 p.m., Monterey
Pop, Nov. 14, 4:00 p.m., Woody Allen triple
bill. Nov. 19-21, starts at 7 p.m.
The Savoy Cinema (3321 Main, 872-2124):
The Divine Nymph plus Till Marriage Do
Us Park, 7:30 Er 9:15, Nov. 12-14,
Walkabout plus The Last Wave. 7:30 Er
9:15, Nov. 15-16, Murder By Decree plus
They Might Be Giants. 7:30 Ef 9:45, Nov.
17-18, King of Hearts plus La Cage Aux
Folles, 7:30 Ef 9:30, Nov. 19-21.
Pacific Cinematheque (800 Robson St.),
The Life of a Film Director plus The
Downfall of Oseen, Nov. 12at 7 Ef 9:30 p.m.
Cinema 16 (SUB Auditorium): The
Hungarians, Nov. 15, at 6 Ef 8:30. SUB
Auditorium: The Sound of Music, Nov. 16,
7-9:45 p.m.
Vancouver Art Gallery (1145 W. Georgia):
Portraits of Conrad Black and Jim Coutts
acquired for permanent collection.
Surrey Art Gallery (13750 - 88th Ave., Surrey): Paintings by Patrick Gourley until Nov.
28, tours at 2 Et 3 p.m.
Asian Centre Auditorium, Exhibition of
paintings by Mr. Dat Han (Tom) Dam, Nov.
17-21.
7u)eMU!a<&&'
TODAY
IRANIAN STUDENT CLUB
Volleyball game, 3:30 p.m.. War Memorial gym.
LAW STUDENTS
SPEAKERS BUREAU
Guest speaker, Bob Kapiin, Solicitor General of
Canada, noon, Law 101/102
UBC DANCE CLUB
Class-teaching the UBC hustle, noon, SUB
ballroom
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Gym night, everyone welcome, 6:30-8:30 p.m.,
Osborne gym A.
DEBATING SOCIETY
Debate on next week's referendum against AMS
president Dave Frank and student board rep
Dave Dale, noon, SUB auditorium.
ASTRONOMY AND
AEROSPACE CLUB
Slide show, arrangements for meteor shower
party, 8:30 p.r". ht may be 5:30 - the writing on
the form wasn't clear). Geophysics 142.
REMEMBRANCE DAY CLUB
Post Nov. 11 meeting to dry tears, count profits
from sale of poppies, and plan next war, noon,
Peace Memorial gym.
CANOE CLUB
Pool sessions for Kayakers,   10 a.m.-12 p.m.,
Aquatic centre.
NEW DEMOCRATIC PARTY
Bzzr garden, 8 p.m.-midnight, SUB 212.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Happy hour; cheap refreshments and cheap talk,
4:30 p.m., Lutheran Campus centre.
INTRAMURALS
Bingo bowl  night,  7-10:30 p.m.,  SUB  games
room.
PRE MED SOCIETY
Barbara McGillivray, Genetics Counselor, speaks
on medical genetics, noon, IRC 1.
BIO-RESOURCE ENGINEERING
APPROPRIATE TECHNOLOGY
STUDY GROUP
Renewable energy: Technology and applications
in B.C., 7 p.m., IRC 1. Public lecture. Vic Enns of
Solace Energy centre speaks.
WEDNESDAY
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
Ezzat Fattah, head of criminology SFU, speaks
on Abolition of the death penalty — implications
in Canada, 7 p.m., SUB 209.
INTRAMURALS
The Chancellor — 4th Ave. Hill Challenge road
run 10 km. noon, SUB east mall.
CREATIVE WRITING DEPARTMENT
Sponsored reading, Leona Gom will read her
work, noon, Buch. D224. Admission free.
SOMETIME
CANADIAN FEDERATION OF STUDENTS
Rock against repression, support dance for
Universite de Moncton student activists, 8:30
p.m. 1 a.m., Legion hall, 6th and Commercial.
Tickets at AMS box office. Child care info
291-3181. That phone number also might be
useful in finding out when this event is, since
they did not put the date on the top of the
'Tween class form. And they want UBC students
to give them $7.50 per year?
LEAVES . . . creep up building?
-alison hoens photo
SAILING/WINDSURFING/SKI CLUBS
Ski bunny, beach bum interclub broomball
challenge, 8:45-10:15 p.m., Thunderbird Winter
sports. Meet 7:30 p.m. upstairs.
ORAL ROBARTS OF THE
THEATRE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Informal reading; bring something dramatic,
rhetoric, lyric or narrative, everyone welcome,
noon, Brock hall 302.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE
AND MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
A War Story, true story of Canadians in a
Japanese prisoner of war camp, noon, SUB 205.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CLUB
Soup lunch, noon, St. Mark's lunch room.
AMS CONCERTS
Powder Blues, 8 p.m., SUB ballroom. Tickets $8
at AMS ticket centre. No minors please.
UBYSSEY/CUP
Feature writing seminar with freelancer and ex-
Ubysseyer Tom Hawthorn, 4 p.m., SUB 241k.
SATURDAY
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Sangria party, 8 p.m., see SUB 239 for details.
DANCE CLUB
Rock and Roll party, 8 p.m., SUB partyroom.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
CSA badminton tournament, 6 p.m., Osborne
gym B.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Square   dance   and   dinner,   6:30   p.m.,   SUB
ballroom.
INTRAMURALS
3 on 3 basketball, all day, War Memorial gym.
Draw up Friday.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
Women vs. Brandon University, 8:30 p.m., War
Memorial gym.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
Men vs. Grads, 6 p.m., War Memorial gym.
THUNDERBIRD FOOTBALL/CITR RADIO
Live broadcast of Canadian semi-final game from
Halifax, 8:45 a.m., FM 101.9, cable 100.1.
SUNDAY
CYCLING CLUB
Ride, everyone welcome, 9 a.m., between SUB
and Aquatic centre.
MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Group ride to Harrison Hot Springs, dry weather
permitting, 10 a.m. meet in SUB cafeteria. Note
new time.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Practise, 10 a.m., Aquatic centre. New recruits
welcome.
SAILING CLUB
Work crew, 10 a.m,, Jericho.
END THE ARMS RACE COMMITTEE
Public meeting on civic election disarmament
referendum, with three MPS, Paul McRae (Lib),
Bob Ogle (NDP) and John Fraser (P.O. Allan
Fotheringham moderates. Sir Charles Tupper
school, 419 E. 24th, Vane, 7:30 p.m.
MONDAY
CAMPUS PRO-LIFE
Lawrence Abello on Euthanasia, noon, SUB 206.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
English language evening, 7:30 p.m., International house Gate 4.
SAILING CLUB
General meeting, movie and information on
winter sailing, noon, SUB 205.
ARTS UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Resume and interview clinic, noon, Buch. A104.
TUESDAY
LAW STUDENTS LEGAL
ADVICE PROGRAM
Free legal advice, noon-2 p.m., SUB 111.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Forum   on   nuclear   disarmament   involvement:
What can we do? 7 p.m., Grad centre garden
room. Followed by Bzzr garden.
FAMILY HOUSE
Sound of Music, 7 p.m., SUB Auditorium. AMS
card $1, children $1, general $3.
ENVIRONMENTAL INTEREST GROUP
Recycling committee meeting, Mercia Spickney
guest speaker, noon, SUB 206.
THUNDERBIRDS ON TOP
Repeat of play-by-play video broadcast of the
UBC vs. Manitoba Bisons league game played at
Thunderbird stadium, 8 p.m., the Pit. Courtesy
of the student broadcasting association.
ZOOLOGY CLUB
General meeting, noon, Bio. Sci. 5458.
ANARCHIST CLUB
Literature table, noon, SUB.
THURSDAY
CYCLING CLUB
Planning meeting for 1983 touring and racing
events, noon, Bio. Sci. 2449. This is really this
week and not last week.
GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES
Tectonic relationships in the basement of the
Trans-Atlantic mountains, noon, Geol. Sci.
330 A.
UNITARIAN SERVICE COMMITTEE
Speach and slides on Asia and Africa and USC
programs by Giltes Latour, 7:30 p.m., Asian centre auditorium.
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Film Sad Song of Yellow Skin, noon, Asian centre auditoriun.
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY
Lecture on dental hygiene by E. Stradiotti, noon,
IRC 1.
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAMS
Information meeting for students in Science I,
Applied Science I. Forestry I, or Agricultural
Science I, noon - 2 p.m., Hennings 201.
FM 101.9 on air, 100.1 on cable
The Atlantic Bowl
Sat., Nov. 13 at 8:45 a.m. . . . Live from Halifax,
the play-byplay broadcast of the Canadian university
semi-final football contest between the UBC
Thunderbirds and the St. Francis Xavier X-Men.
CITR's Joe March, Phil Kueber and Monte Stewart
will be there to relay ail the action to you via satellite.
Pre-Bowl Show is at 8:45 a.m. with the Game starting
at 9:00 a.m.
Other sports
Every Monday and Friday after the 6 p.m. Dinner
report . . Birds' Eye View: reviewing the past
weekend's UBC sports action on Mondays and
previewing upcoming action on Fridays.
Every weekday at 4:30 p.m. . . . The CtTR Afternoon Sports Break.
Every Wednesday at 10:30 a.m. . . . Sports
Unlimited: sports stones, information and interviews.
CITR news menu
Every weekday . . .
8:00 a.m. Wake-Up Report
9:00 a.m. Breakfast Report
1:00 p.m. Lunch Report
3:30 p.m. Afternoon News Break
6:00 p.m. Dinner Report
6:10 p.m. After Dinner Portion:
Tues., Wed. £t Thu. . . . Insight (news analysis and
editorials); Fri. . . . UBC Capsule (recaps the week's
UBC news events).
Every Sunday at 6:00 p.m. . . . The Doug Richards
News Magazine.
Public affairs shows
MON.: Political Forum (political analysis by UBC
political clubs).
TUE.: UBC On Tap (dispenses information and
knowledge tapped from UBC for community consumption).
WED.: Sports Unlimited (sports stories, information and interviews).
THU.: Cross Currents (insight into issues of conflict and confrontation).
FRI.: Dateline International (analysis of international issues).
Every Saturday at 3:00 p.m. . . . Laughing Matters
(a comedy show).
Every Sunday at 12:15 a.m. . . . Sunday Brunch
(literary works and radio plays written by UBC
students).
Every weekday at 11:30 a.m. and 6:45 p.m.  . . .
Generic   Review   (reviews   movies,   plays,   books,
restaurants, etc.).
At UBC Feature
Every weekday at 8:40 a.m., 12:40 p.m., 4:00 p.m.
and  8:40   p.m.   Announcements  to  let   you   know
what's happening at UBC. If you would like to put
one in, visit SUB room 233 or call 228-3017 between
9-and-5 on weekdays.
Alternative Music Programming
Monday to Saturday at noon and 8 p.m. . . . Mini-
Concerts (music from past and present with commentary on one band!.
Everyday at  11   p.m.   .     .   Final Vinyl (an album
played in its entirety): Mon. . . . jazz; Tue. it Wed.
new album;  Thu.   .  .      import album;   Fri.   . . .
neglected album; Sat. .     . classic album; Sun. . .
CITR's #1 album.
Saturdays 10 a m. to 12 noon . . . Folk Show.
Saturdays 3:30 to 6 p.m. . . . Playlist Show (countdown of CITR's top albums and singles).
Sundays 8:30 a.m to 12.15 p.m. . . . Music Of Our
Time (exploring 20th century music, primarily from
the classical tradition)
Sundays 12:45 p m. to 3:00 a.m. . . Reggae
Show.
Mondays 9:30 p.m. to 1:00 a.m . . Jazz Show.
Broadcast Hours
Monday thru Thursday .     . 7:30 a.m. to 1:00 a m.
Friday Er Saturday . . . 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 a.m. and
beyond.s
Sunday . . . 8:30 a m. to 1:00 a.m.
Vancouver Musical Theatre's production of Snoopy is held over until
Nov. 21. This bright, energetic show is
first-rate entertainment recommended
for all. At Presentation House, 333
Chesterfield, North Vancouver. Reservations 986-1351. Ask for student rates.
Performances 8 p.m. Thursday-
Sunday, with matinees on Saturday and
Sunday at 2 p.m.
The   Screen    Performer   series,
sponsored by the British Columbia'
Film Industry Association, continues
Saturday at the Varsity. Series passes
and individual tickets can be purchased
through Vancouver ticket centre outlets
and at the door. More information
about guest speakers and topics can be
obtained from BCFIA, at 684-4712.
#
And you thought The Ubyssey
was only good for polemics and
rhetoric. Well, make no mistake about
it, whatever you think of our politics,
we've had some pretty damn good
writers come through ye ol' den of
subversion. One such scribe, the object
of this particular diatribe, is Mr. Thomas
Hawthorn, who will be passing on some
of his scribbling talents in a feature
writing seminar at 4 p.m. Friday in SUB
241k. All welcome. Bring your professors.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:      AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines, 60c.
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.20; additional lines, 63c.
Additional days, $3.80 and 58c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance.
Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Vancouver, B.C.   V6T 2A5
5 — Coming Events
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
DR. LEWIS THOMAS
Memorial Sloan Kettering
Cancer Centre, New York
MATTERS UNSETTLED
BY SCIENCE
Dr.  Thomas is a well-known  "medical
philosopher".
LECTURE HALL 2,
WOODWARD BUILDING,
Saturday, Nov. 13 at 8:15 pm
LEARN TO SAIL. 30 ft. cruiser/racer.
Hands on Basic Coastal Cruising, C.Y.A.
Certificate. Next class registering now.
734-1675 after 7:00 p.m. Sailcraft Ltd.
30 - Jobs	
FULL TIME-PART TIME JOBS. Contact
Randy at 324-8391. 25-50% commission.
35 - Lost
LOST: NOV. 4 Brown Ultrasuede sack
containing contact lenses and solutions.
Reward. 327-8512, 988-5698.
LOST: Last May in SUB, gold ring. Plain
band with inlaid brass and copper strips.
Reward. 274-0284.
40 — Messages
20 — Housing
1 BDRM. IN 3 BDRM. basement suite.
Fully furnished. 41st & Dunbar area.
$208/mo. Includes heat & hydro. 266-2745.
ON CAMPUS: full room and board,
shared accommodation $1240 per term,
phone 224-3606 or 224-9431. Ask for House
Manager.
COMFORTABLE CHINESE home can
accommodate Taiwan, Hong Kong,
Singapore students. Furnished, convenient. 261-7033.
ROOM FOR RENT in shared Point Grey
house. Female preferred. $225 & utilities.
224-0024 after 6 p.m. Avail Nov. 15th.
WOULD THE GIRL who witnessed car with
license plate KDG 525 hit my white '73 VW
Bug and left a note on my windshield on
Oct 18 in B-2 lot please phone 222-2735 &
leave name & phone no. for Dave. Otherwise I'm out $150.
TYPING. Special student rates. Fitness &
Cameron, public stenographers. 5670 Yew
(Kerrisdale). Ph. 266-6814.
EXPERT TYPING essays, term papers, fac-
tums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses. IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose, 731-9857.
U-WRITE WE TYPE 736-1208. Word Pro
cessing Specialists for Theses, Term
Papers, Resumes, Reports, Correspondence, Days, Evenings, Weekends.
FAST, efficient typing, 41st and Marine Dr.
266-5053.
MICOM WORD PROCESSING: Thesis,
term papers, equation typing. Rate $10 an
hour. Jeeva, 876-5333.
TYPING. Fast & accurate. $1.10 per page.
Please call Katey at 224-5264 or 929-6790.
99 — Miscellaneous
70 — Services
MODE COLLEGE of Barbering and Hairstyl-
ing. Students $6.50 with I.D. Body wave,
$17 and up. 601 W. Broadway, 874-0633.
80 — Tutoring
TUTOR - Economics. Well qualified
University instructor available for tutoring.
Contact Maureen 733-0760.
25 — Instruction
85 — Typing
CANADIAN INSTITUTE of Tai Chi Chuan.
Classes starting in Nov. Steve 731-3021.
EXPERT   TYPING    available    immediately.
Located near campus. Phone 732-1745.
BELIZE AT XMAS
Diving-Adventure Tour
snorkel &7or dive on barrier reef
camp on tropical islands
one week minimum
$1200.00 CDN
Cost includes: tanks, boat charter, meals
& rooms
Cost includes' flights, tanks, boat charter, meats
& room
Belize is safe and exotic — I lived
there for the last two years — returning myself at Xmas to continue
research.
Contact Airfaire Travel 3470 Dunbar
733-4611
or Brian Egan 731-3341, evenings Friday, November 12, 1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 15
Disarmament issue goes to vote
People in more than 100 Canadian municipalities, including
several towns in the Lower
Mainland, will be voting this fall in
a referendum on a new topic: disarmament.
Voters will be asked if they support balanced moves by NATO and
Warsaw Pact countries removing
nuclear weapons and whether they
support giving the federal govern-
More voting
problems?
By FRANCES LEW
The Alma Mater Society is spending funds to promote its current
fee referendum apparently without
approval from student council.
About $500 has been spent to
produce 1,000 buttons and 3,000
posters soliciting 'Yes' votes to raise
the current AMS fee by $20.
"Student council supports the
referendum," said student administrative commission member
Tom Grady.
"But what is unclear is the extent
to which student council supports
the 'Yes' campaign, if it even supports the campaign at all.
Both AMS president Dave Frank
and SAC commissioner Scott Ando
think the costs for the campaign
buttons and posters will be paid by
student council's elections budget.
However, there are not any student council minutes supporting
any decision to allocte specific
funds to the 'Yes' campaign or even
the referendum.
Frank admitted Wednesday "I
think we might have screwed up on
the buttons." Should student
council decide they won't pay for
the buttons, Frank said, "I'll pay
for 'em."
SAC has budgeted $8,000 to be
used for referendum costs
through the year. Frank said the
AMS's current referendum is likely
to cost more than $2,000. This includes costs for the 'Yes' buttons
and posters, polling stations, and
media advertising.
ment    a    mandate    to    negotiate
agreements toward that goal.
A total of 137 municipalities have
approved the referendum, including
Vancouver,   Victoria,   Richmond,
Pitt Meadows, and North Vancouver — where students from the
Capilano College Peace Group
helped to raise the $3,400 needed to
finance the referendum.
PLO options low
By CARY RODIN
The decisive defeat of the
Palestine Liberation Organization
this summer has left them with just
two options for future action: a
return to terrorist activities, or a
course of accommodation, the
director of the Refugee Documentation project said Monday.
"There is a possibility that the
PLO will become moderate, but we
don't get that message from Begin
in terms of the West Bank and we
don't get it from the PLO in terms
of rhetoric and doctrine," Howard
Adelman told 35 people in
Buchanan 402.
The Arab Fez peace proposal is
not a viable solution because it fails
to recognize Israel's right to exist,
said Adelman. The Begin peace
plan is no more promising since it
does not grant the Palestinians
autonomy beyond the administerial
level, he added. Adelman said the
Reagan peace framework, which
essentially calls for the trading of
land for peace, is the most promising prospect for a PLO-lsraeli settlement.
Canada has a role to play in the
peaceful resolution of this conflict
by offering Palestinians Canadian
citizenship, Adelman said. In addition to its humanitarian value such
a move would relieve some of the
pressure on the PLO and may permit them to move in a more
moderate direction which would
permit recognition of Israel's right
to exist, Adelman said.
Citing Red Cross and Lebanese
figures released during his recent
trip to Lebanon, Adelman criticized
the media for publishing inflated
counts of homeless refugees and
civilian deaths.
Some   B.C.   municipalities  that
have rejected the referendum, such
as the West Vancouver district,
agree with the stand supported by
Bill Vander Zalm, former provincial minister of municipal affairs,
who feels municipalities do not
have the jurisdiction to hold a
referendum on disarmament issues.
Municipal councils also fear the
refrendum may invalidate the elections.
In Vancouver, several public
meetings on the referendum will be
held before the Nov. 20 election
date.
A public meeting will be held
Nov. 14 at Sir Charles Tupper high
school with three MP's representing
the three major federal parties.
Also speaking will be Southam
newspaper columnist Allan Fotheringham. A report will be compiled
after the meeting and sent to Ottawa.
The arms race committee is
holding a meeting Nov. 13 at their
headquarters in the Fairview Baptist Church at 1708 W. 16th Ave.,
to organize the distribution of information throughout the city on
the disarmament referendum.
located in the /tudent union bldg.
in the heart of the ubc compu/
r
CFS relative success
VICTORIA (CUP) — "There's a student movement in Canada?"
asked a bewildered student from the University of Victoria. "Well —
power to them."
He had just learned of the Canadian Federation of Students
because the organization is holding its second ever national conference at his campus. He momentarily pondered the concept of a
Canadian student movement, took a sip of beer, and soon turned the
discussion to the theory of relativity.
As he spoke, about 150 delegates from 40 Canadian post-
secondary institutions were debating the nature of CFS and how to
motivate more students to participate in the federation.
The conference began on an awkward note Monday, when the
opening plenary started an hour late and was forced to close before
delegates had gone through the agenda.
But on Wednesday afternoon, debate began to take shape during a
strategy session. Though nothing was resolved and there is a clear
disagreement on what issues CFS should target for protest, there was
concensus that CFS should concentrate on specific goals. The
delegates will decide what those goals will be at the final plenary
Saturday, and their decisions will affect student protest in Canada
for the coming year.
deane lAition
/ing/ folk
nov. IO-I3
Iter chabaaowich
at the piano
nov. 15,16
gross GGROJiman
ploy jaxx
nov. 17-ftO
HEARY VOUnG TRIO
play jazz
nov. 2Q-25
"flO COVER CHARGE
open monday thru /aturdag
noon to IfttfO p.m.
EXTRA GOOD
GOING DOWN.
Now you're talkin taste. THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 12, 1982
lc SALE!! 3 DAYS ONLY
BUY NOW
YAMAHA
• T •
99
MasterCard
mmmmmmmmmmmmm
r\ r)
O    O     •
Superior performance AM/FM receiver provides 60 watts total power, continuously variable loudness control, optical balance tuning.
PIOIMCCR
SX3700
TEAC
V30
An economical cassette that offers
remarkable sound reproduction, Dolby NR,
LED meters and switchable bias/EQ.
•199
99
Pioneer quality and classic stylilng. AM/FM receiver with 90
watts total power. Quartz servo-lock, digital/quartz tuning.
Fluroscan tuning display.
PIOIXIEQY
PL5
TEAC
V95RX
iKfff1*****     nnmr
Unique cassette deck features real time
reverse, positouch transport controls,
built-in DBX, Computomatic program
system and 3-motor transport. (Remote
control optional).
A no compromise performance turntable. Low mass polymer graphite
tonearm, coaxial suspension
system, and full automatic operation.
•179*
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99
/1LPINE
7120 & 6001
"CAR STEREO
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T610
KRACO]        [KRACO
CX269
KGE803
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Bi-level cassette deck features auto-
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glide and sendust head. 6x9 3-way
speakers with 30 watts handling
capability.
•399
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A CRAIG EQ252      ]
EQUALIZER/AMP    i
VALUED AT       /
L      $49.90 FOR        '
.    ONLY 1c    A
Cassette deck fits inost import cars. Locking fasty
forward/rewind, automatic frequency control and
local/DX control. 6x9 air suspension speakers
with built-in coaxially mounted tweeter.
High power AM/FM cassette deck
with 5 band graphic equalizer,
auto-reverse, high blend switch,
and equalizer by-pass switch.
$299-"
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MERAK, EPI, JBL, MARANTZ, ZENITH, MITSIBISHI, SANYO, BOSE, DBX, MANY MORE
Your Total Entertainment Centre
(Main Store)
556 Seymour St. 687-5837
(Car Store)
2696 E. Hastings St. 254-1601
(Victoria)
641 Yates St. 385-1461

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