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The Ubyssey Jan 5, 1993

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Array Kl.
VOLUME 75, NUMBER
CIRCULATION 15 000
A founding member of the Canadian University Press
TUESDAY, JANUARY 5, 1993
Publishing continuously .since 1918
K4-9M© The Ubyssey
emerges.
Gays. Lesbians &
sexual* of UBC. General Meeting. 12 noon.
SUB 215.
Staff Meeting. The
Ubyssey, noon,
SUB 241K.
AMS    Art     Gallery.    AMS     Art     Gallery.
Gallery, SUB Main Con-    Gal levy,
course. I Concourse.
Concourse
Concourse.
Production. The
Ubyssey, 5pm on,
SUB 24IK.
The Ubyssey
emerges again.
Classifieds 822-3977
RATES: AMS cardholders - 3 lines $3.15, additional lines 63 cents. Commercial - 3 lines $5.25, additional lines 80 cents. (10% discount on 25 Issues or
more.) Classified ads pay able in advance. Deadline 3:30 pm. 2 days before publication. Room 266, SUB, UBC, Vancouver, B.C. V6T2A7. 822-3977.
11 - FOR SALE (Private)
NAD Stereo Receiver, NAD CD,
turntable, 2 psb speakers, excellent condition. Call 253-9149.
TRAINTICKETtoMontreal. $200
Negotiable. 3 days, voyage via
USA(i.e. Wash, Chicago, NY). Call
Peter 531-9700.
70 - SERVICES
OVERCOME SHYNESS and
anxiety. Speak up more in
groups, be assertive. A 4-session
training program (free) offered as
part of counselling research.
Please call 822-5259 NOW!
RESPONSIBLE couple looking to
house sit Feb - April 93. Able to
look after plant, pet & willing to do
minor carpentry jobs in exchange.
Phone 224-7983.
75-WANTED
JAZZ & CLASSICAL musicians to
perform at New West coffee house.
Contact Dale at Grabbajabba 925-
9290.
80-TUTORING
FORMER UBC INSTRUCTOR
will tutor students in all aspects of
French lang. & literature. Reasonable rates. 689-7889.
PROFESSIONAL typist, 30 years
exp., wd process/typing, APA/MLA,
thesis. Student rates. Dorothy,
228-8346.
— ON CAMPUS —
Resume Special On Now
AMS WORD PROCESS-ZING
Room 60, SUB (downstairs)
Mon-Thurs 9-6 — Fri 9-5
Drop in or call: 822-5640
TYPING & WP of theses, essays,
letters, manuscripts, resumes, reports. Bilingual. Clemy266-6641.
PROFESSIONAL (B.A., M.L.S.).
Typing, editing of theses, papere,
resumes, etc. flyers. Word Processor, Laser Printer. Norma 224-
1263.
PROF. TYPING OR W/P any type.
Reasonable rates, pis. call 264-
8667. Fast & accurate.
No time to waste? "LEAVE IT TO
US" Typing Services had a January Special: $1.75/page and free
pick-up and delivery. Call Diana
at 244-8679.
85-TYPING
Gays, Lesbians & Bisexuals of UBC. Discussion Group. 5:00 pm,
Campus Lutheran
Church Lounge.
Advertise your group's on
campus events in The
Ubyssey Campus
Calendar. Submission
forms are available at
The Ubyssey office, SUB
241K. Submissions for
Tuesday's paper must be
in by Friday at 3:30pm,
and submissions for
Friday's paper must be in
by Wednesday at
3:30pm. Sorry, late
submissions will not be
accepted. Note: "Noon"
is 12:30 pm.
<r
!^m3Z**B**&
HHi
(■■■■iiiii
Speakers Series
as part of Environment Week
Dr. David
Suzuki
January 11
12:30, SUB
Theatre
Liz Armstrong
(Women for a Just
& Healthy Planet)
January 15
12:30, SUB
Theatre
Co-Sponsored with the Student
Environment Centre
JAN 7
GRAMES
BROTHERS
JAN 14
THE SMALLS
JAN 21
ROOTS
ROUNDUP
JAN 28
STRANGE
CAYS
EVERY THURSDAY
@ 9:30 PM - FREE!
Wednesdays
in the SUB
Theatre
Starting again
Jan.13
Free
lunch to
first 100
people!
UBC-AMS
JAZZ
FESTIVAL
Feb. 22-26
is now accepting submissions for all jazz styles.
Send us:
• a tape of your best two
songs. Only the first two
songs on side A of the
tape will be listened to.
■ A 1 -page typed bio indicating the number of
people in your band (for
pricing purposes)and a
contact number or
address.
Send submissions to:
UBC-AMS Jazz Festival
6138 SUB Boulevard
Vancouver, BC
V6T1Z1
Submission
Deadline:
January 15,
1993
THE UBYSSEY
January 5,1993 N -E--W-S
Supplementals in jeopardy
by Mark Nielsen
The Faculty of Science has
won Senate permission to abolish supplemental examinations
by 1994 sparking fears that
other faculties and departments
may follow suit.
Engineering may be next
on the list says student senator
at-large Orvin Lau, who argued
against giving Science the go-
ahead when the motion was
passed in December.
Lau said a similar measure
was being discussed for Engineering during recent curriculum committee meetings.
"As far as Fm concerned,
they're doing it more as a mat
ter of convenience than anything
else," Lau said in an interview.
Dean of Science Barry
McBride told the Senate that only
25 per cent of students granted
permission actually write
supplementals, and only 25 per
cent of those pass it.
The low success rate is due to
the lengthy period before the
supplemental is given and because no remedial work is given
to the student, who is often away
from the university before the
exam McBride said.
But Lau said that may not be
true for Engineering where he
says many students use
supplementals to get through
courses.
As well, if a faculty is to do
away with supplementals, Lau
said something, possibly an "extended semester system" should
be found to replace them.
"There has to be a reason
that they were introduced in the
first place, and the question is
"has that reason disappeared?™
Lau said.
During the meeting Lau also
said more substantive information was needed before a decision
could be made, and therefore
moved to table the recommendation. The motion was defeated.
Although regulations regarding supplemental examina
tions vary among faculties, students usually must obtain a
standing at least 40 per cent, and
the final exam must account for
at least 40 per cent of the final
mark.
Regulations for specific faculties and schools are described
in their respective sections ofthe
course calendar.
• Lois Moen, an Education in
Medicine post-graduate student,
currently working at Vancouver
General Hospital, was named the
new staff Board of Governors
member.
She replaces Doug Napier,
who spent two terms on the Board
and who was defeated in his bid
for re-election. Moen takes office
as of February.
• Dr. John Stubbs, current
president of Trent University,
will be replacing Bill Saywell as
president of Simon Fraser University this summer.
• The AMS Executive has
reached a tentative agreement
with Ber;riie Sheehan from the
vice-president of Student and
Academic Affairs Office that includes the SUB lease and the
Aquatic Centre.
AMS researcher Derek
Miller said in a statement that
an agreement should come to
council in the next couple meetings.
Perry says cupboards are bare
by Martin Chester
The BC government will not
be pitching in money to stop the
UBC administration's proposed
18 per cent tuition increase, students were told by advanced education minister Tom Perry.
Perry met with a delegation
of UBC students on December 18
but offered very little hope, according to AMS graduate studies
representative Michael Hughes.
"[Perry] said there wasn't
much money going around and
that his concern is with accessibility—the number of students
who can get in," Hughes said.
Perry has said the government
was working to increase the
number of places available to
prospective students in the province as a whole. "He did seem to
think 18 per cent might be on the
high side."
The budget for the Ministry
of Advanced Education will not
tie released until late January,
but "[Perry] did indicate the university isn't going to get any more
money,"Hughes said, perhaps not
even an increase to keep pace
vrith inflation.
"What will have to happen is
Tom Perry will have to force the
Board [of Governors] not to put
through the increase," he said.
Hughes said the 18 per cent
tuition increases will effect all
students, but engineering students will be particularly hard
hit. "The Engineers are really
upset because some of them will
be seeing a $1500 increase," he
said.
The proposed fee increases
will be portioned out on a per unit
basis, causing massive increases
for students whose programmes
demand a heavier course load.
For engineering students this
could mean paying as much as
$3700 in tuition next year.
Should the tuition increases
pass at the next Board of Governors meeting on January 21,
LFBC's tuition will be the second
highest in Canada, and certainly
the highest for engineers, Hughes
said.
Hughes also questioned what
value students were going to get
from these increases. "The library
will be cutting a million dollars
from periodicals," he said. The
libraries budget will not change,
but with costs rising, there will be
a real loss of $1 million.
"So the 18 per cent isn't going
to services for students," he said.
"It is questionable where the
money is going to go. Four per
cent is supposed to go to bursaries
and student aid, but that is about
$4 million. That would more than
double the money now given for
bursaries. It doesn't seem likely
they'll put it all into bursaries." The current AMS funded ef-   campaign whichisintendedtoflood There will be a meeting on
"The increases will effect ev- fort to fight the proposed increases the Perry's office as well as the Thursday,January7,atl2:30p.m.
eryone and we want to show the has consisted of producing a peti- offices ofthe premier and BoG chair in SUB 212, to organize the future
administration it really concerns tion, which has been signed by about Ken Bagshaw with 3,000 pieces of of the fight to stop the increases,
students," Hughes said. 7,000 students, and a post card   mail. All students are encouraged to at
tend.
TAMIA TOEPANIER PHOTQ
Snow falls at UBC
It's been snowing
outside.
Thirty centimetres of
it.
And while the
weather may have kept
many students away
from their first day of
classes on Monday, those
who were driving into
UBC managed to stay out
ofthe ditches.
Slightly less than
half the parking spaces
inB-Lot remained empty
by the time they're nor
mally completely full said
assistant parking manager
Danny Ho.
As well, he said, colds
prevented at least two toll
booth workers from coming
in, allowing those drivers
who did show up to enjoy a
rare day of free parking.
Meanwhile, by late afternoon constable Davis
Wendell said there had
been only one accident that
he was aware of No one
was hurt when a car slid
off South West Marine
Drive near the lookout.
"The roads were somewhat treacherous, but if you
stuck to the main roads
you'd probably be okay," he
said.
"Drive slow and cautiously, and you'll get
there."
Mike Hurren of Plant
Operations said "we were
very lucky because no one
came back until today."
Plant Operations is responsible for plowing the
roads on campus.
"We had people working yesterday to get
things done."
All Vancouver
Community College
campuses were open for
registration, as was
Douglas College and
BCIT.
Simon Fraser University, meanwhile, had
the day off, but not because of the snow—
classes weren't scheduled to begin until tomorrow in any case.
January 5,1993
THE UBYSSEY/3 COLUMBIA COLLEGE
BURNABY, B.C.
offers
University of Cambridge
Certificate in Teaching English
as a Foreign Language to Adults
(CTEFLA)
CTEFLA is the most widely
recognised certification in ^3
world for teaching English as a
foreign language abroad.
• Part-time course:
February 27th - April 24th
• Minimum requirement:
undergraduate degree
• Applications submitted by:
January 15th
CONTACT
Martyn Williams, English Language Centre,
Columbia College
6037 Marlborough Ave., Bumaby,
B.C. V5H 3L6
(located near Metrotown)
SFU cancels prison education program
University education system killed due to lack of funding
"' —*«•—^*—i^—        I IMM—^—■ ■- ■'■'^ a.—.—.i——mmm
Tel. 436-0144
BURNABY (CUP)—Students
enroled in Simon Fraser
University's prison education program at Mountain Penitentiary in
Agassiz, B.C. are upset the program will be cancelled next spring-
The students first learned of
the plan to review the future ofthe
12-year-old program in October
from Corrections Canada officials.
They say cancellation of the program will be devastating.
"If [Corrections Canada] cut
this out, Fve got nothing," said a
student who did not want to be
named. Other prison programs s?re
useless, he said.
Another said his university
studies allow him to take c- °rtrol of
his rehabilitation.
The prison had a contract with
the university to provide university courses to 50 prisoners. The
contract will not be renewed in the
spring. Instead, courses will be
offered that will help prisoners
leave the prison.
"All programs have been reviewed, and that includes university programs," said assistant
prison warden Dave McLaren.
"What we're trying to do is
match the criminological needs of
offenders with the appropriate
resources."
The SFU program allows students to pursue certificates,
bachelor's or master's degrees.
UofT?
Graduate Studies at the University of Toronto?
WATCH OUT!
UofT wants you.  But for how long?
RIGHT NOW
You are worth BIG BUCKS ($15,000-30,000 per year) in government funding to
UofT. But those big bucks only last so long—not as long as it takes to get a degree.
THE FUTURE?
Current UofT contract proposals attack the slim margin of job security that now exists
for graduate students employed as teaching assistants. Why com*; here if your funding
only takes you part way through your degree?
CAN YOU AFFORD THAT RISK?
CONTACT US:   Canadian Union of Educational Workers, Local 2
Syodkat canadien des travaillcmes et travatlletirs en education. Section locale 2
229 College Street, Suite 304, Toronto, Ontario M5T 1R4
Phone (416) 593-7057; FAX (416) 593-9866
Women educators valued lower
Study shows women teaching in Canada are paid less
by Michelle Paquette
cug|w2^^ttel
Teaching Assistants and Student Instructors
at the University of Toronto
NO!
WINNIPEG (CUP)—Female
teaching staff still earn less than
male teaching staff at Canadian
colleges and universities, a Statistics Canada study has found.
The study compared the pay
of full-time instructors at 19 different Canadian schools. On average, women earned $9,000 less
than men. At some schools, women
earned as much as $17,000 less
then men.
Only Edmonton's Concordia
College paid female instructors a
higher average salary. Women
earned an average of $50,669 as
opposed to $48,711, the salary men
earned.
The report cautioned many
factors can influence the salary
figures, including "the age and
qualification profiles ofthe teach
ing staff and the number of years
in the ranks."
Average reported salaries at
the University of Manitoba for
women were $15,236 less than
men's and median wages were
$19,293 lower.
Brian Fijal, associate vice-
president (human resources) admits there is a recognized pay discrepancy at the U of M.
But he said the university
doesn't have the money to implement a pay equity program right
now. Fijal said the school has applied to the provincial government
to get money to implement the
program.
The University ofVictoria and
Trinity Western University were
the only two B.C. universities surveyed.
Mi\)
A U TO     IMP OR T S
AUDI MERCEDES, VW & VOLVO SPECIALISTS
Complete Repair Service
HGNDA
VOLKSWAGEN
AUDI
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News from around Canada is taken from the
Canadian University Press wire service. Al!
papers who are members of the student press
co-operative contribute to the news exchange
as part of their membership responsibilities.
10% DISCOUNT FOR
UBC STUDENTS, FACULTY & STAFF
Very competitive rates & fast quality service.
Iboschi   BOSCH
Authorized Service
1505 W. 3RD AVENUE
(at the entrance to Granville Island)
4/THE UBYSSEY
AirCare
Repair Centre
731 -8171
NOMINATIONS FOR AMS
EXECUTIVE POSITIONS
1993-1994
• President
• Vice-President
• Director of Finance
• Director of Administration
• Coordinator of External Affairs
Are now being accepted. The term of office is one year, beginning at the AGM of the AMS in February, 1993. Nomination forms
are available from the Executive Aassistant in SUB 238. Closing
date for nominations is Friday, January 15,1993 at 4:30 pm.
The elections will be held January 25-29,1993.
Any Questions please contact:
Randy Romero, Elections Commissioner,
Grant Rfxxie%Chie|Retuming Officer, or
Michael Maher.^Deputy Returning Officer
in SUB 246,t>rfall {822-&361)
w
ElectioN
January 5,1993 N E W S
Palestines alone in safety zone
by Nadine Araji
The Canadian government
should demand the return of the
418 Palestinians expelled by Is
rael, according to protestors outside the Vancouver Art Gallery
last Saturday.
Organized by various organi
zations including the UBC and
SFU Arab societies, three Palestinian organizations, Middle East
Peace Action Coalition and Jews
for a Just Peace, the
demonstration drew 130
people to listen to speakers and handout leaflets
to the public asking them
to write and call their
government officials and
demand that the expelled
are returned.
The 418 Palestinians, deported as the
Israeli government's response to the killing of
an Israeli soldier, are all
thought to belong to the
Hamas organization, an
Islamic fundamentalist
group dedicated to the
formation of an Islamic
state in Palestine; this
group is thought to be
responsible for the
soldier's death. The
Palestinians were randomly arrested and expelled without charge or trial.
The 418 Palestinian men
have run out of food in the safety
zone between Lebanon and Israel.
The Israeli government has
been condemned by the United
Nations but Israel has flaunted
these condemnations, according
Hanna Kawas, president of the
Palestine Canada Association.
"When Saddam Hussein invaded Kuwait, The US and the
world were quick to condemn the
Iraqi president's action," Kawas
said, "and soon after, there was
sanctions and military intervention.
"What has the world done now
when Israel has defied UN resolutions and ignored its condemnation?"
Mordecai Briemberg, a member of both MEPAC and Jews for a
Just Peace, said This incident has
nothing to do with religious fundamentalism. If Canada had
rounded up 418. unwanted Christian Canadians and dumped them
in the US how would the world
react? The same should apply to
the Palestinians."
The expulsion ofthe 418 Palestinians has resulted in violence
in the Israeli Occupied Territories. Many Palestinians have been
killed by Israeli soldiers during
the demonstrations.
HANA KAWAS, ONE OF SEVERAL SPEAKERS, ADDRESSED DEMONSTRATORS FOR PALESTINE ON THE
VANCOUVER ART GALLERY STEPS ON SATURDAY, JANUARY 2ND.
ScrUpleSChair design")
1911 West 4 .Avenue • 732-3270
• COLOUR • PERMS • FOIL HIOHLIGHTS •
NEW
#41 EXPRESS
SERVICE TO UBC
Effective January 4,1993
A new "express" service across 41st Avenue for
passengers travelling from east Vancouver to UBC
will commence at the start of the Winter/Spring
semester at UBC. The #41 Express will follow the
same routing as the #41 Joyce Station/UBC, operating two trips in the a.m. and p.m. peak periods.
Schedule Times A.M. Peak:
Trips currently leaving Joyce Station at 7:24 a.m. and
7:29 a.m. will be adjusted to 7:31 a.m. and 7:36
a.m. and revised to operate as "express" service.
Arrival times for these trips at UBC will be 8:12 a.m.
and 8:18a.m.
Trips currently departing Joyce Station at 7:26 a.m.
and 7:36 a.m. will be adjusted to 7:27 a.m. and 7:34
a.m. respectively.
Schedule Times P.M. Peak:
Trips currently leaving UBC Loop at 2:32 p.m. and
3:32 p.m. will operate as "express" service to Joyce
Station.
Stopping Procedures A.M. PEAK:
From Joyce Station the #41 Express will stop for
passenger pick-up only at the following locations:
Joyce at Kingsway, 41 st Avenue at Rupert,
Clarendon, Victoria, Knight and Main. Service will
then operate non-stop to Marine Drive and
Camosun, at the beginning of UBC Endowment
Lands. From this point stops will be made for the
pick-up and drop-off of passengers at all stops to
UBC Loop.
Stopping Procedures A.M. PEAK:
From UBC Loop the #41 Express will stop for the
pick-up and drop-off of passengers at all stops to
Marine Drive at 41st Avenue. Service will then
operate non-stop to 41st Avenue and Main. From
this point, stops will be made for passenger drop-off
only at the following locations: 41 st Avenue at
Fraser, Knight, Victoria, Clarendon, Rupert, Joyce at
Kingsway and Joyce Station.
For further details call Transit Information at
261-5100.
BC Transit $%$ "ss^zr*
REAL SUBWAY
IS NOW AT UBC
(in the village)
THE BIG NAME IN FAST FOOD.
Get a taste of the big time. With your Subway subs - jam-packed on
fresh baked bread and piled high with free fixin's. Come to Subway.
We're making a big name for ourselves in fast fcod
I
I
I
15% OFF
HAIRCUTS
with valid student I.D.
jjPERMS & highlights;
with valid student I.D.
ANY
FOOTLONG
SUBOR
SALAD
$1.00 OFF
AMY
FOOTLONG
SUBOR
SALAD
(50( off six-inch)
5736
UNIVERSITY BLVD.
222-0884 ._„	
0N THE VILLAGE)    of,,, ^1^5. Jan wQ3 Valid at this location only
a--- .     uner expires j an larvo vouu hi uiis luttuiun uniy
Horn
MorvTue/Thu/Sun:
10 am - Midnite
Wed/Fri/Sat:
10 am-2 am
.J
January 5,1993
THE UBYSSEY/5 S PO R T S
The University of British Columbia
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
James Reaney's
the story of the Donnelly massacre
Directed by Sandhano Schultze
JANUARY 13-23    8pm
2 for 1 Preview: Wednesday Jan. 13
Thursday Matinee-. Jan. 21    12:30pm
RESERVATIONS: 822-2678
Support Your Campus Theatre
nfiff
«*    „.-.ENIENTPICK-UP TIMES:   M
6:10am    TOTEM PARK*f |te^M6:40am   10TH AVE. SAFEWAY
L^^]^. 6:50am   10TH & ALMA 7-ELEV
ilrUR^it^BOUT 6:I5pm
6:20am   PLACE VANII
ELEVEN
ROOKIE T-BIRD WINGER MIKE SHEMKO (18) SCORES UBC'S 8TH GOAL IN A VICTORY OVER THE MCGILL
REDMEN TO FINISH THIRD IN THE '92 FATHER BAUER CLASSIC AT UBC, DECEMBER 30.
o
h-
s
a.
u
m
o
w
GEE-GEE GOALIE PHIL COMTOIS STOPS ONE OF 52 SHOTS BY THE
MANITOBA BISONS BEFORE BLANKING 4 OF 6 SHOOTERS IN THE
OVERTIME SHOOTOUT TO BACKSTOP HIS TEAM TO A 5-4 VICTORY IN
THE FINAL GAME OFTHE FATHER BAUER CLASSIC
HEY!
New Bird Watchers
Sports meeting
Thursday Jan 7th
12:30pm
room 241k SUB
CASH  for
at the  UBC   BOOKSTORE
luring your used books to the UBC Bookstore and get CASH
BACK!  Softcover or hardcover course books, we will buy all
current edition titles having a resale market value.
m
BUY-BACK DATES
JAN 4 - 8. 1993
9 AM TO 5  PAA
~SS
rXd.
mm BOOKSTORE
6200 University Boulevard
TbI822-2665 Fax 822-8592
We're open to serve you:
Mon, Tubs, Thurs, Fri:
8:30 am-5:00 pm
Wed: 8:30 am - 8:30 pm
Safc 9:30 am -5:00 pm
-ssak
5» BfFrW P0& &/CE\
WITH VALID STUDENT LD.
;     7752 Demon (at PwMtJ 689-7772   I
374<7 k/ed?tBroa</c</acf (at 7r«tciJ  737-9636
6/THE UBYSSEY
January 5,1993 S FOR T S
Couch Potato's Dreams
by Stan Paul
Okay, how many people
played the role of couch potato in
front of the T.V. or. New Year's
day? Bowl games. Bowl games.
Bowl games. A sports enthusiast's
dream or an unsympathizer's
nightmare.
What is this whole concept of
sport that forces certain members
of the populace to meditate on it,
dream about it and even create
degrees of specialization at higher
centres oflearning? If you have not
noticed, there are people out there
getting paid a lot of money to hit a
ball or to punch somebody in the
face. Forty-nine million dollars for
seven years. That is $7 million a
year. How much do you think you
will be making when you graduate? We have created a subculture
from simple children's games to a
complex multi-billion dollar business.
My view on sport and the
reason for suchis that of catharsis.
A purging of our violent nature.
Instead of subduing our innate
feelings of aggression such as the
desire of beating the daylights out
of our enemy, we let loose our energy in our so-called competition.
Humans have a so-called need to
feel superior.
Watching sports is another
matter. It seems that we are really
primeval where we are like the
Romans at the Colosseum watching and waiting for the Christians
to be eaten by the lions or the
"barbarians" fighting to the death.
We are all gathering around either
in the stadium or the television to
watch people suffer loss. For every
enthusiastic winner there is a despondent loser.
Now when those
unsympathizers see us sitting in
front of the television completely
unconscious of everything else;
understand that we are just trying
to be more of the filthy vile creatures we are. Human.
(YOUR "UNWANTED" X-MAS GIFTS)
CHI
USED SKI & SPORTS
EQUIPMENT
skis, snowboards, boots, poles,
clothing &. accessories etc.
SPORTS JUNKIES
737-8000
2124 Burrard @ 5th
"We Want Your Used Sporting Goods."
THE T-BIRDS CELEBRATE THEIR SECOND STRAIGHT VICTORY OVER
MCGILL, THEIR FIRST WINS SINCE SHUTTING OUT THE LETHBRIDGE
PRONGHORNS OCTOBER 23.
ON THE BOULEVARD
s300 off cuts
s1500 off perms
with presentation of this ad
5784 University Boulevard
Esthetician
Suntanning Special
10 sessions for   29'
Exp. Feb. 15/93
Phone 224-1922
224-9116
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powerful software are trademarks of Claris Corporation. All other product names are
trademarks or registered trademarks of (heir respective owners.
January 5,1993
THE UBYSSEY/7 s&
. tt?WOfa>&.
OLD SCHOOL BURNER BY FX AND KS, VANCOUVER B.C. (ALLEY BEHIND GRACELAND)
by Ted Young-Ing
You've seen the shit around town. There's
the stuff on the walls at Dld's Pizza, that
burning wildstyle piece by the comic shop
on Granville, if you've been to a rave youVe
seen it on the walls, and the tags and throw
ups are on almost every flat, blank space
around Vancouver.
Graffiti art started in New York City in
the early 70's. Urban kids without a recognized means of expressing themselves
created their own artform and developed it
for themselves. From there, it moved across
the continent.
It's not about trashing property or vandalism; it's part of a culture. It's fast, it's
from the streets, and it's real. It's the urban
artform.
There's different styles and forms of
graffiti. Tagging is the easiest and most
prominent form. Tags are those two- or
three-letter stylized signatures that are
magic markered on walls and windows all
over downtown. If you get your tag up a lot
around town, you can get noticed by other
writers.
Throw-ups are small, simple spray-
painted names. They're done quickly with
only one or two colours, and the main point
of throw-ups is to get up.
Pieces are the stylie full-wall works that
use lots of colours. Pieceing takes talent
and it's in pieceing that writers can really
show their style.
The scene here in Vancouver is pretty
small. There are only a dozen or so graffiti
writers In Vancouver with any peer status.
Locating them is pretty easy. For the
most part, they're all friends and they all
hang out together. Some of them are members of Aerosoul, a graffiti crew that's down
with the Groove Shop in North Vancouver.
KS is a member of Aerosol. He's done a
lot of work around town, did some ofthe
walls for the Nutta Butta New Years rave
and did the front cover for this issue. I
interviewed him at the Groove Shop.
Ted: How'd you come up with your tag?
KS: To be honest, the letters. They're easy
to write and they look good. I guess you
could say its the sound the can makes
when I'm spraying.
Ted: How long have you been spraying?
KS: I started following it about four years
ago. I started spraying a couple years ago. I
used to skate, and through skating I got
into hip hop culture and stuff when I lived
in Toronto and I started getting heavily into
hip hop and into spraying.
Ted: How'd you get into it?
KS: The first time I saw a piece I went,
*whoa. I want to do that!' So I drew until I
thought my drawings were good enough
that I could put them up on a wall and
then I started practicing. I started with
tagging then I started doing two-coloured
lettering called throw-ups. I did a couple of
those and then I started getting into multicoloured pieces.
Ted: Where do you do most of your
stuff?
KS: A lot of stuff I do is in areas like under
bridges where people don't care. But then
you gotta watch that it's not a historical
landmark like under the Burrard Bridge. A
lot of people been pieceing under there and
the city gets all uptight cause it's a historical site, so we stay away from that. We
usually try to do it under train bridges and
stuff like that. But the point of it is to get
visibility at the same time, so we try to get
walls that everyone can see, too. Like that
wall on Commercial. That's probably an
ideal place cause lots of people see it.
Right now we're trying to work with the
city so they can give us a place to work, so
that we're not painting where they don't
want us to paint.
There's some walls where people give us
permission and then we do clubs and raves
and stuff like that where we get paid for it.
Ted: Ever been hassled by the cops?
KS: I haven't, but my friends have. Some
writers have been fined. Mostly they leave
us alone. They crack down on the people
who piece in stupid areas.
We try to piece in areas where there's
already stuff on the wall, like where
someone's written "fuck you" on the wall.
We try to piece in places that are suitable to
the style.
Ted: What's a typical fine like?
KS: Usually around $200. You can buy
quite a bit of paint for $200. If you're not
stupid about it you won't get hassled. WeVe
been painting under bridges and the police
have come down and all they say is just
don't put anything offensive on the wall,
which isn't our aim. I mean, some cops dig
it.
Ted: So they're cool about it then!
KS: Yeah, usually. But there's dicks everywhere. There's been times when we got a
commission to paint a wall and weVe been
hassled. They threw my friends up against
cars and shit without asking us.
Ted: Graffiti's getting kinda trendy right
now. It's really being exploited like on
videos, on t-shirts, whatever. How do
you. feel about that?
KS: Mixed feelings. If you're good, you
should be getting the respect you deserve,
right? But there's a lot of people out there
who want to get at it and they don't know
what they're doing or what it's about and
they're getting paid for whatever they do.
It's hard to say. In some ways I feel that it
should stay street but then damn, if you
can make money off of it, go for it, you
know? But you gotta be careful.
Ted: Can you make a lot of money at it?
KS: Yeah, actually. When you do get a job,
it doesn't last that long though. T-shirt
designs are coming in right now. A lot of
people doing that. But you gotta watch out.
There's a fine line between [working and]
selling out.
Ted: What do you think graffiti's about?
KS: It's about doing it for yourself and
other writers. That's what it should be
about. Getting your status on the street.
That's what it's mainly about. Everyone
has their own opinion of what it's about.
Some people don't even like to call it graffiti, they call it aerosol art.
Ted: What's the relationship with graffiti
and hip hop, skating and gangs and
subculture stuff like that?
KS: It has no relationship to gangs. None at
all. But skating and hip hop, it all has to
do with the attitude. You see Hlds now
walking down the street with their Raiders
jackets or whatever busting whatever style
they see on Rap City and they don't know
what It's about. I think skaters know what
time it is cause they^re with the culture. It's
all about culture.
Ted: Is the style here different from in
Toronto?
KS: Oh, yeah. Toronto's more like New
York. They're on their own tip. The difference between east coast and west coast is
that west coast has more range. New York
came up with all the techniques and styles
and west coast push it. There's a different
vibe on the west coast. Different progression.
Ted: What's the future for graffiti?
What's coming up?
KS: Right now, everybody seems to be
going back to old school. You know, the
roots. Breakdancing's coming back in and
shit. Basically graphics; people are going
back to old school writing. Last year it was
playing more towards people getting into
the new school, more characters.
Ted: Neos and Sin [two Vancouver graffiti artists] got their own show at the
Smash Gallery. Is that important to
you? Is that something you'd like to do?
KS: Yeah, I wouldn't mind having a show.
It's cool. They did a good Job; it was wicked.
I give them a lot of respect. They're the first
guys in Canada to have a show on graffiti.
It was good exposure I like the techniques
they used promoting it and stuff. They did
the advertising through the street. They're
still keeping it street. But yeah, I'd like to
have a show. Right now I'm concentrating
on the Groove Shop, though.
Please see AEROSOL, Pg. 13
"ALTERNATIVE GRAP STYLE PIECE BY NEOS
EAST COAST STYLE EARLY PIECE BY KS. TORONTO ONT.
PORTFOLIO SKETCHES BY KS TRAVEL CUTS/VOYAGES CAMPUS
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Lower Level, Student Union Building
822-6890
Canadian
«»-—«••■, Federation
 CES °* Students
F-kfcratJon^ XJJS K
canadienne I-CEEI
des 6tudiantes„" WfcB- ■
et 6tudiants
CMAs
won't
survive
the '90s.
They'll
MANAGE
the'90s.
The graduates who become the managers ofthe '90s
and beyond will have the flexibility to manage any change.
Even a change of industry or two.
That's why the CMA program places so much stress on
broad management skills. In fact, it's the only
professional program devoted exclusively to hands-on
training in management accounting.
The CMA designation starts with a thorough grounding
in finance - then goes on to provide an overview of all
aspects of business, and how each contributes to the
bottom line. That overview is constantly updated, too,
because the CMA designation carries with it a mandatory
requirement for continuing professional development.
As a CMA, you'll do more than just manage financial
information. You'll use financial information to manage.
And that includes managing your own career.
For more information on your future as a CMA, mail
this coupon now or telephone (604) 687-5891 or
1-800-663-9646 in B.C.
I " ' _ " 1
I     Please send me a copy of the Professional Program Guide 1992 - 93.
NAME
ADDRESS
CMA
The "M" stands for Management
CITY
PROVINCE
POSTAL CODE
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Accountants of British Columbia
P.O.Box 11548
1575 - 650 West Georgia Street
Vancouver, B.C. V6B 4W7
IM
J
ARTS
Can't sit down for long
(or you might just miss it!)
by Sara Martin
VISUAL AHTH
Taniu '1 n psnior
Janutirv lltri - 15th
AMS Art Cillery
Student Union Building
Artaon^atthi pauntm-^piioto-.,
sculptures, and prints tliitt will lx*
displayed in Tama Trupnmer's
showat tht- AMS Art Gal I «•>, there
-will he a argla colour ph<>t*> of a
lonely purple chair. The chair remain* Unoccupied, an e\pri*-Jon of
Trep'-mirr'-. ro-nliwsne-fl, ht*r desire mii seed to travt-1, to experience suit-tire throiif-jh hrt* camera
lens.i" _
'ftjeisxhibition, titled "i an'I ait
down far long," will Ik-fire-sen U. din
the Student Union Building Art
f. ilW r> from :he ll„h to the 15th
of .lcwiu..iy. The opening, to which
<-ll mi* invited, is fiom 7 to 10pm
i*n \t Mond.iy evi-nrig.
Trep.-iniL-r'- jhow features
Photos of Asia, .Hid, Exploration of
ilu.'lluim»nl-->rni
The dif-plsy h.is two main
paiiIs One include *•■ photograghs,
Ixiih color and blmk and white,
thait were taki n during her recent
ti.iu-ls to Indi>i and Indonesia.
ponent of the
erf's use of a
such as paint-
igs, and several
her art, all
iwants to do is
'. However, she
tedlongenough
ternational Re-
C next year.
also return to
e Ubyssey.
Tri.
Vt
]•« hoping
to complete
ttitions
tukt?
3)
3
.1
Sample of one of Tania's photographs featured in her forthcoming show
at the AMS Gallery.
JM
III
1925 West Fourth J|ttue, Vancouver
Reservation^ 736-8480
10/THE UBYSSEY
January 5,1993 ARTS
Broadway bunny still very funny
by Graham Cook
When I was just a wee lad,
it didn't take much
preparation to watch Bugs
Bunny. You just got your bowl of
Honey-Nut Cheerios (or equivalent), plunked down in front of
the set, and waited for the
refrain: "Overture, down the
lights, this is it, the night of
nights." That would
send thrills up your
spine.
It was not too
different, perhaps, from
the thrill felt by kids of
the 1940's and 50's
watching the cartoons
in the movie theatres
before the main
feature.
ance in person of cartoon director
Chuck Jones.
With Jones in attendance,
Daugherty felt it necessary to
mention the director's "genius" in
every second sentence of his
fawning introductions to the
cartoons. When the balding,
goateed 80-year-old Jones finally
FILM/MUSIC
Bugs Bunny on
Broadway
Queen Elizabeth
Theatre
January 2
Bugs Bunny, Daffy
and especially the Road
Runner and Coyote
provided a simple
cartoon universe with a
twisted but nevertheless consistent logic.
Anvils falling on
Coyote's head flattened
him momentarily but
did no long-term
damage. Products from
the Acme Corporation consistently failed in their intended
destructive uses. And if Bugs
ever had a long trip to make, you
could be sure he would miss that
left turn at Albuquerque.
Today they'd have us believe
that you have to dress up and
head to the highbrow theatre to
really appreciate Bugs Bunny. At
least that's the impression given
by "Bugs Bunny on Broadway".
The idea behind the touring
cartoon/orchestra show is that
Bugs and co. are really "Art,"
and that the brilliant music of
Carl Stalling deserves to be
played by a full symphony rather
than the bare-bones musicians
used for the original scores.
The audience at Saturday
night's show certainly played
along, with natty suits and
formal dresses the norm - even a
few (rabbit?) fur coats.
The show presents nine of
Warner Brothers' classic cartoons ofthe late 40's and 50's
with synchronized backing by
the VSO. The result is a peculiar
hybrid of slick self-congratulation and genuine anarchy, the
former provided by conductor
and "executive producer" George
Daughe rty, the latter by the
insanity ofthe cartoons themselves and the surprise appear-
came out on stage to a standing
ovation, he seemed a bit befuddled by the whole thing, and
humbly compensated by praising
Daugherty for his "genius" in
putting the show together.
While I don't doubt
Daugherty's love for Bugs Bunny
cartoons, it doesn't take much
"genius" to repackage something
that has already proven itself in
decades of television re-runs, and
then to market it for a more
upscale audience.
In fact, ifs surprising that
no-one has mined the Warner
Brothers vaults before now. The
blossoming of art shops like
"Cartoon Corner" that sell
"authenticated" animation eels,
and the hundreds of millions of
dollars of business done by
Buena Vista Productions, Walt
Disney's "classic animation"
repackaging arm, shows how
lucrative the cartoon exhuming
business is.
Most telling in the "Bugs on
Broadway" show was a saccharine "birthday greetings" video
for Chuck Jones that Daugherty
included in the program.
Amongst platitudes from Steven
Spielberg, Ron Howard, and
"Simpsons" creator Matt
Groening was a clip from a
Warner Brothers "Vice President
DESPERATELY SEEKIN(^^i9fl^
WE ARE HIRING UBC STUDENTS
FOR OUR ON-GOING
CAMPAIGN CONTACTING ALUMNI
If you possess excellent verbal skills
and enjoy working with the public
CALL THE UBC DEVELOPMENT OFFICE AT
822-8900
For Classic Animation."
"Happy Birthday, Chuck,
and I look forward to bringing
our classic cartoons into the
twenty-first century!" she
enthused, images of the successful re-release of Merrie Melodies
on home video dancing in her
eyes.
Despite all the
hype, the "genius"
moniker really does suit
Chuck Jones. In his
thirty-year, underpaid
and overworked tenure
at Leon Schlesinger
productions and later
Warner Brothers, Jones
produced cartoons that
stand up today as
brilliantly surreal,
anarchic, and
gutsplittingly funny.
They are
violent and bereft of
female characters,
without question - not
unlike most ofthe
popular culture ofthe
day. That said, they
take a refreshingly
twisted view of contemporary life.
Bugs Bunny
spends most of his time
outwitting overbearing
authority figures,
whether they're construction workers
building office towers
over his hole or, (ironically
included in this production),
pretentious opera singers
drowning out his banjo playing.
The insanely perfect destruction of Elmer Fudd, via haircuts,
in "The Rabbit of Seville" shows
what can only be called genius.
The fruit salad assembled on
Elmer's head, the vertical barber
chair chase, the brilliant mix of
Rossini and rabbit is still funny
the zillionth time you see it — in
fact, the familiarity ofthe gags
increases the delight of recognition.
Bugs Bunny is brilliant
whether it's given highbrow
approval or not. "Art" it may be;
"funny" it most definitely is.
■M«
-'*>?
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1 INTRAMURAL 1
UNIFORMS
•COFFEE
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m
SILKSCREENING
(QUICK TURNAROUND)
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HOTLINE: 875-1245
•TRO-MTT VfLLlVEXf OT QOOVS'
OPEN EVENINGS & WEEKENDS
BY APPOINTMENT ONLY.
Try it STEAMY HOT!
Directions:
Open carton
or pour in
microwave
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and heat to
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Made from real
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No Artificial
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dinoccino!
THUNbERBIRD SHOP AT UBk
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MAIN FLOOR
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HOURS: (■
MONDAY TO FRIDAY 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM
SATURDAY 10:00 AM • 5:00 PM    „
SUNDAY 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM    <y
January 5,1993
THE UBYSSEY/11 e
flocjiiOB
software
Kodak's new
Photo CD technology
Whya
Macintosh II vi?
$3169.
QuickTime
Explore the world of multimedia computing with the new
Apple Macintosh Ilvi.
Introducing the Apple way to enhance your productivity with the speed and flexibility of CD-ROM based computing — the
Apple® Macintosh™ Ilvi computer.   An affordable personal computer that can help you work faster and give you access to a
world of new information through CDs.   Interactive games, books, educational software and music are fust a few of the areas your
family can explore with CD-ROM.   The Macintosh Ilvi has lots of storage space and, as always, the ability to grow with you.
The Macintosh Ilvi comes with Apple's
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fastest CD-ROM drives available — for
everything from computer-based education,
business information management, Kodak's
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imagery of QuickTime. ™
The Macintosh Ilvi is ready to grow with
you because this computer includes the
AppleCD 300i internal storage device —
opening the door to the wealth of
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accelerator slot enables you to increase
performance later on.
The Macintosh Ilvi
comes with:
• 5MB RAM
• 80MB hard disk
• 14" colour display
• Apple internal 300i
CD-ROM drive
• Extended keyboard
• Mouse
The colour of less money: When it comes to
appearances, the Macintosh Ilvi can display
32,000 colours on the Macintosh Colour
Display monitor. Sixteen million colours
and larger monitor support is available by
plugging in an appropriate card into one
ofthe expansion slots.
Come in today for a hands-on
demonstration. Sale pricing in effect until
January 15,1993. Also, save $50 on any
Apple laser printer with the purchase of any
Apple computer.   For more details and
other Apple computer packages available,
visit or telephone the UBC Computer
Shop.
C o m p u . :r  Shop
Tel 822 - 4748 • Fax 822-8211
E-Mail: computer @bookstore.ubc.ca
HOURS
Mon.Tues.Thur.Fri8:;
Wed 8:30 am-8:30 pm
Sat 9:30 am 5:00 pm
BOOKSTORE
6200 University Boulevard
Tel 822-2665 (UBC-BOOK)
Authorized Campus Dealer
Apple and the Apple logo arc registered trade marks of Apple Computer, Inc.  AppleCD, Macintosh, and QuickTime, are trade marks of Apple
Computer, Inc.   Kodak is a registered trade mark of Kodak Canada Inc.
1      HE UBYSSEY
January 5,1993 ARTS
^
Ted: What's the story with you guys and
the Groove Shop?
KS: We're doing t-shirts and stuff. Our crew's
doing a t-shirt line called Aerosoul, which is
part of Booty t-shirts.
We're trying to school people basically. A lot
of the kids into the hip hop culture tv' \ that
it's cool to be a gangsta and stuff lii        it
and they play that role. They see it and
they think
yeah, that's      -*-~~|jp2jjj2jgnjjjjj ||c'iiiMMMi ^^^1,.
what it's all      §   BhSA^B    I    ^J|
about, man.
They don't
get it, so
what we're
trying to do
with the
shop is
school
people what it's about. It's not about drugs or
who fucking beat up who or who wears
Raiders jackets or I don't know what they
think. They're cultured through the television
set. Gangs are glorified and whatever, it's
nuts man. It's feeding them negative images
and that's what they use cause that's all they
know. They don't see nothing positive.
So basically what we're trying to do through
the shop is to show them that they can get
into writing, they can get into dj'ing, breaking, dancing, whatever. Even rhyming. We're
trying to show them what it's about, cause
this is what it's all about. It's about battling
through talent, not through fighting.
Ted: That's really cool.
KS: Yeah. That's how I see what we're about
and that's how everyone who's down with
Booty and with Aerosol sees it. I think this
toft 1m m?«
PIECE BY SKETCH ARD CURVE, COMMERCIAL AND HASTINGS
attitude's going to take over. I feel like I'm
doing something positive.
A lot of people think that graffiti is violent
or that it's about gangs or whatever. I know
that the police think that. People don't take
the time to look at it. They judge it before
they see it or before they take the time to
try and understand it. That's ignorance. I
want people to see what it's really about.
Ted:
What's
the
future
for you
in
graffiti?
KS: I'm
going to
stick with it, hopefully it'll get me into
graphic design. I also wouldn't mind getting
into animation. Right now, I'm going to
Cap[ilano College] taking graphic arts
there.
Ted: What do you want to tell people
about graffiti?
KS: I don't want to preach to anyone, but
don't judge anything till you give it a
chance. Don't perpetrate. It's art. Look
deeper into :lt. We have something to say.
Ted: Anything else you want to add? Say
hi to your crew?
KS: Yeah, I want to give shout outs to
EFEX, Krewz, Neos, Sin, Z-LOK and Dido.
And peace to Sec, JINX, Ren and Hope.
Peace out. *.(%_
BROKEN
COMPUTER?
We repair all Makes and Models.
U.B.C. Network Services
Computer Science Bldg., Rm. 106
822-5516
AMS Used Bookstore
Sell your books:
January 4 to 8 8:30 am to 6:30 pm**
SUB 119
Buy your books:
January 4 to 15*** 8:30 am to 6:30 pm**
SUB 125
Why sell your used books to the AMS Used
Bookstore?
While other places determine how much they will give you for your used
, we let you determine your price.* This means more money in
• While other places determine now much they will give you tor your us
books, we let you determine your price.* This means more money
your pocket.
I
rheap
• It's also a convenient way to sell your books. No need to do your own
advertising. No need to sit by the phone waiting for a call. No need to
arrange to meet with the buyer.
Why buy your used books from the AMS Used
Bookstore?
• It's run by students. The handling fee is primarily
charged so that the AMS is able to hire students.
• Your patronage supports students and
their interests. Profits earned, if any,
support the many service organizations,
clubs and programs sponsored by the
AMS.
Why go anywhere else?
'Tha AMS charges a 20% handling fee on all books sold. * 'Hours are subject to change without notice. '"Closed on the weekend.
January 5,1993
THE UBYSSEY/13 T'f-f'
^r^-
s/M
xUijji a I" O R 1 A Jb
Vacuum
cleaner sucks
up Budgie
"Universities went news."
So wrote John Cruickshank, then
man-aging editor of The Globe and Mail
newspaper, in the April 1992 edition of
University Affairs.
While the University of Toronto, on ■
average, was mentioned three times in ev-
eiy issue The Globe and Mail published in
1991, most ofthe stories were "pretty routine stuff."
Generally, the media glom onto the
false arguments produced by the public
relations staff and ignore, or choose not to
find, the real issues lurking just below the
surface.
Universities are not boring—-journalists are. Or at least they are dull.
They (or perhaps we) are easily led
away from the issues the education
industry's leaders want the media not to
look into. Like who pays for the "objective"
research that proves that this or that
chemical, drug or gadget is harmless, or
less harmful than the previous chemical,
drug or gadget?
What the problem is, then, is a failure
in the framework the media requires everything to be put in. News is written in a
formula. Anything that does not fit into that
formula is immediately not news.
The media used to take into consideration the importance of the stories to the
public, or the publics right or need to know.
Now the framework consists strictly of
what can be written quickly, simply and at
the lowest labour costs.
Entertainment, not information or interest, is the relevant factor. Entertainment sells advertising space, quality, does
not.
That the managing editor ofthe Globs
and Mail can't find anything of interest to
him in universities across the country is not
surprising—nothing jumps out and bites
him. Institutions like the one we attend
have advanced strategies against anything
jumping up and giving haircuts to anyone.
Funding for academic research is becoming more and more dependant on directly applicable output. Just as the
journalist's job is dependant upon the individual producing'useful'(or entertaining)
stories. The goals of both institutions are so
similar that they are completely obscure to
the other.
Just as the editor can't see the value of
the academic's treatise on the connections
between Tolstoy's first novel and his toe
) nfection, the academic finds it difficult to
comprehend the value of a 101 year old
grandmother's bar mitzvah.
Tie Utyssey welcoires letters on any Issue. letters nust be typed and are rot to exoeed 300 wards in length. Oontent which is judged to be libelous, hatcf*obic( sexist, racist or factually incorrect will
itt be pi-dished. Please be ccncdse. Letters may be edited for brevity, but it is standard tfcyssey policy rict txi edit letters fc^speUi*-g or graratatical mistates. Please tiring than, with identification,
to SUB 241k.  letters must include name, faculty, ar*d signature.
Losing our touch
Of course I saw it coming ... the title caption from
the cover of your December
2nd issue read "Dont believe
the bullshit. Christmas spirit
is a term invented by the
advertising executives to
entice you to spend your
cash." Rats, I thought the
feelings of happiness I got
from being around my
friends and family during
Christmas were genuine.
Can you imaginehow quickly
my bubble burst when the
Ubyssey informed me that I
was just another sucker
buying into the corporate
trap? It turns out I wasn't
buying gifts and behaving
cheerfully to add to the festive mood and express my
appreciation of those around
me, I was doing it under the
hypnotic spell of the ever-
powerful man in the blue
suit. Ill try not to beleaguer
the point. This cover meshes
perfectly with your predictable, one-dimensional, conspiracy-chasing editorial
stance. I'm sure not everyone
on the Ubyssey staff sees
Christmas this way, but for
those who do: Fd invite you
to my house for an honest
good time, but I wouldn't
want you to depress us.
P.S. Fm surprised you
didn't refer to it as "the
holidays" or "Xmas." Shame
on you for your political
correctness.
Kevin Watson
Fine Arts 4
Zionist
Confusion
Mr. Rabiner urges
Ubyssey readers to check the
facts about the Arab-Israeli
conflict. One wish he took
his own advice.
Mr. Rabiner blames the
Palestinians for the genesis
of the Arab-Israeli conflict
by refusing to accept the partition plan. He forgets to tell
us that the partition plan
proposed to give the 30%
Jewish minority (who owned
less than 6% ofthe land who
are largely foreigners) 55%
of Palestine including the
most fertile areas. The Pal
estinians on the other hand
wanted a democratic election (what a radical idea!) to
decide the future of their
country. He also forgets to
tell us that the Zionists accepted the partition plan as
a temporary mean with the
aim at expansion into the
rest of Palestine. Also ignored is the fate ofthe Palestinians in the new state.
Before Arab "armies" [read
palace guards] tried to help
the Palestinians, Zionist
forces, under the guise of
police action, have driven
hundreds of thousands of
Palestinians from their
homeland, destroying their
villages and have also captured areas allocated to the
Palestinian state in the partition plan.
Mr. Rabiner's quotes
from Arab leaders and radios
(culled directly from his
"reliable sources" [sic], no
doubt) are either fraudulent
or grossly taken out of context. For example, Mr.
Rabiner claims that Nasser
stated that "Our objective
will be the destruction of
Israel" to give the impression
of an imminent Egyptian
attack on Israel in 1967. In
reality, President Nasser
said "If Israel embarks on an
aggression against Syria or
Egypt, the battle against
Israel will be a total one ...
Our objective will be the
destruction of Israel." When
asked by British Parliament
member Christopher
Mayhew "If Israel does not
attack, will you let them
alone," President Nasser
stated clearly "Yes.. we have
no intention of attacking Israel." No one in his right
mind would have expected
an Egyptian attack against
a much more powerful Israel,
especially with third of the
Egyptian armed force bogged
down in Yemen's civil war.
Mr. Rabiner's claim that
Arafat has called Jews "dogs
and filth" has been widely
reported in the media. It was
hotly denied by all involved
and not a single substantive
proof could be found to support this claim. But why
bother with evidence when
the fictional world is so much
"nicer?"
Rephrasing Mr.
Rabiner's question, "why is
it that [so called] Zionist resort to inventing Tacts' in
order to complement their
fictional and distorted views
ofthe Arab-Israeli conflict?"
It is because they are fed a
sanitized and distorted version ofthe history of Zionism
and Israel with a silver
spoon.
Rafeh Hulays
Electrical Engineering
1993: A Dream
Year
If you feel things are
bound to get better in 1993,
you're in good company!
At hisrecentNew Year's
Peace Concert at Alice Tully
Hall - Lincoln center, in New
York, the peace philosopher
Sri Chinmoy says 1993 will
be one ofthe brightest years
ever! In fact, he looks toward
a decade of unprecedented
global peaceandfulfillment.
Sri Chinmoy sees: "The
world-power—the United
Nations—and the heart-
power of the world are becoming infinitely more powerful than the mind-power
... I see that brightness and
luminosity have already
started blossoming." His
New Year's message of Hope
and Newness offers:
"God is dreaming,
Newness singing,
Oneness blossomming,
Fullness dancing.
Hope no more gropes,
Life without slopes.
Splendid depths and
Heights
Transform bondage-
nights."
—Sri Chinmoy
So if this is the year you
want to try something new,
go for it! This "dream year"
heralds in the new hope to
turn our dreams into fruitful realities. Everyone can
make a bright and confident
new start!!
ArunSud
UN condemns Israel's actions
Israel's deportation of
418 Palestinian civilians
without charge or trial is
not only a blatant violation of international law,
but yet another blow
against peace prospects in
the MiddleEast. The deportations are Israel's response to the earlier killing of an Israeli soldier, an
act publicly deplored by
the Palestinian leadership.
No evidence was offered by the Government
of Israel linking the expelled Palestinians to the
soldier's death. The illegality of deportation is abundantly clear.
Deportation is
illegal on the
following
grounds:
Article 49(1) ofthe Fourth
Geneva Convention (Israel
is one ofthe signatories to
the convention) regarding
the Protection of Civilian
Persons in time of war
states that "individual or
mass forcible transfers, as
well as deportations of
protected persons ... are
prohibited, regardless of
their motive."
Article 147 of the
Convention defines "unlawful deportation" as a
grave breach which as
such, according to article
146, places on high offi-
cialsof contracting parties
a responsibility to prosecute those guilty of such
breaches in their domestic
court. Also, the 1945
Charter of the International Military Tribunal at
Nuremberg defined deportation as a war crime
and a crime against humanity.
Deportation is a form
of collective punishment
proscribed by article 33
ofthe Fourth Geneva Con-
vention. Deportation
flouts the principle of
personal responsibility; it
is a cardinal principle of
penal law that a person
should not be held responsible for the criminal acts of
another.
In the current case,
members ofthe Palestinian
community are threatened
with deportation simply on
the basis that they are
thought to belong to the
Hamas organization one or
more members of which (as
yet unidentified and brought
to trial) are believed to be
responsible for Sergeant
Toledano's death. Finally,
deportations are administrative orders taken by military commanders, not by any
Perspective
judicial authority, and they
are not pursuant to
a procedure which can be
measured against due process criteria. They are extrajudicial punishments in the
extreme.
The United Nations Security Council has condemned the Israeli deportation policy in its resolutions
468 (8 May 1990), 469 (20
May 1980), 484 (19 December 1980), 605 (1987), 607 (5
January 1988), 608 (14
January 1988), 636 (7 July
1989), and 681 (20 December 1990). These resolutions
have time and again exhorted the Israeli authorities to desist from their deportation policy. To date,
however, none of these
resolutions has been heeded.
In its latest resolution
(799 Dec. 18/92), the UN
security council "strongly
condemn[ed] the action
taken by Israel, the occupying power, to deport hundreds of Palestinian civilians, and express[ed] its firm
opposition to any such deportation by Israel;
Reaffirm[ed] the applicability of the Fourth Geneva
Convention of 12 August
1949 to all the^Palestinian territories occupied by
Israel since 1967, including Jerusalem, and
affirm[ed] the deportation
of civilian constitutes a
contravention of its obligations under the convention."
It rejected Israel's
argument that the expelled Palestinians are
now the responsibility of
Lebanon, it rejected the
threat made against
Lebanon by the Israeli
government, and it affirmed "the independence,
sovereignty and territorial integrity of
Lebanon."
It also "de-
manded]
that Israel,
the occupying power, ensure the safe
and immediate return to
the occupied territories of
all those deported."
The deportation orders against these Pales-
tin ians (who ha ve not been
formally charged with any
offense) is part of the
Rabin government's collective punishment imposed on Palestinians.
These collective punishments, including the mass
expulsions, are completely
out of proportion to the
precipitating events.
Other measures
taken in the aftermath of
the killing of Israeli soldiers have included the
total sealing-bff of the
West Bank and Gaza
(Gaza since December 9,
1992), the rounding-up of
hundreds of Palestinians
in an aggressive arbitrary
arrest campaign; the
shelling of residential
homes allegedly used to
shelter wanted Palestinians, and prolonged punitive curfews involving a
large percentage of the
population.
Rafeh Hulays
Engineering
theUbyssey
————■■•■——i January 5,1993
The Ubyssey is a founding member of
Canadian University Press
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays and
Fridays by the Alma Mater Society of the
University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those ofthe staff and not necessarily those ofthe university administration, or
of the sponsor. The editorial office is room
241K ofthe Student Union Building. Editorial Department, phone 822-2301; advertising, 822-3977; FAX 822-9279.
Editor SamGnen
Tupac Amaru. Don't ask me why, but apparantly he beat the snot out of the Spanish in the 1780s—not
by himself I assume. Completely unrelated? Yes, but then so are we.
Lyanne Evans returned to find no one. Helen Willoughby-Price came late and found the same thing. Yet
many had wandered through, like Nadine Araji and Graham Cook. Sandlak scored during the meeting,
or so Siobhan Roantree Insists. Sammy Green coup was highly successful, but .ostly because the others
didn't show. Tanla Trepanier was both a subject and an object, as was KS—yes that is all there is. Not many
others were objects, but Colin Maycock was, and likely will be even more of one before the night Is out.
Sara Martin Chester, just use the middle one twice. Ted Young-lng decided it was better to hyphenate than
to have a middle name, or not. Hao LI kept it simple, of course Rod McFarlane tried to, but I got confused,
like I did with Stan Paul. It was a confusing night. But Kahlid Nahhas confused no one, he wasn't seen
by anyone but Noha Sedky. Mark Nielsen wasn't sure Nahhas existed, but then sometimes he's not sure
he exists. Are you sure you do?
14/THE UBYSSEY
January 5,1993 ARTS
The Dance Horizons club of UBC
puts on a performance at the end
of every academic
year. If you are interested in participating or just taking classes in ballet, jazz, hip-hop or
modern dance,
pick up a schedule
at SUB 208.
TANIA TREPANIER PHOTO
ELECTRONICS
STATIONERY
& SUPPLIES
•Pilot BPS Pen-Reg. 98c
ONLY 59*
•Avery Dennison Highlighter #774 -Reg. 79c
ONLY49<
Acco Press Binders -Black Only #25971 -Reg. $2.47
ONLY $1.19
Acco Grip Binders -Black Only #42521 -Reg. $4.19
ONLY $1.99
• Oxford 1", 1.5", 2" Round Ring Binders
-Black Only. V1756. V1766. V1776
NOW30%OFF
TICKETED PRICE
•Boston Value Pack V73601
(includes stapler, staples, & remover)
ONLY $7.95
•Sharp EL-556D Calculator-MSR. $39.95
NOW $19.95
•Sharp EL-9300 Graphics Calculator
-MSR. $169.95
NOW $109.95
•Hewlett Packard 42S Calculator- MSR. $147.95
NOW $118.36
•Maxell Diskettes (box of 10)
3.5" MF2DDM $9.95
3.5"MF2HOM $14.95
5.25" MD2-D $7.95
5.25" MD2-HD $8.95
•NEW! All Computer Accessories by
Dominion Blueline
NOW20%OFF
CLOTH I NO
xssm^^t C/^$AL
PENS & GIFTS
•All Sheaffer Pens over $10
30% OFF*
fonly Jan 4th-9th)
•Receive a second set of prints FREE* at
the time of developing
(*offer good until Jan 15th)
COMPUTER SHOP
•Visit the UBC Computer Shop for Back-to-School
specials on computer hardware, software & CD-
ROM products. We carry brand name products
from IBM, APPLE, NEXT, UBCPRO, HEWLETT-
PACKARD. MICROSOFT. CANON, WORDPERFECT &
many more!
•Sale pricing on Apple computer bundles
until Jan 15th.
BOOKSTORE
All Clothing Merchandise
20%OFF
6200 University Boulevard
Tel 822-2663 Fax822-8592
We're open lo serve you:
Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri: 8 M) am    ->:()() pm
Wed: d'd) am - .H:->() pin
Satrryy) am - xio pm
Sale ends Jan 30, 1993
January 5,1993
THE UBYSSEY/15 QassicH
The Macintosh Classic II comes with
• 4 MB RAM
• 80MB hard drive
• built-in monitor
• keyboard
• mouse
The Apple® MacintoshIM ClassicmH comes complete with monitor, keyboard, mouse,
microphone, and system software. The Macintosh Classic II is easy to set up, and even easier to use. Its
built-in networking connections let you effortlessly share files and printers. And the Apple
SuperDrive™ floppy disk drive is capable of reading both MS-DOS and Macintosh disks. What's
more the Macintosh Classic II includes full System 7 software capabilities, including Virtual Memory
and Balloon Help™.
Whether you're running a spreadsheet analysis or
writing a paper, check out the Macintosh Classic II. The powerful personal computer that's affordable, too! Come in today for
a hands-on demonstration. Sale pricing in effect until
January 15, 1993.
Also, save $50 on any Apple laser printer with the purchase of any Apple computer. For more
details and other Apple computer packages available, visit or telephone the UBC Computer Shop.
Only $1299
UBC
Computer   Shop
Tel 822 - 4748 • Fax 822-8211
E-Mail: computer ©bookstore.ubcca
HOURS
Mon, Tues. Thur, Fri 8:30-5:1
Wed 8:30 am-8:30 pm
Sat 9:30 am - 5:00 pm
BOOKSTORE
6200 University Boulevard
Tel 822-2665 (UBC-BOOK)
Authorized Campus Dealer
Appl: and tk Apple logo are repaired Irade marks of Apple Computer, Inc. Apple SuperDrive, Balloon Help and Macintosh are trade marks of Apple Computer, Inc.  Classic is a registered trade mark licensed to Apple Computer, he.
MS-DOS is a registered trade mark of Microsoft Corporation.
16/THE UBYSSEY
January 5,1993

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