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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Nov 22, 1988

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Array REPORT ON
BUSINESS
101 MAPLE SYRUP RECIPES
PETER BROWNS ROLL'S: ITS REAL
DISCOVER CANADA, THEY DID
TURKEY FARMING WITH BRIAN
TORONTO: OUR NEW YORK
GREAT SLAVE LAKE
JIMMY PATISON: oy^TRUIIg
'A
ALBERTA: ROIL OUT THE BARR
THIS ISSUE: HOW JfjPST AN AMERICAN
ERNATIVES TO EH
VOLUME 71, Number 21
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, November 22,1988 Classifieds
Rates: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, $3.00,
additional lines 60 cents, commercial -3 lines
$5.00, additional lines 75 cents. (10% Discount on 25 Issues or more) Classified ads
payable In advance. Deadline 4:00 p.m,. two
days before publlcalton. Room 266, SUB,
UBC, Van., B.C. V6T 2A7
05 - COMING EVENTS
GUITARIST BILL KANENGISER, Crossroads film musician and first prize winner
1987 Concert Artists Guild International
New York Competition, performs Fri. Nov.
25,8 pm, Cdn. Memorial United Church, W.
15 at Burrard. Tickets at the door, $8. Gen.,
$7 St., Info 687-5195
10 ■ FOR SALE - COMMERCIAL
GAMES AND COMICS, Avalonhill, SPI,
DGW Marvel and DC Comics, up to 25% off.
Prompt Delivery for X-Mas, write or phone
The Comic Broker PO Box 2630 New Westminster V3L 5L2, 526-6353
11 - FOR SALE - PRIVATE
LETTER QUALITY PRINTER - mint condition - hardly used, includes $150 tractor
feed. Asking $350 O.B.O. 682-0599.
BRAND NEW MOUNTAIN BIKE - never
used. BRC - Trekker - 18-8peed - includes
extras. Asking $375 O.B.O. 682-0599.
COMPL WORD PROCE SYSTEM incl.
daisy wh. printer & manuals. Ideal for students. Must sell. Will deliver and set up. Ask
for Dan 263-9050 $499.00
ONE WAY TICKET: Vane, to Toronto leaving Dec. 22, $200 or b.o. Call Brian 224-
9001, 224-9989.
EIGHT PLACE SETTINGS of Roger Bros.
Grand Silhouette Silverwear. New $722
asking $400 OBO extra pieces also. 732-
1778.
ENERGY BOOST! Delicious, nutritious,
easy-drink /or quick meal, weight/muscle
gain, weight loss. 3 flavours, in juice or milk.
Call Margo 583-2498.
DATSUN F10 1978,, Standard, New Tire,
Batteiy Asking $1200 OBO 224-6963.
AUTOMATIC RICE COOKER - Hitachi 1L.
size. Great gift! In box, never used $85,
asking $50 OBO. 876-7719.
30 - JOBS	
PACIFIC COAST TALENT exch. is now
hiring attractive, intelligent, socially polished females for corporate needs. Downtown location, flexible hours. This is a super
job with excellent pay for the right people.
Call now to arrange an intv. 685-6516.
HERBALIFE Independent distributor, call
me for products or opportunity. Margo 583-
2498.
NEEDED: P/T - Temp. Nannies. Ifyou have
child care exp, a drivers license, n/s, have
child care references, and want to earn $6/hr
or $100+/wknd, call QUALITY CARE 325-
7585.
35 - LOST	
LOST ON CAMPUS, Nov. 14 - HP41CV
calculator with card reader. Phone 738-
3632. Reward!!
40 - MESSAGES
MESSAGE OF ISLAM 5: Islam is an Arabic
word which means submission, surrender
and obedience. As a religion, Islam stands
for complete submission and obedience to
Allah.
VOTE V.C. Tired of campaign speeches,
empty promises, the three wise men. Vote
.for a sure thing. Become a volunteer. Contact Brock Hall No. 200 or call 228-3811.
80 - TUTORING
ESL TUTOR - 4 yrs exp., editing papers,
essays, produce social docum. on video
travel to Japan to do ESL-681-3405. Rm.
245.
85 - TYPING
50 - RENTALS
MUSIC MASTER D J. SERVICE
Highest quality digital sound
*For any occasion*
Well beat any price
732-9503
TYPEWRITER RENTALS $29 PER
MONTH Free Delivery and Pick up. All recent electric models. Very low rates. Call
anytime 682-1535.
60 - RIDES
WANTED: CHRISTMASBREjUCRIDETO
SOUTHWEST U.S. for me and the kid.
' Share driving and exp. Doug: 733-5356.
65 - SCANDALS
DESPARATE! To the person who stole my
knapsack from the bookstore on Nov 12.
Please return the books to the library and
my notes to the lost and found. My whole
term is at stake.
70 • SERVICES
G. TE HENNEPE
Barrister & Solicitor
#203 - 4545 W. 10th Ave., 228-1433.
GRAMMATICALLY PERFECT papers get
better marks. If your writing is less than
perfect, have your work edited. Call Katie
737-0575.	
ABC EDITING & PROOFREADING for
Accuracy, Brevity, Coherence in articles,
papers, dissertations, etc. 8 years' experience. Karl Bergmann, B.A. 261-0850.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST, 30 years exp.,
word proc. & IBM typewriter. Student rates.
Dorothy Martinson 228-8346.
YOUR WORDS professionally typed, fast &
reliable. Judith Filtness, 3206 W. 38th Ave.,
263-0351.
Typing, Editing, NO NOTICE REQUIRED, resumes. (Same day service).
Tapes transcribed. 224-2310 (Days), 327-
0425 (eves.).
WORD PROCESSING, $2.00/dbl. sp. page,
MLA, APA, CMS, editing. Comput-
erSmiths, 3724 West Broadway at Alma,
224-5242.
FAST! WORD PROCESSING. Accurate,
APA/MLA experienced laser printed. Day
rate $1.50/pg, overnight 10 p.m. to 8 a.m.;
2.50/pg. Bookings accepted. Vivian 682-
6945.
ACADEMIC WP/TYPING, Dunbar/Kerris-
dale, 263-4862. Fast professional service.
ACCURATE REPORTS word processing,
Word Perfect, laser printer, dictation, student rates avail. #16-1490 W. Broadway at
Granville 732-4426.
TYPING QUICK - right by UBC. All types,
$1.25 page, dbl. space. Call Rob 228-8989
anytime..
WORD WEAVERS - still on 41st bus line.
New location #101 - 2258 W. 41st Ave. at
Yew St Excellent student rates for quality,
custom word processing, aussi en francais.
Tel. 266-6814.
A & Y Manuscript Masters
Specialists in scientific texts, graphs, grammar correction and style polishing. 253-
0899. Free pickup and delivery on campus.
WORD PROCESSING - fast, efficient, will
pick upand deliver. $1.50/pg. Call 879-1755.
ADINA WORD PROCESSING for resumes,
essays, theses. Discounts for students, 10th
and Discovery. Phone 222-2122.
WORD PROCESSING - Scientific Papers,
Theses, all publications, English-French
Mac/Laserwriter 255-2737.
FAST, ACCURATE WORD PROCESSING.
So good: 5c rebate each typo. $1.50/pg. Rachel 228-3881 or 224-1595.
WORD PROCESSING SERVICES. Laser
printer, experienced typist Call mary Lou @
421-0818 (Burnaby).
■Hill FORERUNNERS
forerunners    UBC'sSpoits Shoe Headquarters
RUN ALL
Air Pegasus for Men and Women
The NIKE Air Pegasus is the fourth generation of
the world's best-selling running shoe. Lace up a
A    I    R pair, and you'll know why.
3504 West 4th Ave 732-4535
10% Discount on regular price items to students, staff and Faculty
NEED YOUR PAPER TYPED?
Fast, Accurate,
Inexpensive, Overnight Service
"Letter-Quality" Printing
FREE DELIVERY (8 pgs & up dbl. sp.)
Call Amber 688-4281
7:00 a.m. to 10 p.m.
WORD PROCESSING - Quality work at
reasonable rates. Downtown or Richmond
pick-up. Call Glenna 275-4326.
Between
♦Note; *Noon* * 12:30 p4».
TUESDAY
24 HOUR
word processing
KELVIN DOUGLAS INTERNATIONAL
688-6151
Economical Laser quality
UBC Film Society
Movi«:*WUldw» 7:00 pm, SUB
Auditorium,
Jewish Students'
Assodetjoij/Hlllel
Eda__.ti_tt__  Opportunities at
University of Judaism* <3o»swi-   FRIDAY
tataons 11 a.m. - 3 p.nru HUlei   	
BqUs*.
UBC Film Society
Movie: "Colors' 9:30 pm, SUB
Tb*atr*
Jewish Students* Afisociataan/
Hillel
Hat Lunch. Noon. Hillel House.
WEDNESDAY	
Jewish Students' Association/
Hillel
Discussion - Torah Portion ofthe
Week. 12:30 pm, HiHel House.
Varsity Outdoor Club.
Talkon: Backcountry Ski J_qnip-
ment (everybody  welcome).
12-30 (noon): Chem 150.
THURSDAY	
UBC Pacific Rim Club. Lecture -
"Ten Years of Open Policy and
Economic Reform in China".
Noon. Asian Centre.
Pre-Dental Club
Dr. Braverman - Lectures on
Oral Surgery. Noon. Woodward
IRC Room S.
Chinese Christian Fellowship
Come to the Talentless Show .♦,
and watch ua make a fool of ourselves!   Favourite event of the
year! Noon, Scarfe 201.
Inter Varsity
Christian Fellowship
Guest speaker:   Rita Houston.
Please bring a Bible.    Noon.
Family andNutritional Sciences
Rm30,
Newman Club (Catholic University Students Assoc.)
Guest speaker: L- Johnson on
Liberation Theology. 12:30, St.
Mark's College.
Jewish  Students' Association/
Hillel
Israeli Dancing. 7:00 pm, SUB
207/20$.
UBC Astronomy and Aerospace
Club
BzzrGarden, 16:30-19:00,SUB
SOS-
UBC Film Society
Movie; "Willow" 7:00 pm, SUB
Auditorium.
School of Community and Regional Planning
Address. Stephen Lewis, former Canadian Ambassador to
the UN, talks about Sustainable Development. Admission:
$5, $3 Students. 7:30 pm.
Woodward IRCLecture Hall #2.
First Year Students Committee
Aussie-Rules Foreplay Dance -
noholdsbarredfuni Tix:=$4.00,
7:30 p.m. - midnight, Partyroom
in SUB.
SUBUD
Dance: Salsa Tres Benefit.
Tickets $5/Student, *$8/non-
students. 3:30 pm - 12:30 pm,
Capri Hall 3925 Fraser St,
UBC Film Society
Movie: "Colors" 9:30 pm, SUB
Theatre.
SATURDAY	
UBC Film Society
Movie: "Willow" 7:00 pm, SUB
Auditorium.
UBC Film Society
Movie: "Colors* 9:30 pm, SUB
Theatre.
SUNDAY	
UBC Film Society
Movie: "Willow" 7:00 pm, SUB
Auditorium.
UBC Film Society
Movie: "Colors* 9:30 pm, SUB
Theatre.
URGENT
IHOT   „ _ ..... mm.
I FLASHES student requires a tutor to provide academic assistance with computer programming design and mathematical structures. Applicants must
be full-time UBC students, Canadian citizens or landed immigrants - $7.75 per hour, 10 hours per week maximum.
If interested, please contact:
Diane Currie, Coordinator Students Helping Students
Room 200, Brock Hall, phone 228-4840.
The great egg drop will be
happening outside SUB Wednesday noon. The media has been
called out to watch teams of
greeks and non-greeks compete to
pillow an egg. Teams must wrap
an egg in 15 pages ofthe vilest rag
west of Blanca, and hope it doesn't
smash. Teams can register the
day of the event, or they can call
the Alpha Delt House.
This is club and constituency
space. It is yours to use. We want
to know what you're up to. Use this
space...or else it will be filled with
babble like this. Come up and see
us in SUB 241K and arrange a
liason with the media. Even ifyou
are not from a club...come and
write for us...do production with
us...take pictures...eat, sleep,
merry make with us.
2/THE UBYSSEY
November 22,1988 NEWS
Employment grows for UBC grads
Faculties report increases
By Sheila Hansen
Job opportunities for UBC
grads look good and are improving
according to recent surveys and
future outlooks for the different
faculties.
"In the next couple of years,
most ofthe students in our faculty
will find jobs after graduation,"
said Antal Kozak, associate dean
of forestry.
"The student population
started to decrease due to the recession in the early 1980's. Today
there is less competition for our
graduates. In '87 the employment
rate for forestry grads was 77 percent and this is on the increase," he
said.
Kozak's statement applies to
other faculties as well.
Kenneth Pinder, head of the
chemical engineering department
in applied sciences, reports a 100
percent employment rate for the
52 graduates of'88.
"This upcoming year looks
good," he said. "All across Canada
the numbers in classes have gone
down."
The grads of geological engineering have maintained a 100
percent employment rate for the
last few years. "I think it will
continue for a few years to come,"
said Colin Godwin, director ofthe
board of study for the department.
"Engineers are increasing in
demand. There is a strongfocus on
precious metals in the mining
industry and also more effort towards environmental improvement," said Godwin.
Some graduates don't have to
go far to find work. MacMillan
Bloedel of Vancouver will be seeking two electrical, one mechanical,
and one chemical engineer next
year for permanent positions.
They will also hire about a dozen
forestry students for the summer.
Commerce students may look
forward to higher future employment rates too. At the time of
graduation this year, 61 percent of
the B.Com. grads reported they
had found jobs in their field while
12 percent weren't looking.
For M.B A. grads, 67 percent
were employed and 11 percent
were not seeking work. These
rates would have increased as
more students found work after
graduation.
"Looking at the past three
years, the employment rate gets
better with each year," said Grace
Wong, the commerce placement
director. "This upcoming year will
be strong for recruitment."
Students going into education
should consider specializing in
French immersion or French as a
second language as well as math
and science education. According
to Murray Elliott, the associate
dean of teacher education, teachers in these areas are currently in
short supply.
"By about 1995 there will be
more school kids then ever before
in Canada and the U.S. Those
students entering education this
year will be in demand by the time
they graduate," said Elliott. The
offspring of the Baby Boom generation will probably create a
teacher shortage in several years.
Graduates from the faculty of
medicine face the issue of where to
set up practice as opposed to who
will hire them.
"UBC doctors stay in B.C.,"
said Willian Webber, dean of the
faculty. "There are positions available outside the Lower Mainland.
For example, smaller centers are
looking more for specialists and
less for family doctors."
Webber added that 20 percent
of the doctors in the province are
from UBC. The rest are from other
universities and countries, making it "relatively competitive".
According to the division of
health services, research and development on campus, areas of
high demand include physiotherapy, dental hygiene, and dental
assistance.
Students from the faculty of
pharmaceutical sciences may be
sure of getting a job upon graduation.
"There is a demand for pharmacists now which has been in
existence for several years," said
James Orr, assistant dean of undergraduate programs.
"Some students don't want to
leave Vancouver and may only be
working part time. Outside the
Lower Mainland they could find
full time jobs," he said.
Gordon Sauder, director of
employment relations for the B.C.
Pharmacists Society feels that
"the secret is mobility. Go where
the jobs are. There are ongoing
vacancies in places such as Fernie,
Salmon jArm, and Whitehorse."
And there are still more jobs
to come in pharmacy. Large food
stores are now setting up pharmacies, such as Save-On Foods.
"These will probably require two
full-time and two part-time pharmacists each, due to the long hours
these stores keep."
"More job vacancies are also
being created as more pharmacists approach retirement. After
World War Two the classes were
very large and now these people
are considering retirement," said
Sauder.
Based on their most recent
survey, the faculty of agricultural
sciences has a fairly steady employment rate of 77 percent for the
last few years. Twelve percent
went on to further education and
11 percent were unemployed.
Faculty of arts graduates
have the advantage of diversity.
"With a liberal arts degree, a
graduate is flexible to go into a
variety of areas," said James
Caswell, head of the fine arts department. "The computer science
student has a particular skill and
seeks work in a specific area." The
arts student has more freedom in
this respect, he said.
Caswell added that most
M.F.A.'s find jobs or continue to
get their Ph.D., at which level "it is
very certain that they will get a
job."
This trend is echoed by other
Arts departments. Politcal science
M.A.'s have an 80 percent employment rate and the remaining enter
other professions or get their
Ph.D.'s where a 95 percent hiring
rate follows. The rate is similar for
psychology grads.
Brian Turrell, head of the
physics department, commented
on the future of faculty of science
grads.
"Today there is a big push, at
the provincial and federal level,
towards technology. There is an
increasing demand for science
grads and the future looks good,"
said Turrell.
All physics Ph.D. grads successfully located jobs last spring
and the rate was 90 percent for
those with their master's. Other
science departments experienced
simlar success.
Dentistry graduates may not
be as successful with their, job
endeavors.
Dr. Laurient fo the College of
Dental Surgeons of B.C. said there
is now an oversupply of dentists.
"Young graduates will have a difficult time in establishing practices
in the Lower Mainland, Okanagan, or other congested areas,"
he said.
"Today dentists do very good
work which has brought the decay
rate down. This, along with the
fact that the population isn't expanding rapidly has created the
oversupply," said Laurient.
Laurient concluded that to
counter this problem UBC will be
encouraged to cut down on faculty
numbers, from about forty to
thirty-two students. Another step
would be to emphasize mobility to
smaller areas, such as Quesnel or
Prince Rupert, where there is
more opportunity.
Youth seek jobs
through university,
study shows
By Deanne Fisher with CUP files
Canada's youth are disappointed with their job opportunities because they don't match their
educational experience, a recent
survey says.
The Canadian Youth Federation polled 2100 people of age 15 to
24 across the country and found
that more than half of Canada's
youth want a university degree
and 90 percent of students think
their career will relate directly to
their education.
But campus employment
counsellors say many students are
entering university with misguided intentions.
"It requires a good education
to get a job, but just because you
have an education doesn't mean
you'll have a good job," said Kenneth Kush, director of UBC's student counselling.
Kush said many students are
Students hit the polls in SUB polling station yesterday.
November 22,1988
HEATHER JENKINS PHOTO
"career illiterate" and need to
"plan a career and not just look at
a degree as the end of it."
"A degree in today's economy
is a stepping stone," said Kush.
The survey showed only 44
percent of university graduates
find their education relates to
their career.
Gordon Fox, manager of
UBC's Canada Employment
Centre said Arts and Science students experience the most disappointment.
"We find the problem with
people in Arts is they haven't
thought in the last year what
they're going to do with it," said
Fox.
"You have to think about what
you want to do with (a university
degree) rather than just going for
the sake of going," he said, adding
that students who go on to graduate work "just for the sake of taking it" often end up overqualified.
"With Science, you're looking
at lab type work, and there's not a
lot in B.C.," said Fox.
But Fox said job placement for
Arts graduates is not too bad, listing banks, life insurance companies, the government, and retail
trade as some ofthe more frequent
employers of Arts grads.
"They're getting work," said
Fox. "But we're not doing as much
with them as we'd like to."
Both Fox and Kush said a
university degree should not be
considered job training but that it
is still valuable. "Often what one
gains through an Arts degree is to
be an articulate person," said
Kush. "The mistake we make is
that we equate university education with community college. A
university education is designed
to educate you."
Kush stressed the difference
between straight employment, a
vocation and a career. A vocation
is something "you are called to", he
said, "but a career is a path."
The counselling centre in
Brock Hall provides career counselling in individual sessions to
about 6000 students, said Kush.
An additional 3000 are helped in
workshops.
But Kush said not enough
students take advantage of career
counselling services and equate it
with high school guidance counselling. "It's a lack of understanding," he said.
THE UBYSSEY/3 GOURMET BURGER
(SmI or Totu)
OR ENTREE
The good deal is, your least expensive meal is FREE when two or more of the
above items are ordered. Not valid with any other coupons. Dining in only,
please. Valid only when this ad is presented prior to placement of order.
3431 WEST BROADWAY 738-5298
'^wsjc-j^w-m,. W'
w^ \\MfrH.. '■r-x-^xfy-;-.
NEWS
NOTICE OF ELECTION
Student Representatives to serve on the Board of Governors and the
Senate.
This notice is a call for nominations for full-time students to run for
election for the following positions :
BOARD OF GOVERNORS  TWO students
SENATE - SEVENTEEN students (five at-large and one from each
faculty)
Nomination formsgivingfull details ofthe requirements of nominations
are available in the Registrar's Office, the A.M.S. Office (Room 266
S.U.B.) and in the offices ofthe Student Undergraduate Societies and
the Graduate Student Association.
Nominations must be in the hands of the Registrar no later than 4:00
p.m. on Friday, December 2,1988.
Great Cuts.
Great Quality.
Great Prices.
Guaranteed!
Toppy's
Gteat(g)Cuts
4th Avenue 734-4541 • Broadway 222-3331
CHRISTMAS
CRAFT
FAIR
November 21st
to
December 2nd
_*&'S3_'
SUB Main Concourse
Lets face it...
You need
a break.
UBC
Student Union Bldg
Main & Lower
Concourse
Jldg    Gffi^^W
mMk
PRESENTATION
COUNTS!
Native students unite
OTTAWA(CUP)—Desperate for more input into the
fate of their education, native students have formed
a national lobby group to protest additional government cutbacks in their funding.
At the same time, more than 200 students at the
Canadian Federation of Students conference in
Ottawa in early November—where the Native Student Federation of Canada was formed—called for
the resignation of Bill McKnight, minister of Indian
and.Northern Development.
"He's out of control and the amount of consultation he has done has been zero," said CFS chair Beth
Brown.
In June, McKnight announced a federal consultation process aimed at changing the financial aid
program for native students. Since that time, the
"consultative process" has come under fire from
almost every
native group
in the country.
CFS in-
digenous
c o m m i s -
sioner Phillip Stewart said the national group was
created to organize a nation-wide response to the
government's closed door policy.
"Considering that the first draft of their analysis is a secret document, it's ridiculous," said Stewart.
"The consultation was feeding us information
and taking nothing back," agreed Oscar Swanson,
president of the Native Indian Student Union at
UBC.
Besides cutting funding to eligible native students from $7,432 to $4,800 a year, the new proposal
would chop the number of months for which native
students can get funding by half.
Funding for daycare, special lab clothing and
tutorials will be eliminated. And a native's choice of
schools will be limited since the government will
only pay for tuition costs at the post-secondary
institution closest to them and has substantially
reduced travel allowances.
Dalhousie faculty strike
reaches second week
HALIFAX (CUP)—The Dalhousie University senate convened on the university's tennis court November 14.
The senate's strange meeting venue, rallies, sit-
ins and letter campaigns marked the second week of
the 700-member faculty strike at the Atlantic's largest university.
Members were to pass a resolution that all
courses still being taught must be re-offered to students who refuse to cross picket lines. But the meeting was cancelled "in order that the integrity ofthe
senate be preserved," according to an official on the
university^ board of governors.
Ignoring the 'cancellation', faculty and student
representatives on senate gathered on the tennis
court after finding the door to the meeting room
locked. Although quorum was achieved and the
resolution was accepted, the administration announced it does not consider the motion legitimate
because of "insufficient notice".
A rally organized on November 15 by the association of physical, health, education and recreation
students drew almost 700.
Students surrounded the administration building and began shouting, "One, two, three, four, we
don't want a strike no more. Five, six, seven, eight,
sit down and negotiate."
Meanwhile, members of the negotiation were
meeting in a downtown hotel, brought together at the
request of provincial conciliator Gordon Keeler. The
long-awaited return to bargaining table came as a
result of a meeting between executives of the
Dalhousie student council and provincial minister of
labour Terry Donahoe.
Talks broke off after 15 hours, with the faculty
association rejecting the board's proposal for binding
arbitration. The two sides are haggling over wages.
Student strike dwindles
MONTREAL (CUP)—Striking Universite du Quebec
a Montreal students were back in class November 17,
but 2000 students across town at l'Universite de
Montreal say they won't give in.
The province's student coalition, l'Association
nationale des etudiantes et etudiants du Quebec
(ANEEQ)
called off a
general strike
November 13,
saying it was a
"strategic
pause". A
three-day strike in October at 32 colleges representing 100,000 students dwindled November 2 to an indefinite walk-out of 54,000 students and 20 colleges
and universities.
Arts, literature education and social science students at UQAM refused to extend the two-week strike
for loans and bursaries reform by three days at a general assembly.
But sociology, social work and theology students
at U de M are still on strike. Criminology students are
expected to vote to strike soon.
Anthropology students, who have been picketing
since November 2, suspended their strike for a week
while students drop courses and write mid-term
exams.
'Geers apologize for
AIDS spoof in paper
OTTAWA (CUP)—Outrage over an article in their
newspaper that ridicules AIDS victims has forced the
engineering student society at Carleton University to
apologize and pledge money to AIDS research.
The anonymous article—which parodies an information pamphlet distributed by the Carleton
health department—appeared in the 'Vena Contracts' and refers to AIDS patients as "degenerates of
society", calling the acquired immune deficiency syndrome "Anally Infected Death Sentence".
The engineers' pledge was made November 17—
two days after a coalition of 23 local, provincial and
national groups said it would file a complaint with the
Ontario Human Rights Commission against the society.
At a Carleton student council meeting the week
before, engineering society president John Duck and
newsletter editor Bob Bowerman agreed to council's
demand that they print an apology and retraction for
the article.
"I don't think the article is at all funny now," said
Duck. "If we had it to take back, we certainly would."
Volunteer for the coalition will start a petition at
Carleton to stop funding of the engineering society
and revoke its office space.
"I don't think all engineering students are Neanderthals," said Pierre Beauline, a Carleton student
who is involved in the protest against "this malicious
piece of hate literature."
"I know a lot of engineering students don't want
to fund this kind of trash through their students fees.
I'm sure most students don't want to pay for this kind
of hate-mongering."
Get a jump on the January rush - learn to write news at The Ubyssey now.
Only two weeks left to write for "the best journalism school in the country"
(Alan Fotheringham) in 1988. We don't bite (just snarl a bit) SUB 241K
We do beautiful work at...
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to Sunny
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X'mas Break
From DEC. 26/ 88 TO JAN. 2189
From  $359.00
Includes:
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GRE
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Preparation
Courses
at UBC
Next Courses:
GMAT & GRE -
JAN. 13,14,15
CALL: 222-8272
(Sexton
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i!_r  New Year's Eve
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t!_r   All Transportation
*&  and Bust Loose Activities
Contact STEVE WILSON   682-6044
4/THE UBYSSEY
November 22,1988 Arts challenges 'Geers
By Catherine Lu
The Engineers are expected to
accept a challenge from the Arts
Undergraduate Society today to
collect the most cans of food for the
Vancouver Food Bank.
Greg "Flea" Smith, Engineering Undergraduate Society vice-
president, expected the EUS to
formally accept the AUS proposal
and said, "we're not going to decline a challenge."
An AUS letter said the engineers "are good at being big blowhards and drinking beer, but we
(the AUS) want to see if they can
actually do something of consequence."
The collection begins today
and ends on the last day of classes.
The AUS wants to promote
awareness that "there are some
people who don't have a lot," according to the letter, which stipu
lates that if the engineers lose,
they must write 20 poems in praise
of arts students and the Arts faculty.
If the arts students are defeated, they must donate 40 beers
to the charity of the engineers'
choice, and the AUS president,
Mike Lee, will write a letter to the
engineers, The Ubyssey, and other
campus publications "conceding
the Engineers' superiority."
Sylvia Russell, executive director of the Vancouver Food
Bank, said the food will be greatly
needed due to the recent $50 cutback in welfare. For some people,
the reduction will mean the inabil -
ity to buy groceries, she said.
"We may see more people in
December than we have in some
time," said Russell.
Russell   estimated   2600   to
Student aid needs
student input
By Deanne Fisher
The province's ailing
student financial aid system
is in need of change according to UBC Arts student
Andrew Hicks, who is being
given the opportunity to
provide input to the ministry of advanced education.
Hicks is part of this
year's Provincial Government Standing Committee
on Student Financial Assistance and he is asking for
student input on problems
with the student aid system.
Tm just learning the
ropes. I want to talk to
people," he said, adding that
he has never applied for a
student loan himself.
Hicks said he knows of
problems with the appeals
process on student loans
that he would like to see
changed.
"Ifyou appeal, you don't
get any money until the
appeal has been dealt with.
That's a real problem," he
said. Some students do not
appeal for more money because they cannot afford to
wait for the money, he said.
Hicks said a 1987 study
showed B.C. ranked lowest
ofthe ten provinces in terms
of how much the provincial
government disbursed in
financial assistance.
B.C. students got $198 in
provincial financial assistance per full-time equivalent student in 1986-87. Students in Saskatchewan got
$1674, Quebec $1368, Newfoundland $1367 and Ontario $448 in comparison.
Hicks said he thinks B.C.
is now ranked eighth of the
ten provinces due to some
improvements.
Hicks also said scholarships and bursaries do not
rise with inflation and he
would like to see that
change. "I think it would be
good if it were tied to inflation," he said.
He would like to see students involved in the appeals process and is unhappy with the tax put on
student loans.
Hicks was recommended for the committee
by Alma Mater Society president Tim Bird, who in turn
recommended him to president David Strangway and
Stan Hagen, Minister of advanced education and job
training.
The first meeting of the
committee is scheduled for
Thursday and students who
want to speak to Hicks can
reach him through the AMS
or the Arts Undergraduate
Society.
3000 people line up at the food
bank every week. With each family having an average of 2.5 members, this means that about
65,000-75,000 people obtain their
food from the food bank.
"The supplies are low again,"
Russell said adding that public
donations decreased after
Thanksgiving.
Russell said she hoped the
donations to be as substantial as
possible because the pre-Christ-
mas distribution will have to last
the recipients for two weeks. Also,
she noted the importance of early
contributions to ensure that the
food will reach families in time for
Christmas.
"We distribute on the 21st of
December...and we don't distribute again until January," she said.
UBC's Alma Mater Society
established its own Food and
Development Centre Board in
1986 to provide students with
"emergency food supplies", "counselling" and "basic economic and
nutritional education," according
to student council documents.
In March of this year, Jan
Redekop was selected to be the
centre's co-ordinator. But the
committee has been completely
inactive.
AMS vice-president Carolyn
Egan said Redekop "showed significant interest, but nothing's
been done with it."
Redekop, a second-year Agriculture student, conceded that
nothing has been done on the
committee.
Arts students can donate
canned and other non-perishable
goods in bins in the Buchanan
Block A foyer, Buchanan lounge,
the Geography building, and the
History lounge on the 12th floor of
Buchanan Tower. AUS treasurer
Andrew Hicks also hinted that
Santa Claus may make an appearance during the drive.
The pen is
the tongue
of the mind*
- Cervantes,
Don Quixote
Come lick
with us.
Meet moist lips
in SUB 241k
BOOK LOVER'S SALE
Gift giving made easy
Sale continues to November 26 -
The sale for those with an eye for a rare bargain
Publishers' remainders, "hurts ", UBC Library book & record discards
and much more.
6200 University Boulevard, Vancouver • Telephone 228-4741
Hours: Monday. Tuesday, Thursday, Friday 8:30am-5KX)pm
Wednesday S:30amS-30pm I Saturday 9:30am-5Mpm
UBC!
Whistler Lodge
Christmas Break Ticket Sale-i
(Dec 1,'88 —Jan 3,'89)
Wednesday, November 23, '88
SUB Room 212 8:00am - 1:00pm
• Total of 10 tickets allowed, any combination
ie. 10 people, 1 night or 2 people 5 nights, etc.
• Proper ID required for each ticket holder
• CASH ONLY
For more information call 228-5851
— For other dates, tickets on sale at the AMS Box Office —
November 22,1988
THE UBYSSEY/5 SWISS EMBROIDERY & CHENILLE
——— ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■»■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■»■
HIWS
MMMMMMMHMWMMMMMM
(1 week Oelivery on stocK items)
Kenny
OYE SPORTSWEAR & DESIGN
• SPORTS JACKETS   $25.00 ea
• NYLON SHELLS      $19.50 ea
' POLO SHIRTS      $17.00 ea
• BASEBALL CAPS       $6.50 ea
PRICE INCLUDES: Direct Swiss Embroidery onto
garments   or   accessories,   with    faculty/staff   or
department/club names   .   layout _ set up       name
bars & chenille crests by quotation
(Based °ri *S pieces)
WE DO CUSTOM
FACULTY KNITTED SWEATERS
Call: (Ask for Kenneth) 876-0828
- Mon-Thiirs  10 am to 5 pm -
Hong Kong
Chinese Foods
5732 University Blvd.
Lunch Specials (combination)
 $3.45	
MSG FREE
Licensed • Self Service
224-1313
Royal Canadian       Gendarmerie royale
Mounted Police       du Canada
HIT RUN
Everyone's responsibility!
►   Observe:
►
If you see an accident
Record:
Date, Time, Licence Number
and Description
►
to your local Police
224-1322
□ ICBC
*&
Working
Canada
MUSSOC resurrected
By Robert Groberman
The Musical Society of UBC
died a quiet death last year when
no volunteers came forward to
replace the club's departing executive.
And if not for UBC math professor Nathan Divinsky calling an
organizational meeting last week,
UBC's oldest club might have
ended its run after 73 years.
Now, according to newly
elected producer Sara Levine,
MUSSOC is "a new club with new
ideas and new blood."
Known best for its annual
production of a Broadway musical,
MUSSOC has become synonymous with Oklahoma or Fiddler
on the Roof. Following last year's
production of Merrily We Roll
Along, MUSSOC found itself in an
organizational and financial
mess.
The club's debt had become
unmanageable, sending MUSSOC into financial paralysis. It is
only with the Alma Mater
Society's decision to put aside the
club's debt indefinately that
MUSSOC can continue.
MUSSOC    vice-president
John Stefaniuk cites increasing
royalty fees, lack of box office revenue and poor management for the
debt.
Levine and Stefaniuk want to
extend their club's activities beyond a single, annual production,
and their membership beyond a
single cast. They will offer musical
workshops and sing-throughs of
show scores, both designed to include more people in the club and
to improve members' performing
abilities.
They do not want to cater
exclusively to music and theatre
students, but to students from all
departments who would like to
perform.
"We want all those people who
did high school musicals, and now
they're in Math," Levine said.
With the help of a loyal
alumni and an enthusiastic new
membership, MUSSOC will produce a revue show this year, tracing the club's lengthy history at
the university.
It would appear that
MUSSOC's near-death experience
has motivated the club to assess
itself and make some much needed
changes.
MUSSOC '71 - Sweet Charity - the year they didn't do Fiddler or
Oklahoma!
Win
One of Two
T-shirts
(the type available only
at Famous Players Theatres)
• tell us in 250 words or less, why YOU deserve
a black t-shirt with Bono and the Edge on it.
• bring entries to SUB 241K before Friday at 4 pm
6/THE UBYSSEY
November 22,1988 Ken Scott hauls down rebound
STEVE CHAN PHOTO
Vikings storm Mainland
by Joe Altwasser
UBC's female basketbirds
lost a double header to cross strait
rivals University of Victoria
Vikettes on the weekend with poor
shooting costing the 'Birds the two
games.
The opening game Friday
night witnessed Victoria edge
UBC 62-59 in an exciting match.
But the 'Birds shot only 33
percent from the field and 62 percent from the line—figures that
won't win most high school tournaments. Certainly, they wouldn't
knock off one ofthe hottest teams
in the country.
UBC coach Bev Smith was
content with the defensive play,
but said the team "must shore up
the offensive part ofthe game."
Raj Johal led the T-Birds' attack with a spectacular 28 points
and was helped out by Tessa
Valg's 12. Joanne Nutini led UVic
with 16 points but four other
Vikettes also scored in the double
digits showing the great depth of
the squad.
The second game saw the
'Birds play better ball, especially
in the first half which ended in a
tie. The final score ended 66-51 but
Smith claims the game was much
closer than the score indicated.
Again, shooting was the key to
the 'Birds demise, managing only
a paltry 37 percent. The problem,
said Smith, was that the 'Birds
could not adjust to the zone defense the Vikettes threw up in the
second half.
Also Smith says the 'Birds
"made poor shot selection and
were often hesitant," because of
the larger, intimidating size ofthe
Vikettes.
In an unrelated note Smith is
not happy with the time the
women's matches begin. The
women's game usually starts at
5:45 p.m. which Smith feels is very
inconvenient. "Most people are
just getting home from work or
school at this time and you have to
rush to get to the first half," she
said.
The result, Smith said, is that
it is tough to get people out to our
games. Smith also noted that UBC
is the only university in the West
thatoperates with this time schedule.
The UBC women travel to
Calgary next week to play the
Dinos on Friday and Saturday.
Game time is 6:30 p.m.
The UBC T-Birds were a both
a disappointment and disappointed in weekend action against
their B.C. rivals the UVic Vikings.
The 'Birds dropped a pair against
the Vikings losing 78-61 on Friday
and 84-83 on Saturday in a
thriller.
On Friday the 'Birds shot a
miserable 32 per cent from the
fieldcommittingmany turn-overs.
The 'Birds were no match for the
Vikings led by the brother tandem
of Spencer and Geoff McKay. Geoff
led the Vikings with 18 points.
UBC was led by Perrie Scarlet who
finished the game with 17 points
and received the praise of coach
Bruce Enns.
The match on Saturday might
have been played in another galaxy with the Birds losing at the
wire 84-83 in a contest that could
have gone either way. Victoria was
again led by the McKays who accounted for half of the Viking
points. UBC was led by Mike
Clarke with 22 points.
The game was a tight one
throughout and the result was a,
"major disappointment," to Enns.
Either side could have won, but
unfortunately, "everything hinges
on a small decision," said Enns.
Enns was referring to the last
minute excitement in which UVic
was awarded possession on a play
in which he felt could have resulted in UBC free-throw. U-Vic
scored the winning basket on the
play.
Enns, summarizing the play
of the 'Birds said, "The two key
stats to beating Victoria are rebounds and turn-overs." Enns said
the 'Birds did well on the boards,
but "turned over the ball too
much."
Enns was also not particularly pleased with the shooting of
the 'Birds but he feels that it will
improve as the season progresses.
The 'Birds were also not without controversy this weekend.
UBC lost what may be their most
talented player, Aaron Point, who
left the team for personal reasons
on Friday according to coach Enns.
Enns was disappointed with the
loss of his self-described most talented player but noted that it is
difficult for an athlete to stay on a
team if he "cannot make the commitment." Point could not be
reached for comment.
The 'Birds also journey to
Calgary to play the Dino's who are
the top ranked team in the country.
Hillel, PZC (Progressive Zionist Caucus)
and Israel Program Centre
Present:
The Israeli
Election Results:
5$$%&&&w%&s'
HOPES AND FEARS
WSr^^dmmmmmmmT^^^^^y-.
3_B L^^^^^^HMMBlaar*
with                                                  *
nlzm
NACHMAN SHAI,                 ,,
DIRECTOR GENERAL
AND CHIEF EDITOR OF
THE ISRAELI DEFENCE
FORCE RADIO STATION
'Lr^  r
Thursday, November 24th., 12:30 ■
2:30 pm at Hillel House
For further information please call 224-4748 or 266-5333
Hillel is located across from SUB. behind Brock Hall
VIDEO TAPES
REQUIRED
IMMEDIATELY !!
We are looking for completed educational video tapes for students 6
to 21. Art to zoology and any material from which students can
learn. Canadian content in History, Geography, and Law preferred.
MAKE YOUR FILMS WORK FOR YOU AND FOR OTHERS.
CONTACT MR. WILLIAMS AT 416-924-3923,
OR FORWARD A COPY OF YOUR TAPE TO:
EDUCATIONAL VIDEO DISTRIBUTORS
13 CHARLES STREET WEST
TORONTO, ONTARIO, M4Y 1R4
GENTLEMEN like Leonard Grogan and son
William make Jack Daniel's Tennessee Whiskey.
They also make good country music.
And while they know their music
is much appreciated around Lynchburg,
they're equally proud to know that
the Jack Daniel's Tennessee Whiskey
they help make is much appreciated
in Canada. You see, as Mr. Grogan
tells it, there are lots of boys
who make good country music.
But only a few who have the
knack of making Jack Daniel's
Tennessee Whiskey.
JACK DANIEL'S TENNESSEE WHISKEY
If you'd like a booklet about Jack Daniel's Whiskey, write us here in Lynchburg, Tennessee, 37352. U.S.A.
November 22,1988
THE UBYSSEY/7 The University of British Columbia
ENGLISH   COMPOSITION   TEST
TUESDAY, DECEMBER   6,1988
From 3:30 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.
1. Ifyou are at present enrolled in English 100, you must take this sitting of the ECT. You can write the
Test without having to buy a "sticker" for the Test booklet. But you must present a photo ID (a piece of
identification with a current photograph) when you arrive at the Test room (see below).
2. If you are at present enrolled at UBC and have received credit for English 100 or its equivalent, you
are eligible to take this siting of the Test. But you must have a $10 "fee-paid sticker" which you must buy
from the Department of Finance, 3rd Floor, Administration Building. To buy the sticker, you must
present a Library/AMS card or similar ID.
3. You will be admitted to the examination room beginning at 3:00pm.: please be ready to show your
Library / AMScard (or si milarlD). You must write the Test in the room towhich you have been assigned.
(See the list below.)
4. An information meeting about the ECT will be held on Thursday, November 24, at 1_30 p.m. in
Hebb Theatre.
Students are permitted to use a dictionary
Room Assignments
Report to the room according to your surname
AAA-BAO BUCHANAN A106
BAP-BIR BUCHANAN A100
BIS-BRA BUCHANAN Al 02
BRB<AM BUCHANAN Al 04
CAN-CHI MATH 100
CHJ-CHU CHEMISTRY 300
CHV-COO BUCHANAN A2Q2
COP-CUR BUCHANAN A203
CUS-DEM BUCHANAN A204
DEN-DOL BUCHANAN A205
DOM-DWZ BUCHANAN D238
DXA-EVA BUCHANAN D239
EVB-FOM BUCHANAN D339
PON-FUH LASSERRE 102
FUI-GIB MATHEMATICS ANNEX 1100
CIC-HAL GEOGRAPHY 100
HAM-HAW GEOGRAPHY 200
HAX-HOW COMPUTER SCIENCE 200
HOX-JES COMPUTER SCIENCE 201
JET-KAH COMPUTER SCIENCE 360
KAI-KUB
KUC-UT
UU-Mj\M
MAN-MCE
MCF-MEZ
MFA-MUN
MUO-OVB
OVC-PET
PEU-QUA
QUB-ROL
ROM-SHE
SHF-SME
SMF-STE
STF-TAL
TAM-TIM
TIN-TZZ
UAA-WAL
WAN-YEZ
YFA-ZZZ
ANGUS 104
WOODWARD (IRC) 2
ANGUS 110
CHEMISTRY 150
CHEMISTRY 200
CHEMISTRY 250
HENNINGS 200
HENNINGS 201
HENNINGS 202
BIOLOGY 2000
WESBROOK 100
WESBROOK 201
WOODWARD (KC) 1
WOODWARD (IRC) 3
MCMILLAN 166
WOODWARD (KC) 4
McLEOD228
HEBB THEATRE
WOODWARD (KC) 5
On
Success:
A
Series
From
Black &
McDonald
"The key
to success
is not
information.
It's people."
-Lee Iacocca
Black & McDonald Limited
Canada's largest independent electrical & mechanical
contracting organization
St. John's • Goose Bay • Halifax • Montreal • Ottawa • Toronto • Hamilton
London • Kitchener • Winnipeg • Edmonton • Calgary • Vancouver
CAYS AND LESBIANS
Cf UCC
AND
CALA SfL
PRESENT THE
S HAKE |T UP
SATURDAY, NOV 26T11. 8:€C P./H.
UBC SUB PARTYRCOi
TICKETS S3:CC.
AVAILABLE AT SUB 237E,
LITTLE SISTERS,
CR ERC/H CAIA SEU
Pentland Unipeds soccer team In practice.
Soccer with a difference
By Sean Kelly
Soccer coach Tom Chan's
shrill whistle is silent for the
moment as he shouts out his instructions for the next drill.
Then the action starts again
as the panting players knock the
ball around looking for a shot on
goal. The concentration and effort
is intense but the chatter and
laughing never stop.
Finally the ball is blasted into
the netting and the conquering
scorer raises his crutch and pretends he is firing a machine gun at
the sprawling goalkeeper.
These players are amputees
but their game is no less challenging than conventional soccer.
In fact, it is even more physically demanding in many ways
because the upper body and hands
must support the weight of the
body when running and when the
foot is kicking. Many who tried out
for the team found it too strenuous.
The loss of a limb is tragic but
"life isn't over," according to manager Allan Hart. "Playing soccer is
good rehabilitation. It gives the
guys  more   confidence   and  in
creases awareness of what we can
do."
The Pentland Unipeds, as
they are unofficially named, or the
Vancouver Amputee Soccer
League, was founded in 1986 by
Hart who lost his leg in a logging
accident 10 years ago.
He was turned on to the concept by a Seattle man, Bill Berry,
whose full-time job is promoting
amputee soccer around the world.
The idea was born in Seattle
five years ago when amputee Ron
Bennet was walking to his car as
his kids were playing basketball.
The ball rolled towards him and
because he was holding crutches
he couldn't pick it up. So he kicked
it.
There are two teams from
Washington State but right now
the Unipeds are the only team in
B.C. A team from Vancouver Island is in the works and a Lower
Mainland League could follow.
But for now the Unipeds have
enough players for one outdoor
team and two indoor teams. They
play Seattle about once a month
and Hart is quick to point out that
they haven't lost to them in about
the last 10 games.
They also compete every year
against teams from Calgary, California, England and El Salvador
in the International Challenge
Cup in Seattle. Next year teams
from the U.S.S.R. and Israel might
participate.
Hart laughs as he remembers
a game in the tournament against
Los Angeles. The Unipeds goalie,
Keith, lost an arm and a leg below
the knee in a motorcycle accident.
When he plays in goal, he wears a
prosthesis under his sweatpants
so it's hard to tell he's missing a
leg.
"This big guy kicked the ball
and Keith stuck out his artificial
foot. He stopped the ball but the
ball broke his foot right off and it
stayed inside of his sock. He was
lying on the floor with his foot at a
funny angle. This guy didn't know
that Keith had an artificial leg. He
said, 'I kicked that ball hard but I
didn't think I could do that! Did I
do that?'"
Donations can be made to the
Vancouver Amputee Soccer
League and the team is also looking for a trainer. If you can give
some time to the Unipeds contact
Allan Hart at 596-0789.
. :-n.>:>-:-n:w^nw>m
M_
ii__
SPOIT BRIEFS
yottimu.
The Volleybirds split their matches this weekend in Victoria. The men swept the Vikings in both
their matches on Friday and Saturday. UBC won
three games to one in both matches.
The women did not fare as well and were swept
three love in both matches.
The men's victory moved the *Birds into a tie for
first place with Calgary. Both teams are undefeated
at 4-0. The women are tied for third with Saskatchewan at 2-2.
VOLLEYBALL, Men
Mate
hes
Games
Points
W
L
W
L
F
A
P
Calgary
4
0
12
1
196
122
4
British Columbia
4
0
12
3
213
150
4
Victoria
0
2
2
6
95
114
0
Saskatchewan
0
2
1
6
70
106
0
Alberta
0
4
1
12
107
189
0
Womens Standings
Victoria
4
0
12
0
180
62
4
Calgary
4
0
12
0
180
67
4
Saskatchewan
2
2
6
6
118
126
2
British Columbia
2
2
6
8
165
154
2
Alberta
0
4
2
12
103
203
0
Lethbridge
0
4
0
12
46
180
0
X IS■¥ *M ■ V *WH«Ki *»»« ■<■■<*!
By Laurie McGuiness
The UBC hockey "Birds pronged the University
of Lethbridge over the weekend, winning 4-3 Saturday and 5-2 Sunday in the Pronghorns' home rink.
The wins put UBC in third place in Canada
West, one point behind second place University of
Alberta and one point ahead of the Universities of
Saskatchewan and Manitoba.
Saturday the "Birds came from behind overcoming a 3-2 third period deficit to record the victory.
The Pronghorns had strong goaltending as UBC
outshot them by a two—one margin.
Sundays game showcased the UBC power play
as they were 4/11 with the man advantage.
The only sour note was a third period injury to
defenseman Henry Czenczek who left the ice with an
undetermined shoulder injury. Coach Terry
O'Malley hopes it won't keep him out of next week's
action.
Without question this year's edition of the T-
Birds is the strongest in recent memory. The last time
UBC earned a play-off berth was in 1975 when most
of this year's T-Birds were in elementary school.
Strong goal-tending from Carl Repp, disciplined
play and a good power play anchored by Keith Abbott
have elevated UBC to their heady position in the
standings.
The only missing ingredient is fan support. T-
Bird arena needs to be a more unpleasant place for
visiting teams to play. Try leaving the comfort ofthe
bar.
The T-Birds journey to Saskatchewan to play the
Huskies in Saskatoon. Home T-Bird games are
broadcast live on CITR.
8/THE UBYSSEY
November 22,1988 ENTERTAINMENT
Canadian seeks answers
to the Israel situation
by Adam Jones
Erna Paris is a nice, liberal,
Jewish woman from
Toronto who went to Israel last
year, armed only with a superficial knowledge of Jewish scripture, a grab-bag full of cliches,
and a portable tape recorder.
Why did she bother?
BOOKS
The Garden and the Gun:
A Journey inside Israel
By Erna Paris
Lester and Orpen Dennys,
Publishers
"I wanted to experience Israel directly, beyond the propaganda and counter-propaganda
that depicted that country either
as a reincarnation of Paradise
whose leaders could do no wrong,
or as the abode of war-lusty evildoers who could do no right."
Fair enough. In a region
stewing with war and fanaticism,
where dogma is eroding the precarious hold of discussion, a few
sensitive souls are necessary to
help us sort things out.
The problem with The
Garden and the Gun—the title
refers to the Zionist dream of
"settlement and regeneration" in
a context of physical security—is
that Paris more often resembles
a bull in a china shop than an
observer. Her ideological bent is
usually wide enough to permit
an empathetic treatment ofthe
Palestinians and Israelis she
meets. ("I was," Paris writes, "...a
humanist...with a deeply felt
commitment to Jewish history
and an equally deeply felt
commitment to human rights")
But she is sorely afflicted with a
syndrome common to liberal
spectators. The material she
wrestles with seems so volatile,
so full of turmoil and contradiction, that she just doesn't trust
her readers to find their own
frame of reference.
What we get, then, is a
traipse around Israel and the
West Bank through the eyes of
Erna, who barges in every third
paragraph or so to remind us
what we should be thinking
about the people she meets.
Beyond being painfully obtrusive, this perspective simply isn't
interesting or fresh enough to
hold us.
This is especially true whenever the author's formidable flair
for cliche enters the picture. "I
was a traveller in time, dropped
into a secret universe whose
A troubled peace on Israel-occupied West Bank
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language I did not know and
which excluded me today and for
eternity," Paris writes of a
Sabbath meal with an orthodox
Jewish family in the West Bank.
In Jerusalem, she muses: "...this
street must have looked much
the same in the time of Jesus, as
he made his way through the
market among his fellow Jews."
At the frontier with Lebanon:
"The border road hid death and
shadowed secrets....The very
stones and trees that lined this
road hid death." And on the West
Bank: "Fear was creeping over
me hke a slow, inexorable tide."
Entire sections of The
Garden and the Gun are riddled
with such cringe-worthy stuff.
Nonetheless, there's much of
interest here.
Issues are debated and
schisms articulated in Israel
with a fervor that few societies
can match. Sometimes almost
despite herself (and sometimes,
to be fair, as a direct result of an
honest desire to understand her
subjects' motives and dreams),
Paris gives us glimpses into this
fractious, vocal, and earthy social
landscape. Paris's treatment of
the resurgent ultra-orthodox
trends in Judaism is intriguing.
Many ofthe orthodox adherents
she interviews are immigrants
from the U.S., and they ably
articulate their reasons for
turning from a secular "western"
world-view to the undiluted
Jewish faith of their forebears.
The author devotes a central
portion of her book to the
generation gap in Israel. To her
mind, the ascetic Zionist ideal,
scratching subsistence out of the
barren land, is increasingly
being replaced by the gun-toting
settler with his West Bank condo
and Palestinian Arab underlings,
or the material-minded youth
who leaves his or her kibbutz to
carve a niche in the wider world,
away from Middle Eastern
tensions and bloodshed. The
most memorable portraits,
predictably, are those of the
older generation: the two aging
kibbutzniks who reminisce about
life under the British mandate;
the holocaust survivor who has
devoted his life to transforming
desert irrigation techniques.
As for insights into present-
day politics, there are not many
to be found. This, of course, is revealing in itself. Palestinian representatives, mistrustful of the
foreign scribe in their midst,
mostly give her the standard
public relations line.
The Garden and the Gun is
not a particularly interesting
book by a not particularly
interesting writer. Its sole
advantage—and its redeeming
feature—is that its subject
commands an enduring fascination.
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
FREE PUBLIC LECTURE
Saturday, Nov.26
The Media
and Morality
Miss Pauline
Mary Webb
Writer and Broadcaster
London, England
Lecture Hall 2, UBC Woodward
Building at 8:15 p.m.
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November 22,1988
THE UBYSSEY/9 The end
of an era
The election campaign is now over with only
history left to decide the fate of our youthful nation.
Whether we become the 51st state under Governor
Brian Mulroney or the stronger, wealthier nation as
promised daily and in almost every editorial from
St. John's to Victoria, is left to history to decide.
Although historically the economically sane
north-south pull has always been stronger, until
now the Canadian public had always been too suspicious of our southern neighbour to actually enter
into a written agreement. This distrust appears to
have changed.
Until now the bulk of Canada's-differences in
elections have been based on regional, religious, or
language barriers. This election saw the entry of a
new force entering the fray—class.
It was obvious that the debate split the business
vote from the ordinary Canadian to a degree rarely
seen in a Canadian election.
The election also saw an unprecedented entry of
the multinationals directly into the contest, doling
out cash with a purpose that surprised and offended
many.
And if there was ever a good opportunity to see
the effects of a monopoly in action and the power it
can possess, the media provided it during this campaign, with the Southam and Thompson chains at
the helm.
At times, their editorials contained a shrillness
that even Kim Campbell would envy. The Globe and
Mail, in particular, outdid itself with the publishing
of pedantic, patronizing editorials that dictated the
public's only choice.
The positive result is that at last the first twelve
pages ofthe Globe and Mail were exposed for what
they are—the veneer for the true "substance" that
lay within.
We hope that they at last remove the preposterous
slogan about being the "National" paper from the
front page. Not only are they the "National" paper of
only the business class, but they never could give us
in the West the hockey scores on time.
The well-timed polls seemed to have only one
purpose—to influence the voter. These useless appendages to elections should be banned for the final
two weeks of a campaign as they are in many
European countries.
The changes continue. The campaign was already American in style. ("Liar": the official word of
the Tory election campaign.) Somehow the thought
ofthe Mulroney government questioning the ethics
or morals of anyone or anything is beyond tragedy
but rather reaches the pinnacle of comedy.
The Liberal and NDP flag-waving was only slightly
less unnerving and only succeeded in muddying an
already cloudy campaign.
Americanization, it appears, has already begun.
theUbyssey
November 22, 1988
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays and Fridays
throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society
ofthe University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions
are those ofthe staff and not necessarily those ofthe
university administration, or ofthe sponsor. The Ubyssey is published with the proud support of the Alumni
Association. The Ubyssey is a member of Canadian
University Press. The editorial office is Rm. 241k ofthe
Student Union Building. Editorial Department, phone
228-2301; advertising, 228-3977.
What an election shouted Sheila Hansen letting it consume
her total being before she was interupted by Olivia Zanger
and Deanne Fisher who also wanted to partake in the
extravaganza. But wait said Chung Wong and Mandel
Ngan, "The bloody thing is not real it is only an illusion.
"That didn't stop Sean Kelly and Kathy Monk from giving
it their own oral tongue lashing. HAHA squeeled Ted
Aussem, "I've seen much bigger elections in Germany. "Yes
and they are usually more rigid in structure," noted Adam
Jones wisely. "I like my elections rigid," Laura Busheikan
bubbled enthusiastically. Cathy Lu and Robert Groberman
went off together to see about starting their own election.
Laurie McGuiness said if he thought hard enough he got his
own. Steve Chan and Joe Altwasser just smiled and nodded, knowing that whenever an election is concerned
someone gets the shaft.
Deanne Fisher-
Robert Groberman:
Katherine Monk:
Mandel Ngan:
entertainment
city desk
photography
Letters
Ski club
disappoints
Before I came to UBC,
I'd heard a lot about the Ski
Club and was looking forward to going to some good
parties. However, I was extremely disappointed in the
unfair and elitist system
they use for buying tickets
for the Whistler Cabin.
Tickets for the
Hallowe'en party had gone
before I'd even known they
were on sale, so I vowed to
get a place on New Year's.
So, on Nov. 17, I went to
UBC at 4:50 a.m. But I was
too late. I lined up behind
about 40 others, thinking
that if I didn't get a bunk for
New Year's Eve, at least I'd
get one for the 30th or 29th
of December.
If each person could buy
only two tickets—one for
themselves and one for a
guest—for one of the nights
ofthe 28th to 31st, with 56
beds a night, that would be
224 beds divided by 2 tickets
which equals 112.
Therefore, 112 people
could get a spot on one ofthe
prime nights, that would be
fair. However, that's not the
way the system works.
There sure weren't 112
people in front of me, but by
the time 8:00 a.m. came and
my name was called, there
was nothing left but January 1st.
The way this could
happen is that Ski Club
executive and the first, say,
five people in the line-up
buy two tickets for each
night (10 tickets). They also
have their friends' membership cards and buy them
tickets, without them having to waitin line for three or
four hours or camp overnight. (If you do camp out,
and leave your car in B-lot
all night, you can get a
ticket.)   So,   a  few   select
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any Issue. Letters must be typed and are not to exceed 300 words in length. Content
which Is judged to be libelous, homophobic, sexist, racist or factually incorrect will not be published. Please be concise.
Letters may be edited for brevity, but It Is standard Ubyssey policy not to edit letters for spelling or grammatical mistakes.
Please bring them, with identification, to SUB 241k. Letters must Include name, faculty, and signature.
people get tickets for all the
prime nights. The ordinary
person has no chance to
begin with unless they
"know someone" on the Ski
executive.
I think it's pretty bad
that some people can get
eight or 10 tickets (and don't
even stand in line) and I
couldn't get even one, after
waiting outside for four
hours.
I am speaking for a lot
of people who were disappointed that morning when
I say cut the elitist system—
make it so that each person
can buy two tickets for one of
the prime nights. They must
be there in person to buy
them and no holding places
in line.
We, the members ofthe
Ski Club, paid our fees to get
some privileges—where are
they? Give everyone a
chance. Otherwise the cabin
is monopolized by a few
"elites", and the Ski "Club-
is nothing more than a
name.
Gail Sherbaniuk
Trade saga
continues
In "Free Trade Kills the
Arts" (Wednesday, November 15th, page 8), reference
is made to an organization
called "Concerned Citizen's
About Free Trade." As a
bona fide member of this
group, I can assure you that
its real name is Citizens
Concerned About Free
Trade, and that it will continue to fight for Canadian
independence against
American economic domination, even after this particular free-trade arrangement has been scrapped.
Canada has more
American investment than
all of Central and South
America combined (you
know, all those countries we
smugly call "banana republics'), and anyone who
thinks that this situation
has no political reverberations is kidding himself.
Canada can already be
properly classed as a "trust
territory" (so called) of the
U.S., a shameful state for a
nation with such great natural and human resources.
Sean McHroy
Arts 2
Sedge strip
dispute soars
I am weary of stupid
attitudes. One such attitude
can be found in C. Szabo's
letter of Nov. 15 ('Segde
stripper not appreciated').
The letter was a heart-felt
response to something C.
Szabo found dismaying; the
stupid attitude is that, because C. Szabo found it dismaying, so should the rest of
us. Far stupider is the idea
that we should legislate
against everything that disgusts C. Szabo.
C. Szabo, you don't
make it clear what it was
that dismayed you. Was it
the heavy-metal music? The
applause? Long hair? It
seems that three years at
the university have not
given you much talent for
reason. In the midst of your
rhetorical slop, one single
bit of reasoning shines
through. Unfortunately, I
don't agree that all occurrences at Sedgewick should
by unlawful.
Don't worry, I know
what you meant to say. You
tried to express your feeling
that public displays of indecency should be unlawful.
They offend you. Hundreds
of others, maybe thousands,
were as disturbed and disrupted as you were. So let's
crack down! Shape up! Legislate!
I  can't  really  believe
that C. Szabo wrote that
letter for any other reason
than as a joke. But in case
you were serious, C. Szabo,
why not visit Wreck Beach
next summer. Hundreds of
disgusting incidents await
you; they seek to draw you
in, then shock the hell out of
you. Form a lobby group!
Close the beach! Close
Sedgewick!
To me, the sad and disgusting thing is that someone so close to graduation
should combine illiberal and
self-righteous attitudes
with a complete disregard
for what constitutes good
reasoning.
Tim. Burden
Artsl
Subway smoke
smothers
As you may well know,
most of the area surrounding the upper level of the
non-smoking section in the
Subway cafeteria has been
changed from a non-smoking section to a smoking
section. Now, the non-smoking section is almost fully
encircled by smokers. I find
this quite annoying. We all
know that smoke rises, and
if someone is sitting around
the edge ofthe non-smoking
section (where most of the
tables happen to be) they are
bombarded by second hand
smoke.
This is not entirely convenient for someone who's
allergic to or bothered by
cigarette smoke and may get
ill. Where are they supposed
to sit? Obviously not in the
smoking section—they're
given their own place. But
when this place is not what
it says it is—reserved for the
comfort of non-smokers—
then I think some changes
should be made.
Lisa Tench
Artsl
10/THE UBYSSEY
November 22,1988 OP-ID
Keepin' the
clouds away
"Are there any quality television programs that educate, enrich our lives, make us laugh and
cry, and portray life realistically?"
People often ask me this question, knowing my disdain for the
banal nonsense which fizzes from
our television sets every day, pandering to the lowest common denominator in society, giving us
measured doses of comic-strip-
violence, telling us when to laugh,
and then bombarding us every few
minutes with brain-gripping
jingles and slogans.
Happily, there is one.
This program has earned a
secure position on morning television that has lasted for twenty
years. It competes with the glossy
game shows and soap operas and
still maintains a loyal following.
This is no small feat considering the mesmerizing excitement of
game shows. People answering
stupid questions and spinning
prize wheels while clapping and
maintaining a silly grin (probably
held in place by Scotch tape or tiny
sutures) is heavyweight entertainment.
"This is our champion, Doug
Blecky. He likes to collect shiny
things that he finds in the street.
Let's give him a warm welcome!"
Then there are the soap operas . Those melodramatic melanomas that agonize our emotions.
And when we can hardly bear it,
some woman comes on to allow us
a moment to wipe the tears away
and tell us how we can get whiter
socks.
How this program competes
with all that is beyond me.
It keeps a low profile. It
doesn't carry advertising or blow
its own horn. Its stars manage to
keep their integrity.
Its biggest blunder is calling
itself a children's program.
Sesame Street.
I'm serious. Ifs really good.
Sometimes it's funny and sometimes ya learn stuff. I like it way
better now than I did when I was
little. I understand the French
part. And there's lots of jokes and
stuff that kids wouldn't get.
I started watching it again
about a year ago. It's not the same
as it used to be. There's lots of
neat-o new characters like Placido
Flamingo (he's a real funny opera
singer), Elmo (he's kinda silly),
Slimy the Worm, the Honkers, the
Rhymies and scads more.
There's also tons of cool new
features like Monsterpiece Theatre hosted by Alister Cookie (he's
really Cookie Monster). I liked it
when they had Chariots of Fur.
And Guy Smiley has a new show
called What's Prairie's Problem?
They have cool special guests
like Whitney Houston and John
Candy and Andrea Martin from
SCTV, plus puppets of famous
people. A Billy Idol puppet sings
"Rebel L" instead ofthe real "Rebel
Yell." That was so funny.
One kinda sad thing is that
the human people on the show are
getting old. Oscar the Grouch
doesn't have any grey fur yet but
Bob is getting grey and David has
gotten kinda pudgy working in the
store. He took over a few years ago
when Mr. Hooper died (I used to
love it when Big Bird would call
him Mr. "Pooper" instead of
Hooper).
Sesame Street is so liberal
now too. I couldn't believe Ernie's
latest performance of the song
"Rubber Ducky." It used to be so
cute and sweet. Now he does a
reggae version and everybody in
the neighborhood actually takes
offhis clothes and gets into the tub
with him (and they're all nude).
Unlike most commercial television, Sesame Street shows real
kids: kids with overbites and bad
haircuts who aren't afraid to
scratch themselves in unseemly
places the way real kids do.
Sesame Street is for everybody.
Bill Lake, a 42-year-old driving instructor said, "Yes, sometimes 111 sit down and watch it for
five minutes. It puts across a quality message to people - that they
should care about others and their
feelings."
I tried to interview a four-
year-old when it was time for Sesame Street to come on but she was
too busy laughing to comment.
By Sean Kelly
Right on the button
I voted yesterday. As I made
my way across the elementary
school gymnasium, a man in a
grey three-piece suit towered
over me. He looked down at my
chest, and told me to remove my
button. The rest ofthe gym looked
at me—a law breaker. The hornrimmed ladies stopped in their
stunted steps and stared. My
knees quaked, my hands turned
white as oysters—the guilt of an
electioneer hit me in the gut.
I reached up to my overcoat,
and felt for my propaganda-laden
accessory. There it was...why
does he keep staring at me?
Gone—if s gone now, see? I tried
to break the gloom with a wimpish smile. It only made me look
more guilty.
The polling clerk took my
side in an attempt at sympathy.
"That guy has been breathing
down my neck the whole day. This
is a very Progressive Conservative polling station." "Really?" I
asked—a little nervous about
speaking to an employee of Elections Canada.
The grey-haired crowd grew
thicker around me and the clerk.
Their canes were poised for a
bludgeoning. I played with the
little pointy tip on my button, and
thought I might have a chance at
ripping some nylons, or giving a
pretty nasty scratch on some bifocals.
"Where's the button?" they
asked in unison.
"You mean this one?" I said
with the slightest tinge of sarcasm, as I hauled it out of my
pocket to their waiting glance.
"Give me that button," the
man in the grey suit said. The rest
of the crowd cackled. Alas, I had
left my little dog Nono outside the
building. He could not help me
now—poor Nono.
"There's no place like home,
there's no place like home..." I
chanted.
My home had been taken
over by grey-suited scrutineers.
Anditwasn'tjustmybutton—but
any button. You see, my button
was simply a non-partisan message for peace. Apparently, peace
propaganda is not allowed at a
polling station—it is too political.
But grey-suited scrutineers who
wear a partisan label on their
person, and sit behind the polling
booths are allowed. There is also
no limit on how many scrutineers
each party is allowed to have
present.
Here's to democracy, and fair
process.
By Katherine Monk
DAL GRAUER MEMORIAL LECTURES
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
CYRUS GORDON
Director, Centre for Ebla Research
NEW YORK UNIVERSITY
CYRUS GORDON was with the expedition that discovered what is
popularly known as King Solomon's Mines. Currently he is working to
restore the Lost Language of Ebla. In 1983, the Syrian Department of
Antiquities invited him to examine 15,000 clay tablets from Ebla's royal
archives. A specialist in deciphering ancient inscriptions, Professor Gordon is proficient in many languages, including Hebrew, Greek, Latin,
Egyptian, Akkadian, Babylonian, Hittite, Sumerian and Arabic.
THE PENTATEUCH: Source Criticism of Multiple or Single Authorship
Wednesday, November 23Chapel Auditorium, at 11:30am, Regent College
How Has Our Knowledge of 'Forgotten Scripts' and of 'Human
Prehistory' Changed Over the Last 100 years?
Thursday, November 24   In Buchanan A-104, at 12:30pm
The Early Bronze Age (3000-2000 B.C.) is particularly crucial to civilization because writing was developed during that period - writing in the
sense of the phonetic spelling out of languages that can be read and
interpreted. At Ugarit, around 1400 B.C., the first form of our own ABC's
appear in cuneiform on clay, with nearly all ofthe letters arranged in the
order we retain today.
Room 210, 6328 Memorial Road, Vancouver, B.C. V6T1W5
Telephone: (604) 228-5675
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November 22,1988
THE UBYSSEY/11 NEWS
Athletes aim for a fair shake
Administration is out of touch
By Katherine Monk
UBC athletes don't know
what the future holds and how
they can make their voice heard,
according to John Stevenson, student representative to the University Athletic Council.
Stevenson will be holding a
meeting with the Women's Big
Block—the only student athletic
organization left on campus—
Wednesday to discuss where student athletes stand in relation to
the administration.
They are tending to
choose coaches who
generate winning
teams, instead of
choosing people who
care about the all-
round athletic and
academic experience
"The meeting is more of a
question and answer period. The
idea is to get people to come out
and ask what's happening," said
Stevenson.
"Being an athlete myself
there's very little communication
between the administration and
the athletes—students don't have
much chance at participation," he
said.
The problems in athletics
began when the Board of Governors restructured the University
Athletic Council, Stevenson said
in an interview yesterday. The
board cut off the student run men's
and women's athletic councils and
replaced them with the UAC,
which falls under the
administration's umbrella, he
added.
"Even now that I'm on UAC,
I'm frustrated at how the administration manipulates the committee," Stevenson said.
As it stands now, the UAC has
five student representatives—
approximately .015 percent student representation. And not all of
these students are athletes, said
Stevenson.
But vice president of student
services K.D Srivastava doesn't
■think there is a problem. "If there
is a lack of representation, I'd like
to hear about it," he said. "But
frankly, I don't believe there is."
Linda Diano, ex-president of
the Women's Big Block, said the
administration cannot adequately
represent the needs of students, as
they are not students themselves.
She said the situation has not
changed since she left her post last
year after the dissolution of the
Women's Athletic Council.
"The administration is paid
employees, and they have not
always been big on student involvement, and it is even showing
through the coaches. They are
tending to choose coaches who
generate winning teams, instead
of choosing people who care about
the all-round athletic and academic experience," Diano said.
Stevenson said he was also
concerned about how much information reaches the students, even
those on council. "Last year I tried
to get an audit done ofthe athletic
department amid rumours of
missing funds. It was finished but
I don't know what the report said,"
Stevenson said.
"Part ofthe frustration is that
K.D. Srivastava is the man who
gets the report ofthe audit, and he
defines things on the audit—and
he told us everything was on the
level."
"I'm skeptical—but that's just
my nature," Stevenson added.
Stevenson said
he wanted to start an
external management review of the
way athletics is
managed, but following the results ofthe
audit, K.D. Srivastava found it was not
necessary.
"There was no
need for a major reorganization, but
there will always be
evolution," said Srivastava.
Gail Wilson,
women's field hockey
coach and faculty liason to Women's Big
Block, said the Wednesday meeting is
just one positive way
to address the problems which students
face.
"We had Joanne
Jones (director of
women's athletics)
come in and speak to
female athletes, and
she raised the issue
ofthe UAC and what
they did. So the next
logical step was to
have Bill McNulty
(of UAC) to come in
and explain the
student's role in the
administration of
athletics from the
point of view of the
UAC," said Wilson.
The Wednesday
meeting will be held
in War Memorial
Gym room 211 at
noon, and is open to
all students.
John Stevenson in better times
JOE ALTWASSER PHOTO
"Here's my card."
Tell the world who you are!®
Introduce yourself by handing
out your personalized student
business cards. They are
exclusively designed with
the new University of British
Columbia crest. Come to the
Bookstore for complete details.
special n
iuy one set of 250 cards for $39.95 and receive
a second set free! Offer expires December 15th, 1988.
Available exclusively
at the UBC Bookstore.
anas bookstore
6200 University Boulevard • 228-4741
Contestant Search
We're the exciting new TV game show
We Want Partners! TOlIC AbOlit
Husband/Wife
Instructor/Student
Boss/Employe©
endless combinations
** 682-5993
must be
18 years or older
NOTICE OF ELECTION
Student Representatives to serve on the Board of
Governors and the Senate.
This notice is a call for nominations for full-time students
to run for election for the following positions :
BOARD OF GOVERNORS - TWO students
SENATE - SEVENTEEN students (including at least one
from each faculty)
Nomination forms giving full details of the requirements
of nominations are available in the Registrar's Office, the
A.M.S. Office (Room 266 S.U.B.) and in the offices ofthe
Student Undergraduate Societies and the Graduate Student Association.
Nominations must be in the hands of the Registrar no
later than 4:00 p.m. on Friday, December 2,1988.
12/THE UBYSSEY
November 22,1988

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