UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Sep 14, 1978

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0127059.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0127059.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0127059-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0127059-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0127059-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0127059-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0127059-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0127059-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0127059-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0127059.ris

Full Text

Array Black Africa visit reflects racial hardship
By JEFF RANKIN
The white South African government
has adopted policies signifying increased
restrictions and repression for the
majority black population, a UBC
chaplain said Wednesday.
Lutheran Rev. Don Johnson had
previously been involved in protests
calling for human rights in South Africa,
but this summer he went to check the
situation out for himself.
"On my first day in Johannesburg I
went down to this bar for a beer, and
while I was there the owner took his black
servant into the back room and beat him
up with a billy club," he said.
"When he came back into the bar and
put the club away, everybody cheered. I
was sick.
Johnson spent most of his time with the
Christian Council, a protest group involved in providing free legal services to
blacks and keeping track of political
prisoners.
"They are the only legally operating
protest organization in South Africa,"
said Johnson. "Every other one has been
banned.
"To go into their building is to have
your picture taken. The telephones are
tapped, mail is opened and they have been
raided by the police four times this year.
"I thought it was scary, but it's
everyday stuff for them."
The government deals very hard with
their critics. While Johnson was in
Johannesburg a new black organization
was formed in the Soweto township.
"The day after it was formed it had
been banned, closed down, and four of its
members were in jail. They didn't have a
constitution yet, didn't even have a
name!"
See page 8: SOUTH
AMS escalates fight with Hydro
The Alma Mater Society is
escalating its campaign against
B.C. Hydro's 15-cent bus fare
increase with petitions and
demonstrations. The society will
also present a protest brief to a
provincial government committee
Friday.
"Our objective is to rescind fare
hikes. The government has made an
unjustifiable increase and we have
to let them know that they can't
keep this up," external affairs
officer Kate Andrew said Wednesday.
The student representative
assembly also voted Tuesday to hire
a full-time bus campaign coordinator to organize the student
protest against the fare increase,
which came into effect Sept. 5.
"Most students don't want to get
involved in an active campaign,"
Andrews said,"But increased bus
fares really bite into the student
budget. We've had a positive
response."
SRA granted Andrew $1,000
from the special projects fund to
hire a campaign organizer and
activate the "big blitz" against
increased fares.
"We're not alarmed. We're not
worried. We're not concerned at
all", Sandra Kass-Smith, B.C.
Hydro public relations officer said
of student protests Wednesday.
"I'm confident that senior heads,
will prevail. I don't want to curtail
students from speaking up. It's a
free country and by all means
people should protest if they feel a
violation."
Kass-Smith said the fare increases were justified because B.C.
Hydro has to pay operating costs
which might run at a.$60 million
deficit this year.
And she was unconcerned about
the sale of a $25,000 B.C. Hydro
bond by the SRA to protest the
increase.
"Somebody else will buy it (the
bond) the next day. We would have
to check with our financial advisor
for evidence of financial loss. But
bonds are traded, bought and sold
every day in the great financial
scheme of things."
The AMS is presenting its
petitions and protest brief to the
crown corporations committee of
the provincial legislation Friday to
blast B.C. Hydro for its increased
bus fares.
The society, along with eleven
other groups in the Coalition
Against Fare Hikes and Service
Cuts, will present its brief to the
committee chairman at the Hotel
Vancouver Friday at 9:30 a.m.
The brief states that the coalition
"believes that, full public access to
all transit records is necessary. This
would permit public intervention to
argue against fare increases in the
light of full knowledge."
The brief asks 24 questions
seeking information on B.C. Hydro
management and executive staff, as
well as salary and benefit costs of
supervisors.
"Our books are open. They're
always  open."   said   Kass-Smith.
Petitions protesting fare hikes
will be available today and
tomorrow at the AMS booth and
the information counter on main
floor SUB.
Fines finance
administration
The UBC administration has
trapped infuriated students into
paying old library fines dating as
far back as 1975 before allowing
them to register.
And all the money is going into
the university's finance office
rather than to the libraries.
Assistant librarian Doug
Mclnnes   said   Wednesday   the
Dead yet?
Are you interested in the arts,
sciences, politics, religion,
philosophy, war, studying, sports,
or journalism?
If not you probably died long
ago. Otherwise you'll be participating in clubs day today and
tomorrow on SUB's main floor and
in the ballroom.
The Ubyssey is always interested
in new staffers and our booth can
be found in the ballroom on the
second floor of SUB.
library receives none of the money
collected from old library fines,
even though the library lost $35,000
because of the devaluation of the
Canadian dollar.
And the amount collected might
be substantial.
Heather Robertson,
rehabilitation medicine 4, said she
had to pay $105 in library fines
dating back to 1975 before
registering.
Students were not allowed to
register until the fines were paid
and had no way of appealing the
fines immediately.
Merriiee Robson, grad studies 7,
said she was surprised by her $20
fine.
"I've never paid a library fine
and I never thought I would have
to. It's so stupid because they
haven't enforced it in the past."
Robson added she intended to
appeal the fine, but decided it was
not worth the trouble.
See page 7: LIBRARY
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. 1X1, No. 2       VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1978   <^>'8    228-2301
—geof wheelwright photo
UNEMPLOYED MUTT SEEKS possible channels for self-betterment in a well-pawed Ubyssey. But unfortunately, the campus rag contains no job market for dog obedience school drop-outs. The career-less canine was
last seen clenching the news in his mongrel mouth, looking for some poor devil in an armchair with pipe and slippers.
Governors silent despite 'dismay'
By HEATHER CONN
Members of UBC's board of
governors are reluctant to discuss
the "secretive appointment" of
new board chairman Ian Greenwood.
"There was some dismay in the
way the whole procedure was
carried out," a board member, who
asked not to be named, said
Wednesday.
"It caught the entire board by
surprise."
The board member said no notice
of the election had been made
before the August meeting to give
members time to consider a candidate.
The election occurred at the end
of the meeting and was not included
on the agenda, he added.
"It (the election) was not overly
democratic. We should have
received at least some notification
to have some time to think about
it."
Former board chairman George
Morfitt said administration
president Doug Kenny had spoken
to him before the meeting and was
asked his opinion of Greenwood as
a possible new chairman.
When asked if any other board
members had been consulted,
Morfitt replied: "I can't answer
that."
Morfitt said the election had been
conducted properly, but agreed that
a name should be mentioned for
consideration prior to the board
meeting.
Greenwood said the election issue
was raised at the board, his name
was mentioned and the election
process was done democratically.
He declined to discuss the matter
further, claiming that it was an
internal matter and "was not the
sort of thing you'd put in the
paper."
"It might be quite the proper
thing for the Ubyssey to do, (to
write about it)," said board
member Peter Pearse.
"I don't blame you at all for
trying to seek comments from those
who'll give them to you."
Pearse said he did not think it
was proper for a board member to
voice his complaints to the press
over internal board matters.
Ken Andrews, staff representative on the board, also refused to
comment. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 14, 1978
Gov't 'working from ignorance'
Canadian University Press
The B.C. Students' Federation is
aiming a fierce fight against cutbacks this fall, zeroing in on fewer
course offerings and higher teacher-
pupil ratios in post-secondary
education.
"The federal government has no
idea of the numbers in grad
schools. They're working from
ignorance," said BCSF staff
member John Doherty.
Doherty said the federation is
participating in the national
campaign to reverse the cutback
trend and preparing for possible
spring action.
"We   need   to   show    people
concrete, day to day examples of
what cutbacks are."
Doherty cited reduced library
hours, reduced book purchases and
less support staff as obvious targets
in the fight against cutbacks.
The recent B.C. hydro bus fare
increase of 15 cents is a prime
example of cutbacks directly affecting students, he added.
The B.C. Students' Federation is
asking education minister Pat
McGeer to outline his position on
differential fees for international
students.
The prospect of a regular tuition
fee increase by a possible figure of
15 per cent as recommended by the
GOOD TIMES
^«SARE BACK AGAIN \,
V
OPENING FRIDAY, SEPT. 15
Sorry for the delay
\**&
Collectables and
Original Clothing,
Styles of Yesteryear
GOOD TIMES VINTAGE CLOTHING
AND COLLECTABLES
(Beside Hong Kong Kitchen)     224-2413
s*
Back to
PACKS
and BOOTS
Daypacks , Walking and Hiking boots
are our speciality. Outfit at the PACK and
BOOTS SHOP; a speciality shop operated by
THE CANADIAN HOSTELLING ASSOCIATION and dedicated to providing quality
equipment at the lowest prices.
NOVEMBER 1st we are moving to
3415 W.Broadway
WATCH FOR OPENING SPECIALS
PACK&
BOOTS SHOP
1406 West Broadway Tel. 738-3128
710 YATES MALL VICTORIA 383-2144
Universities Council of B.C. is an
issue all councils can understand,
Doherty said.
Members of BCSF and the
National Union of Students will
tour campuses in B.C. and Alberta
during the last week of September
and the first week of October to
provide a focus for campus work
against cutbacks.
"We want students to know they
are not working in isolation,'"
said Doherty.
The federation plans an at-home
lobby of provincial MLA's in
November and a meeting with Pat
McGeer in December.
"By that time we'll be able to say
we've gone to all the other levels
and we need a meeting."
Doherty said he hopes to apply
pressure to McGeer, who he claims
is making a concerted effort to
ignore BCSF by developing a media
profile.
UBC
Graduation
Portraits
since 1969
Amnyrapli   ^titituts ICtii.
3343 West Broadway
732-7446
Phone now for your Free sitting
CampusBank
"The Little Bank That's Always Open!"
At U.B.C.
We are pleased to announce the placement of
INSTABANK"   cash  dispenser  at
an
our
With CampusBank
you can .. .
.
• withdraw     cash     from
personal chequing account
• avoid line ups
your
Student Union Building Branch. You may
now withdraw cash from your chequing
account on a 24-hour-a-day basis. There will
be no additional charge for use of the
dispenser and the CampusBank card is free!
make deposits
have 24 hour a
week service
day — 7 day a
obtain up to $25 cash a day
Remember Your CampusBank Card is free... free... tree.
JLJL   The First Canadian Bank
Bank of Montreal Thursday, September 14, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Feds end student housing funds
—geof wheelwright pnoto
NURSING STUDENT PAT HEMPSTOCK mourns the loss of $68 and ponders few meager books received in
return for monetary loss. Bookstore prices have gone up as much as 15 per cent on all new textbooks, so if you
want to save money on books, buy them used or borrow from a rich friend.
Bookstore prices soar sky high
By GLEN SCHAEFER
Inflation and the declining value
of the Canadian dollar have increased UBC students' book costs
by as much as 15 per cent in some
cases.
"Book prices have been hit as
hard as everything else by the
current economic decline," UBC
assistant bookstore manager Don
Donovan said Monday.
Most of the bookstore's textbooks are imported from the
United States but these books have
not been as severely affected by the
current decline of the Canadian
dollar as much as other imported
goods, said Donovan.
"The prices we are charged are
converted (from U.S. to Canadian
dollars) at 10 per cent, irrespective
of the current exchange rate," he
said.
Among the steepest price increases are books from Britain
because of the British pound's
resurgence on international money
markets, he said.
A sample of textbook prices at
UBC shows price increases range up
to 15 per cent.
Loomis' Introduction to
Calculus, a required text for
Mathematics 100 and 101, went
from $19.95 last year to $22.95.
Economics by Lipsey, Sparks and
Steiner, the Economics 100 text,
increased 12 per cent from $15.70
to $17.55. International Politics: A
Framework for Analysis, by UBC
professor K.J. Holsti, increased
from $16.10 to $16.75.
An employee of Duthie Books
said their prices had gone up
between 10 to 20 per cent since last
summer. He said that their largest
price increases were in British and
technical books.
Many textbooks are being sold at
last year's prices at the bookstore,
Donovan said.
The leftover books amount to 25
per cent of the bookstore inventory
and are available for various
courses and faculties.
"Students buying these books
will have a substantial saving
passed on to them," Donovan said.
Bookstore profits have averaged
more than $100,000 per year for the
last three years.
Management at the bookstore
has said the profits would be used
to finance the construction of a new
bookstore.
Library budget beats dollar's drop, inflation
Shrewd fiscal planning will allow UBC libraries to
beat spiralling inflation and continue with regular
book and magazine purchases.
Head librarian Basil Stuart-Stubbs said Wednesday
the devalued dollar and inflation are not as serious
problems for the library as they were last year.
"This year a normal rate of acquisition as been
maintained because the University Council has
provided the funds allowing for the devalued dollar
and the rising cost of publications," said Stuart-
Stubbs.
"It is these two factors combined that hit the library
hardest (last year)."
Stubbs told council he estimated that the Canadian
dollar would drop even lower than its 1977 level of 89
cents American, which cost the library about
$350,000.
"The library is perceived as being important by the
people who use it and an issue was made of the
problem the library had to face last year," Stubbs
said.
He also said library expenditures will reach more
than $9 million.
OTTAWA (CUP) — Recently
announced budget cutbacks by the
Central Mortgage and Housing
Corporation have effectively
eliminated all federal government
funding for student housing.
The cuts, announced by treasury
board president Robert Andras,
will see the current budget for
student housing slashed to $1.6
million from $2.4 million. The
1979-80 budget for student
housing, which was to have been
$8.5 million, is to be entirely
eliminated.
"Student housing, as far as the
federal government is concerned, is
finished," said John Dowell, a
representative of CHMC.
"If there is any project underway, it will not be cut in mid-
stride," he said, but added that
there is "zero money" for any
future projects.
Dowell said although there was a
slight possibility of money being
made available from other federal
sources, groups seeking to build
student housing would have to
approach either provincial
governments or private sources,
such as banks, for the money.
Several campuses have tried to
obtain money as non-profit
organizations, but the budget for
non-profit housing will also be
eliminated, Dowell said.
"Red River Community College
tried to get money under the nonprofit guidelines, but will have to
go elsewhere now."
National Union of Students
executive Len Taylor was
"dismayed and disappointed."
"Students are being hit from all
sides by the cutbacks," said Taylor.
"There are many campuses that do
not have any student housing
whatsoever, and now have very
little chance of ever getting any."
Research funding
cuts attacked
OTTAWA (CUP) — If the
federal government reduces
research funding or financing for
federal-provincial cost-shared
programs, it can expect "disastrous
consequences for universities and
the health care system".
That's the view of eight faculty,
medical, and research associations
across Canada, including the
Canadian Medical Association
(CMA) and the Canadian
Association of University Teachers
(CAUT).
It was expressed in a telegram
sent to Prime Minister Pierre
Trudeau September 6, in which the
associations deplored recent cuts in
research funding for the next year
and impending cuts in federal
support for cost-shared programs,
and asked for consultation on the
cuts.
Two of the major cost-shared
programs are post-secondary
education and health insurance.
According to the associations, "a
withdrawal or any substantial
reduction of federal funding under
the present equalization
arrangements would produce
disastrous consequences . . .
particularly in economically
depressed areas".
As well, they said, reducing
university funding will make it
impossible to maintain the research
system in Canada because most of
the scientific work done in Canada
is conducted at the universities.
"Adequate university and
research funding, particularly in
economically depressed areas,
demands direct federal funding
under present or comparable
equalization agreements."
The associations also said they
"viewed wjith considerable concern" cutbacks in federal research
granting agencies such as the
Medical Research Council.
"Cutbacks in these areas will
further reduce Canada's over-all
research and development
capability", they warned.
They also predicted cutbacks in
research would "result in the
eventual loss of highly-qualified
and experienced personnel and
adversely affect our post-secondary
education and health care
systems".
Last June Science and
Technology minister Judd
Buchanan announced that research
and development would be encouraged in Canada, with increased
research grants and greater encouragement for university and
industrial research.
The associations said that this
policy, if followed, could contribute to strengthening Canada's
manufacturing sector, stabilizing
prices by increasing industry effectiveness, strengthening the
Canadian dollar, and improving
Canada's trade balance.
Senate votes to
increase French
in UBC courses
By KEVIN McGEE
Bilingualism is alive and well at
UBC, as senate voted Wednesday
to promote teaching of "the other
official language of Canada."
Arts dean Robert Will said a
similar move 10 years ago was met
by an underwhelming response.
Senate voted to "encourage all
the faculties of UBC to offer a
greater number of their courses in
the other official language of
Canada." The French language
itself was never mentioned in the
motion.
Meanwhile, some senate
members objected to three new
scholarships and bursaries, two of
which were restricted to women
while the other was available to
only children of a union's membership.
If specific criterion such as
parent's occupation or nationality
were to be allowed, some argued,
then finding eligible students would
become an arduous task.
"With regards to awards based
on sex, that we cart handle, but
ethnic origin is much more difficult," said Will.
Student senator representation
on the university library committee
was increased by one, doubling the
student representatives compared
to 13 non-student members.
A student senator representative
was also added to the liaison with
post-secondary institutions
committee, bringing the membership to one student and seven
non-students.
A new four-year program for
engineering students was passed
despite a number of protests from
faculty and student reps that the
heavy workload would doom the
program to failure. Students attaining an A standing in Grade 12
math, physics, and chemistry in the
program would be allowed to go
directly into first year applied
science instead of taking first year
science as is presently required. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 14, 1978
Board abuses
basic freedom
There is division on the university's board of governors and it appears UBC president Doug Kenny is up to his old tricks again.
Last month Ian Greenwood was "elected" chairman of the
board, the highest decision-making body on this campus. And the
repercussions of the appointment are still being felt.
Greenwood, former general manager of B.C. Tree Fruits Ltd.
and Sun-Rype Products Ltd., was asked by administration Doug
Kenny if he wanted the job, according to our source. Greenwood
agreed, even though most other board members were not consulted. And they are ticked off.
The vacant position was not announced, and no one was given
an opportunity to come up with other nominations.
The election of the board chairman was not even an item on the
meeting's agenda. --
Former chairman George Morfitt says the post should be rotated
to different board members so everyone gets a crack at the job.
A fair-sounding sentiment but when you realize there are 15
members on the board, the argument seems hollow.
Democracy is an important principle, one that should be
respected in a western university. Appointing the chairman without
consultation or properly entertaining other nominations
demonstrates contempt, not just for democratic principles, but for
fellow board members.
But not all the blame should be placed on Kenny's shoulders.
Other board members were present and if they had serious objections to the process being used they should have complained at the
time, and bitterly.
Theoretically board members are equal and no one on that body
can be pushed around without his or her consent.
If they are saddled with a chairman they did not want because
they were too shy to speak up, then they are just as guilty for the
abridgement of democratic choice.
In a democracy the preservation of liberal freedoms must be
upheld by its leaders and zealously guarded by the governed.
Democracy is a fragile ideology and easily eroded.
Get on the bus
The student representative assembly's decision to actively
become involved in the bus fare increase debate is as welcome as it
is surprising.
The decision to hire a person for a month to organize a campaign
against the increase is a radical departure from the sluggish and
apathetic council last year.
The active participation of the Alma Mater Society in the campaign gives the protest a whole new character just as the isolated
attempts to resist the increase were beginning to tire and give up —
in the face of tough tactics by B.C. Hydro against protestors. It is
also a time for entirely new tactics to fight this insensitive crown
corporation, originally formed to serve the people of B.C.
Promissory notes were a good tactic to fight the increase, but opponents of Hydro had not counted on the corporation throwing
their own manual for bus drivers out the window.
The AMS' new organizer should plan immediately a campaign of
"bus seizures" whereby twenty to fifty students carrying promissory notes board a bus at once with promissory notes.
If unenlightened bus drivers follow Hydro policy and stop the
buses until a supervisor comes by, then so be it. Let the bus sit
there. For hours if necessary. Bring a lunch.
The campaign should also switch targets. It is now obvious Hydro
officials have no intention of changing their minds about the policy
so it is time to hit the people mainly responsible for the increase,
namely Hydro's bosses, the Socred government.
Politicians are more sensitive to change. Government employees
can remain in office until Hell freezes over, but politicians can be
removed. It is time to switch the emphasis to pressuring the provincial politicians and the organizer should look into that.
Get mad for a change. Don't be a wimp and let them kick you
around. Demonstrate.
THE UBYSSEY 1
SEPTEMBER 12, 1978
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the
AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in
room 241K of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Mike Bocking
"Get on the bus," sang Verne McDonald in a lilting soprano as Heather Conn chewed coyly on the tip
of hei promissary note. Bill Teileman and Mike Bocking Joined hands and threw themselves under the
wheels of the oncoming bus, unable to watch the bizarre rituals being performed at the bus stop by
Fran McLean, Kathy Ford, and Tom Hawthorn. "I wonder how he gets his legs so far apart," asked
Marili Moore of an already stimulated Mario Lowther as they watched from the sidelines. Soon the
distractions created by the writhin bodies of Richard Schriener, Jan Nichol and Matt King caused the
overexited bus driver to join in. "Banzai" shouted Jeff Rankin as he grabbed Kevin McGee, Mary Anne
Samwald, and Sonia Mysko in a fit of lusty abandon. Glen Schaefer, an angry shout called a halt to the
bus stop boogie. "Can't you see my baby is asleep," said a disgruntled Julie Wheelwright. And they all
gazed upon the countenance of the child Geoffry and the heavenly host raised its voice in song.
FOR THE STUDENT WHO STILL HASN*T GROWN UP...
DONT FUCK AROl*«JN THE
POOL-.YOILKNOW WHAT WE
MEAN. SOME GUYS THMK JI$
JUST AS FWJNT AS IT WAS M
GBADEJHREE. mSHPOOmS
AftEUDCATEDJN THE UQBgK
USE THEM. YOU HO.
LEAVE THE GIRLS ALONE. YOU
DON'T KNOW THEM AND IT'S
CERTAINLY GOING TO STAY
THAT WAY.
PLEASE.. .DON'T TAKE OFF
YOUR SHORTS. WE KNOW.--WE
KNOW.. .WE'RE THRILLED TOO
„.BUT PLEASE. DONT.
THIS AD SPONSORED BY THE
UBC AQUATIC CENTER
A fine mess this time
If they don't get you at the bookstore, or with
housing, or with the high tuition fees, then the
administration can always rely on the library for
financing.
Some students registering were trapped into
paying old library fines, some amounting to
well over $100, because there was no way to
appeal without missing registration.
But while the library was collecting fines for
overdue library books, all the money was going
into the coffers of the administration.
This is astounding considering the library lost
$350,000 in 1977 and was forced to go to the
Universities Council this year for additional
funds.
Purchases which had to be curtailed in 1977
should have been made now with this additional revenue.
If the administration is so eager to grab library
fines, then they should also use the additional
revenue to correct the book situation on campus.
The amount collected unexpectedly during
registration week should be made public, and
the funds spent to aid students and the libraries
in acquiring important texts and periodicals.
Letters
New bus fares ludicrous
When I lived in West Vancouver
and drove to UBC. I was always
amused each time that I was caught
in the rush hour traffic. There I sat
in my old car, and invariably the
car in front was a cadillac, while the
one behind was another suitably
expensive car. Although the other
drivers were more confortable than
I, and looked far more impressive,
none of us were actually achieving
our objective, which was to get
from A to B as quickly and as
comfortably as possible.
But unlike those who had the
misfortune to be caught standing in
the crowded buses, we at least had a
seat. Overall, the travelling public
was not adequately served by our
transportation system.
A speeding up of our transportation requires less cars on the
road, more buses and fixed rail
transport where buses are
inadequate.
Unfortunately public transit
improvements are continually
hindered by those calling for a
profit. For myself, a profit means
coming out of a financial transaction with more money than with
which I went in. Our transportation
system is more than a financial
transaction and as such requires a
wider use of the word profit.
The people of Vancouver profit
from an efficient transportation
system with time saved going from
A to B and a richer environment
with less pollution of both noise
and fumes.
The people of Canada, which of
course includes Vancouver, profits
from an easing of the demand for
oil which is reflected in our balance
of payments and the value of the
dollar.
To ask the transit rider to pay the
full cost is ludicrous. We all profit
from our public transit system.
Continual fare increases merely
encourage riders to use the private
car. A fare is to be expected, but
shortfall should come from a tax on
luxury cars, as they benefit most
from extra road space made
available by attractive transit. The
remainder of the shortfall should
come out of general revenue, and
not out of property taxes, as
everyone benefits.
The livability of our cities
benefits from public transit, and
that is profit enough.
A. J. Wolfe-Murray
political science 3
'I am not a crook9
In an attempt to start off the new
year with a clean slate I'm writing
to plead innocence in the two-bit
cover-up concerning Tor Svanoe's
resignation that was alleged in the
first issue of your fine rag.
My inability to supply The
Ubyssey with a copy of Mr.
Svanoe's letter of resignation was
not due to any lack of willingness -
quite the contrary. I originally
offered to give The Ubyssey a copy
of the letter because I knew that I'd
been given a copy at the time of his
resignation, felt that the pater
should have the opportunity to see
it and thought, naively it turned
out, that with my usual lightning
efficiency that I'd have filed it in
some suitably obvious place.
No numismaticists
Now that we're computed into
UBC, settling into classes and
hoping to get a handle on things,
what about taking a moment to
consider participation in non-
academic efforts?
Thursday and Friday this week
are Club's Day. Insight '78, page
three, says "no matter what you
want to do .... UBC has a club for
you."
Well, I want to join a UBC coin
club or numismatic society. It
doesn't exist - but it should. Don't
you agree?
Numismatics is a hobby of interest to those in classics, commerce, engineering, fine arts,
geography, history, IH, languages,
science and others. On request local
coin clubs and a provincial service
organization can provide
suggestions and programs to get
things going.
If you, the students, want to
form a "numismatic" club and put
it in proper shape for next year,
contact the undersigned at 738-
3052.
Bill Ziegler
education S
However I hadn't and was
consequently unable to find the
reporter my copy of the letter. I did
nonetheless make a few helpful
suggestions as to where the reporter
might be able to secure another
copy and left it at that.
I was in no way trying to hide
anything - I did my best to be
helpful and then found myself part
of some alleged cover-up conspiracy. Sorry chumps I'm not
involved.
Kate Andrew,
AMS external affairs officer
No respect
Two years ago, people howled
when we changed The Ubyssey's
loga and last year they cried when
Page Friday's logo took a ghoulish
twist. After seeing your
reprehensible debut issue of
Tuesday, I must join the chorus of
anguished howls.
I am disgusted with the new
letters and sports logos, and I urge
you to revert to the old logos which
have served The Ubyssey so well.
Doubtless this will be the first of a
long line of great traditions you
insolent bunch of teenyboppers will
stomp on. All I can say is you have
no respect for your elders, you
dress like bums, and your
music . . . it's just noise.
Chris Gainor
arts 5,editor, 1977-78 Thursday,. September 14, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Rent high, landlord nasty
Students living in University of B.C.
residences are plagued by a nasty and incompetent group of landlords.
The housing department, headed by Mike
Davis, formulate unfair policy, charge an
unreasonable rent, and run an inefficient and
wasteful operation.
I have witnessed these problems having
lived in Gage Towers for a year and a half as
well as spending last summer working for
the housekeeping department.
For instance, many students returning to
Gage are not guaranteed a room. For that
matter neither are out-of-city or out-of-
province students.
were told at 7:30 a.m. they had to leave at
12:30 p.m. because of lack of work. Since
employees cannot be layed off work without
24 hours notice, this was a decision made in
ignorance of the labor code. The shop
steward of our union informed management
of this error after irate summer employees
refused to leave at 12:30.
This particular problem was resolved but
would not have surfaced if management were
properly instructed.
Everyone is losing with the present group
freestyle
of managers in housing. Students pay high
rents and get pushed around by ludicrous
policies. Employees are frustrated by an
incompetent management and housing is
losing money through tremendous inefficiency. Action must be taken to clean up
this department.
How?
Students in residence should grumble
loudly, the student council should look into
housing costs, the adminstration should
investigate the operations of the housing
department, and the housing department
should read this item and take note.
c
By JAM NICOl
)
This is because Housing does not make the
effort to operate on a quota system even
though a booklet published for housing
purports to do so. Instead students are
selected at random. An inequitable process is
conducted whereby students with greater
need are neglected.
And students unfortunate enough to be
shuffled on to the waiting list are subjected
to an unorganized and intimidating ordeal in
September. This year students were herded
into a room at the Ponderosa Annex and
barely heard their names being called off the
list because of the noise. Many students
undoubtedly lost their place on the waiting
list due to the confusion.
On top of all this, students must pay
$955.11 for eight months rent at Gage
Towers. This comes to almost $120.00 a
month for a room with a bathroom and
kitchen shared by five other people. For the
same price two people could live in a roomy
one-bedroom apartment downtown and
enjoy more privacy.
If downtown landlords are making a profit
on their rents, why are rooms from the nonprofit housing department so costly.
It must also be remembered that during the
summer months, housing rents out rooms to
conventions and tourists at $12.50 a night.
And every summer, housing makes a tidy
profit.
With high rents for students and profits
during the summer, one wonders where all
this money is going. Is the housing budget
being managed efficiently or are students
losing out on a fair rent?
I know for a fact money is mismanaged in
the housekeeping department at Gage.
Working as a chambermaid while the
conventions were here this summer, I saw the
situation first hand.
Maids, being paid $6.20 an hour, spent
idle time daily waiting for the supervisors to
organize the work required.
Sometimes room service was only partially
given to the guests due to inefficient
organizing. And often employees were given
double time simply because the housekeeping
head did not organize properly to handle
large bookings.
Management also attempted to violate
labor laws. On one working day, employees
£ppfc pjlSH^NES^gfrlg
Name change slammed
The axing of the title of dean of women is
a typical move in the hoary old male UBC
administration tradition of Telling UBC's
Girls What They Want.
Using the excuse that the title is irrelevant,
a subservient student services review committee did not have to twist the administration's arm particularly hard to get
the title eradicated. It is well-known that the
last woman to hold the title, Margaret
Fulton, made the administration uncomfortable with her outspoken views on the
status of women at UBC and by her demands
for action in upgrading their position.
Small wonder, therefore, that the administration seize the opportunity to
eliminate the possibility of another Margaret
Fulton coming along.
Now the deed has been done, the administration can sink back into its usual
torpor, rousing itself from time to time,
when the clamor from persistent individuals
bothers it too much to set up another instant
committee which might eventually produce a
report with some recommendations (unless it
fades into oblivion first) that will be quietly
ignored.
Sure, the director of the women students'
office, as the job is now called, can complain
and bitch. But how much less weight that
title carries than does that of dean. A dean
complaining at a university where most deans
are more concerned with not making waves is
enough to make people listen.
But a director, whose title is far less
prestigious, has less chance of commanding
the necessary attention. Prestige, unfortunately, is still important around here
and women have few enough of the prestige
positions.
c
By KATHY FORD
J
Fulton did not accomplish many concrete
things in her four-year tenure here before she
resigned in frustration and went to be
president of Mount St. Vincent University in
Halifax. This is due to the fact that previous
deans of women were not as mouthy and
uncaring of whose toes were in the way.
Fulton also suffered the fate of other
women who speak out loudly and often:
people stopped taking her seriously and this
damaged her credibility. She did get some
good programs going last year, but a too-
small budget and lack of real co-operation on
the part of the administration prevented
them from being more than token affairs.
Unfortunate, too, was the strained
relationship between Fulton and Erich Vogt,
vice-president in charge of faculty and
student affairs. It would be an understatement to say they did not get along.
Coupled with dishonesty on the part of the
administration about where Fulton stood,
that spelled frequent disaster and contributed
indirectly, to Fulton's resignation.
Looking for a case against Fulton's office,
Vogt leapt gleefully into the breach when
office politics, found in any university
department, flared up into a major con
frontation between  Fulton's  assistants
Maryke Gilmore and Nancy Horsman.
Gilmore, a newcomer with a decided
tendency towards playing queen bee, a
dubious commitment to feminism and
definite opinions as the the superiority of her
social standing, treated Horsman, a veteran
of the office, with thinly-disguised and
unwarranted contempt. Eventually, Horsman handed in her resignation but made the
mistake of doing so to Vogt while Fulton was
away.
Vogt handled the situation, advising
Horsman to take a leave of absence (which)
she did), rather than wait for Fulton's return,
thereby overstepping the limits of his job.
Before the final decision about changing
the name was made, Vogt also made a
valiant, and for awhile successful, attempt to
convince student politicians that Fulton's
deanship was more symbolic than anything
else.
He told them, at one point, that Fulton
had been misled into thinking she was entitled to sit on the committe of academic
deans, despite the fact that Fulton received
official notification of the meetings until last
year, and despite the fact that previous deans
of women sat on the committee.
When Fulton heard about this while attending a conference at UBC this summer,
she blew up, saying Vogt's claim was untrue
and explaining that here exclusion from
"inner circle's" meeting began when administration president Doug Kenny set up a
so-called outer committee which included the
physical plant, computing centre and
housing heads. At this time, she stopped
getting notices of academic deans' meetings.
The entire move to eliminate the position
of dean of women is an obvious attempt to
denigrate the need for a strong women's
leader on campus
Freestyle is a column of opinion, analysis
and humour written by Ubyssey staffers.
Kathy Ford and Jan Nicol are two of The
Ubyssey's grey eminences, who pop into the
office from time to time long enough to
hammer out a few words of wisdom. Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 14, 1978
'Tween classes
,"f#tr,,x,:
TODAY
SIMS
Group meditation, noon, Angus 210.
CENTRE FOR HUMAN SETTLEMENTS
Audio-visual library, every weekday from 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m., IRC B-80.
AUS
Arts intramural organizational meeting, noon.
Men are to meet in SUB 125, women in SUB
205.
UBC SKYDIVERS
Demonstration jump, 1 p.m., south playing field
by the Winter Sports Centre.
THUNOERBIRD HOCKEY
Organizational meeting, noon. War Memorial
Gymnasium, room 25.
FRIDAY
INTRAMURALS
Intramural 2 mile jog, noon, Mclnnes field.
GEOPIT
Bubblies and bulk, 4 p.m.. Geography building
lounge.
SQUASH TEAM
Tryouts for C-D squash team, 2:30 to 5 p.m..
Winter Sports Centre squash courts.
DEBATING SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, SUB 113.
MONDAY
CCCM
Potluck dinner and discussion about abortion,
5:30 p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
FENCING    *
General meeting,  7:30 p.m..  Gym  E, Winter
Sports Complex.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
Tryouts for UBC varsity ice hockey, 5:30 p.m.,
main rink, Winter Sports Centre.
TUESDAY
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, SUB 130.
Hot flashes
It's or bird,
it's a plane...
The sky is falling, the sky is falling!
Well, not quite, but members of
the UBC Skydiving Club will be falling from the sky. They'll be holding
demonstration jumps Thursday onto the south playing field by the
Winter Sports Centre. Remember
to bring your umbrellas.
Celebrity cooks
The  first   annual   Doug   Kenny
roast will be held today.
Dean Martin won't be in atten
dance, but Kenny and others will as
the Alma Mater Society will be
holding a barbecue and dance.
Food and fun starts at 4:30 p.m.
with the dance at 8 p.m. It'll be held
between the new aquatic centre
and SUB.
Mjght be interesting to see Kenny
on a spit.
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
George & Berny's
VOLKSWAGEN
REPAIRS
COMPLETE SERVICE BY
TRAINED
MECHANICS
FULLY GUARANTEED
AT REASONABLE RATES
731-8644
2125 W. 10th at Arbutus
N0RRES
*W MOVING AND fcs
SI TRANSFER LTD. I"
■STORAGE
Big or
Small Jobs*
Reasonable
Rates
2060 W, 10th^
Vancouver
732-9898
ALSO GARAGES.
BASEMENTS & YARDS
CLEAN-UPS
COMING THURSDAY &   FRIDAY
SEPTEMBER 14 & 15
CLUBS' DAY
Clubs Day gives you a chance to talk to the many different
clubs you may wish to join. Club representatives will be on
hand at their booths and displays in SUB to explain their
activities and functions.
ROYAL BAN K
... FOR A LOT OF
REASONS.
CANADA STUDENT LOANS
NEW LOANS   • DEPOSIT ACCOUNTS
TRANSFER ACCOUNTS FOR CONVENIENCE
SAVINGS WITH CHEQUEING PRIVILEGES
UNIVERSITY AREA BRANCH
Don Routley, Manager
Brenda Flack, Senior Loans Officer
Heather Betker, Loans Officer
10th at Sasamat
228-1141
Faculty of Arts Members
Are you interested in playing Intramural Sports?
If so come to an organizational meeting
on Thursday, 14th September.
Men: Room 125 SUB
Women: Room 205 SUB
BICVCLE
STUDENT SALE
it's the best way back to school
. . . and you save $$$ on this sale!
Raleigh Rampar 10-Speedj
Reg. 139.95 - SALE 122.95
Raleigh Record 10-Speed
Reg. 164.95 - SALE 154.95
Raleigh Grand Prix 10-Speed
Reg. 194.95 - SALE 179.95
Also Chimo, Apollo and many more!
Specials On Touring Bags and Racks!
"Check Our Prices,
Guarantee and
Service —
The Bicycle
Specialists"
3771 W. 10th Avenue (at Alma)    224-3536
J.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 tines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35a
Commercial •*■ 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines
50c Additional days $2.25 and 45c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable i'n
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Off ice. Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T 1W5
5 — Coming Events
TAKE A
LIBRARY TOUR
OP
Main and Sedgewick Libraries
Every Day This Week
Meet at Main Library Entrance
10:30 a.m. or 12:30 p.m.
SPEAKEASY, UBC's crisis and information centre, needs volunteers this
session. FREE training, weekend Sept.
22-24. Applications SUB 100B this
week.
GSA FOLK NIGHT needs talent and
audience Fri., Sept. 22, Grad Centre
Garden Boom, 8:30 p.m. Call Glen or
Dave at 2095 days, ASAP.
10 — For Sale — Commercial
COMMUNITY SPORTS. Excellent prices
for ice skates, hockey, soccer, jogging
and racquet sports equipment. 733-
1612, 3615 West Broadway, Vancouver,
B.C.
19« VALIANT. Excellent condition.
Conv. 225 slant six, 4 bbl., cam, headers, milled head, new paint, new
trans., new 3.55 posi. Steve, 224-9869
after 6:00 p.m.
11 — For Sale — Private
25 — Instruction
CANOEING INSTRUCTION by cert. inZ
15 hour course. 266-5705. Group rates.
Maximum of 6 students.
THE CITY — where the action is. URBAN STUDIES 200, HENNINGS 200.
Every Tues., Wed. 11:30.
30 — Jobs
III HELP   GREENPEACE   HELP I I I
Sellers urgently needed for the Greenpeace "Go Anywhere" lottery. Make
money! Save Life! 2108 West 4th Ave.,
Vancouver, V6K 1N6, 736-0321.
ART STUDENT to do some pen and Ink
drawings and layout work. Call Susie,
736-; Sll. 9-5 Mon.-Frt.
HOUSEKEEPING, 10th and Balaclava, 4
hours per week/$3.50 per hour. Phone
732-6858.
35 - Lost
LOST — Carved ivory brooch. Reward.
Return to SUB lost and found or call
874-2498.
65 — Scandals
CITR — UBC RADIO, FM-Cable 95.9,
open for membership. Room 233 SUB.
Come up for a look around. The
sound of the campus.
DOUBLE DISCO — Come to the S.U.S.
Double Disco. SUB Ballroom — Room
207-209 in SUB Fri,, Sept. 22, 8 p.m.-
12:30 a.m.
85 — Typing
ON CAMPUS TYPIST. Fast, accurate.
Reasonable rates. Phone 732-3690 after
6:00 p.m.
TYPING — 75c per page. Fast and accurate by experienced typist. Gordon,
685-4863-
99 — Miscellaneous
A COMPLIMENTARY (Free) Music Lesson in an innovative method, will be
given to music lovers wishing to learn
or improve guitar playing skills. This
method has received accreditation
with major Canadian Universities and
been praised by artists of international stature, Leonard Cohen, Leo Brou-
wer and others McGill and other students previously enrolled accomplished
in 3 months what may normally take
one year or more of conventional
study. Beginners. Advanced. Limited
enrollment, 732-7314 for further information.
=lr=Jr=lr=Jr=Jr=lr=lt=Jr=Jr=Jr=]|
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
TO SELL - BUY
INFORM
=Jr=J'=J'=Jt=Jf=Jr=Jp=ii=ii=Jr=Jr Thursday,-September 14, 1978
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
longf erm SUB manager Vance
victim of AMS tutbatks scheme
r
A restructuring of Alma Mater
Society management has left SUB
building manager Graeme Vance
out of a job as of Nov. 30.
The decision to eliminate the
position of building manager was
made to steamline the society and
save money, AMS president Bruce
Armstrong said Monday.
The new structure provides for a
new position, assistant general
manager, said director of finance
Glenn Wong. The duties formerly
under the building manager's
jurisdiction will be divided between
two positions: the new assistant
general manager and the social
centre manager.
The assistant general manager
will take over the duties of the
office manager, who will be retiring
on Jan. 31, and also take charge of
the booking office.
The new social centre manager
Presidential race on
will take over as the games room
and information desk supervisor, in
addition to his duties as pit
manager.
At the moment, neither position
is filled.
The motion to implement these
changes and effectively eliminate
on job was put forward by Armstrong in an August student
representative   assembly   meeting.
"There was a general feeling that
upper management was not performing as efficiently as it might
be," said AMS external affairs
officer Kate Andrew. The motion
passed SRA by a seventeen to two
margin.
The new structure will result in a
loss of $13,454 in the coming fiscal
year due to severance pay owing to
Vance, but savings are hoped to
range between $19,406 and $27,406
in following years.
PUBLIC
Paul Sandhu, student board of
governors member, has been
selected as the temporary student
representative assembly president
to replace Bruce Armstrong, who
resigned Tuesday.
Sandhu was chosen at Tuesday's
Library fine
funds go to
UBC admin
From page 1
"Actually, I wouldn't mind
paying the fine if the money went to
buy new books," she said.
Mclnnes said fines were increased when a new fine system was
introduced in January, 1976.
"Fines are not normally held for
more than a couple of years unless
the books are not returned. Under
the new fine system students are not
fined for overdue books unless
another requests the book," he
said.
But what does the library do with
all the money collected from fines?
"The money from fines does not
go to the library but to the finance
office," said Mclnnes.
UNIVERSITY
TEXT BOOKS
NON FICTION PAPERBACKS
NEW & USED
BETTER BUY BOOKS
4393 West 10th
Open 11-7:00 224-4144
SRA meeting and will only serve
until next Wednesday when a new
president is expected to be chosen.
A by-election will be held to fill a
senate-at-large position left vacant
when Lome Rogers resigned during
the summer.
Undergraduate elections for
student representatives will be held
in early October.
Kate Andrew, Alma Mater
Society external affairs officer, said
Wednesday only someone already
sitting on SRA would be qualified
to be president.
"It wouldn't be fair to push a
newcomer (to the SRA) into the
presidency."
No one has yet been nominated
for the position.
Andrew also said there was a
strong possibility that no one will
want to run for election.
"No one is willing to run, it's a
hell of a job," she said.
Armstrong resigned after
receiving an ultimatum from the
senate admissions committee
stating he drop all extra-curricular
activities or be ineligible for
enrolment at UBC.
THE
MOTORIZED
BICYCLE    .-
228-6121
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
NO MAN'S LAND
By Harold Pinter
SEPTEMBER 22-30
(Previews Sept. 20 & 21)
8:00 p.m.
Directed by John Brockington
Setting by R. K. Wilcox
Costumes by Brigitte Sitte
STUDENT SEASON TICKETS (4 Plays for $8)
AVAILABLE FOR ALL PERFORMANCES
Sept. 20-30 NO MAN'S LAND (Pinter)
Nov. 7-22 THE BACCHAE (Euripides)
Jan. 10-20 THREE BY BECKETT (Beckett)
Feb. 28-March 10 ALL'S WELL THAT ENDS WELL (Shakespeare)
BOX OFFICE
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
Support Your Campus Theatre
ROOM 207
FRI. & SAT.
7:30 p.m. - 9:45   p.m.
SUNDAY
1:00— 3:00 p.m.
STUDENTS
& CHILDREN    .75
ADULTS $1-25
THUNDERBIRD
WINTER
SPORTS CENTRE
"\
IF YOU CAN
AFFORD ONLY
ONE SPECIAL
OUTFIT THIS
YEAR
Distinctive hand batiked
fashions for men & women
in silk & velvet
by
Cnda cS.
4325 W. 10th Ave.,
Vancouver 228-1214
Tie po^De^o^q
C°R»Jen of
fr>uLe#a*p
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
WOMEN'S
ATHLETICS
BE A PARTICIPANT -
JOIN WOMEN'S ATHLETICS
Starting tryout dates for Women's Athletics:
Badminton
Basketball
Bowling
Curling
Fencing
Field Hockey
Golf
Gymnastics
Ice Hockey
Rowing
Sailing
Skiing
Soccer
Squash
Swimming &
Diving
Tennis
Track & Field &
Cross Country
Volleyball
Thurs Sept 14 6:30 p.m. Gym A
Mon Sept. 18 4:30 p.m. Memorial Gym
Sun Oct 15 7:00 p.m. S.U.B. Lanes
Wed Oct 4 5:00 p.m. Winter Sports Center
Mon Sept 18 7:30 p.m. Gym E
Thurs Sept 14 12:30 p.m. McGregor Field
Fri Sept 15 4:30 p.m. McGregor Field
TBA     Check with the Athletic Office
Mon Sept 18 3:30 p.m. Gym G
Thurs Sept 14 4:30 p.m. Winter Sports
Tues Sept 19 4:45 p.m. Centre
Thurs Sept 14 12:30 p.m. Rm 211 Memorial
Gym
Sat Sept 16 9:00 a.m. Vancvr. Rowing Club
Early October-Checkwith the Athletic Office
Thurs Sept 14 5:30 p.m. Gym B
Thurs Sept 14 12:30 p.m. P.E. Cents/
Tues Sept 19 12:30 p.m. Field
Tues Sept 19 5:30 p.m. Winter Sports Center
Mon Sept 18
Sept 13 on. Check
Tues Sept 19
Thurs Sept 14
Mon Sept 18
12:30 p.m. Rm 25 Memorial Gym
with Athletic Office
immediately
4:30 p.m. Memorial Gym
4:30 p.m. Memorial Gym
7:30 p.m. Memorial Gym
ANY FURTHER INFORMATION
CAN BE OBTAINED FROM:
The Athletic Office
Rm. 208 Memorial Gym
228-2295
Women's Athletic Assc.
OR Rm. 204 Memorial Gym
228-5326
Everyone is welcome to come and try-out. These teams are open to
all women students on campus. Take advantage of the opportunity
and participate. Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 14, 1978
South Africa shocks UBC visitor
From page 1
He said the government of South
Africa has a policy which sets aside
certain areas as homelands for the
various black tribes. These areas
are small, widely scattered, landlocked, and possess almost
nothing in the way of natural
resources.
This cleans the 80 per cent black
population out of the cities and
splits them up, while still leaving
them available when cheap migrant
labor is needed.
"The government is spending
great sums of money improving the
technology of industry in South
Africa, mechanizing so that less
and less black labor is required,"
Johnson said.
"Which means that 20 per cent
of the population has all of the
natural resources and 90 per cent of
the land, while the blacks will be
put on tribal reserves where they
will be given the freedom to live in
deep poverty," he said.
In the township of Alexandria,
where 75,000 blacks live, Johnson
saw the results of the government's
policies. As work permits were
taken away, families were forced to
move out, while their dwellings
were demolished.
"Every other house was ripped
down," said Johnson. "And all
this is done in the name of
Christianity. It's a highly Christian
country."
"They say they are preserving
black culture and tradition. The
press is actually claiming that the
government is doing a good thing
for the blacks.
"Any dissention is reported as
communist agitation, he said.
STUDENT
DISCOUNT 10%
FRAMES & LENSES
CONTACT LENSES
PERFECT VISION
CENTRE
1453 W. Broadway
738-8414
Johnson was in South Africa at
the time of the well publicized army
raid on a SWAPO (South West
African Peoples Organization)
refugee camp just inside the
Angolan border.
"It was publicized by the
national media as a great military
victory, with the South African
forces wiping out an entire armed
camp and sustaining only one
casualty," he said.
"Over 600 were killed in the raid
on the Angolan side. The children
of Lutheran bishops in South West
Africa were in that camp," said
Johnson. "I guess that's why I get
so — I mean, those people are my
brothers."
The majority of whites seem to
be in total agreement with the
governments methods and policies,
he said. They know little of what is
going on, and most don't even
know where their servants live or in
what conditions.
"There are a small percentage of
whites that do understand the
situation, but of those only a very
few overcome their fears and act to
help the blacks.
"They are harrassed, arrested,
and shot down by vigilantes. They
are under surveillance by police
constantly, and if they speak out
they are banned."
To be banned is the South
African equivalent to house arrest.
When one is banned one cannot
leave their residence, speak
publicly, or be in the company of
more than one person at a time.
This includes members of your
immediate family, he said.
The blacks' legal right to protest
has been cut off, and yet there has
been little violence since the Soweto
riots in 1976. This is due to the
efficiency of the South African
army, Johnson said. They are so
well trained and equipped, so
ruthless, that attempting violent
resistance is just an easy way to get
killed.
But if internal resistance is
waning, movements of Marxist-
backed "freedom fighters" have
been gaining momentum in neighboring Zambia, Mozambique and
Botswana.
On his way to Zambia from
South Africa, Johnson's plane
made a brief stopover in Botswana
to pick up 22 prospective fighters
on their way to guerilla training
camp.
"They were just young kids, 16
or 17," he said. "They don't want
to fight but they see no other option."
The consensus is that the
guerillas will wait until Rhodesia is
pROff
G^°l
There's a lot in it
-for you.	
To get your copy, mail or take this coupon
to your local branch of the Bank of Commerce.
Profession
Graduating Year
Rime
Address
Telephone Number
City
Province
Postal Code
<i>
CANADIAN IMPERIAL
BANK OF COMMERCE
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
1978 FALL LECTURES
BY VISITING PROFESSORS
Sir Denys Wilkinson
A physicist of international repute. Sir Denys Wilkinson is also Chancellor of the
University of Sffssex in England His research in physics, especially nuclear and
elementary particle research, has gained him many awards and honors His most
recent work has been concerned with determining the structure of a nucleus and
the radioactive decay of a nucleus He is a Fellow of the Royal Society and was
knighted by Queen Elizabeth in 1974
WHAT IS THE ATOMIC NUCLEUS MADE OF?
Thursday, September 14     In Hebb Theatre, at 12:30 p.m.
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE
PLEASE POST AND ANNOUNCED
sponsored by
The Cecil H. and Ida Green Visiting Professorship Fund
under black rule before attempting
anything against South Africa, and
even then they will be restricted to
border skirmishes in the face of
vastly superior forces and
technology, he said.
"To me it will be just attacking
the border and attacking the border
and attacking the border until the
Vorster government spends so
much on arms that it starts hurting
the economy," Johnson said.
South Africa is in a strong
position, but it is totally dependant
on the West to keep its economy
going, he said.
And it is now actually impossible
to withdraw invested money from
South Africa anyways, due to new
currency regulations, said Johnson.
So a company or corporation that
has invested often finds it necessary
to leave the money for the maintenance of that investment.
One Sunday while he was still in
South Africa, Johnson decided to
go to a church service in Soweto,
and though it was illegal for him to
go there, his clerical collar and a
few friends finally got him in.
"I met parents whose children
were killed in the 1976 riots," he
said. "And wives whose husbands
were in jail, and almost" every
family there had been touched in
similar ways.
"And the last thing they said at
the end of the service was 'Lord
help us to love our enemies.'
"I was very shook up."
Science Undergraduate Society
Double Disco
In: Sub Ballroom - ID required
Rm 207-209 - free punch
Date: Friday Sept. 22. 1978 - 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.
Tickets available until 7:30
the day of the dance
Discount for Science Students
Notice of Election
An election will be held on the 29th September 1978 to fill the following position within the Alma Mater Society
Senator at Large
Nominations for a person to fill this position will be accepted commencing Thursday the 14th September, 1978. The nomination period
will close at 4:00 p.m. on Thursday the 21st September, 1978.
Nomination forms are available at the Registrar's Office and election
procedures and other information is available at the A.M.S. Office,
Room 246.
Pam Rosengren
Secretary/Treasurer
Room 252, 228-2050
AMS
APPROVED
STUDENT
ACCIDENT INSURANCE
PARSONS BROWN
&      COMPANY      LTD.
684-0311
470 GRANVILLE
VANCOUVER, B.C.
V6C 1WI
"Just Insurance
for 56 years''

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0127059/manifest

Comment

Related Items