UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Nov 24, 1966

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0127061.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0127061.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0127061-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0127061-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0127061-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0127061-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0127061-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0127061-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0127061-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0127061.ris

Full Text

Array f^.   r^   _*
COMMITTEE NAMED TO PICK PRESIDENT
One of four men chosen Tuesday by
the board of governors to find a new
UBC president says the selection committee will welcome nominations from
students.
Mr. Justice Natham Nemetz, chairman of UBC's board of governors, said
in an interview Wednesday any citizen
has the right to suggest candidates.
"The board would be delighted to
receive recommendations not only from
alumni and faculty, but the student
body," he said.
Nemetz said students with a presidential candidate in mind could contact
Stuart Keate, honorary board secretary,
for further instructions.
Other members of the new subcommittee, picked at Tuesday's B of G
meeting, are chancellor John Buchanan,
Stuart Keate, and Donovan Miller. All
are B of G members.
The board as a whole is responsible
for selection of the university president.
The sub-committee will examine qualifications of candidates and report to the
board.
Nemetz said the president should be
a "vigorous Canadian academic," but
other guidelines would be set by the
committee.
He said the committee will have to
decide whether to accept applications.
"The usual procedure is for the committee to seek out candidates after
recommendation. However, we would
also have to deal with any uninvited
applications."
The board's aim is to f Jnd a suitable
candidate by July 1967. If they don't
JUSTICE NEMETZ
. . . will choose
the two deputies to the president, Dean
Walter H. £*&$& and Dean William Armstrong, wotitd take over.
Nemetz said the suib-committee meets
later this week after contact with the
UBC faculty association.
Canadian-born president John Macdonald was head of the Harvard University's institute of preventive denis-
try when picked to replace retiring
president, Norman MacKenzie in 1962.
Former board chairman, the late
George Cunningham, chaired the committees which picked both MacKenzie
and Macdonald.
The faculty association is selecting its
own four-man committee to advise the
board committee.
Other three members of the board's
sub-committee were unavailable for
comments Wednesday.
Vol. XLVIII, Ne. 29   VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24,  1966
48
224-3916
Mynott
fed  up',
resigns
BURNABY (UNS) — Simon
Fraser student society president John Mynott has resigned
from his post because of what
he described as academic and
financial difficulties.
The resignation is effective
Jan. 1.
Mynott said: "I am not satisfied with the education I am
presently pursuing.
"I am unhappy with the
courses I am taking, and the
way some of them are being
presented. I want a chance to
study on my own for awhile."
He added his academic activities were the major reason
for his decision.
The president said he was
tiring of his position, and
would have quit anyway, even
if he had not been forced to.
Mynott criticized students,
saying: "Loud mouths became
mute when asked for concrete,
comprehensive suggestions."
He added that a lack of
office staff and students to handle organizational duties hampered his work.
"I haven't had a soft term,
it was one hell of a job," he
stated.
Mynott has served as student
society president at SFA since
September, and before that
was Canada's first ombudsman,
a position he held for eight
months.
He was also a major instigator of the newly formed B.C.
Assembly of Students, and
served as that association's interim president from January
to this month.
(The post of BCAS president
is now held by Frank Flynn, a
UBC science student.)
Mynott concluded: "I'm not
bitter, but to some extent I'm
fed up. I felt I was doing the
best I could."
—kurt hilger photo
OPEN DOOR to an empty chair ? No, UBC's president is
still here, although the board of governors has named
a committee to find a replacement. You can see Mac in
his office today noon.
Residence
rates hiked
$8 a month
UBC residence rates will
Permanent rates for sing!
double rooms from $85 to $93
Dormitory rates rise from
$72.50 to $80.50 single room
and $67.50 to $75.50 double
room.
Graduate dorms go from $80
to $88 single room.
Mary Bollert Annex for
women jumps from $80 to $88
single and $75 to $83 double.
The new rates are effective
July 1, 1967.
The board of governors approved  the increase  Tuesday.
"Cost of food supplies have
been rising for some months,
and higher wages for both food
and residence service employees were provided in union
agreements recently signed by
university," a university announcement said.
Increases apply across the
board to previous rates which
range from $67.50 a month in
former army huts to $90 a
month in permanent residences.
The monthly charge for
three meals a day goes from
$42 to $47.50 and raises the
average rate to $1.59.
Average housing rates will
rise to $37 a month or $1.23 a
day.
The balance goes to higher
wages and costs of bedding,
furniture, and laundry service.
The last UBC residence rate
increase was made four years
ago.
Interest and repay principal
on mortgages and loans take
up 38 per cent of the housing
budget. Officials claim this
proportion is higher than other
Canadian universities.
UBC residences accommodating 2,900 students operate
as self-supporting, non-profit
ancillary service to students.
jump $8 a month next year,
e rooms rise from $90 to $98,
UBC COSTS
REVEALED
(SEE PAGE 3)
City rejects
regulation
relaxation
By BO HANSEN
Vancouver city council voted
Tuesday to reject the AMS request to relax zoning regulations.
The AMS brief, presented to
council October 4 as part of
Housing Action Program, asked
for: extension of the deadline
for termination of illegal suites
to 1970; amendement of zoning
by-laws to allow three boarders
in single-family dwellings in
RS-1 zones; and consideration
of creation of a two-family
dwelling zone in the area
bounded by Blanca, Dunbar,
Tenth and 16th Avenues.
A report by city planning
director Bill Graham recommended council reject the request.
AMS vice-president Charlie
Boylan sharply rebuked city
council for accepting Graham's
recommendation.
"We have said all along the
housing crisis is not simply a
student problem. Housing
shortages facing students are
bound to affect everyone,"
Boylan told the aldermen.
Graham's report contended
student housing is a matter for
the university and provincial
government rather than for
Vancouver.
The report claimed the AMS
petition represented only 5 per
cent of the university area.
Boylan charged the planning
department's analysis of the
628-name petition was grossly
one-sided.
"Those six hundred names
were gathered in two days by
about twenty people. If we had
the time and resources we could
have had two or three thousand
names, and I suspect the planning department knows this." Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 24,  1966
ACADIA PARK DEVELOPMENT . . . first phase to be finished by August.
CUS DIRECTORS
Participation discussed
OTTAWA (CUP)—The Canadian Union of Students has
skirted the forbidden waters
of political involvement in
international affairs.
The organization's board of
directors—bound by this fall's
decisions by CUS members to
withdraw from decision-making
in international student affairs
—voted not to send a delegate
to next February's International Student Conference
supervisory committee meeting.
The motion was approved
after a considerable amount of
discussion extending over two
days.
The debate brought charges
that CUS is "contradicting" itself by trying to retain associate status in international
organizaions while at the same
time refusing to allow associate or non-involved status
within its own ranks.
CUS directors decided to stay
away from the supervisory
committee meeting and see
how the U.S.-dominated ISC
reacts to their policy of non-
involvement, instead of abandoning their committee seat.
By following this course,
the board bound itself to the
30th CUS Congress decision
which permits it to hold only
associate status in the ISC and
Soviet-dominated International
Union of Students.
CUS president Doug Ward
supported a withdrawal from
the ISC's policy committee
(Supcom), admitting he personally has "little competence" to
discuss resolutions being debated in the U.S.-backed organization. He called this "a fact
of life which we must face."
CUS has refused to allow the
seven dropouts to take out
associate membership in CUS
or take part in CUS programs
CUP to investigate
firing of Daily editor
OTTAWA (CUP) — A Canadian University Press
investigation commission will probe the McGill student's
council firing of McGill Daily editor Sandy Gage.
The commission, called Tuesday by McGill council president Jim McCoubrey, will conduct its inquiry into alleged
violations of CUP's charter
and code of ethics.
The dispute centres around
a front-page story published
by Gage concerning research
by a McGill professor, research which is alleged to be
aiding the American war
effort in Vietnam.
Fifty-two staff members resigned Nov. 16 from The Daily
following Gage's dismissal. An
interim editor, Mark Feifer,
Tuesday produced his first
issue of The Daily, a 12-pager,
with temporary staff of 60
students.
Feifer, a third-year law student, was appointed interim
editor at a council meeting
Monday   night,   after   another
interim editor had resigned as
soon as he had been appointed
to the post.
Beer tops
lined up
The engineers have a new
contest.
It's called Total the Tabs.
See if you can guess the
number of tab-tops from beer
cans in the chain the engineers
have constructed.
First and only prize is a
case of beer.
"We began collecting the
tabs at the beginning of the
term," said engineering vice-
president Pete Olsen. "Now
we have a chain over 100 feet
long."
You can look at the chain
and make your guess at the
engineering undergraduate society office.
or   services   on   a   piece-meal
basis.
Now, the organization finds
itself in the awkward position
of holding an important and
treasured seat on the ISC's
main policy-making committee,
and espousing a policy of non-
involvement.
Mac's door open
to meet students
UBC president John Macdonald opens his door today.
In his welcoming address
to students in September,
Macdonald announced that
he would meet students one
day a month, without appointment, in his office.
Today is the day. Take
your mind and meet the
president.
Fire chief
bookstore
refuses
censure
UBC fire chief Robert Rollins Wednesday refused to
say the university bookstore's paper-cluttered basement is
a fire hazard.
"It is contrary to our policy
to discuss any fire hazard with
anyone but the people concerned," he said in an interview.
But, Chief Rollins said, any
paper and wood situation is a
potential fire hazard.
And paper, boxes and books
jam the bookstore's basement
to the rafters.
Bookstore manager J. A.
Hunter said employees are not
permitted to smoke while working in the basement.
"We do everything we can
to prevent a fire, so it's not a
real hazard," he said.
But, he said: "It's not a good
situation. I don't like it. It's
too crowded and there's too
much paper around."
More than 20 employees
work in the crowded basement.
"If a fire did occur, it would
be a pretty bad situation,"
Hunter said.
Assistant fire chief Jack MacKay said the situation was not
hazardous because it was .a temporary one under control.
"I have no idea what he
meant by a temporary situation," Hunter said.
"The administration is aware
of our problems, but nothing
concrete is being done."
MacKay also said he could
show The Ubyssey many other
similar situations on campus.
Housing
contract
approved
UBC's board of governors
has approved a $4,533,081 contract for married graduate student's housing units.
The contract was awarded to
Laing Construction and Equipment Ltd. subject to negotiation on final contract amount
and building specifications.
The first phase in the Acadia
Park development will include
275 of the planned 350 units.
The development consists of
10O, one, two and three bedroom suites in a 12-storey
tower, the first highrise on
campus.
Another 175 suites will be
built in courtyard clusters of
two-storey row housing.
Colored cement tiles will
roof brick lower-floor exteriors and stucco second-floor
exteriors.
Detached study areas, open
and covered play areas and
communal social and laundry
facilities will also be included.
Contract calls for completion by Aug. 18, 1967, to permit occupancy during 1967-68
term.
Officials say rentals will be
as low as possible but sufficient to cover operating costs
and interest and principal repayments.
WHY BE GRAY ?
HAIRCOLORING TREATMENTS
—  HAIRSTYLING  —
UPPER TENTH BARBER
4574 W. 10th Ave.        by the Gores
-F"
FORMAL
SEMI-FORMAL
rental and Males
I TtfM4Sr fSNS* wfcH# •••••ff
tectots, wurwlM  c • • t s.
I  F9fHMl  Mi
MCCUISH   FORSWEAR
STUDENT RATES
2046 W. 41st - Ph. 263-3610
VILLAGE   CAFE
"Where good friends and fine food meet"
5778 University Blvd.
(In the Village)
224-0640
B.C. Civil Service
Commission
Chief Selection
Officer
will hold a general briefing sessions
for Graduating Students interested
in employment opportunities and
conditions on Friday, December 2,
1966, Buchanan  106.
STUDENTS!
FUU  RANGE  OF  STUDY  MASTER
NOTES NOW AVAILABLE
OPEN DAILY
From 10 a.m.
to MIDNIGHT
(Noon-to Midnight Sunday)
Out-of-towners:
Send for
catalogue.
891 Granville St.   Tel. MU 5-5814
PSYCHEDELIC
WORSHIP
A Trip In the Church With
(Rev.) Jim  McKibbon.  Tommy Chong  and The  Vancouvers
a'
UNIVERSITY HILL UNITED CHURCH
Friday:   Nov.   2b,   7:30   P.M. Thursday,' November " $k,   1 $66
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
—al harvey photo
BRILLIANT BAWDY BULBS beam brightly beyond
Buchanan's borders battling bitter blackness back, bewitching bubbling brook below, beckoning battered beech
branches beside, bedaubing bedrqggled blacktop beneath, but beguilingly  beautiful.
Administration releases budget;
costs covered by use of services
For the first time in UBC's
history the administration has
released figures on the profits
and losses of campus ancillary
services.
Ancillary services include
campus food services, residences, bookstore and post-
office, and traffic and parking
facilities.
The figures are from the financial year ending March 31,
1966.
According to the administration's break-down of the figures, neither food services nor
the residences are making a
profit.
$10,000 PROFIT
The bookstore and post-office
made a profit of over $10,000.
Food services made $691,731
and spent as much. One-half of
their expenses went to food
costs, and one-third went to
labour.
Campus food figures are:
Food costs $307,082; labour
costs $236,634; other operating
costs $90,036; repayment of
advance for construction of
Ponderosa cafe; $57,979.
The bookstore and post-office
had a gross revenue of $1,671,-
145 but gave $50,000 back to
students on their rebate policy.
BOOKSTORE COSTS
Bookstore and post-office
figures are: revenue $1,621,145;
cost of books and supplies $1,-
446,886; labour costs $134,045;
other operating costs $20,369;
development of facilities
$9,374; net profit for future
development $10,471.
(Residences' revenue was
$1,180,491.
Students ate $571,761 of food
UBC library purchases
English book collection
A 50,000-volume collection
of rare books has been acquired by UBC library.
The books form one of the
world's largest private collections of nineteenth and twentieth century English literature.
"This is the  most dramatic
New planner
'uncertain'
UBC's new head of future
planning can't tell yet what the
future holds.
James Turner, head of the
combined department of buildings and grounds and architect
planning, said he hasn't had
time yet to assess the situation.
Turner, with his official title
director of physical plant, has
been on the job since Nov. 1.
The 33 and G post became
vacant during the summer
when former head Tom Hughes
resigned.
The administration decided
to create a common head for
both departments and picked
Turner from 102 applicants.
He was formerly assistant
project manager at B.C. Hydro's Peace and Columbia
projects.
acquisition in the field in the
last decade in North America,"
said head librarian Basil
Stuart-Stubbs.
Also coming is the collection's owner, antiquarian book-
dealer Reginald Colbeck, of
Bournemouth, England.
"Colbeck will join the library during or before 1968 as
a bibliographer engaged in
developing and cataloguing his
own collection and in improving our existing collection of
English literatur e," said
Stuart-Stubbs. The agreement
has been approved by. the
board of governors.
Arrangements to bring Colbeck and his collection were
started by Dr. William Fredeman, associate English professor.
"The Colbeck collection will
do far more than fortify the
existing 19th and 20th century collections of the UBC
library," said Dr. Fredeman.
"'Because of its comprehensiveness, it will immediately
make totally representative
our holdings in the major and
minor authors of the periods
covered. Beyond that it will
provide a strong foundation
for expansion."
"The Colbeck   collection   is
'primary' because the focus is
on first editions of the authors
contained and many copies
were presented by the authors
or closely associated with the
authors. Many manuscripts
add to the uniqueness of this
valuable acquisition," said
Fredeman.
"Prior to Colbeck's arrival,
the 50,000 volumes, including
works by Robert Browning,
Elizabeth Barrett, Alfred
Tennyson, Swinbirne and W.
Savage Landor, will be available for study and research,"
said Stuart-Stubbs.
in residence. Labour and operating cosst were half of the residences' budget.
HOSPITAL LOSES
The university hospital had
a revenue of $113,105. They
lost over $3,000 on the year's
operations.
Students paid $135,834 in
parking tickets and fees.
Traffic czar, Sir Ouvry
Roberts employed 27 men at
$106,480. He lost $266 last year.
UBC's research farm and
forest had a revenue of $591,-
439.
It lost over $90,000 but was
saved by a reserve fund set up
by the administration to sustain the forestry operation.
Of the total expenses of ancillary services, 30 per cent
was paid to labour. More than
ten per cent was paid to debts
and advances for buildings.
The administration claims
ancillary services are operated
under a policy of the full cost
being met by those using the
services.
Rates are also set to cover
the full cost but without profit
to UBC.
UBC information director
and administration mouthpiece
Ralph Daly seemed pleased
with the publication of the
figures.
'LONG WAIT'
"We have waited a long time
for these, but now everyone
knows the individual costs of
cur services," Daly said.
"We are publishing them because of pressure from students,
The Ubyssey and the new advisory committees," he said.
GREAT TRAGEDY
Faculty blamed
for pot smoking
Irresponsible statements by faculty members are probably responsible for marijuana experimentation among young
people says a Vancouver magistrate.
"People in position of influence in the community and
members of certain faculties
are quoted at great length as
to the lack of harm associated
with this serious criminal
offence," said magistrate Les
Bewley.
"The result of these statements is that young people
are caught up in the ferment
of intellectual ideas and are
bound to be affected," he said.
"The tragedy is that the
faculty member who makes
the statement is not charged.
It is the young person who is
charged."
"That   to   me   is   the   great
tragedy," Bewley said.
Bewley made these remarks
when he sentenced two men
for  possession  of  marijuana.
He would not comment to
The Ubyssey on the matter.
"I would rather not make
statements out of court," he
said.
Smooth move
PANGO PANGO (CUP) —
A troop of smooth puce blorgs
today captured and shaved a
hairy green blorg commandant
in this island capital's town
square. He turned red in embarrassment.
Leak works thrice daily
in Totems common block
Totem Park has sprung a leak in the main common
block.
The leak, according to a residence official, "comes
not from the roof but from the kitchen floor which is
just over the main common block. It is caused by
faulty installation of the steamers."
"It only rains during breakfast, lunch and dinner"
he said."
A bucket catches the water.
The offical refused to say how many times a day
he had to empty the water bucket.
LES BEWLEY
. . hits faculty
Alumni plan
posts marks
by New Year
Would you like your Christmas exam result in time for
New Year celebrations?
The Alumni Annual Giving
committee has the answer.
Simply fill in one of the
specially-prepared cards that
will be at all campus bulletin
boards.
Enter your name and' address, course and section number. Be sure to check with your
prof first to make sure he is
willing. Then hand in the card
and wait for the postman.
The cards all have pre-paid
postage so the service is free.
"We want to bring our name,
cause and purpose to the attention of the students so that
they'll be a bit more familiar
with us after graduation,' 'said
Philip Walton, student chairman of the committee.
So Happy New Year everyone! THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
the editor's and not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding member, Pacific Student Press. Authoriied
second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash.
The   Ubyssey  publishes   Page   Friday,   a   weekly commentary   and   review.
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo, Page
Friday, loc. 24; features,  sports, loc.  23; advertising,  loc.  26.  Night calls,
731-7019.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and  editorial writing.
NOVEMBER 24,  1966
LETTERS
FROM GABOR MATE
t*"<
_. - ,v,*.\
"i "?&'
.: *VWT
The grand vizier
We've always wondered who makes the decisions
at UBC, and just as in senior governments, it appears
to be the civil service.
In this case, university bursar William H. White.
The case: for 20 recorded years, students have
clamored to find out exactly how much money the bookstore makes, spends and keeps.
In 1963, when The Ubyssey flailed its editorial
sheepskins at the bookstore, bursar White quoted university policy: "It is not university policy to divulge
bookstore revenue and expenditure.''
He did the same in 1964, and 1965.
This year, university mouthpiece Ralph Daly said
figures would be released as soon as White could
prepare them, and today they were released.
Daly, when asked who made the policy change,
said no policy was involved, just a different administrative procedure. That is, White decided to give out the
information and no policy ever actually existed.
As bursar, White attends board of governor's meetings — the board is a financial body, and the bursar
is responsible for financial records.
Sources close to the board report White is the man
who brings most things to its attention, and probably
drafts most of the resolutions discussed.
Thus far, White's encroachments into policy making
are trivial and not worth noticing. But the university
changes presidents this year.
- Deans Walter Gage and William Armstrong, are to
act as presidential assistants to smooth the transition,
although both are already very busy men.
White works in an office near the president's, and
is the only man who knows just where all the money
is at any time. Since the greater part of adminstration
is spreading the money around, White must hover at
the new man's elbow — a grand vizier advising the
inexperienced boy king.
Thus, he will have even more power to make policy
decisions. Students should know what he decides now,
and why he has the power in the first place —and if
he hasn't that power, he shouldn't be using it.
Obelisks, eh?
So the lunar orbiter pictures show tall skinny things
on the moon, eh?
Arranged in no particular pattern, eh ?
The Egyptians didn't arrange pyramids in patterns
either.
They built obelisks too, — tall, skinny things.
What a swipe at the American ego — losing the
space race to a bunch of lousy Egyptians.
Cheers, John
Fed up to the teeth with crap, watching his studies
float gently down the pipe and feeling his wallet flap
emptily, Simon Fraser's council president John Mynott
quit Monday.
For the academy it's bad — Mynott was one of the
better student councillors at B.C.'s three universities.
But his plight is universal, and neatly shows why
many good people never enter student government in
the first place.
It's not worth the effort.
Addendum...
When we wrote our editorial of Nov. 17, we were
not aware that foodman Alan McGavin had recently
been named a director of B.C. Forest Products. UBC's
board of governors is now back at full strength, with
five members who double as timber barons.
In the same editorial, we goofed when we placed
lumberman-cum-governor Walter Koerner atop the grad
student centre. Actually, Walter's brother Leon, a retired forest mogul, lives there.
Nothing, if not nice
My one or two opponents
on this campus have been extremely active this year,
while my doubtlessly numerous fans have maintained a
dignified silence. This is the
sole possible explanation for
the unusually high ratio of
hostile letters to friendly
ones. Approximately 87 to 0.
The following letters to the
editor attempt to rectify the
situation somewhat.
Dear Sir: Regarding the
many vicious attacks on your
poor columnist, I am reminded of some-
thing my
mother always told me:
If you can't
say anything
nice about a
person, don't
say anything
at all.
Lorna Frug, art* 1.
Dear Sir: As the manager
of a local supermarket, I
have been requested by one
of your columnists to testify
in public that he is a regular
purchaser of soap at our store.
In all candor, Sir, I can say
that Mr. Mate has bought
soap from us several times in
the last five or six years.
Those who claim that he
does not use soap are therefore in grievous error. I have
no knowledge, of course, as
to what your esteemed colum-
ist uses the soap for.
Friedbert J. Lux.
Dear Sir: My poor son came
home crying again the other
day. Crying Sir, bawling his
poor little head off, because
someone had just written another nasty letter. Have you
no compassion, Sir, have you
no regard for a mother's feelings? Must you continue to
drive my poor son to tears?
I implore you, Sir, hear the
pleas of a mother's heart.
Stop publishing those nasty,
nasty, letters.
Mrs. Male.
Dear Sir: For a long time
I disagreed with your colum-
ist's views. But he has finally
convinced me, and in the coming elections in my faculty I
will run for president on the
basis of a program that I will
ask him to outline for me. I
have no doubt that my election by an overwhelming majority is assured.
Boris Borscht, engineering.
Comrade Editor: If you
print another letter against
Comrade Mate's opinions, you
will be purged as soon as our
liberating troops land in Vancouver.
Chairman Mao.
Dear Sir: Once in a while a
man comes along who is intelligent, articulate, . witty,
and has an admirable grasp
of reality. I am glad Mate
exists. He has the courage to
say what I have been thinking for many years now.
Gabor Mate.
Languish
in anguish,
bitch
Politics: not just ideas,
but responsible action
By MIKE COLEMAN
There are a lot of political
theorists on campus, both
professional and amateur.
Many hours are whiled away
discussing philosophy.
This is great, as far as it
goes. Too often it doesn't go
far enough.
Discussion must bring decision. Conversation must
bring commitment. Once all
the dialogue has been digested, it is not enough to sit
back in a self-satisfied sense
of knowledge. The dialogue
must continue, and must produce action. To do otherwise
is to be an intellectual coward, a fit subject for the
scathing epithet of ivory-
towerism.
For politics is not just ideas,
it is people. If one does not
accept democracy, one ought
to have the moral courage to
challenge it. If one does accept it, he must have the
moral courage to work to
further the concept. God
knows, there's little enough
democracy in the cold world
outside the campus (or on the
campus, for that matter).
The great cry of the sixties
is for freedoms and rights.
But when it is brought to the
human level, far too few remember that the other side
of the coin is responsibility.
And a major offender in
this vital disregard is a group
one would expect to be more
aware of the inherent duties
of democracy — the inhabitants of the university.
From the Daily Ryersonian, Toronto, Nov. 7.
So you sit in Kerr Hall
with nothing to do and your
girl friend suggests a game.
Let's play 'mental anguish,'
she says.
"Mental anguish?" you gasp
as you choke in your coffee.
"Yes, mental anguish. Look,
to play the game, all you have
to do is sit there while I call
you such names as 'impotent,
incompetent or goof-off.' You
see, the idea is to make the
other person as miserable as
possible. Then after you come
close to giving the person a
complex, you give him enough
time to recover—then you let
him call you names."
"You're out of your mind."
"No I'm not — just try it.
Here, I'll start: you are a
clod, a fink, and probably
chase little children."
"But I don't chase little
children."
"Quiet—you're supposed to
play the game."
So you sit there and let her
insult you at the same time
just itching for your turn
when you'll toe able to use
such descriptive terms as
Medusa, Klosetputzer and
Bitch.
Great game, mental anguish.
EDITOR: John Kelsey
Managing    Richard Blair
News Carol Wilson
City   Danny Stoffmon
Photo   Powell Hargrave
Page Friday __  Claudia Gwinn
Focus     -_ Rosemary Hyman
Sports  Sao Gransby
Ass't News   Pat Hrushowy
Ass't City '. Tom Morris
CUP Bert Hill
Piles of releases were yo-yoed
into the office. Boni Lee, Charlotte
Haire, Val Thorn, Val Zuker,
Norman Gidney, Jill Green, Dave
Cursons, Mary Ussner, Rod Wilczak, Bo Hansen, Murray McMillan,
and    Irving    Fetish    papered    the
Derrek Webb, Al Harvey, Patsy
Pococurants, and Chris Blake
snapped shots. Thursday,   November   24,   1966
THE      UBY5SEY
Page 5
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
'Open  seminar'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
To promote understanding
and communication among the
various disciplines in the arts
faculty, I suggest to the fac-
utly members an open seminar
to 'be held in early second
term and to deal with such
broad topics as classical
Greece, medieval Britain, renaissance Italy, reformation
Germany, England in the
romantic period, or Canada in
the twentieth century.
At such a seminar, open to
the public if possible, papers
would be given on the literature, history, philosophy, art,
music, and perhaps theology
of the period, and the two or
three day meeting could be
critically discussed for content and method in a terminating panel discussion.
BEVERLY TROUNCE
Arts 3
'Veto  incorrect'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Your claim that section 55
of the universities act gives
the board of governors power
to veto academic decisions is
incorrect.
Section 55 must be read in
the context of the entire act.
The act establishes a board
with jurisdiction in financial
matters and a senate with
jurisdiction in academic
matters.
The two governing bodies
work in co-ordination, but in
distinct jurisdictions.
Section 55 empowers the
board. to withhold final approval, and thus implementation, of senate decisions only
on financial grounds; that is
to say, if money is not available.
The board, on the other
hand, cannot make academic
changes without approval by
the senate (sec. 46f).
If either body suspected the
other of transgressing, and a
conflict arose, it could be carried to the visitor (sec. 4) for
resolution.
It is correct, as you say,
that the act does not compel
the board to appoint to faculty anyone nominated by the
president. But that is stating
the situation backwards.
The act does not permit the
board to appoint anyone (or
to dismiss anyone) without a
recommendation by the president.
It is most unlikely that a
president would recommend
appointments for which money was not available. Or that
any president would remain
whose recommendations were
rejected by the board.
RALPH DALY
Director,
Information Services
Ed note: We doubt that Daly's
last paragraph intends to imply an additional reason for
president John Macdonald's
recent resignation.
'Presumed brains'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Much as I am averse to
criticizing The Ubyssey, and
particularly a feminine member of that establishment, I
must iii all conscience point
out that your reporter Kris
Emmott has made a mistake.
This is the only rational
conclusion I can draw from
the AMS Council report
("UCC tries power coup").
For surely my great and
good friends, the AMS executives who were quoted in the
article, could never have
made such blatantly ludicrous remarks as were attributed to them.
Boylan surely knew the
blue guard had a constitution approved by UCC a
month ago; if council has not
yet acted on this, it is surely
not the fault of the blue
guard.
Lightfoot also, must surely
know that all constituted
clubs have constitutions —
one might hestitate to point
out that this necessarily follows from the definition, for
it is surely too obvious to
have escaped the attention of
our vigilant AMS.
Further, I cannot comprehend Hudson 'growling'. So,
on the basis of the presumed
intelligence of the members
mentioned (and I do not think
this can be challenged too
seriously), and on the flimsy
basis that it was tabbed as a
bitter letter while it was, at
least in intent, a whimsical
letter, I must sadly conclude
that Kris Emmott has misinterpreted the kerfuffle.
Then again, and on the
other hand, council could be
accused of a total lack of humor and a pomposity exceed-
Maple leaves
/ctLOdyyvri
u>dl fattier *a_?
r*;
-^zs^.^r^.)
ed only by their stupidity —
I just feel that this would be
an unfair accusation.
MIKE   COLEMAN
UCC President
'Re-evaluation
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I feel obliged to answer the
charges contained in Peter
Minshull's letter (Nov. 17).
Although lacking in factual
detail, on the whole his criticisms of the 1965 mock parliament were probably well
founded. However, in my
opinion, his placing of total
responsibility for the farce
on the Liberals is illogical
and unfounded.
Our withdrawal from this
year's mock parliament election and session was not done
"arrogantly and with total
disregard for the parliamentary traditions of our country." Rather, our purpose was
to promote a serious re-evaluation of the past structure of
mock parliament with a view
to shaping it into a more relevant forum of student political discussion.
I'm happy to say that all
campus political clubs are
rising to this challenge and
are presently engaged in a
cooperative attempt to reconstruct mock parliament to, in
Minshull's words, "use the
parliamentary system effectively."
SHAUN  SULLIVAN
President.
'Change attitudes'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
In reply to the exalted treasurer of the NDP, I am just
one of many students who
believe in the parliamentary
system and don't want to see
it done away with. Since I
have neither the prestige nor
the influence of Montador's
executive position I can only
ask him to use his power wisely in the defenso of parliament.
I am glad to learn that the
political parties on campus
have resolved not to engage
in trivia anymore. Unfortunately Montador is not following this policy as he has
chosen to make trivial criticisms of my letter and has
failed to comprehend the main
point.
Although it took The
Ubyssey almost two weeks to
publish my letter with the
last two paragraphs deleted,
I think the most important
point of the letter was clear
and is still pertinent. I was
making the point that despite
some amateur politicians who
cannot distinguish trivia from
serious debate, I still have
faith in the parliamental system.
Rather than substitute a
forum discussion or a teach-in
for parliament I want to see
parliament work. It is not the
form or the name that needs
changing, it is the attitude of
some campus politicians.
PETER MINSHULL
Acadia Camp
I EM
Hair
Stylists
YEAR ROUND STUDENT RATES
Presents
• SCIENTIFIC BEAUTY METHODS
• EXPERIENCED STYLISTS
• PROFESSIONAL  PRODUCTS
• REFRESHING  ATMOSPHERE
4603 W. 10th Ave. 224-4384
SEASON'S GREETINGS FROM THE STAFF
AT    THE    PLAYHOUSE
WORLD PREMIERE & CENTENNIAL PRODUCTION
Countdown
TO
■ IVrflVE I 9 now on sale at Vancouver Ticket Centra, 630 Hamilton
St., MU 3-3255; all Eaton's stores (charge them), and Town and Country
Home Furnishings, Kerrisdale and Richmond.
Half-Price Student Tickets now on Sale at Vancouver Ticket Centre
^y <rJjiamond with (^oiifidi
ence
Special 10%  Discount to all UBC Students
on Diamond Engagement Rings
FIRBANK'S
DOWNTOWN
BRENTWOOD
PARK ROYAL
Here Is An Opportunity To
Enlarge Your Catalogue Of Fine
Recordings At Sensible Prices
A wide select-ion is available from the Renaissance, Baroque, Romantic, Classical and Contemporary periods.
Shop early and pick up several for appreciative Xmas gifts.
Choose from such famous economy labels as:
Nonesuch Victrola
Music Guild Monitor
Everyman's Helliodoi
Serafhim (Angel) Richmond
Golden Guinea
Alexander & Axelson
APPLIANCES LTD.
4558 W. 10th Ave. 224-6811 Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 24, 1966
SUB drawings get nod
tenders will be called
The board of governors
Tuesday approved working
drawings of UBC's new student union building.
The board authorized a call
for tenders.
Alma Mater Society representatives met with the board
for the first time in two years
Tuesday afternoon to request
approval.
SUB construction schedule
calls for late-1968 late summer
completion.
The building will cost more
than $5 million, with students
contributing $3 million
through the annual assessment
of $15 a student begun in 1964-
65.
"This is a mgnificent contri
bution by the student body to
the quality of campus life for
decades to come," said president John Macdonald.
"It is the ninth major project at UBC initiated by the
student body and largely financed by student donations
and fund raising efforts."
The university leases to
AMS 175,000 square feet on
three floors of the new building at $1 a year for 45 years.
There is a 15 year renewal
option.
University food services will
control and manage 32,712
feet and the Bank of Montreal
will occupy 6,000 feet.
A minimum of 625 parking
spaces available for general
use  during   the   day   will foe
BOARD APPROVES
Estate renamed
for reimburser
The UBC board of governors
Tuesday approved renaming
the Yorkeen estate after Dr.
Cecil Green, who donated
$200,000 to buy the three and
a half acres of clifftop property.
The property consists of a
large mansion on endowment
land overlooking English Bay
and the Gulf of Georgia.
The new centre will provide
a meeting place for seminars
and conferences and will also
house the offices of the Three
Universities Capital Fund, the
University Resources Committee and the Alumni Annual
Giving Program.
Green's gift reimbursed UBC
for the $103,722 cost of purchasing Yorkeen from Senator
S. S. McKeen in 1964 and for
subsequent alterations.
It provided $66,393 for further renovations and furnishing to create a "town grown"
centre.
Described   as   "a leader   in
geographical exploration whose
love for science and higher
learning was first aroused in
Vancouver," Green holds an
honorary doctorate from UBC
awarded in 1964.
C/\J
REQUIRES
Graduates in Commerce, Economics,
Engineering, M.B.A., Maths. & Physics for placement in our Systems
offices. Interviewers will be on Campus Nov. 30th and Dec. 1st. You are
invited to attend to discuss the opportunities for employment within
CN. Interested students should make
appointments at the Student Placement Office.
NIKON
YASHICA
MINOLTA
IF YOUR ARE AN OWNER
OR ABOUT TO PURCHASE A CAMERA OR EQUIPMENT
OF THIS TYPE
AS A GIFT, FOR A HOBBY, OR FOR INDUSTRIAL
AND RESEARCH WORK
ALSO BESELER & OPENUS DARKROOM EQUIPMENT
THEN BE SURE TO SEE
MR. DENIS MASON
IMPORTERS REPRESENTATIVES
WHO WILL GIVE ADVICE, HELP, AND
DEMONSTRATE EQUIPMENT SUITABLE
TO YOUR NEEDS
FRIDAY, NOV. 25th - 3-9 P.M
SATURDAY, NOV. 26th - 9 - 6
RUSHANT CAMERAS LTD.
224-5858 4538 West 10th Ave. 224-9112
THE STORE WITH THE TECHNICAL PHOTO KNOWLEDGE
Parking at rear
built adjacent to SUB.
Provision is made for future
construction of a theatre or
SUB annex or both.
Janitor, watchman and maintenance service, heat water,
electricity, and gas will foe
provided by the university.
Building also includes a
1,200-seat food service area,
450-seat auditorium, ballroom,
conference, meeting, and seminar rooms, art and cultural
display areas, and senior student area.
"SUB will provide social
and cultural facilities for students, alumni, faculty and
community," said AMS president Peter Braund.
CONTROVERSIAL!
The critics disagi
trt or Pornography?
"One ol the best  films ot what  it is really
like to be 18."
-LOS   ANGELES   TIMES
formerly Sweet Substitute
With/**4*
ALL OUR SKIS ARE
GUARANTEED AGAINST
BREAKAGE FOR ONE
SEASON.
10% Student Discount on
Presentation of Student
Card.
336 West Pender St.
681-2004
I.AKKY ki:\rs
aressed
Filmed   m   Vancouver
1965   Film   Festival  Award Winner
NOW  PLAYING-LYRIC  THEATRE
SPECIAL
EVENTS
Presents
The Vancouver
Symphony Orch.
Today — Armouries — 12:30 — 35c
X, Q
852 Granville St.
Vancouver 2, B.C.
SATURDAY 2-4 P.M.
Sp^ciaJU^injLp ul ImpoJdsuL knit
AuitA. and. ^ohmal&u
FORMALS $20.00 to $150.00
— one of a kind
KNIT SUITS $30.00 to $45.00
— 2 and 3 piece styles
WOOL SUITS $75.00 to $135.00
— from London
any purchase during the fashion show 20% off
- Also special discount for students at all times
ito*. Lije-oA.
r Thursday,   November  24,   1966
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
COUNCIL JOLLIES
BY KRIS EMMOTT
Flynn flies out in time
An informed guess at the
proceedings of a recent science
undergrad society council
meeting . . .
President Frank Flynn
stands up and announces,
"Mother says I've been working too hard and I quit."
Consternation reigns. Now
Flynn knows perfectly well
that nobody else wants the
thankless task of attempting
to run science. They all beg
him to say.
"Well, o.k.," says Flynn,
laughing up his sleeve, "tout
you kids will have to take
over all my AMS duties."
"Fine, fine," says the science
council with relief, and everybody is happy. Happiest of
all is Flynn, who has now
gotten out of attending AMS
council meetnigs.
Council censured Flynn for
not wanting to waste every
Monday evening on council's
non-activities. His mistake, of
course, was in ever attending
at all. Messrs. Redenback,
Poulos and Robinson, three
other censured presidents,
drop in once or twice a year
for appearance's sake, but the
library school rep has the
right idea. He hasn't attended
a single meeting since he was
elected last spring.
And indeed, why should
he? You might as well non-
represent away from the
council  as on  it.
Last Monday night the
SUB architect was explaining
the floor plan as councillors
sat on the edge of the big U-
shaped table around him, feet
dangling. Tuned to trivia, the
reporter notes shoeshines.
Lome Hudson has only
decent shine. (Perfectionist.
President Braund wears nubbly leather that doesn't need
shining. Busy man. Engineer
Newell, also busy man,  lets
his shoeshine go to pot.
Newell has a habit of leaning his head on his hand,
wincing and drawing his hand
across his brow, seemingly in
terrible pain. It's getting to
you, Eric. Try Alison Rice's
pain-killer. She comes, sensibly keeps her mouth shut,
and knits. So far she's tatted
up a lovely sweater and is
going great guns on a baby
blanket. Yessir, she's got the
right attitude.
What else can you do when
the boredom strikes? You
could count the number of
uh's in one of Lome Hudson's speeches—record is 111.
Scrutinizing the guest list
for the November 7 council
meeting, we note the presence
of three members of the Society for the Investigation of
the Apathetic Multitudes on
the Alma Mater Society Council. They are sociology students. They too stopped coming after a few meetings, being unable to stand it any
longer,   but   while   she   was
there Marilyn Hill took note
of who spoke the most. At
one check per speech, Charlie
Boylan and Peter Braund collected upwards of twenty
checks apiece in one hour,
whereas nine other councillors hadn't a check amongst
them. These nine are undergrad society presidents.
Now since the executive
does all the work, all the talking and indeed all the quibbling, why don't councillors
abandon all pretense of work
and hold the next meeting at
the Fraser Arms? The executive can get all the business
out of the way at their regular Thursday meeting, and
. . . but what's this? You say
they've already decided to
hold the next meeting at the
Fraser Arms? Private meeting
room upstairs? Regular business for as long as anyone remains vertical?
Well, there it is. They've
admitted the whole thing is
a farce. Mr. Flynn, I salute
you. You got out just in time.
A Full
Feature,
Quality
German
S.LR. for
99
THE PRAKTICA NOVA features quality where it counts and low, low
price! The famous f2.8 TESSAR lens is low in cost yet exhibits the brilliant
definition and freedom from flare -that made it a world standard. The
body is an up-to-date version  of the original  PRAKTICA that had all the
bugs  weeded   out  years  ago.   In-
Kerrisdale Cameras
2170 West 41st
266-2622
stant return mirror; auto diaph-
rogrm, Pentax-Praktica universal
thread, interchangable lens; full
synch and focal-plane shutter to
1 /500th.
Career Opportunities In Iron Ore Industry
at
Quebec Cartier Mining Company
Opportunities ore offered in ENGINEERING: Civil
Mechanical
Electrical
Mining
Metallurgical
Quebec Cartier Mining Company is one of the largest iron and ore mining companies in Canada. The mine and concentrator are located at Gagnon, Quebec,
with shipping facilities and Headquarters located at Port Cartier, Quebec.
Company recruiters will interview interested candidates on the U.B.C. campus,
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1966
For more information on Job openings, benefits, etc.
Placement Office immediately.
.  .  please contact your
Frat trophies disappear,
value estimated at $500
EDMONTON (CUP)—About 50 trophies have been
stolen from the University of Alberta's men's fraternities
during the last three weeks.
Inter-Fraternity Council president Bob Rosen says
the estimated value of the missing trophies is $500.
Rosen says he believes the losses are not due to
raids by other fraternities.
Nor is theft believed to be the main objective as
other articles in the fraternity houses were left untouched, Rosen said.
from  the  style  centre ...
RICHARDS & FARISH LTD.
786 GRANVILLE STREET
ALSO
THE COLLEGE SHOP
802 GRANVILLE STREET
'yjDWL    ShjDfL' Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 24,  1966
Announcement increases
functions of two staffers
Two faculty changes were
announced Tuesday by president John Macdonald.
Gordon Selman, executive
assistant to Macdonald, was
named secretary to the UBC
board of governors.
Macdonald also announced
the appointment of math professor Benjamin Moyls as
assistant dean of graduate
studies.
Macdonald said: "Selman's
new duties will involve facilitating the work of the board
by supervising the administrative tasks related to board
meetings and decisions."
Selman, former president of
the Canadian Association of
Directors of Extension and
Summer Schools and vice-
president of the Canadian
Citizenship Council, became
executive assistant to the
president in Dec. 1965.
He enrolled at UBC in 1945
and graduated with a BA and
MA.
Moyls, a member of the
math department since 1947,
will take up his new position
Jan. 1, 1967.
"Moyls' distinguished career
as teacher and researcher, his
long association with this university, and his wealth of administrative experience will be
invaluable," said graduate
studies dean McTaggart-
Cowan.
He was the chairman of the
committee which released the
report on the administrative
structure of UBC.
First enrolled at UBC in
1936, he won the governor-
general's medal and a gradute
scholarship when he graduated
in 1940 with a BA.
At UBC Moyls became an
assistant professor in 1948,
associate professor in 1954,
and full professor in 1959.
GORDON SELMAN
.  . board secretary
BENJAMIN MOYLS
. . . dean's aid
B.C. HYDRO & POWER AUTHORITY
requires
ENGINEERS
for its expanding activities
There are excellent opportunities for graduates to obtain
a variety of training and experience in many locations
throughout the Province, leading to promotions and increased salaries commensurate with responsibility.
Please consult your bulletin board and our brochure
"Engineering the Future" for background information
and description of B.C. Hydro's diverse activities and
engineering career opportunities.
Campus Interviews:
November 28, 29, 30
December 2
We are looking forward to discussing your career plans
with you and in exploring how your interests and talents
could ibe best utilized in this rapidly expanding organization. Please arrange an appointment time through the
iStudent Service Office.
RECORD SALE
\
FAMOUS  R.C.A.  LABEL
Our Entire $4.20 Group
JEFFERSON
. M. ,i	
HOW
ONLY
each
Thousands to Choose From
Here are a few example*:
Harry Belafonte • Elvis Presley • Henry
Mancini • Al Hirl • Sound of Music •
Jim Reeves • The Brass Ring • Fiddler
on the Roof • Glenn Yarbrough • Sam
Cooke.
All Hm Gnat Artitti—Lata* Hit.—
Broadway Muiwab    Rtfck and Roll-
Popular—Folk Music, Etc.
Merry down — pick out yarn fovowire record
end mv*. Cfcooit from Peps, Clonics, Showtumt.
All or* mow hi stock ot wir Record Department.
LOWEST PRICES IN TOWN
ABSOUND
Open Friday Until 9 p.m.
571 GRANVILLE (at Dunsmuir)
MU 2-4846
EAST BOUND STUDENTS TAKE NOTE:
Xmas Train leaving for Montreal via Edmonton, Saskatoon, Winnipeg and Toronto.
$ SAVE ON SPECIAL GROUP RATES $
Example: Vancouver to Toronto $33.80
Contact Immediately: Bruce Ph. 291-1984
Excellent Tutors, Moderate Rates
Do Well On Christmas hams
History Italian
French Mathematics
Spanish Physics
Russian Law
Courses in English Composition & Literature a Specialty
EXTRA COACHING MAY MAKE THE  DIFFERENCE
PHONE 736-6923 AT ANY TIME
PAPERBACK
NEW ARRIVALS
List No. 82 - November 21, 1966
Before The Mayflower, Bennett (Pelican)  2.93
Bridge  Force  Davey  (Contact  Press)      2.00
British  Politics People, Parties & Parliament. King (Heath)  2.50
Confrontation:  Black & White. Bennett (Pelican).  2.95
Consumer Credit in Canada. Ziegel & Olley  (Univ. of
Saskatchewan)     5.00
Controls From Within. Redl & Wineman (Free Press)  3.35
The Cool  Crazy Committed World  of The  Sixties. Berton
(McClelland & Stewart)  _   2.50
Culture Consumers.  Toffler (Pelican)  1.85
Economics of the Soviet Bloc. Wellisz (McGraw-Hill)  2.90
Equality. Wilson (Hutchinson) ,  2.75
Ernest Hemingway.  Baker  (Scribner)         2.70
Essays in The Philosophy of History. Collingwood (McGraw-Hill)  2.30
50 North-Canada's Atlantic Battleground. Easton (Ryerson)  2.50
The First World War. Taylor (Penguin)  2.95
Frank Lloyd Wright. Smith (Spectrum)   2.65
From Schumacher To Brandt. The Story of German Socialism 1945-1965.
Childs.   (Pergamon  Press)  _    ...     2.95
Guide to The Study of International Relations. Zawodny. (Chandler) 2.25
History of Africa South of The Sahara. Wiedner (Vintage)  3.55
How To Use a Microscope. Shepherd (Signet)    .60
Insect  Pests.  Fichter  (Golden   Press)              _       1.10
Introduction  To   Industrial  Clinical  Psychology.  Miner  (McGraw-Hill) 2.90
Khrushchev & The Soviet Leadership 1957-1964. Linden (John Hopkins) 2.45
The Lean  Years.  Bernstein  (Pelican)   .                       . 2.75
The Lost Girl. Lawrence (Penguin)        _   .    „„     1.35
Khrushchev. Frankland (Pelican)                   _            _.                __ 1.25
Linguistics and English Linguistics. Allen (Appleton Century Crafts)    - 1.80
Man-Machine Engineering. Chapanis (Wadsworth)            1.75
The  Man  Robert  Burns.  Smith  (Ryerson)  _     _     _.    3.25
The Meaning of Dreams.  Hall  (McGraw-Hill)      2.90
Men and Places. Plumb (Pelican)   -_.   _  _  1.35
Milton. Hanford (Appleton Century Crofts)    1.35
Nasser's  Egypt. Mansfield  (Penguin)                 .95
Outlines of Classical Literature. Rose (Meridian)         _    1.80
Penguin Dictionary of the Theatre. Taylor    (Penguin)  1.25
Poets on Poetry. Norman    (Free Press)          -    -    -  2.75
Political   Ideologiese of the Twentieth  Century.  Kohn  (Harper)  2.25
Politics of Escalation In Vietnam. Schurmann et al (Premier)  .60
Principles of Topological Psychology. Lewin (McGraw-Hill)  2.90
Problems of Life. Bertalanffy (Harper Torch)     1.45
Psychology Experiment. Anderson (Wadsworth)      2.45
Psychology of Union-Management Relations. Stagner & Rosen
(Wadsworth)   1.75
The Queens and the Hive. Sitwell (Penguin)   .      ..    2.50
Reader's Guide to Literary Terms. Bechson & Ganz (Noonday)   .  2.10
A Rader's Guide to Marcel Proust. Hindus (Noonday)   2.10
Religions In America. Rosten (Simon & Schuster)  2.25
Report To Greco.  Kazantzakis (Bantam)             1.25
The Rise and Fall of Stalin. Payne    (Avon)  1.65
Safety Last. O'Connell Myers (Avon)      _        .60
Science of Science. Goldsmith & MacKay (Pelican)  . _.  1.35
The Second International 1889-1914. Joll (Harper Colophon)   1.85
Selected  Poetry & Prose of Shelley. Shelley (Signet)    .95
The Selected Poetry of Browning. Browning (Signet)  .95
Social Psychology of the Work Organization. Tannenbaum
(Wadsworth)       ... _    .     —  ..    __      1.75
The Soviet Union Today. Whiting  (Praeger)                 3.60
The Spectroscope. Reid (Signet)                            _  .60
The Spice Box of Earth. Cohen (McClelland & Stewart)  2.50
Stalin.   Deutscher (Pelican)   ...   _       2.50
Swift  In An  Hourglass. Gustafson  (McClelland  & Stewart)       2.50
Ten Canadian  Poets.  Pacey (Ryerson  Press)     2.75
Three Men. Evans (Vintage)                                2.20
Toward   Peace  In   Indo-China.   Eden   (Oxford)               1.95
Tropical Africa Today. Kimble & Steel (McGraw-Hill)                         ___ 3.35
The Truth About Vietnam. Robinson & Kemp (Greenleaf Classic)  1.75
Tudor and Stuart Drama.  Ribner (Appleton  Century  Crofts) 1.45
The United States In World Affairs 1965. Stebbins (Harper Colophon)    4.55
Victorian Poets and Prose Writers. Buckley (Appleton Century Crofts) 1.80
Wolf Willow. Steqner (Compass)                  _   .... _     2.50
Writing   In  Canada.  Whalley   (MacMillan  of  Canada)  .95
Your Local Government. Rowat (MacMillan of Canada)  1.50
UBC BOOKSTORE
V-k,. Thursday,   November  24,   1966
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
BRIEF GIVEN
Paper wants liquor ads
HALIFAX (CUP)—Dalhousie
University students' council is
trying to get liquor advertising
back in its campus newspaper,
The Gazette.
Council president John Young
planned to present a (brief to
the chairman of the Nova
Scotia Liquor Control Board
when it convened Tuesday.
Until a year ago when an unnamed Nova Scotia university
president complained to the
board, The Gazette carried advertising from a local brewery.
The ads, which had appeared
for at least three years in almost every issue of The Gazette, listed current events on
campus. They were informative, and no attempt was made
to convince students to consume the brewery's product, a
Gazette spokesman said.
Get their man,
but not for keeps
Men enjoy being arrested, when the job is done by
female bobbies, that is.
So said Margaret Heald, an
ex-detective, in a talk to 60
law students Wednesday.
Heald, and her partner,
Beryl Derwin are on a cross-
Canada tour, sponsored by the
British Information Service.
Both women are ex-detective
inspectors for Scotland Yard.
Heald said, "Training and
work are basically the same
for men and women, but female
Resignation
move denied
REGINA (CUP) — University of Saskatchewan's students'
council gave its president a full
vote of confidence recently
when it refused to accept his
resignation.
Council president Don Mitchell had resigned after dropping all his fall-term classes.
He said he left as he was no
longer eligible to hold the position. However, he will attend
on class on an audit basis and
is to write a supplemental in
December.
Mitchell also said he intends
to resume a full course of study
when the spring term begins
in January-
Council said it felt this was
enough to allow him to remain
in the students' union and hold
office.
officers work mainly among
women and children."
Derwin outlined the duties
of Scotland Yard, saying it
handled most types of police
work, but "Scotland Yard
work is different from that of
local police forces."
She added, "Smaller forces
in England are slowly being
absorbed into larger ones."
Crimes involving narcotics,
prostitution, forgery and murder are all handled by the
Yard, with many of the cases
being investigated by female
officers.
Derwin said the days of
policewomen being employed
strictly for the searching of
female offenders are now gone.
■_»^_M>«_*©^_NI«_»0<__MI^_M»«_M*__»~«_M>«
WHEN THE NIGHT BEGINS
AND THE VANCOUVER LIGHTS
SHINE
ITALIAN   PARADISE  SWINGS.
Take an Angel to
the Paradise
Enjoy the best Italian Dish]
Open   every   night   except   Sunday
5:00 p.m. — 2:00 a.m.
LIVE BAND
NO COVER CHARGE
SPECIAL
U.B.C. STUDENT DISCOUNT j
10% to 15% an weekdays
Suddenly, the brewery was
ordered to stop advertising.
Students' council members
George Munroe and John Graham who questioned the ruling
were told to contact the liquor
control board.
Said an irate Munroe: "The
ruling is ridiculous to say the
least. At Dalhousie the administration has never objected.
"Most of us are over 21 and
yet we are considered too tender and impressionable to read
at the bottom of a list of events:
'This advertisement inserted
with the compliments of X
Brewery'."
SPECIAL CLEARANCE
SHOE SALE
MEN'S AND WOMEN'S
HIGH GRADE SHOES
Clojsk.
ITALIAN PARAD/SE
CABARET       !
1047 Granville      685-9412 i
JUST ARRIVED!
Calgary Raw-Hide Leather1
Sheep-Tex Coll Al  & Lining
Only $39.50
#&**
4445 W. 10th
near  Sasamat
2901 W. B'dwy.
at  Mackenzie
Don't Get Caught
Your
SNOW TIRES DOWN
LET
UBC
HOME
SERVICE
keep you horn those embarrassing moments
P.S.      WINTERIZE  NOW!!
2180 Allison
224-3939
4564 West 10th
j EYEGLASS FRAMES
▼ TO CHOOSE. FROM    d* ^^
I WITH YOUR ^
I
l
»
I
l
 I
f Granville Optical Ltd.   f
L861 GRANVILLE, VANCOUVER, MUtual 3-8921 A
Open daily including  Saturday — Ne appointment needed ■
«mmm*"*mmmm><m^mm»>^mmm+..mmm*"*mmm+> <•*%**+■'**»*
TO CHOOSE FROM
WITH YOUR
PRESCRIPTION FOR GLASSES
Prkod from only
Money Back Guarantee
EYE EXAMINATIONS
No Appointment Needed
Contact Lenses Sniy_c.dour_  $49.50
Any colour.
Only     .
Check For Yourself. Lowest Prices in Townl
•FREE CREDIT TO STUDENTS
J.  L. TYRER,  C.L.U.
F.  C. HUDDLESTAN
Serving your Insurance needs through your own unique
CAMSI and CUS
LIFE PLANS
New Low Rates Now In Effect
Approximately 30%   lower than previous
Underwritten   by
"Your Link with Security"
Request    a    brochure    including   all   details   from:
Vancouver Branch: Room 300, 2695 Granville
Vancouver 9, B.C., Phone 736-6637
Canadian Premier Life
INSURANCE COMPANY Page 10
THE     UBYSSEY
^Thursday, November 24, 1966
Waterloo
dissenters
hit profits
WATERLOO (CUP) — More
than 200 University of Waterloo students demonstrated Nov.
18, climaxing four years of discontent with university bookstore profits.
The highly-organized demonstration, which began as a bookstore sit-in ended in a march to
university president J. G.
Hagey's office.
The students were protesting
high bookstore prices and the
$7,000 profit make by the bookstore last year.
An invoice, found by chance
inside a book, revealed a 66 per
cent markup in book prices.
President Hagey refused to
make an on-the-spot commitment to the students concerning reduction in bookprices.
"I don't think your demands
are unfair," he said, "but I don't
say that they are fair either."
He made no promises regarding a student proposal to place
two student members on the
bookstore committee.
Some things
You DESIRE . . .
Some You Need!
And one of these is education. Imperatively! Once it
was a prerequisite of success. Now you need it just
to get by! YOU know this.
Consult us. Vancouver's
first tutoring college. (Still
here because we get results). To third year University — Our staff is fully
qualified. Success rate?
Above 90 per cent pass in
subjects tutored.
Universal Tutoring
College
(Vancouver) Ltd.
571 Howe Street
683-8464
BIRD CALLS-Available Now
Be sure of your copy - buy early - limited quantity
PUBLICATIONS OFFICE AND BOOKSTORE - ONLY 75 CENTS
THf WAY OP...
Be it over a suburban acre or on campus the rugged look
reigns with authority. A look accomplished with a skillful
combination of a sporty sweater, neat shirt and dress slacks
. . . each superbly styled, deftly detailed and tailored to
perfection ... all specialties of the Bay Campus and Career
Shop, second floor.
Bulky wool pullover . . . high
V neck, tapered body, raglan
sleeves . . . close bulky knit
in rich marl blends. S, M, L,
XL. Each 22.50
Dress shirts buttoned down . .
Oxford cloth with long point
collar, ibox pleat back, tapered body, long sleeves with
button cuffs. Blue, shell white
or corn; 14-16V& 32-35.
Each $8
Wool drew slacks in two
styles . . . self-belt loop with
pleatless front, slim leg. In
grey, blue, black, olive or
brown. 28-38. Each 19.95
Use your PBA to shop for on
campus wear ... in the Bay
Campus and Career Shop,
second floor.
*■ Thursday,   November  24,   1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11
—al harvey
MIDNIGHT OIL BURNED late in the library Tuesday night when students stayed till
closing time at 10 p.m. cramming for fast-approaching exams. The registrar's office will
have the exam timetable Monday.
Grad booze cruise stalled;
'not enough fun and games'
The grad ibooze cruise may
never weigh anchor this year.
The grad class executive says
it is considering a different
type of social function to interest and accommodate more
graduates.
"In the past," said grad president Bert McKinnon, law 3,
"only albout 200 of a graduating
class of 3,000 have showed up."
McKinnon said the work in
organizing the cruises has hardly been worthwhile in view of
the number of people taking
Prof illustrates
music advances
Final pre-Christmas lecture
sponsored by the Vancouver
Institute will be given Saturday by Dr. G. Welton Marquis,
head of UBC's department of
music.
Marquis will give an illustrated lecture entitled
"New directions in music,"
at 8:15 p.m. in UBC's Buchanan building.
SATURDAY
NIGHT
NOVEMBER 26
INDOOR
AUTO RACES
FOREIGN STOCKS
A spectacular cross
between a stock car race
and a demolition derby.
AGR0D0ME
Time trials 7:30 • Races 8:30
Adult $2.00, Student $1.25
Children under 12 Free with Adults!
part.
"Last year we had a $200
deficit on the cruise," he said.
"Instead," says McKinnon,
"we want to plan some sort of
social evening to be held at a
downtown supper club. If we
hold the affair downtown there
might be two separate evenings
to accommodate more people."
Grad students who wish to
register approval or disapproval for the plans can do so
at an executive meeting today
at noon in Brock council chambers.
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
WUS INTERNATIONAL SEMINAR
Anyone wishing to apply for the World University
Service Seminar in Canada next summer please pick
up application form in W.U.S. office, Brock Extension.
Deadline for application form returns is Nov. 28th.
12 month Scholarship tenable at any university in
Germany, in any field open to graduate or graduating
students. Applications & information at W.U.S. office,
Brock Extension 257. Deadline Dec. 9.
1058 ALBERNI
685 - 0586
NEED A CAR?
FOR AN EVENING
OR A WEEKEND
ONLY $5.00 plus 5c a mile on ANY of our cars over night.
5:00 p.m. • 9:00 a.m.
24 Hours Weekend
$5.00 $12.00
RAMBLERS 5c/mile 5c/mile
VALIANTS
$6.00
5c/mile
$14.00
5c/mile
GALAXIE 500's, H.T.
FURY Hi's, H.T.
$8.00
5c/mile
$18.00
5c/mile
MUSTANG'S, H.T.
SPORT FURY
$8.00
5c/mile
$18.00
5c/mlle
ALL RATES PLUS GAS
(Ages 21-25 Collision Insurance Extra)
SPECIAL RATES FOR TEAM,  CLUB AND OTHER ORGANIZATIONS
HARVARD PROF TALKS
Professor Harry Levin of Harvard University will
give this year's Sedgewick Memorial Lecture on Friday.
Levin is the Babbitt Professor of Comparative
Literature and his topic at UBC will be "Counter-
currents in the Study of English Literature."
Levin has held a number of posts as a visiting
professor at Oxford, Paris and Tokyo.
He is the author of a number of books and articles
including a study of Christopher Marlowe and a critical
introduction to James Joyce.
SALE - SALE - SALE
Totem GRAD Books
1966's - NOW ONLY $2.00
1965's - NOW ONLY $1.00
1964s - NONE AVAILABLE
1963's - NOW ONLY $1.00
1962's - NOW ONLY $1.00
While Supply Lasts
PUBLICATIONS OFFICE, BROCK HALL
CAMPUS INTERVIEWS
November 28 - 29, 1966
Special interest in these fields:
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
COMMERCE AND  BUSINESS  ADMINISTRATION
GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS
For appointments, contact
The  University Placement Service Office
HUSKY OIL CANADA LTD.
ALL  THESE  METALS
ARE  AVAILABLE  AT
GRASSIES  ON  SEYMOUR
Designed to any special requirement whether it be
watches — rings or exquisite table pieces. Come in
and ask for it by name.
STUDENT PREFERENTIAL DISCOUNTS ACKNOWLEDGED
BUDGET TERMS
10% DOWN
Bel. In 11 menths
5s#i*_--££.//»
OPEN 5 DAYS
A WEEK
FRIDAY TIL 9
566 SEYMOUR . . . 685-2271 Page 12
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 24, 1966
'TWEEN CLASSES
Redshirts chase jumpers
EUS
Kangaroo hunt today at noon
on main mall. Bring running
shoes.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Special events presents the
Vancouver Symphony Orchestra today at noon in the armory. Admission 35 cents.
GEOPHYSICS
David Small speaks on lead
isotope   measurements   in   the
beltian  area,  Idaho,  today  at.
3:30 in Henn. 301.
SPORTS CAR CLUB
School for rallyists, today at
noon in Chem. 250.
VIET NAM COMM
Paul Phillips speaks on U.S.
foreign policy  towards  China
and its effect on Viet Nam, today at noon in Bu. 104.
GRAD CLASS
Executive meeting today at
noon in Brock council chambers.
NEWMAN CENTRE
Meeting today at noon in the
St. Mark's bridge room, concerning Children's Christmas
party. Bring record of donations.
NEWMAN CENTRE
Tapes and discussion on the
Council    and    the    Renewing
Church, today at noon in the
St. Mark's music room.
GERMAN CLUB
Coffee   party    today   from
12:30 to 2:30 in IH 400.
SUS
The movie Winter Olympics
will be shown today at noon in
Chem.-250.
PHYSOC
Biophysics  grad talk today
at 1:30 in Henn. 307. Lab tour
will follow.
COLLEGE LIFE
Josh McDowell speaks on
Jesus Christ and his impact on
U of T buys
own hospital
TORONTO (CUP) — University of Toronto Monday bought
Ontario's first university-owned
teaching and active-treatment
hospital for $1 million.
Sunnybrook Hospital, which
cost $14 million to build nearly 25 years ago, will continue
to live up to the premise made
when it was dedicated Armistice Day, 1943, to be "a living
memorial to the men and women of the armed forces ... to
honor the dead and to care for
the sick and injured."
Veterans will receive priority treatment under the transfer terms "so long as the need
exists."
Changing veteran's needs
and the growing demand for
civilian hospital beds led to the
changeover at Sunnybrook.
history,    tonight   at    9:01    in
Lower   Mall   common   block
lounge.
AMS CHARTER FLIGHT
Slides of camping in Europe
will be shown today at noon
in Bu. 100.
BLIND PAINTER
Gilmore Hanko, a totally
blind painter will lecture and
show his work, today at noon
in Bu. 225.
SPORTS CAR CLUB
Ladies    division   gymkhana
for club members only, Sunday
at 9:30 a.m. at the top of C-lot.
Classes for Yank tanks down
through hondas.
HENRI COMMITTEE
Wally Gnorts shows slides of
Chicoutimi, tonight at 6:30 in
Robson 325.
MUSSOC
Those interested in playing
for the orchestra in How to
Succeed . . . are asked to phone
the musical director at 228-
8659.
Grits rise to debate,
Pubsters grab victory
Ubyssey editorial policy was vindicated and campus
grits routed at a noon debate Tuesday.
Editor John Kelsey and columnist Gabor Mate
successfully defended the negative of resolved that
political parties are an effective vehicle of social change.
First negative Mate lambasted a weak Liberal
affirmative argument by showing the basic philosophic
contradiction between political parties and change.
Editor Kelsey then rounded out the negative stand
with historical examples, and an argument involving
the survival instinct.
Liberals A. Gould and M. Coleman appeared crestfallen before the crowd of 200 at the debate.
The Huberman Educational Institute Ltd.
TUTORIAL COLLEGE
"Knowledge and success through learning power"
Director:
M. HUBERMAN, B.A., LL.B., B.C.I.C.
3601 West 16th Ave
228-8028
263-4808
GOING TO EUROPE?
IT'S CAMP TO CAMP
Slide Showing Today
Bu. 100 — 12:30
"Camping in Europe with Autotours"
PRESENT THIS COUPON
and receive from
PETERS
ICE CREAM PARLOR
3204 W. Broadway and Park Royal
ONE SUNDAE OF YOUR CHOICE
at halt price
GOOD UNTIL DECEMBER 3. 1966
■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■a
This weekend don't be left out
join the "in crowd"
Dance to Terry and The Viscounts
featuring the dynamic Bud Currie
Friday and  Saturday  Night at the
EMBASSY    BALLROOM
1024   Davie The   Place   With   the   Dancing   Lights"
Dancing   from    10:00   until   1:00   a.m. Admission   only   $1,50
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00 Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
LOST — SMALL OBLONG POCKET
watch, pigskin case. BMA 101 or
Brock lot. Reward, Jane Rule,
Bu  2260 or  224-0567.
REWARD FOR RETURN OP
blue bag containing skates,
gloves. M. Kerr, etc. Phone Peter
224-7809.
Greetings
12
Coming Dances
12A
AFTERTHOUGHT HAPPENING
presents:
"BRAVE   NEW WORLD"
Tom Northcott Trio
Friday,  November  25,   8:30  p.m.
DANCE TO "LA PLATA" AND HIS
exotic Latin American Band. I.H.
Dec. 2nd, 8:30. Members $1.00, non
members, $1.25.
Special Notices
13
SKIERS SPECIAL RATES.
Double Rooms. Phone 492-2969.
Write Braemore Lodge. Reservations 2402 South Main St., Penticton.
SPECIAL ANTIQUE SALE — OLD
mugs. Selling at real low prices.
See Miscellaneous For Sale.
HAPPY   BIRTHDAY   H.    BEAR.
Love, Tiger.
Transportation
14
RIDE WANTED TO CALGARY
leaving after Dec. 16. Share gas,
driving, Bill, 224-5373.
RIDE WANTED FROM 70TH AND
Montcalm. 9:30-5:30 lectures, phone
Dave,   AM  6-2732  or FA 5-5860.
Wanted
15
Travel Opportunities
16
GOING TO EUROPE? SEE OUR
slide show on camping in Europe.
Bu.100 Thurs. 12:30 noon. A.M.S.
Charter flight.
AVAILABLE UBC CHARTER
flight; 2 tickets London to Vancouver, August 25, 1967. Phone Ed,
876-8069.
AUTOMOTIVE   8c  MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1954 CHEVROLET IN GOOD RUN-
ning order. Good battery, tires
and radio. Car is on the Campus.
Phone Ed, 224-9667.
TR3   WELL   MAINTAINED,    CITY
tested. RE 8-5537.
FOR SALE: 1957 JAG XK140. NEW!
Motor, clutch, top, exhaust system,
carbs. Phone 733-4090 after 6 p.m.
Sunday,  anytime.
MUST SELL ! "59 SINGER GA-
zelle, 4 dr. Saloon, 27,000 mi. Mech.
exc. Body good. WA 2-1675.
1 :00   a.m.
'57 STUDE HAWK V8, STICK.
New trans., orig. owner. Good
cond. 433-8611; eves. 626-6884.
FOR SALE, 1957 AUSTIN A-66.
Call 228-2794 after 6 p.m. Ask for
Don.
*54 FORD V8 AUTO. SOUND BODY,
snow tires. 4572 Main St., Ph.
TR 6-7675. Best offer.
•64 FURY CONV. 383. P.S. & P.B.
Bucket seats, auto. 879-6427.
URGENT! MUST SELL '64 MGR
Mint condition. Wire wheels, new
tires, head rests, ski rack. Must
be sold by this weekend. Must see.
WA 2-8954.
1960 AUSTIN A-40 WAGON.  GOOD
condition. YU 5-3058.
Accessories ft Repairs
22
V.W.  CHAINS—GOOD CONDITION.
Phone 738-2957 after 4:00 p.m.
RADIO AND SPEAKER FOR 1960
Ford for sale — $45. Contact R.
Blair at noon in Ubyssey office.
Automobiles Wanted
25
BUSINESS SERVICES
Miscellaneous
34
Scandals
39A
CUT IT SHORTER AND KEEP IT
longer—why not try it! Campus
Barber Shop, Brock ext.
SURF SVISDAHL IS STILL WOW-
ing the fans with good vibrations.
NEWS BREAK — SANTA CLAUS
was a Byzantine Emperor! Is
Peter Rabbit really Athena,
Chris?
Typing
43
Professional Typing
ARDALE   GRIFFITHS   LIMITED
70th   &  Granville  Street        263-4530
PROFESSORS
Fully   exp.   in   the   typing   of   your
theses.  Reas.  rates.  Ref.  Inger 872-
7380.
STUDENTS!
Am once again free to accept your
typing   requirements.   Elec.   Typewriter.   Inger   872-7380.
LEGAL SECRETARY NEEDS EX-
tra work! Will type: essays, thesis,
notes. Call AL 5-8588 (after 6 p.m.)
EXPERIENCED TYPIST WILL DO
essays and thesis at home, 25c per
page. Mrs. Hay, 5-3963 Bond St.,
Bby. 1, 433-6666 after 6 p.m.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
WHIPPING  PIG   PORKS   PIGS.
DEAR PAM. WHY HAVE YOU
been avoiding me? Love and kisses
G.T.
THANKS F. PAY: HAD A BALL
Wed. note. Found a real neat B.G.
with red top car and a cool side
window. C.  (H.S.) L.
CON-ARTIST? STRAIGHT COM-
mission. Approx. 35% part-tine.
Ph.  872-2276.
WANTED: YOUNG MAN TO TAKE
group of boys from private school
skiing on Mount Seymour on
Saturdays next January and February. Phone CA 4-1304 daytime.
Music
63
SAX AND ORGAN PLAYERS URG-
ently needed for R&B Band.
Phone Lincoln, 876-9173, after 9
INSTRUCTION — SCHOOLS
Instruction-Tutoring
64
ENGLISH, FRENCH HISTORY
lessons by tutor, B.A., M.A.,
B.L.S. 736-6923. Also pronunciation lessons In French, Spanish,
German, Russian, qualified tutors.
736-6923.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS—the most useful book
on the campus. Student telephone
directory available. Now. Limited
Number. .Buy now, only 76 cants
from Publications Office, Brook
Hall,  or the Bookstore.
STUDENT COUNCIL HAS VOTED
to discontinue Campus Life so
we are selling 1964, 19(5 and lit*
issues for only 60 cents — Publications office in Brock.
SPECIAL SALE OF "OLD MUGS"
in old Totem Grad Books. 1966
issues now $2.00, 1965's only $1.00
(No 1964's), 1963's, $1.00. Publications  Office,   Brock   Hall.
ONE MATCHED PAIR OF KNEIS-
sel Black Star skis, 200 cm. Never
used.  Phone Murray, 224-9662.
GUITAR AMP, $125, TREMOLO, 12"
speaker, bass treble, vol. controls.
Phone Bob after 7,  277-5061.
BELTONE ELECTRIC BASS AMP.
45' wfrtt output, two heavy-duty
12-inch speakers, $190.00 Cash or
terms. Phone John after 6:00 p.m.
at 435-8389.
RENTALS  ft  REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ROOM WITH BREAKFAST. MALE
student sharing. 2427 West 3rd
Ave.   Phone:   731-6062.
GIRLS
FURNISHED    ROOM    FOR   RENT,
3461 West 3rd. Phone 738-6980.
MALE SLEEPING ROOM FOR
rent. Near Gate. Private entrance..
Available end November. Phone
224-7623 after 6.
MAIN FLOOR BED - SITTING
room, kitchen privileges, near
MacDonald.   Phone   733-4670   eves
ROOM OR SUITE WANTED CLOSE
to UBC. Phone Mary, 224-3103,
after 5.
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD CHEAP. CALL
Andy Sandilands, Zeta Psi Fraternity 2250 Wesbrook Cres. 224-
9662.
SHORT OF FUNDS? ENJOY COOK-
ing? Music? Room and board close
to Gates in return for cooking family evening meal five days a week.
Optional additional light domestic
work  paid   by   the  hour.   224-7574.
Furn. Houses ft Apts.
83
Real Estate
86
CLASSIFIED
BUY  -  SELL  -  RENT
WITH
UBYSSEY

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0127061/manifest

Comment

Related Items