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The Ubyssey Mar 20, 1973

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Array Asian studies
students want
tenure review
—mark hamilton photo
HUNGRY MOTHS? Nope. Giant ink-blot test? Wrong again. This excellent example of
art chaufee was discovered Monday morning burnt into the AMS executive office carpet,
apparently the result of a bizarre AMS initiation ceremony. Members of the outgoing
AMS executive, who earlier deplored the theft of pieces of executive carpet by several
unidentified students, denied any involvement with the perverse ritual.
By LINDA HOSSIE
Student concern is developing over
the Asian studies department decision
not to reappoint professors Zenryu
Shirakawa and Shreeprakash Kurl.
Official complaint has not been made
to the liason committee or to the
student representative but department
head Edwin Pulleyblank has received a
petition from Kurl's students asking for
a review of his case.
"The chances of a change in the
decision are not great because there
isn't much in the way of new
information on the issue," Pulleyblank
said in an interview Monday.
"The reasons for the decision are
confidential but the criteria for reappointment and hiring are teaching
and scholarship," he said.
Alma Mater Society ombudsperson
Amarjeet Rattan said Monday the
department is run by fear.
"Graduate students and faculty can't
bitch for fear of getting axed or getting
a black mark against their name.
"A small group of people at the top
seem to control everything," he said.
"Other department members have no
say.
"Pulleyblank says people are free to
come and discuss problems with him.
In theory that's probably true, but not
in practice."
The promise of a review prompted by
the petition "is just a token move. I
don't think Pulleyblank has any
intention of giving a real review."
John McLaughlin, a student
representative at faculty meetings,
agrees in part with Rattan.
"The real problem is that the student
representative and the students are
kept in the dark about what is going on
until it's done," he said.
"People were invited to replace
Shirakawa before student
representatives who are supposed to
have equal vote and status at the
faculty meetings were informed of the
tenure decision.
"Very little of what goes on in
department meetings is actually
decided at meetings. It is figured out
before hand," he said.
"The department is trying to operate
on the idea that if you attract well-
known faculty you will attract students
and have a prestigious department.
"The department won't give younger
profs a chance. If after two or three
years they're not brilliantly famous the
department gets rid of them,"
McLaughlin said.
Both the professors concerned were
reluctant to discuss the issue.
Shirakawa did say he had accepted a
fellowship to finish his PhD thesis at
Harvard.
Student representative Dan Bryant
, considers the general policies of the
department to be satisfactory.
"After a stink was made about
student reps being badly informed the
department became so scrupulous
about informing us that it is at the point
now where it almost interferes with
work," he said.
However, Bryant said he is not
satisfied with the confidential
classification of much of the
information about departmental
decisions.
"The year someone's contract is
coming up for consideration students
should be informed so they can state
their opinions as early as possible. It is
too late in the year for this now."
Pulleyblank said Monday he can see
no reason for students or faculty to
nave reservations about what they say
concerning the department.
"We have some very critical
graduate students as far as the issue of
course evaluation goes.
"It's true that when appointments are
being considered we don't give
students a voting say but graduate and
senior undergraduates meet the
candidates and their views are taken
into consideration.
"As far as the student contribution to
hiring is concerned, their input is
valuable only insofar as they are
informed. The graduate students and
faculty are better informed than the
undergraduates," he said.
Despite student criticism and the
reluctance of many of the students to
discuss department problems with The
Ubyssey Pulleyblank said he thinks
"student-faculty relations are pretty
good".
"It is my wish and intention that we
should have the maximum amount of
communication with the students," he
said.
Denny's negotiations end, picket revived
By GARY COULL
Picket lines went up again at
Denny's on Broadway Monday
night after management failed
to comply with a demand by
the 14 fired waitresses that
they be reinstated.
The former employees met
with management twice
Monday to negotiate a
settlement to the month long
dispute. At that time the
workers rejected a
management offer of three
weeks' severance pay to those
waitresses who had worked
longer than 10 weeks and two
weeks' severance pay to those
who had worked less than 10.
About 60 persons began
picketting Denny's at 9 p.m.
carrying signs and handing out
pamphlets protesting the firing
of the workers who went on
strike Feb. 12 because of bad
working conditions and lack of
job security at the restaurant.
Alma Mater Society
secretary Stan Persky said
Monday it was the picketting
and loss of business which
brought Denny's to the
negotiating table.
"The fact that they want to
negotiate shows that if lots of
groups back an issue results
can be obtained through this
collective political action."
AMS president Brian
Loomes, interviewed while
walking the picket line, said
the pickets must continue until
the workers are rehired.
Leslie Mclnnes, one of the
fired waitresses, present at the
negotiations with Denny's, said
whatever the restaurant does
now they will look bad.
"They will break before we
do because we have so many
people behind us."
She said the fired employees
will negotiate again with
management if  they  offer
something new but "we're not
going to listen to the same old
thing again."
Also present at the meeting
Monday was Bruce Housser,
vice president of Denny's
Restaurant International. He
arrived at the Broadway
restaurant about 9:45 greeted
by cries of "scab" from the
picketers. He was not
obstructed by the pickets as he
entered the restaurant.
The picket lines convinced
many prospective customers
not to eat in the restaurent.
People handed out the
pamphlets and explained the
dispute.
Housser said later Denny's
is getting legal advice
on how to procede with any
legal remedies to the problem.
He said citations for contempt
of court against the former
employees and any others
present who know of the injunction are being considered
as well as court action against
groups like the Working
Woman's Association, who
have aided in the picketting.
Housser said there is no
doubt the picketers have hurt
Denny's financially but could
not give any exact figures. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 20, 1973
National abortion tribunal called
By STEPHEN MORRIS
The second cross-Canada
conference for abortion repeal
held last weekend in Toronto
called for a national tribunal
on abortion Nov. 3.
The tribunal will be held in
Ottawa,       said       Joanne
AUCM needs bread
The campus ministry is asking for $26,000 from the United
and Anglican churches to pay two ministers salaries and
continue operations at UBC, ministry chairman Hugh
Dempster said Monday.
While the United church has agreed to continue support, the
Anglican church has said that they will not donate any more
funds, Dempster said.
A meeting with the Anglican church has been called for
March 26 to persuade them to change their decision, he added.
"If their decision remains firm the campus ministry will
either try to raise the necessary money elsewhere or attempt to
operate without money," Dempster said.
"However there is no possibility of finding that much
money from other sources right now and in the future it will be
necessary that the ministry be supported from within the
university as neither the Anglican or United churches will
donate money after this year."
Dempster also said that an evaluation committee set up by
the two churches to determine the usefulness of the campus
ministry has recommended that funding be continued for one
more year.
George Hermannson, one of the two ministers involved in
the fifty member organization and a spokesman for the group,
said the ministry is active in campus politics and throughout the
school year brings speakers to talk on current issues.
Nakonechny, UBC abortion
action committee chairwoman
and one of three delegates to
the Toronto conference.
"The tribunal will receive
testimonies from women
across Canada. We hope to
bring to, the attention of
Canada the women who have
suffered under our abortion
laws," she said Monday.
Section 221 of the Canadian
Criminal Code sentences
women obtaining illegal
abortions to two-year
imprisonment.
The two-day conference was
designed to decide what action
can be taken to change the
abortion laws. Men were not
allowed to attend, Nakonechny
said.
"The issue of abortion is
mainly concerned with women.
The abortion movement is tied
in with women's liberation,
and we felt that women should
be put in the position of
organizing a political
movement themselves.
"We do not want to
discourage men. We welcome
their support. We feel it is
more important that women
formulate their own policies
and take an active role," she
said.
In the meantime, UBC's
committee will help organize
the tribunal, collect petitions
and encourage people to attend
in Ottawa, she said.
"Abortion is more than a
political and legal issue. When
women can control their own
bodies, they will become fuller
human beings," Nakonechny
said.
For more information on the
tribunal, contact 207 West
Hastings, Suite 512.
Board approves new Pit
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ByKENTSPENCER
The board of governors Friday approved the
Alma Mater Society's plans for construction of
a new Pit in the basement of SUB.
At a special meeting with AMS reps the
board was presented with architectural plans
for the student pub in the south-west corner of
SUB adjacent to the Thunderbird shop, which
they subsequently okayed in private session.
The plan, which calls for seating for 400 in
the 7,000 square-foot area, was submitted by
current AMS president Brian Loomes and past
president Doug Aldridge.
As owners of SUB the board must approve
any physical changes to the building.
Construction by Halse-Martin Ltd. should
begin late this week or early next according to
Rick Murray, chairman of the SUB
development committee.
Scheduled completion date is August 1 at
which time a manager will be hired and staff
moved in for the proposed opening during
registration week.
UBC students approved the $250,000
complex in a referendum last spring.
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OfEN THURSDAY o«d FRIDAY UNTIL 9 P.M. Tuesday, March 20, 1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Quorum cornered in cafeteria
By VAUGHN PALMER
The Alma Mater Society
executive brought democracy
to the people Friday and the
people responded by approving
almost everything the
executive wanted.
The annual AMS general
meeting, moved to the SUB
cafeteria after a SUB
concourse site failed to attract
a quorum, approved
membership in the National
Union of Students, an AMS fee
levy on graduate, summer and
undergraduate president
Harold Cunliffe unsuccessfully
challenged the quorum there
was no doubt the required 2000
students were present,
reluctant though they may
have been.
However, only a small
portion of those attending
voted on the various
resolutions.
Meeting chairman and
outgoing AMS president Doug
Aldridge declared the vote on
the   food   services   purchase
part-time students, but failed affirmative, but this ruling was
to show a decisive vote on successfully challenged by
proposed AMS purchase of the  Ubyssey-co-editor Jan O'Brien
administration-owned cafeteria in SUB.
The move to the cafeteria
allowed an AMS general
meeting to gain a quorum for
the first time in four years.
engineering  defeated
who called for a vote count.
Secretary-elect Stan Persky
then counted and found the
vote too close to call either way
and recommended to Aldridge
the    motion    be    declared
Aldridge did so saying the
issue will come up again.
AMS treasurer John
Wilson said Monday there are
no plans to hold a referendum
on the issue of food services
purchase.
"Even though it seems to me
to be a logical thing given the
climate of opinion it would
probably fail at this time,"
Wilson said. "People simply
aren't informed about the
plan."
Opponents of the plan
including Judy Zaichkowsky, a
food services liason committee
member and O'Brien said the
plan would merely mean an
increased AMS bureaucracy
with no saving to students.
"The SUB cafeteria is
subsidized by other food
services outlets on campus.
"So it would lose money for
the AMS," Zaichkowsky said.
Zaichkowsky said the AMS
plans to save money by firing
some staff and introducing
more packaged and pre-
processed foods.
AMS vice-president Gordon
Blankstein said this sort of
decision would have to be left
up to students. "Remember
though, food services can do
this any time they want, but if
we owned the cafeteria then we
would control  the  decision."
Wilson said the AMS will
continue negotiations with the
administration and present the
issue to students when there
are more financial details
available, perhaps  next fall.
The approval of membership
in the National Union of
Students negated the need for
referendum on the question
scheduled for Friday.
NEW PIT SITE, formerly the Wally Gage Memorial potato bin, stares
complacently at nobody in particular as it awaits deliberation over
the latest conflict regarding the pub's construction. It seems city
health officials have intervened and refused to allow Pit management
to put in a sawdust floor, as Pit planners had originally hoped to do
to save money on furniture. (See story page 2), -mark hamilton photo
Science students want reps
ByLENJOHNSON
The science undergraduate
society executive-elect wants
to form departmental
undergrad societies  to press
the students, such as the
senate, the Alma Mater
Society student council and the
departmental committees,
Mitchell said.
Because there is no general
He said the percentage of
women in science decreases
from one-third to one-fifth
between first and fourth years.
"We don't have any answers,
but we feel it is something
which should be investigated,"
Mitchell said.
The constitution of the union,
formed last November in
Ottawa, requires all
universities and colleges
joining gain referendum
approval from their student
bodies.
"As far as the NUS is
concerned, a general meeting
equals a referendum," AMS
external affairs officer Bonnie
Long said Monday.
NUS membership was
granted on condition that the
fees not exceed 30 cents per
AMS member. Long said the
membership fees will probably
be about 30 cents per student.
Outgoing AMS treasurer
David Dick told the general
meeting the money for NUS
membership would come out of
existing AMS funds, and would
not necessitate additional fee
increases.
When asked if the fee would
not further increase an already
projected budget deficit, Dick
said the passage of graduate
and part-time fee levies would
more than cover both the
deficit and NUS fee.
The meeting
overwhelmingly passed the fee
levy on graduate, part-time
and summer students thus
supporting the AMS in its
dispute with the administration over fee collection.
Administration 'president
Walter Gage says the
administration will not collect
the fee from summer and part-
time students unless the AMS
consults these students.
The AMS agrees to consult
but says regardless of whether
or not the summer and part-
time students approve of the
fee they must pay it or they will
not be allowed to use the
building.
The levy would exclude
graduate and extension
students who are not attending
UBC, and part-time and
summer students would pay
fees on a graduated scale.
The AMS council voted
Wednesday to close SUB from
May 1 until Aug. 26 thus
denying access to summer
students.
The general meeting also
voted to make undergraduate
fees permanent, instead of
conditional to annual
referendum reapproval by
students.
The two free tickets to
London used to attract a
quorum were won by UBC
radio CYVR hack Chuck
Barton.
for student representation at  method of course evaluation in
all levels of faculty.
SUS president-elect Gerry
Mitchell said in an interview
Monday students currently
have representation on only
one    of    the    10    standing
the science faculty, the new
executive wants to see some
method for handling
grievances that students have
about classes or the
curriculum. Mitchell said he
Exposure
committees and several ad-hoc  was in favor of setting up an
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committees which have been
struck.
"The biggest problem the
SUS has at the moment is not
being able to find anyone who
will take responsibility for
deciding whether or not
students will have
representation   on   faculty
committees,"   Mitchell   said.
V-He said department heads
ombudscommittee consisting
of three faculty, three grad
students and three
undergraduates*
"We think things are
changing enough that this can
be done now whereas two or
three years ago it would not
have been possible. The
decreasing number of students
in the science faculty has made
tend to lay the responsibility at  the faculty more sensitive to
someone else's  feet until  it  student voices."
finally develops into "a very
confusing situation, to say the
least."
The proposed departmental
societies would also keep
students informed on events at
the various levels of
administration   which   affect
The new executive also
wishes to find out if there is a
relationship between the
decreasing number of women
students in the faculty between
first and fourth years and the
small number of women on the
faculty, Mitchell said.
Ubyssey exposure columnist Art Smolensky
is this year's winner of the Meyer Lansky-
Timmy Leary Man Without a Country contest.
Deported from Canada Saturday, Smolensky
was refused entry into the United States on
Sunday due to a misunderstanding with
customs officials over a bottle of Resdan.
NEW YORK (UNS) — One frustrating aspect
of air travel these days is the luggage checks
and body searches one must endure at airports.
It seems the most unfriendly security personnel
encountered so far on this reporter's three-
week journey around the world were in
Vancouver airport.
Vancouver airport's security personnel
consists of several growling guards who in my
case jumped away from my camera bag as I
opened it, thinking I suppose, it might explode.
Their inspection extended to their turning up
the sensitivity of the metal detector so it picked
up the staples in magazines I was carrying.
By comparison, security checks in Los
Angeles, San Francisco, and New York City are
mildly inconvenient, but never a real hassle.
Perhaps this difference is because airlines in
Canada have only recently started checking out
passengers and both security guards and
passengers are not used to the procedures.
A number of myths I have always held about
New York City are at least partially expelled.
One in particular is that everyone is
suspicious of everyone else. True, the cab
drivers have steel-reinforced partitions
between themselves and the passenger seats,
and true our hotel has a lumbering six-foot six-
inch, 270-pound security guard. But one senses
these are reminders of a past era. The bars are
filled with friendly young people and the
service in restaurants and hotels is generally
excellent. And for four Canadian tourists and
two American guides, an eight-block walk
along Manhattan fringes in Central Park at
1:00 a.m. seemed safer than a walk on
Granville at the same time.
Mind you, it's possible the near-freezing
weather and the 50 mile per hour wind made it
too cold a night even for muggers.
Tune in next week and find out what other
ports of call deny Smolensky landed-immigrant
status. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 20, 1973
Hooray!
Hooray, an Alma Mater Society general meeting finally
attracted a quorum.
Pretty clever of the AMS executive to move the
meeting into the cafeteria. One might say a quorum has
finally attracted an AMS general meeting.
Rumor has it the next time they want to attract a
quorum to a council meeting, they will hold it in the
executive washroom.
We're not sure how convincing the mandates of a
bunch of people hopped up on Brock burgers is, but
nonetheless voters tied up some loose ends.
While they personally sacrificed nothing, those
attending did vote to levy fees on part-time and summer
students, thus challenging the administration's reluctance to
collect them.
They approved membership in the National Union of
Students thus helping that troubled organization off the
ground.
In fact they went along with the executive on
everything but the purchase of food services.
Maybe because they distrust the corporate monster the
AMS is building, maybe because they doubt the ability of
the AMS to economically manage anything, or maybe
because they are reluctant to assess a fee extension on
people who aren't even born yet.
On the other hand maybe it has something to do with
their resistance to allowing an organization to which they
belong, to subsidize the production of Brock burgers.
V.P.
Organize
Any movement to organize undergraduate societies
behind student representation is a good move on this
campus.   -
But it is especially welcome when students are only
represented on one committee in a faculty, as is the current
case in science. As Gerry Mitchell, science undergraduate
society president-elect says, the old campus professorial
hierarchy is running that faculty.
And it appears the profs and department heads are
REALIZE -fT//\T
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— From The Gazette
Letters
Help
I would appreciate it if you
could help me by printing this
letter in The Ubyssey.
Please, please, please if anyone
witnessed someone cause $165
damage to my 1969 Toyota
Corolla in the Fort Camp parking
lot on the afternoon of March 15,
please contact Cheryl at 733-1831
or leave a message at the AMS
business office.
I make a plea. I get down on
N my knees and beg you. You who
^ did this to me, please confess. If
baloney on the speaker's table
Friday was surely indicative of the
food quality we might have
expected from an AMS-operated
service. However, I was
disheartened to see that the
undergrads present were allowed
to be swayed by the rhetoric of
fellow undergrads on the matter
of AMS fee levy on grad students.
On the basis of the speakers'
statements as to grad student
usage of SUB I was surprised to
see a definite dearth of said
people in the SUB cafeteria during
the general meeting, either eating
or    listening.    Because    of   the
amiu   ii   appealz,   me   piuis   diiu   ucjjcii uneiu   ncaua arc   ^ you are  covered by the required     U1     uslem»8-     Decause     ui     uie
most unwilling to give up their power — none of them want .^insurance the repairs won't cost    amount of work required of grad
repairs
to use their power to accept responsibility of initiating the 4-y0u a thing. My insurance does
ways and means of introducing student representation. ^not cover this kind of damage and
So it might be a good idea if the SUS executive and ^so the repairs will cost me $165
students in the faculty took the responsibility the profs ) which I haven't got. I'm so broke
refuse and force the issue in the faculty. Don't talk, do. .tfthat I was about to sell my car.
The arts faculty did and is doing. People must realize the J[Now I can't even do that
days of senior profs and department heads running faculties
for their own good and for the good of the industries they
serve are over.
The new executive also says it has decided to begin a
faculty course evaluation program and a method of handling
student curriculum bitches. A counter guide to the course
outlines teachers prepare is always helpful.
The executive also says it will start an investigation
of the decreasing number of women students and the small
number of women profs in the faculty. It will probably find
the traditionally male faculty created the situation, in line
with the usual lack of women in all the professions. Perhaps
the executive should join with the women's action group,
which recently published a statistical study on UBC women.
The SUS is to be commended for having the right idea
of what an undergraduate society should be doing. Now for
some action. If science students begin to agitate for change,
they will have this paper's support, as will any
undergraduate society which does likewise.
M.S.
THE UBYSSEY
MARCH 20, 1973
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions.are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The
Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room 241K of the
Student Union Building.
Editorial  departments, 228-2307; Sports, 2^.^-^305; advertising,
228-3977.
Co-editors: Jan O'Brien, John Andersen
Cynical social demogogues Michael Sasges and Vaughn Palmer said
in a press release Monday they have filed for divorce on grounds of
complete incompatibility. The incident, according to their mutual
spokesman, John Andersen, resulted from an incident arising from their
wedding last Thursday.
The incident, according to informed sources Jan O'Brien and Gary
Coull, occurred during the wedding reception when Palmer asked Sasges
to cut the wedding cake, and Sasges instead chose to wet his pants.
Testifying on Palmer's behalf will be. Linda Hossie, Kent Spencer, Len
Johnson, Steve Morris, and Ryon Guedes. The estranged couple, who
have no children, said they would remain good friends regardless of the
outcome of the case,
'.i ——^— i ———^—— ^ «
r^ If you are embarrassed, just
£ think how I feel. You don't need
' to show your face. Any business
can  be   done   over  the  phone.
Please help me. I'd help you.
Cheryl
733-1831
Inanities
At long last the political
inanities of the AMS council have
forced me to vocalize strenuous
objections to the methods and
aims of this particular segment of
the student population. For three
of the five years I have been at
UBC I was under the bureaucratic
thumb of this egocentric
organization of political
opportunists. Many of the
power-hungry amateur politicians
who so diligently and efficiently
^ screwed the student body in
1 former years have moved on to
bigger and better scenes or carnal
lust and depravity, while others
have merely joined Aqualung. But
I digress.
Last Friday's general meeting
was summed up very neatly by
Doug Aldridge following the vote
on whether grad students should
pay AMS fees (fines?). Over an
underpowered PA system which
reached nearly 75 per cent of the
700-800 people actually listening
to the meeting (How's that fc a
quorum, eh kids?),
mild-mannered leader of o.
hallowed hierarchy was heard to
mumble: "We screwed 'em."
I have nothing but praise for
those students present who
defeated the motion to take over
SUB food services. The amount of
students, AMS services (although
available) are not used by them, if
only because there are too few
hours in the day. How many grad
students are members of AMS
clubs? Virtually none, in my
experience. For those events the
AMS does sponsor the grads pay
just like everybody else, thereby
contributing to AMS coffers, not
depleting them. At Friday's
meeting it was a case of one group
sanctioning another group
without bothering to listen to
both sides.
And who wins? Well, the AMS
executive will have another
$100,000 per annum income to
play with. It's all history now and
here we go again.
John Kent
unclassified 5
Driving
Please read this and remember!
I'm sure anyone who drives has
noticed the sheer wastefulness and
complete disregard some drivers
show in the parking lots. With an
immature lack of concern for
other drivers, a large number of
cars are parked occupying far
more than their fair space. Often
three cars are seen where there is
room for five! Campus Patrol is
powerless here. Marked spaces are
expensive. Let's show a little
concern for the other guy.
Robert Hunter
apsci 2
Birth
As a longtime beneficiary of
UBC education, I note the
opening of Canada's first Birth
Centre under Federal grant, at
531 Glen Drive, in Vancouver.
Hundreds of students will be
interested in its grass roots level of
education for mothers-to-be and
fathers-to-be,    concerning    the
various alternatives for childbirth,
whether   in   hospital   or   home, ■
whether by natural childbirth or
artificially     drugged    and
mechanized parturition.
That natural homebirth is
included as an alternative taught
at the Birth Centre is unique in
modern childbiith history, for
aggressive salesmanship has sold
gullible mothers only the myths
of drugged mechanized hospital
birth. The latter has dragged
Canada down to 22nd place
among nations for infant
mortality at birth — only one
notch better than the United
States, because we mimic
American frequency of
medication, induction, use of
forceps, episioltomy, cesarian, etc.
Fifteen million unfortunates
live on this continent today with
one or more major birth defects
that are due to our birth 'system'
and not heriditary. These include
broken clavicles, torn brachial
nerve plexuses, ears amputed by
forcepts, injured birth canals,
babies' minds retarded by drugs
given to the mother in birth
(which pass through the placenta
within \Vi minutes and narcotise
the baby in inverse proportion to
body weight of mother and child),
and a generation of drug addicts
and slow learners, not to mention
blindness, cerebral palsy and
multiple sclerosis victims.
The standard 'system' of birth
produces a 'civilization' of females
physically and psychologically
traumatized by a childbirth
experience that is impersonally
mass-production conveyor-belt
style, so agonizing as to require
anesthesia, so humiliating and
undignified with legs tied to
stirrups up in the air like a clown,
continous-drip needles in one's
wrist veins, on one's back
handcuffed to an operating table,
in a hospital for the sick and
dying; the back position being the
most dangerous of all positions
for birth — all for the convenience
of the hospital.
Normal pregnancy and birth
are normal healthy experiences
for any healthy female. It can be
psychological joy and physical
ecstasy, not to mention sexual
orgasm, sitting in an armchair at
home or semi-reclining to favorite
music with family and friends
around. I know, because I am the
last of the oldtime scientific
non-medical midwives. I have
humbly delivered more than
2,500    bundles    of   joy    since Tuesday, March 20, 1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
becoming a permanent resident of
Canada in 1949, when I coined
and trademarked the term natural
homebirth. My work has been
mostly in this part of the world
but also in more than 50
countries.
Let's welcome the concept of a
Birth Centre in Vancouver.
Norman Casserley,
midwife
Piss, kiss
The present situation was
brought to focus on my mind by
the activities of some of the more
inert groups on campus. I am
referring to the abortion groups,
both pro and con, the women's
study groups, of which I'd like to
think myself an illegitimate
graduate and the various other
equal rights factions and
discontent in general.
If women want equal rights or
wish to stand on equal ground
with men, then let's start by
sharing the urinals. You think this
absurb? Well I believe in starting
at the bottom and working my
way up (yours). And I can think
of nothing more base. Is it so
surprising that most of the other
' PhD rooms are also marked His
and Her.
Every woman has got
something which appeals to both
the primitive and social
inclinations in man and must be
bought at a ridiculously high
price. I mean to say, is it marriage
or mirage. I will now allow myself
to become socially hyphotized
and repeat: "Yes, I know, a lot
(sic) of my friends are married,
and I do realize there is method in
their madness," but my friends,
why should I be a magnifying
mirror for you when we both
know our madness.
True equality will only exist
when we implement equality on
all levels. What a welcoming,
miraculous, dehypnotic change
this would have on the human
species. Can you imagine seeing
some of those delicate, frail,
dreamy girls whose shit doesn't
stink, tearing off a slice of toilet
paper? Pretty soon you will think
of them and treat them (more or
less) in the same way as you
would your sister or any of your
other friends; up to the time of
course she stops taking the good
old pill and gets ready for the
good old reliably devious
reporduction. After all is
considered natural selection did
not intend us all to have equal
opportunity in the propagation of
the race. This wise law of nature
should not be "put asunder" by
the fucked up state of the human
mind, often called emotional
dependency, excused as love.
Think of the diseased people now
given the opportunity to live out
their useful lives due to the
advancement of medical science
and psychology, I might add, but
surely these diseases should not be
transmigrated throughout the
race. Everyone here has the right
to be here; and children would
grow up expecting everyone to
treat them, to love them equally,
not just their natural or
immediate family nor would they
be inclined to draw that old
prejudice,   emotional   dependent
circle around them called the
wedding band. I dare you to cross
this line. Or as Mick Jagger says:
"Send me dead flowers to my
wedding and don't forget to put
roses on my grave."
Well before we come out with
the common denominator
conclusion  that  your balls  and
clitorises are the same as mine,
let's remember it is better to light
one little candle that to curse the
darkness. Really, we should start
somewhere, preferably at the
beginning: thos.e who kiss
together, should piss together.
Kevin Lynch
science 1
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"Robert Altaian's
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"A movie at once
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— WANDA HALE. Hew York Daily News
224-3730 «»
4375 W. 10th  ,
SHOWTIMES: 7:30,9:30
WARNING: Swearing, nudity and violence.
-R. W. McDONALD, B.C. Director
RICHARD BURTON is
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HAMMERSMITH
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SEE.... Beau Bridges get his,
Elizabeth Taylor get hers,
and Peter Ustinov get mad,
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FROM
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MATURE: Warning:
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R. W. McDONALD  B.C. Director
Coronet
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SHOWTIMES: 12:15,
2:00.4:00.6:00,
8:00, 10:00
JACK LEMMON JUl| MUS  	
I ■Ll|V U " 881   GRANVILI
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MATURE
SHOW TIMES: 12:00, 2:20.4:45, 7:10, 9:35
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GENERAL    COLOR
Show Times: 12:25,
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Dunbar
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DUNBAR at 30th
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MATURE
ONE COMPLETE SHOW AT 8 P.M. Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 20, 1973
Hot flashes
Found goodies
vp for grabs
The lost and found will hold its
last sale this year of found
textbooks, gloves, scarves,
sliderules and other goodies in the
alcove between the travel office
and art gallery in SUB Thursday
noon.
Wheelathon
The school of rehabilitation
medicine is sponsoring a
wheelathon Sunday from 9-11
a.m. in Stanley Park to raise
money for various associations
which aid disabled people.
Wheelers and pushers will
solicit pledges similar to the Miles
for Millions walk. Ten per cent of
all funds raised will be used to
maintain a scholarship fund for
students furthering their studies in
rehabilitation medicine.
Ideology
Norman MacKenzie, educational technology director at the
University of Sussex in England,
will give two lectures this week on
H. G. Wells.
He will speak Wednesday noon
in Angus 110 on "H. G. Wells arid
the ideology of science" and
Friday noon in the same room on
"Wells and English socialism".
Brochures
Student brochures for the newly accredited women's studies
courses may be picked up in the
English office in Buchanan tower
and the anthro-soc office in
Angus.
Kate
Kate Millett, American journalist and author of Sexual Politics
will speak today at 8:30 p.m. in
the SUB ballroom "On being a
woman and a writer".
Admission is 25 cents unless you
are registered in the Alma Mater
Society woman's studies program.
'Tween classes
TUESDAY
SAILING CLUB
Rothman's film "Canada's cup
1969" and summer skippers'
meeting noon SUB 205.
WOMEN'S STUDIES
The accredited women's studies
course Annette Kolodyn, Dorothy
Smith and Meredith Kimball will
answer questions about the program. 7:30 SUB Ballroom. Kate
Millett speaking "On Being a
Woman and a Writer" 25c admission
unless registered for the course 8:30
p.m. SUB Ballroom.
CANOE AND KAYAK CLUB
Trip plans noon SUB 125.
RIGHT TO LIFE
Meeting noon SUB 213.
KRAFT BOYCOTT COMMITTEE
Organizational   meeting   in support
of the National Farmers Union boycott  of  Kraft Corp. products 7:30
p.m. NDP office 1881  E. Hastings.
NEWMAN CLUB
Communication workshop noon
SUB 105B.
GERMAN CLUB
Slides of Germany I.H. 404.
WEDNESDAY
ONTOLOGY
Dale Maranda will speak on "Beyond Spiritual Tripping" noon Bu.
216.
NEWMAN CLUB
Meeting noon SUB 105B.
CHARISMATIC MINISTRY
Film "No Need to Hide" documentary on Nicki Cruz noon SUB
Aud.
1
SpeciciliZjed Service
cebed
Sales and Semica
8914 Oak St.   263-8121
VARSITY OEMOLAY
General meeting-pub night Centennial Motor Hotel 8th and Willow 8
p.m.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
Testimony meeting SUB 224.
WOMAN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION
Deadline for election of executives
noon memorial gym.
T HURSDAY
CAMPUS CRUSADE
Meeting 7:30 1962 Acadia Rd.
ABORTION ACTION COMMITTEE
Discussion    about   the   conference
noon-SUB212A.
SIMS
"Transcendental meditation and
education" a lecture noon educ.
203.
Introduction     to     transcendental
meditation noon Bu. 3201.
VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Dr. Martin — farewell discourses
continued noon Gage towers.
CVC
General meeting and elections noon
SUB 205.
FRIDAY
CUE
Lunch noon grad centre.
AUCM
Slides     "Inside      Pain-Vietnamese
View" noon SUB Aud.
SKYDIVING CLUB
Elections noon SUB 207-209.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
'General   meeting  noon SUB   105B.
A WALL
IN
JERUSALEM
—directed by Frederic Rossif
("Todie in Madrid")
—starring Jerusalem
Campus Invited
members 50c
non-members 75c
Sat., March 24
8:30
at hillel house
PRINCE GEORGE
SCHOOL DISTRICT RECRUITING TEAM
Will Interview
The Prince George School District Recruiting Team will interview
beginning and experienced teachers for positions for the 1973-74 school
year as follows:
VANCOUVER - The Holiday Inn - March 21-23
VICTORIA - The Imperial Inn - March 19-21
Interested applicants may arrange for appointment by writing the District
Superintendent of Schools or by calling The Recruiting Team as follows:
VANCOUVER - The Holiday inn
March 21 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
March 22 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
March 23 9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
VICTORIA - The Imperial Inn
March 19 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
March 20 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
March 21 9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
D. P. Todd
District Superintendent of Schools
School District No. 57 (Prince George)
1891 6th Ave., Prince George, B.C.
FREE FILM FEST
MARCH 21-23
SUB AUDITORIUM - 12:30 P.M.
NO NEED TO HIDE - WEDNESDAY
DOCUMENTARY ON NICKY CRUZ
HOW DO YOU HEAL A WORLD?-THURSDAY
ON CHRISTIAN SCIENCE AND HEALING
INSIDE PAIN: VIETNAMESE VIEW - FRIDAY
PAINTINGS & NARRATION BY CHILDREN
Jointly sponsored by Campus Ministries of
Christian Science, Baptist, Charismatic, Anglican-United
CLASSIFIED
Rates:
Campus — 3 tines, 1 day $1.00; additional Boas, 25e;
Cofnraatstal — 3 Mnas, 1 day $1.50; additional lines
35b; additional days $1.25 & 30c
Classified adt are not accepted by. telephone and ate payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., tht day before publication.
PublicationsOffice. Room 241 S.U.B.. UBC. Va*. 8. AC
ANNOUNCEMENTS
DanoM
11
Lost & Found
13
LOST MARCH 7, UBC, TAN MALE
dog, scar left rear, chain collar,
name Kilo.   Pt.   731-7440  Please.
Special Notices
15
BUNT WHISTLER OONDOM1NITJM
near gondola. Day/wk. Ph. 732-0174
eves, or before 8 a-m.
CASH FOR TOUB USED RECORDS
or trade. Joy Music. 6610 Main
St   (at   60th),   11:00-7:00  p.m.
Special Erents
15A
LAST FREE CONCERT OF THE
year. The Deluxe Portable Band
will appear in the SUB Ballroom
this Thursday, 12:30-2:30. Bring
your lunch and it's FREE!
NOW $75 FOR 25c
40 Bonus Coupons In This
Year's Bird Calls
BUY YOURS TODAY!
— Bookstore and SUB —
Travel Opportunities 18
TRAVELLING OVERSEAS
ON  A   LIMITED  BUDGET?
— THEN ATTEND A SPECIAL
evening sponsored by the Canadian
Youth Hostels Association to be
held at the Vancouver Youth Hostel at the foot of Discovery Street
on Tuesday, March 27th at 8 p.m.
Advice will be given on all aspects
of low-budget travel and free check
lists will be available to all potential travellers. Those requiring
more details of the meeting or its
location should phone 738-3128.
CONTACT AOSC FOR COMPLETE
travel services including scheduled
and charter flights, railpasses, car
rentals-purchases, tours. International Student ID, etc. AOSC Rm.
100B,  SUB, TJBC.  224-0111.
AFGHANISTAN OVERLAND FROM
London. 3 mog. leaving June 4th.
733-6707 after 6:30 p.m. 1942 Mc-
Nicoll  Ave.
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
1969  V.W.,   RADIO,   GAS  HEATER,
offers?   Ph.   688-6800.
1967 VW FASTBACK. GOOD CON-
dition. $1000 or best offer. 228-
8836'.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Photography
96
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736-8375
Typing
40
FAST ACCURATE TYPING OF ES-
says and thesis. Beasonable terms.
Call Mrs. Akau, days 688-S236 —
weekends and evenings, 263-4023.
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING.
My home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat
accurate work. Reasonable rates.
263-5317.
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST.
Experienced Thesis Typist. Specialize in Formula and Math. Reasonable Rates. Mrs. Ellin. 821-3831.
ESSAYS, THESIS, PAPERS. FAST,
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Marine Drive. 166-6053.
FAST   AND   ACCURATE   TYPING.  ,
IBM    Selectric,    reasonable   rates.
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TYPING— GUARANTEED ACCUR-
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Andrea Green, 688-8261 or 278-2043
(after 5).
EMPLOYMENT
Kelp Wanted
91
THE SURREY PARKS AND RE-
creation Commission has openings for positions in the area of
Recreation for the Handicapped.
These positions start in mid-May,
continuing to September, with the
possibility of continued employment in the fall Wage rate:
$3.00/hour. Please contact the
Surrey Parks and Recreation
Commission, 10341—135th Street,
Surrey, or telephone 588-9541.
Special Classes
ea
SOCIALIST LABOR PARTY STUDY
class, 2 p.m., Sundays, 609 East
12th Ave. Box 2666. Vancouver 3.
Free literature.
Speakeasy SUB Anytimel
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Register Nowl 12:30-2:30
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Send $2.00 to 5512 Neville St.,
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RENTALS fc REAL ESTATE
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Use Your
Ubyssey
Classified Tuesday, March 20, 1973
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
SFU's Ian Wilder (11) and Tom Hastie (7) race UBC's Maurice White (4) for a high centering pass
UBC - SFU in another colossal
UBC 4, SFU 0
The usual thing happened
Monday night when UBC and
Simon Fraser University met
in yet another of their cross-
town athletic battles — it was a
gross mismatch.
The only difference was that
this time UBC was on the
champagne and caviar side as
the Thunderbird soccer team
crushed the SFU Clansmen 4-0
in the Pacific Coast League-
Intercity League interlocking
contest before about 600 fans at
Empire Stadium.
UBC's Chris Suzuki scored
an early goal at the one minute
mismatch
mark of the first half to set the
tone of the game. The Clan
never recovered from the early
goal, and couldn't mount a
consistent attack during the
rest of the game.
At the 20 minute mark Jim
Quinn gave the Birds a 2-0 lead
as he headed in a goal from in
front of the net.
For the rest of the first half
the Birds continued to press as
Suzuki again utilized his speed
to set up good chances in the
goalmouth area, barely
missing the net on two
occasions.
Daryl Sampson and Ed
Soltysik completed the scoring
for the Birds.
The major difference
between the teams was. in the
basics: shooting, passing, and
checking.
UBC was able to move the
ball quickly from the midfield
area into striking distance by
utilizing  short   quick   passes
from    the    fullbacks    and
halfbacks to the forwards.
SFU played poorly, as
players were unable to pass
accurately or control the ball.
The backs could not cope with
the aggressive play of UBC
forwards Suzuki and Larson.
The game also featured the
two best goalkeepers in B.C. in
SFU's Tony Chursky and
UBC's Greg Weber.
From their play in the game
it would appear that Weber
would have to be given the
number one rating over
Chursky.
While he didn't have too
many hard shots to handle, he
controlled the play in the
goalmouth, coming out
fearlessly to steal the ball from
the feet of opposing forwards.
The Birds now have 17 points
after their victory and now
remain in fourth place, five
points behind third place
Victoia Gorge.
Their next game is Saturday
against Norburn at Empire
Stadium.
—mark hamilton photo
SFU goalie Tony Chursky . . .
. . . aims for the ball
MsI/MM
Birds take another
By PETER MacQUEEN ever new situation they face
The rugby Thunderbirds especially with the end of the
remained undefeated in inter- season drawing near. Every
collegiate play Saturday by game from now on is for a
defeating the University of trophy; Saturday against Nor-
Victoria 22-3 in Victoria.
As promised, U. Vic played a
strictly defensive style with no
plan of scoring off their own
play; rather they hoped for a
UBC mistake which would lead
to an easy score.
But there were no such
. mistakes and consequently U.
Vic managed but one penalty
goal.
The Birds backs found the
combination of the ft. Vic
defence and the ridiculously
narrow field (15 yards short of
normal size) almost
impregnable as they were shut
out  for   the   first   time   this
S63S0II
Of the Birds 22 points, 18
were off the toe of Mel Reeves,
who kicked six penalty goals,
while Doug mad dog Harvey
scored the lone try.
Reeves, an ex-U. Vic player,
seemed to be under constant
attack from both the players
and the fans, but stood up
under everything U. Vic threw
at him.
Meanwhile, the Frosh team
lost to U. Vic's second team,
and the Braves lost 28-6 to the
Trojans.
The Birds will have to learn
to adapt their offense to what
West in McKechnie cup play,
and one week Thursday with
the University of California at
Los Angeles Bruins for the
World Cup.
THE AMS PRESENTS
THE HON. MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE
DAVE STUPICH
speaking on, (naturally)
The Land Commission Act
WED., MARCH 21
NOON, SUB BALLROOM
Bill opponents Pat McGeer (Liberal MLA) and Derril
Warren B.C. Conservative Leader will be present to
debate the issue with the Minister.
A SUB FILMSOC PRESENTATION
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SUB AUDITORIUM 50*
MARCH 22-25
Thurs. 7:00, Fri. & Sat. 7:00 & 9:30,
Sun. 7:00
■■■■§■■ ■
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WE NEED YOU
Written applications are now being sought
for the following positions:
Speakers Committee—Chairman
Education Committee—Chairman
Special Events Committee—Chairman
Bookstore Committee—4 members
Food Services Committee—3 members
Traffic and Parking Committee—4 members
Men's Athletic Committee—2 members
Women's Athletic Committee—! member
Deadline is Wednesday, Mar. 21 and applications should
be submitted to: The Secretary AMS Offices SUB.
COME IN TODAY!
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WEEKDAYS-9 A.M.-9 P.M.     Sat. 9 A.M.-5 P.M.
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY I
327-0461 Page 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 20, 1973
AMS business oriented
to serve executive's needs
By PAUL KNOX
Second of three articles
Why is the Alma Mater Society such a
bureaucratically-run organization that almost
half the money it has to spend must be spent on
salaries and office costs?
When the AMS was set up 57 years ago it was
not as a business organization, but as a clearing
house for student activities. A nominal student
fee was collected, enough to enable The
Ubyssey to publish once a week and perhaps a
$15 or $20 grant to a few clubs.
As the university grew in size and stature, it
carved out a place for itself in the B.C. economy
as a supplier of businessmen, managers,
scientists and intellectuals. The job-hunting
graduate found his task much easier if he had a
good record of "service" — if he had been able
to rise to the top of student affairs as well as
prove himself intellectually competent.
So the AMS executive positions became
plums for the student on the make. Of the 40-
odd ex-AMS presidents I have been able to
track down, 17 are lawyers (many prominent),
17 businessmen in managerial or higher
positions, and many of the rest in academia or
government.
Oince many of the young executives (who
actually used to wear blue blazers to all their
council meetings) aspired to business positions,
it became more and more important that the
AMS look like a business. Of course, the society
was in control of increasing amounts of money,
and some checks and balances were necessary.
But it was taken for granted that more money
meant a bigger office — more paper clips, more
red tape. No thought was given to the
possibility of alternative forms of student
organization.    .
With this philosophy behind student politics,
it was little wonder that AMS electees started to
get grandiose ideas by means of which they
could leave their stamp on the university. This
psychology can be seen in the present-day
promotion of schemes such as the covered pool.
It reached its grossest and (history will
probably judge) most detrimental depths in the
construction of the student union building, the
mis-designing, mis-planning and
mismanagement of which is only now
beginning to surface. The years of biggest
expansion were the sixties. Between 1962-63 and
1968-69 the amount spent on administration
doubled to $60,000 while the total discretionary
expenditure rose only 50 per cent, to $117,000.
pipe in drooping mouth and stomach bulging
over straining belt, hanging around the second-
floor executive office corridors. With him
sometimes is Roger McAfee, the president in
1964-65 who wormed his way back into the
structure with solicitous offers of help to naive
councillors, until he surfaced this year as the
AMS's new lawyer.
Of course, it would be wrong to attribute all
this to the psychological motivations of the
individual councillors. For a long time, in the
society outside the university, the philosophy of
growth — the well-known ideology of
flagellation at the altar of the Gross National
Product — reigned supreme.
Students balked at some of the grosser
manifestations of this philosophy — McAfee
had to railroad SUB through a referendum by
means of dubious polling practices such as the
placing of huge Vote Yes posters behind polling
booths. But by and large the philosophy of
unlimited growth has gone unchallenged.
With the counter-culture "revolution" of the
late sixties, and the ensuing critique of "growth
at any price", some of us began to wonder
about the monster the generations of AMS
executives had created. Vice-president Carey
Linde in 1968-69 worked all fall on a proposal of
moderate decentralization and democratization of the AMS, only to see his plans shot
down in flames when the general meeting
called to approve them failed to get a quorum.
M
the office expanded when the AMS moved
into SUB. Former general manager Ron
Pearson, an undistinguished accountant who
found his way into the AMS in the late fifties,
built up such a machine that it took elected
student representatives three years to get rid of
him. Even when they did, in 1971, they had to
give him a year's salary (about $15,000) in
severance pay.
Even now, Pearson can be seen, ghost-like,
lost of Linde's recommendations,
specifically the replacement of the "weighted-
vote" system in AMS council meetings with the
present proportional representation system
and the empowering of undergraduate societies
would get too much power through this
moderate decentralization, and that abuse of
money would be the result.
If this sounds familiar, it is because these
are the arguments now used by the entrenched
representatives of the current AMS structure
against those of us who feel further
decentralization is needed.
The choice that faces the students of UBC
now is: do we really want the AMS to be
modelled on the corporations which blindly led
us into the unlimited-growth society? Do we
really need to pay a "general manager" close
to $20,000 a year in salary and fringe benefits
which the favored candidate for the now-vacant
job is reported to be asking, including some
$100 monthly in car expenses?
Would the AMS not serve the students better
if every club and undergraduate society could
be given money at the start of the year and
allowed to spend it without having to get
purchase orders and signatures in triplicate all
year long?
And if we look around us at what we get for
our $9, is it worth the masses of red tape we
have created, the personal empires and the
dehumanization of the present structure?
In the last article I will suggest that this is
the year we have the opportunity to ask — and
answer — these questions.
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Tickets $5.50, $4.50, $3.50, $2.75.
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