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The Ubyssey Oct 18, 1977

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Array UBC's dean of women quits
—doug field photo
CLUTCHING  WATER  BALLOON, commerce undergraduate society  president Mike  lannacone falls to
ground outside Angus after making scintillating catch. Despite good form, lannacone later dropped final
balloon pitched by opponent professors Monday, losing balloon toss for student team.
Fee hikes hit visa students
TORONTO (CUP) - A 20.9 per
cent drop in the number of visa
student applications this September is due to the differential fee
being charged international
students at all but two of Ontario's
universities, according to the
Ontario Federation of Students.
The Council of Ontario
'Universities has revealed that
there were only 13,705 applications
from visa students this September,
compared to 17.330 applications the
previous year. OFS information
officer Alan Golombek said the
federation has actively opposed the
differential fee since it was introduced in May 1976, but the
council data is the first real indication of the impact of Ontario
differential fees abroad..
Releasing the information at a
press conference Monday, the
federation was joined by Ontario
New Democratic Party leader
Stephen Lewis and Ontario Liberal
leader Stuart Smith in calling upon
the Conservative government to
rescind the fee.
Tn their protests, all three groups
emphasized the changing cultural
climate in Ontario universities as a
result of the fee. Federation chairwoman Miriam Edelson said, "It is
not only the books you read and the
lectures you attend that form a
complete education, but also the
people you interact with."
The federation has written to the
Ontario Human Rights Commission asking it to investigate the
possibility that the fee is in direct
contravention of the code which is
designed to protect the rights of all
people regardless of race, creed,
sex or place of origin.
Speaking for the commission,
Bromley Armstrong said he thinks
thef ee contravenes the spirit of the
code but he is not certain it is
against any specific regulation in
the code.
Both opposition parties explained that although they have
been opposed to the fee since its
inception in 1976, they saw little
opportunity to bring the matter up
for discussion  in the legislature.
Tuition fees are decreed by
regulation of the government and
are not controlled by provincial
legislation. Smith said the only
opportunity to oppose the fee will
be during the budget debate and he
warned that the Liberals were not
prepared to force an election on
this issue alone.
NDP opposition member Dave
Warner and Liberal college and
university critic John Sweeney
pointed out that the government
had done no research on differential fees, nor did it consult
with any of the parties involved in
education in Ontario.
Warner said that after studying
the government's action on differential fees he had not been able
to discover where the policy came
from.
The government has cited the
savingto the Canadian taxpayer as
its main reason for instituting the
fee. but education minister Harry
Parrott has admitted that less than
0.6 of one per cent of the total post-
secondary education budget might
be saved through charging international students more fees.
According to the federation, this
represents a saving of less than $1
for each Ontario taxpayer.
This year, all Ontario universities except McMaster and Trent
are charging undergraduate fees
of $700 for Canadians and $1,500 for
visa students, and graduate
student fees of $750 for Canadians
and $1,950 for visa students. Ontario coDeges are charging $325 for
Canadians and $700 for international students.
Ry VICKIBOOTH
Margaret Fulton is resigning as
dean of women at UBC to take a
position where she will be able to
help women students more easily
and more effectively.
Fulton is leaving her post in July
to become president of Mount St.
Vincent University in Halifax.
"I saw this appointment as an
opportunity to make a public
statement of my commitment to
the women's movement." Fulton
said.
Fulton said that although she has
often felt frustrated and angered
by the male dominated administration at UBC, this
frustration is not the reason for her
resignation.
"There's no question that the
first years in this position were
extremely frustrating," she said.
"Women had no visibility and no
real status on this campus. Only a
very few women were committed
to furthering the position of women
at UBC."
Fulton believes she has made
progress at UBC, but "it's been
uphill work every step of the way."
She said making progress at
Mount St. Vincent will be easier.
"T won't have to submit all my
proposals   to   a   solid   male   ad
ministration for approval. It will
be a great change to make
decisions rather than fight to get
decisions made." she said.
Although Fulton said there have
been improvements made on
campus, situations still exist that
she finds frustrating.
Sexism is a major problem.
Relationships between women
students and professors are very
unhealthy, Fulton said.
"They are based on playing the
sex game rather than being
genuinely objective, ethical and
professional," she said.
Another thing that Fulton is
unsatisfied with is the
geographical location of the
present women's office in
Ruchanan 456.
She has asked for a more accessible location, and said that the
ideal location would be a series of
offices adjacent to the Mildred
Brock room in Brock Hall.
"The Mildred Brock room is a
clearly designated women's area,"
Fulton said. "If we had offices
there, we could turn it into a vital
women's activity centre."
One'of the worst problems that
the dean of women has to cope with
is the size of UBC.
Seepage 3: FULTON
BCSF to fight
ed cutbacks
Ry LARRY HILL
TTie B.C. Students' Federation
decided at its annual conference on
the weekend to launch a six-month
campaign against education
cutbacks.
,,JliTsual]y. Wjerej&^great deal of
controversy between delegates of
the BCSF at conferences, but the
members of the organization were
united this time," said Paul
Sandhu, Alma Mater Society ex-
ernal affairs officer, who
represented UBC at the conference.
"We all realize that the issue (of
education cutbacks) is affecting
everybody, and that the only way
we can fight it is to work together
through the BCSF," Sandhu said.
"We want to question the whole
way that post-secondary institutions are being financed."
Delegates at the conference, held
at Simon Fraser University,
carried the motion that all student
societies demand that their
respective institutions allow for
student input in and access to
budgetary information and
decisions.
Most of B.C.'s community
colleges do not provide for student
representation on their councils
governing such matters.
The following motions were also
passed at the conference:
• that individual student
societies approach faculty and
staff to form a coalition to confront
the cutbacks issue;
• that the BCSF contact "existing
provincial faculty and staff groups,
to form a common-front attack on
cutbacks and the ministry of
education;
• that BCSF, along with faculty
and staff groups, request a
meeting with premier Bill Bennett
and education minister Pat
McGeer to discuss cutbacks and
priorities in the financing of
education;
t that the BCSF prepare a report
for student societies on the budget-
making process;
• that the BCSF compile reports
to be prepared by B.C. colleges and
universities concerning the way
cutbacks have affected them individually, and that the BCSF
determine from this the province-
wide effects of lack of cutbacks.
Sandhu said that wereas the
National Union of Students has
decided to battle student unemployment and to fight for student
aid', "the BCSF has decided to
concentrate on cutbacks because it
is more of a provincial issue."
Whales in a let off hot water
Every species of whale that can be exploited has
been hunted to near extinction, a whaling expert said
Monday
Rut because of this whales are now protected by
International Whaling Commission regulations that
set quota on the number of whales that can be caught
each year. Colin Clark said.
Hark, an authority on the whaling industry, fold
about 50 people in Angus 312 lhat whaling is still
profitable to some countries.
"Canada and the U.S. quit whaling when it wasn't
profitable to them any more. It's still profitable to the
Russians and Japanese," he said.
The whaling commission regulations protect any
species of whale whose current numbers have fallen
below 40 per cent of their estimated original level
before about 1910, when whaling became a major
industry. Clark said.
The blue whale is one species that nearly became
extinct, he said. Studies in 1965 indicated there were
only about 200 blue whales left in the world from an
cstimnlcd 200.000 in 1910. Since the study they have
been protected from whalers.
With increased t echnology, such as the use of sonar
and radar on some whaling ships, all larger whales
were being hunted down to five per cent of their
original levels,' Clark said.
The International Whaling Commission was
established by the Jlnited Nations in 1946 to concentrate on the management and economics of
whaling and to set quotas on the tonnage of whales
each country could take in, he said.
Clark said the Russian and Japanese whalers have
kept to the agreed quotas, despite claims that they
have exceeded their limits.
"Russia and Japan have kept to their agreements
and so have the Norwegians. Denmarks has been
about the worst Making more than their quota'." he
said.
Though it is not as big an industry as it once was.
Clark said whaling is still profitable. He said a single
fin whale is worth about S50.000.
Fin whale hunting reached a peak in the 1950s,
when in one year 1.6 million tons of fin whale were
brought in. he said.
Whaling became a booming industry in Ihe late
l02O"s and lM0*s. when 40 whaling ships were
hringing in about 1.8 million tons of blue whale
vearly. Clark said.
Blue whales were hunted down until their numbers
were so low.that whalers were forced to switch .to fin
whales, he said. Page 2
THE        UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 18, 1977
Six after SRA seats
Six candidates are vying for two
open positions of arts representative on the student representative
assembly to be contested in
Wednesday's arts election.
But an arts fee referendum,
planned for the same election, has
been postponed until January.
Running for SRA are Peter
Chant, Kay Leah, Brendan
McGivern, Michael Reynolds,
Rruce Ross and Suk Sihota.
Sihota break-in
almost solved
Student board of governors'
member Moe Sihota said Monday '
he believes someone in the commerce faculty is responsible for the
theft of confidential documents
belonging to him from an office in
SUB last week.
The documents, which included
confidential files and memoranda
pertaining to board of governors
affairs, were stolen last week from
the office of Paul Sandhu, Alma
Mater Society external affairs
officer. Nothing else was taken
during the break-in.
Sihota said he will "lay off
discussion" of problems the
commerce faculty is having if the
documents are returned.
He said there are people on
campus who could profit from the
documents being unavailable to
him. Sihota said he thinks a
professor or student in the commerce faculty is responsible for the
theft.
An RCMP investigation into the
break-in has yielded no information so far. Sihota said he
will contact the university detachment to inform police of his
suspicions. He said he will not lay
charges.
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
The position of arts undergraduate society vice-president
is being contested by Ron Bowles
and Valgeet Johl.
Polls will be open in Buchanan,
Sedgewickand SUB from 9:30 a.m.
until 4:00 p.m. There will be an all
candidates meeting today at noon
in Buchanan lounge.
The elections were called to fill
vacancies in the SRA when Arnold
Hedstrom became a senator-at-
large and Sharon LeBlanc left
UBC. AUS vice-president Theresa
Goulet also did not return to UBC.
The faculty of arts has five representatives in the 52-member
SRA.
HILLEL
HOUSE
LUNCH HOUR
PROGRAMS
TUESDAY. OCT. 18th
ISRAELI DANCING
WEDNESDAY. OCT. 19th
*
FOUNDATIONS OF
MODERN JEWISH MYSTICISM:
A weekly seminar with Rabbi
Yakov Fellig, Chabad House,
Vancouver
THURSDAY. OCT. 20th
Religion in Israel-Diaspora
Relations: Recent Developments
with Rabbi Paul Plotkin, Beth Israel
Synagogue .".-'.'.■'■',■'.■
MONDAYS
On starting and substaining a
Jewish family, a weekly seminar
with Rabbi Daniel Siegel.
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1977 FALL LECTURES
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Thursday, October 20-ln Hebb Theatre, at 12:30 p.m.
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HOMECOMING 77
An open invitation to alumni and their friends
to tour the campus, cheer the Thunderbirds, get
together with old friends and dance the night
away.
Saturday, October 22,1977
The music starts at 9 p.m.
with the big band sound of
Mart Kenney in the
ballroom of the Student
Union Building and the
fast-paced music of City
Haul in the party room.
The dance ticket price of $7.50 per person
includes a midnight supper. For tickets call the
UBC Alumni Association, 228-3313 (8:30 to
4:30). ADVANCE SALE ONLY
Plan to be there. Homecoming days are your
days. They won't be the same without you.
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THE        UBYSSEY
Page 3
Gov't steps up anti-union battle
By MIKE BOCKING
The battle between the
provincial government and the
faculty association of Notre Dame
University over unfair labor
practise charges has escalated into
legal war.
FANDU has laid the charges
against education minister Pat
McGeer. deputy education
minister Walter Hardwick and
other department and university
officials.
The Labor Relations Board was
to hold a hearing Oct. 31. Nov. 1
and 2 to consider these charges.
But the provincial government
through its lawyer Bruce McColl
has asked board chairman Paul
Weiler to postpone indefinitely the
three-day hearing because the
government intends to go to court
on the issue.
The government will ask the B.C.
Supreme Court to rule that the
board has no jurisdiction in the
matter because the alleged unfair
comments which sparked the
charges were made by a minister
and his subordinates in passing
legislation.
Also charged with McGeer and
Hardwick are McGeer's executive
assistant Jim Bennett, Universities Council of B.C. chairman
William Armstrong, University of
Victoria vice-president George
Pedersen. Simon Fraser
University      associate      vice-
president Dan Birch and SFU
academic vice-president Brian
Wilson.
FANDU says these people
violated section five of the B.C.
labor Code which prohibits "intimidation of any kind that could
reasonably have the effect of
compelling or inducing any person
to . . . refrain from becoming, or to
continue or to cease to be, a
member of a trade union."
FANDU    is   a    local    of   the
SUCKING BACK SUDS, furry human prepares to pass empty bottle
to three-legged monster with outstretched hand. Monster went on to
—doug field photo
compete in three-legged race sponsored by commerce undergraduate
society as part of commerce week shenanigans.
Changes in divorce law criticized
Women will still get the short end
of the stick in divorce settlements
despite the provincial government's attempt to amend the
Family Relations Act, according to
spokeswomen for two women's
groups.
Sheila Lidwill of the UBC
women's committee said Monday
there are a number of loopholes in
dealing with divorces and
marriage annulments in the
proposed act. Bill 69.
Themost controversial section of
the act deals with the distribution
of family assets after a divorce or
annulment. The legislation would
ensure equal distribution of family
assets   but   does   not   include
business assets in the settlement.
"The law should be more
specific, as the guidelines are quite
loose," Lidwill said.
It would be easy for either
partner to put their family assets
into their business, she said.
;*' W * s?^r-^r ->w
Fulton moving to Maritimes
From page 1
"It is an overwhelming impossibility for one woman to be
able to relate to 10,000 undergraduate women," Fulton said.
Fulton is also frustrated with the
image that the dean of women is
tarred with.
"People think I'm some fuddy
duddy clucking over the hours that
girls stay out at night," Fulton
said.
"The concerns of our office are
much more broadly based. We're
trying to deal with the needs of all
women on campus."
There is a definite need for a
strong women's office on campus,
Fulton said. She said it is important that ITBC continue to have
a dean of women, and she is
hopeful the office will do good work
in future.
"Although sometimes I have felt
the position is strictly token, it's
better to be tokens than not to be
seen at all."
She said the dean of women is the
only senior woman on the dean's
council, and until the time that one-
half of the.dean's council consists
of women, it is important to have at
least one representative.
Fulton said she has had splendid
co-operation from some faculties,
especially dean Liam Finn of
applied science and dean Joseph
Gardener of forestry.
"They have tried to make
women aware that there are
careers available for them in those
traditionally male faculties,"
Fulton said. "There has been a
slight increase in female
enrolment in these faculties as a
result."
She also said that there have
been groups organized both at
faculty and student level which try
to better the lot of women.
Fulton said that she was asked to
apply for the job at Mount St.
Vincent.
"If women are not prepared to
let their names stand for top
executive positions in the Canadian
academic community, we are
going to be criticized for not
coming forward," she said.
She said the selection committee
of Mount St. Vincent impressed on
her the necessity of having more
senior Canadian women at the
decision making level of Canadian
universities.
Fulton said that because it is
smaller, with 1,500 students, Mount
St. Vincent would not be as hemmed in by rigid structures as UBC
is. "I think that LTBC often hassles
students," she said.
"I want to be president of a
university that co-operates and
does everything it can to facilitate
a students progress."
By taking the position, Fulton
becomes the second woman to
become president of a university in
Canada.
FULTON . .. moving on
Certain sections of the bill are
absurd, Vancouver Status of
Women spokeswomen Mercia
Stickney said Thursday. The equal
distribution of property only occurs after a divorce or annulment
and there is no provision to family
finance during the marriage, she
said.
"There is no promise for any sort
of recognition of ownership as long
as the marriage is functioning,"
Stickney said.
Another section of the bill deals
with the introduction of marriage
agreements. People who are
married or about to be would have
the option to sign a contract on the
division of their assets in case of a
divorce.
If the contract was unfair to one
of the partners it could be adjusted
by a family court judge.
Stickney said that while the
contract would make married
couples more aware of the concept
of equal sharing it could -put
emotional pressure on them by
making them agree to a divorce
settlement before they even get
married.
The family assets and marriage
agreement parts of the bill are
unsatisfactory because both are
subject to judicial intervention.
Lidwill said.
Since most judges are male they
are subject to common male
prejudices, she said, and could
make an unfair decision in favor of
the husband.
Other sections of the bill involve
maintenance and support
procedures for the partners after a
divorce, with the emphasis placed
on the ability for. each to-have
financial independence.
Association of Commercial and
Technical Employees Union which
belongs to the Canadian Labor
Congress.
FANDU says statements by the
individuals claiming the prospect
of post-secondary education at
Notre Dame University would be
threatened by the presence of a
unionized faculty association
brought about the charges.
A spokesman for FANDU said
the government's move was not
unexpected.
Morris Williams said their
position right now is to "wait and
see. We don't want a postponement
of the board hearing."
UBC faculty association
president Richard Roydhouse said
the issue has become "too
emotional" on both sides.
'"fiie procedures being used
seem very strange and I'm looking
for some common sense."
"The demise of NDU was understandable, but I don't understand what the intimidation is
about." he said.
"Why should FANDU feel intimidated?" he asked.
"He (McGeer) interests us, but
he doesn't intimidate us," Roydhouse said.
McGeer could not be reached
Monday, and his executive
assistant Jim Bennett, who is also
being charged, had no comment.
Alcoholics
face danger
By DAVE DIXON
Alcoholics face the possibility of
serious   brain   damage   a   UBC
, ps^chotogst, jfJ,o^t^^»d>^on
-afctSibhsSf Saffl: fhilrsafyf^
Tot of evidence'that gligggsts'that
they have serious problems such as
brain damage," said John Pinell,
supervisor of a research project
investigating the effects of
alcoholism.
Pinel's project. Effects of
Chronic Alcoholic Consumption,
will investigate many of the effects
alcoholism has on the body.
"The information will be
valuable," said Pinel, "as it will
show a clear demonstration of the
terrible effects of alcohol."
The experiment will attempt to
show the "permanency of effects"
which result from prolonged use of
alcohol, he said.
The experiment, which will run
from two to three years, began last
month and is funded by a $34,972
grant from the non-medical use of
drugs directorate.
"You cannot control experiments with actual human
alcoholics," Pinel said, so the
experiment is using rats to show
the effects of prolonged use of
alcohol on the brain and other
parts of the body.
For the experiment, two groups
of rats are being used. The first
group of rats have a normal liquid
diet but the second group of rats
have a diet where ethanol alcohol
is added to simulate a chronic
alcohol consumption.
* The diets of .both groups of rats
have the same amourtt-of calories,
vitamins, and nutrients which is
similar to a human alcoholic who,
Pinel said, has an unbalanced diet
because of the additional amount
of calories in alcohol.
The behavior of the rats is one of
the indicators which are going to
be watched, along with the brain
activity of the rats, Pinel said.
An important result of the experiment will be the autopsy, he
said. In the autopsy, all parts of
the rats' bodies will be carefully
examined, "especially the brain,"
said Pinel.
The two groups of rats will be
compared and the differences
between the straight rats and the
alcoholic rats will be shown." '' Page 4
THE        UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 18, 1977
This year time
for fee vote
It wasn't too long ago that the Alma Mater Society budget
committee was busy cutting back every budget related to the
AMS by one-third and everyone in SUB was crying the blues.
AMS people must have very short memories.
Even while the process of setting a budget continues, the
AMS referendum committee, in deciding to hold a referendum in February on levying a $1 fee each for the National
Union of Students and the B.C. Students Federation, has
deemed it unnecessary to hold an AMS fee referendum this
academic year.
If there has been one lesson from the budget debate, it is
that the AMS fee must go up soon, if AMS services are to be
maintained and relevant new services are to be added.
This year's AMS budget hasn't been formalized yet, but
some new services have already had to be axed or severely cut
back.
One of them, a worker for the women's committee,
miraculously got through budget committee and the student
administrative commission, but the student representative
assembly chopped it after a childish and unfortunate debate
on women's liberation.
The $4,000 freed by this decision will be thoroughly
fought over.
We do not disagree that there is a need for a BCSF/NUS
referendum. The BCSF for instance, can do a great deal for
students, and it is being restrained by serious financial
problems caused in part by the failure of UBC students to
pass two previous referenda.
The annual discussion about tapping new sources of major
revenue has, as usual, proved illusory.
In last year's referendum, both the BCSF/NUS vote and
the AMS fee increase question fell just short of the needed
two-thirds vote. If the AMS and its subsidiaries had got out
and worked, the referenda would have passed.
After this year's budget crisis, the necessary motivation
for these groups has been given. To wait around would mean
a repeat of last year's unfortunate exercise.
The SRA, when it receives the committee's report
Wednesday, should seriously consider adding an AMS fee
vote. And it should insure that the needed groundwork is
done before any referendum is held.
You Mean Students cant be on senate
UNLESS THEY'RE Fl>a-T!HE... DOESN'T
THAT MEAN THAT THEY U>OMT HAVE
TIKE. TO BE FULL-TIME ?...
AREN'T THE   IriPJL/cATfONlS
DEUCfOUSLY
DIABOLICAL
/\
f
y
\
V
\
;
V
\
V
/'   y
/
/
Letters
SUS approachable, unlike AMS
r
On Oct. 19 science students will
be asked to decide whether they
wish to be governed immediately
by the increasingly cold
shouldered Alma Mater Society
bureaucracy which costs them $15
per year or governed intermediately by the friendly,
approachable science undergraduate society which will cost
them only $1 per year extra.
Science students only need to look
at what the AMS has done in the
last year to make their decision.
In the past year or so your $15
has bought you the following: a
five-week Pit closure, an increase
of 25 per cent in beer prices, little
or no concerts or special events
this year, a fee rally that got
nothing but cost a great deal, a
failure known as student forum
and several free trips to various
points around the globe for student
leaders you probably didn't vote
for.
In five weeks this year your $1
bought you the following: a successful and popular disco, full
intramural teams (which we
rarely had before), an office that is
open and staffed most hours of the
day (with apologies for the
location), people that you can talk
to inside that office, a speakers
program, beer nights in the future,
,and much more, too numerous to
even mention.
This is a stickup
This letter is an angry protest to
your editorial in Thursday's paper
supporting the ferry strikers.
Yes. maybe the ferry workers
aren't to blame for demanding
payment for overtime, but they
were fully responsible for withdrawing their services on the day
before Thanksgiving weekend and
over that weekend. A weekend
where traditionally families and
friends get together.
For all those people who had that
opportunity stolen from them or
who paid three times the regular
amount for the "privilege" of
going to the island. I have great
sympathy.
I blame the ferry union for this
theft, so don't try to tell me I'm
justifying robbery.
Andrew W. F. Metten
civil engineering 4
Don't blame the gov't
No matter how justified the
claims of the ferry workers may
be. they must still obey a government order. When a legally-elected
government passes a piece of
legislation such as the Railways
and Ferries Bargaining Assistance
Act. which does not violate our
constitution. that piece of
legislation  is not invalid  simply
because it is "a piece of Socred
legislation."'
A union should not even be
allowed to vote on whether or not to
obey the law.
In this instance, the government
could not have foreseen the illegal
strike, and can therefore not be
blamed for it.
Gilbert Raynard
civil engineering 1
Obviously the SUS is a much
better deal. Yet on Oct. 19 two-
thirds of approximately 600 people
haveto vote 'yes' on our second fee
referendum to permanently renew
our $1 fee. Renew it, not raise it. If
the referendum fails there will only
be a skeleton SUS next year. Why?
Because the cold shouldered
bureaucracy of the AMS has ordained that undergraduate
societies shall receive no more of
your hard earned $15. You will
have no intermediate body between you and the upstairs gnomes
in the SUB. which used to mean
student union building.
Took at it this way. voting yes
serves two purposes; keeping our
society alive and delivering a
massive kick in the teeth to the
AMS.
Brian Knight
science 3
?Ay\ftfM'A')fcd ^nihii*) ^V\
Fla ttered as I was to see my picture appear on page three of the Oct.
7 ITbyssey, I nevertheless would like to point out some errors which
upset some wind symphony members. In addition to the three flautists
mentioned, there were also about 60 other musicians playing in the
SUB auditorium on Friday, and they were playing band music, not
flute music.
The reason for this is that it was a band concert, not a flute concert.
Also, if your music critic-cum-photographer had reflected upon the
right way to print a photograph, the names in the caption would have
been in order, and the flutes would have been pointing in the right
direction, as opposed to the left (wrong) direction. Mirror images are
not always such a good idea!
Catherine Riddle
music 1
Was reporter SUSed?
I just thought I would drop you
guys a line to show that a scientist
trying to spell correctly is as inconceivable as a Ubyssey reporter
reporting correctly. Oh, don't get
me wrong. I like to see things come
out backwards. It tests to see if
THE UBYSSEY
OCTOBER 18, 1977
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS
or the university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in room 241K of the
Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301;
Advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Chris Gainor
It was residence day In trie office, and BUI Tieleman staggered In late
because of all the parties the night before. "Be careful or we'll pull your
licence for three months," warned Chris Gainor and Marcus Gee. But after
being talked Into It by Vlckl Booth and Chris Bannister, Steve Howard
headed off campus In his Volvo on a booze run. "You'd think Mike
Bocking and Verne McDonald couldn't look a booze bottle square In the
face after spending a whole weekend at a depraved Ubyssey retreat,"
thought Mario Lowther as he rewired his stereo for the night's festivities.
"But at least Larry Hill, Heather Conn, Doug Field, Don Maclntyre, Carl
Vesterback, Matt King and Gray Kyles didn't get lost following El
Rotundo's silly maps." Kathy Ford stood In the common room waiting to
pick a fight with anyone who wandered In after 10. How would she do It?
"Everything you know Is wrong," she grinned.
your audience is awake. For instance saying that the SUS would
not be defunct if it got no fee levy
money. That's good. It only follows
that we would be defunct if we got
fee levy money? Brilliant! Such
reverse publicity helps us a lot.
Speaking about money, telling
people we got $1,000 because our
fee levy of $1 per person passed
last year for one year only, is a nice
touch. It adds to the confusion.
(Thanks Heather, but do me a
favor — don't help me.) In actual
fact, we used to get approximately
$1,000 from the AMS each year to
run the society of 4.000 members
for the year. Now, even that is
being removed.
Yes, our public relations officer
would like to thank you also for
spelling his name wrong. He finds
the Gears have more trouble
tanking him if they can't find him
because they don't recognize him
by name.
The SUS has no guaranteed
income. To continue operating we
are asking at least 600 people to
vote to each give us a dollar a year.
Without it we close up shop.
Hugh Welch
president
science undergraduate society Tuesday, October 18, 1977
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 5
On the adrenochrome trail
By VERNE McDONALD
Alchemy profs are least known
for their level-headed sanity. One
of my alchemy TAs once joked that
if it weren't for the fact that
alchemists are scientests they'd all
be psych profs.
Prof. Musgrave, who lectures on
chemicksand properties of ether in
my alchemy 368 class, is perhaps
the weirdest of a weird breed. But
when I found that he was drowning
animals barehanded in his lab, I
knew I had to investigate further.
I played a longshot hunch and
went to his office, but he surprised
me by actually being there. That's
when I becamesure that his was an
unusual case of eccentricity, even
for a UBC prof.
Porcupine
He had apparently decided that
he needed more time working at
his experiments, for he had moved
some equipment into his office
along with a dime store aquarium.
As he motioned me to sit down, he
was bent over the bound form of a
porcupine, which was stretched
spreadeagle on the desk. Its little
paws were tied with ropes that
wrapped around tiny stakes that
professor Musgrave had driven
into the desk.
He took off a huge pair of leather
mittens that were covered with
steel rivets. "Protection," he said.
"Last time I deal with one of these
buggers I ended up having to squat
to take a piss. What can I do for
you?"
I bided my time. "You were
going to drown htm, weren't you?"
"Or course. But first I remove
the quills and the colon." He
moved into his familiar lecture
style. "The porcupine can throw its
quills a distance of six feet. When
I've got him under water, his
prickly body thrashing like an
electric dildo in overdrive, it's like
a Trident submarine blowing its
load.
Flatulence
He rubbed the little plaster
bandages that covered his face.
"TTiere is also the problem of
porcupine flatulence, which has
been known to corrode titanium.
During my last experiment, my
subject completely fouled  the
Another visit into the horrors of
niche my 35Rwith Verne McDonald,
m house cartoonist, wire editor
nnd laugh generator.
Just a reminder. The editor is
searching frantically for opinion
nieces from anyone at UBC to fill
fhis space. Opinion pieces can be
dropped off at the editor's desk at
The Ubvssev. room 241K SUB.
water, then at the moment of
death, the cosmic instant of truth,
even as my own body stiffened and
trembled in sympathy with the
ejaculation of the creature's spirit
from its little furry body, the
bastard emptied his lower intestine
in .0036 seconds (according to my
monitoring equipment) and shot
right through the wall of the tank. I
still can't get the stain out of the
carpet. I was so upset I didn't get
the adrenochrome before it
decayed."
I moved up to the edge of my
seat. "Adrenochrome?"
"Yes, yes, of course. Fun's fun
and all that, but I don't murder
little furry animals for pure enjoyment. With the salary I get, I
have to pull in a buck here and
there.''
"But what's adrenoerhome? Is it
so valuable?"
He sneered, wrinkling his
bandages and exposing his
healthy, neatly filed teeth. "You
haven't been reading your Potions
and Elixir text. Adrenochrome is a
preparation of the adrenal hormone of excitation, which mammals exude into their bloodstream
in times of stress.
It is the stuff that gives you the
energy to leap through a window
and pull on your pants while
running when the husband comes
through the door with a deer rifle."
Murdered
"And you . . . uh . . . extract this
from the animals you drown?"
He leaned over and gazed into
my eyes. "It can only be obtained
from a living body, but you have to
kill that body to get it. Corpses are
no good. It has to be taken at the
precise moment of demise. And a
mammal that is being (ahem)
murdered at the time has more,
much more of it."
I found myself standing up,
teased to run. "And vou sell this
stuff?"
He snatched up a vial from his
desk top. It was about the size of a
hummingbird testicle. "The
adrochrome taken from one
medium-sized rodent at the
moment of ultimate stress, one-
seventieth of a gram," he announced. "It will fetch $150 on the
open market."
"But why?"
He laughed an evil laugh. "Give
this to a quarterback and he'll
throw a 90-yard pass and run over
a dozen homicidal linebackers to
catch it himself. In experiments
with rats they've gotten them to go
through a brick wall to get at
mates, whereupon they copulate
up to 700 times before turning over
and going to sleep." He laughed
again. "And that's without
foreplay."
"Who do vou sell it to? The rats?
"Very funny. It so happens that
the B.C. Lions have used up my
entire supply, distributing it to
their players in the last two
minutes of every game. The time
has come to stop messing around
with rodents. I need large mammals if I'm ever going to make as
much as an applied science dean. I
need subjects that weigh 100
pounds or more."
His stare left my eyes to appraise my pudgy body. I was
covered with sweat and my legs
trembled.
"You might be interested to
knpw the signs of a high adrenalin
count," he said. "Extreme perspiration is usually followed by
trembling in the limbs. I could
probably get a gram out of you
right now."
Before he could get the steel-
studded mittens on I had the
adrenochrome and had swallowed
it. As soon as it touched my tongue,
I felt as if I'd been plugged into a
BC Hydro line heading for
Seattle. The door parted like
cardboard and T was away.
T thanked the heavens that I had
dropped Alchemy 368 as I pushed
the bus home. I had had enough
bad craziness for a while. There
was a consolation though. Tonight I
would be able to make it through
my required readings for the
Milton course — and stay awake.
Subfilms
quietly presents
ISUB Aud  Thurs. & Sun. 7:001
|Fri. & Sat. 7:00 & 9:30    .75c|
Audience     must     remain
soundless, too! 	
AMS SPEAKERS COMMITTEE
Presents
Impact of Feminism
Upon Male & Female
Psychology
- PHYLLIS CHESLER -
Monday, Oct. 31
8:00 pm sub ballroom
tickets at
a.m.s. business office
student $loo other $2oo
(freestyle J
O.LP.H.
BINGO
The Friendly
Bingo
Every Tuesday
7:45 p.m.
4090 W. 10th Ave.
O.L.P.H.
WHISTLER PROMOTIONS
Presents
The GOOD BROTHERS
(Juno Award Winners)
With
BLUE NORTHERN
(formerly Cement City Cowboys)
At
the
COMMODORE
BALLROOM
OCT. 19&20
To all ARTS Students
TOMORROW IS
ELECTION DAY!
For 2 Arts Reps to Sit On the SRA:
CANDIDATES:
PETER CHANT MICHAEL REYNOLDS
KAY LEAH BRUCE ROSS
BRENDAN McGIVERN SUKI SIHOTA
For 1 Vice President:
CANDIDATES —
RON BOWLES VALGEET JOHL
Polls: 10:00 -4:00
Buchanan — Sedgewick
TODAY:
Is the All-Candidates Meeting,
Buchanan Lounge 12:30
Bring your questions, your queries
and your lunches!
THINK ARTS —
VOTE OCT. 19th Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 18, 1977
Cosmic travel
offered by TM
Wouldn't it be great if you
could levitate objects, saving
strain on your beer tipping arm?
Or let your soul travel?
This   is   all   possible  with  ad-
Hot flashes
vanced transcendental meditation,
according to TM instructors
Robert Pepper and Ricky Weberg.
They will be talking about new
TM techniques Wednesday noon
in Bu. 316.
Racism fought
Racism in B.C. is the topic of a
discussion and film noon Wednesday in the Arts One building.
Wes Knapp, co-ordinator of the
B.C. Teachers Federation task
force on racism will be talking
about how the BCTF is combating
racism in schools.
Tween classes
TODAY
CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Weekly fellowship, noon, SUB 205.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Vancouver    Canucks    team    doctor
speaks   on   sports   medicine,   noon,
IRC 1.
GAY PEOPLE
Informal social meeting, noon, SUB
212.
CANOE CLUB
Organizational  meeting,  noon, SUB
215.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
Dr.   Stan   Coren   speaks   on   Right
Hand-Left    Hand:    Psychology    of
Sldeness, noon, Angus 321.
SKYDIVING CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 212.
hang Gliding club
Organizational meeting, noon, SUB
224.
WEDNESDAY
CCCM
Potluck dinner, 5:30 p.m., Lutheran
Campus Centre.
JAPAN EXCHANGE CLUB
Meeting,   new   members   welcome,
noon, SUB 205.
SUS
General     meeting,     noon,     Hebb
theatre.
SIMS
Introductory     lecture     on     transcendental    meditation,    noon,    Bu.
316.
SPORTS CAR CLUB
Short meeting and rallyette, 7 p.m.,
SUB 213.
mt -
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Lesbian drop-In, noon, SUB 130.
THURSDAY
HEUS
Nutrition week presents film Diet
for a Small Planet, noon, SUB auditorium.
DEAN OF WOMEN
Career counselling workshop for
graduate women science students,
noon, Bu. penthouse.
AQUA-SOC
Slide presentation and party, 7
p.m., SUB 207-209.
CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Larry Hurtado on What Is Charismatic?, 7:30 p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre lounge.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Sara David speaks on Women
Emerging, noon, Mildred Brock
lounge.
SCIENCE FICTION CLUB
Meeting, noon, SUB 216E.
SIMS
Special   weekly  meeting, noon,  Bu.
217.
Paer chase, noon, Chem 250.
Candia Taverns §aj(
SPECIALIZING IN *
228-9512 "ZSST 228-9513
FAST FREE DELIVERY-4510W. 10th Ave.
rJBBHdil
Big er Small Jobs
also Parages
basements
.   „&„YAK>S,.
732-9898
CLEAN-UP
Employment Overseas
Over 100 countries are now hiring in all professional and
non-professional categories. Excellent salaries, bonuses
and special incentives. Transportation is paid. An up-to-
date computerized list of international companies who are
now hiring is available for only $4.00, completely refundable if not entirely satisfied. We will gladly accept cheque,
money order or cash. For fast service on all orders, write
today to: —
Imperial World Service
P.O. Box 296, Snowdon
Montreal, Quebec
H3X 3T4
Official U.B.C.
Graduation Portrait
Photographers Since 1969
AutiuTraplt   £>tuituu> iCti).
/formerly Caniiicl 5hi<!m>
3343 West Broadway
732-7446
DEAN OF WOMEN'S OFFICE
CAREER ORIENTATION FOR WOMEN
"GO HIRE YOURSELF AN EMPLOYER"
Career Counselling Workshops
for
Undergraduate and Graduate Women
I.     Thursday, October 20, 12:30 - 2:15 p.m.
Buchanan Penthouse
II.     Thursday, October 27, 12:30 - 2:15 p.m.
Mildred Brock Room, Brock Hall
III.     Thursday, November 10, 12:30 - 2:15 p.m.
Mildred Brock Room, Brock Hall
Workshops will include evaluations of skills, career and lifegoals,
resume writing and interviewing techniques.
Please sign up on Dean of Women's Door
Buchanan, Room 456
or call: 228-2415
APPLICATIONS FOR
STUDENT COURT
5 positions and 2 alternates
Requirements:
a. Chief Justice must be in 3rd year law.
b. At   least  one  alternate  judge  shall  be  a  member of the  Law
constituency.
c. Must be familiar with By-law 25 of the A.M.S. constitution.
Application Forms available in Rooms 266 & 246.
Deposit in A.M.S. Business Office Sub 266.
Deadline: OCT. 25, 1977.
Submitted by the
A.M.S. Student
Administrative
Commission
THE TUTORIAL CENTRE
NEEDS YOU
SUCCESSFUL? Trade your old wisdom in for new
money! Failing Some? A little judicious cerebral
plundering could put you back on the track!
REGISTER NOW
Speakeasy in sub, any time we're open. Costs you $1
A program sponsored by the UBC Alumni Association
coles] nOLBS
400 Titles Available
LARGEST SELECTION OF REVIEW NOTES IN B.C.
BETTER BUY BOOKS
4393 W. 10th AVENUE
224-4144
gr
For HIM
For HER
A definite
dynamic eyeshape —
we have glasses
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STUDENT '! | s
DISCOUNT 10%   If
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THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c.
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines
50c Additional days $2.25 and 45c
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Off ice. Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T 1W5
5 — Coming Events
A CHANCE TO HAVE A BIT oi the action. Vote tomorrow in the Arts election, Buchanan or Sedgewick, all day.
Bring your AMS card plus a friend.
GIVE THE ARTS CANDIDATES a piece
of your mind today. All candidates
from 12:30, Buchanan Loundge.
HUNDREDS   OF   ART   STUDENTS   who
want a say in their society plus, will
vote tomorrow, Buchanan or Sedgewick all day.
11 — For Sale — Private
ORGANICALLY   GROWN,   UNSPRAYED
Okanagan fruit in season. 25c per
pound by the case. Free delivery.
738-8828 or 733-1677 eves.
CANUCK HOCKEY. Selling quarter share
pair centre greens season tickets. Ten
games. Ken, 685-9089.
25 — Instruction (Continued)
20 — Housing
ROOM AND BOARD availale on campus.
Good food. 2270 Wesbrooke, phone
224-9866.
25 — Instruction
SPANISH CLASSES. Beginners and
advanced. Contact  Bertha  738-3805.
PIANO LESSONS by experienced teacher. Graduate of Juilliard School of
Music. Both beginners and advanced
students welcome.  731-06O1.
POTTERY INSTRUCTION in my studio.
Wheel throwing, glaze and clay formulation. Call Don Gallo, 874-8758.
35 - Lost
REWARD for return of old silver watch
with saphire knob. Thurs. Buchanan
to Library.  986-6305.	
65 — Scandals
SCIENCE STUDENTS come to the SUS
general meeting Wednesday, Oct. 19,
Hebb Theatre. Liquid door prizes.
TURN UP YOUR HEARING AIDS, 'cause
here comes Mel Brooks' 'Silent Movie!'
85 — Typing
EXCELLENT       TYPING.       Reasonable
rates. Call 731-1807, 12 noon to 9 p.m.
FAST, accurate typist will do typing
at home. Standard rates, please
phone after 3:00 p.m., 263-0286.	
99 — Miscellaneous
WHITLATH WALRUS. New poems b>
local author at U.B.C. Bookstore.
Use Ubyssey Classified
TO SELL - BUY - INFORM
The U.B.C. Campus
MARKET PLACE Tuesday, October 18, 1977
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
UMMi
'Birds skin Golden Bears,
stay in grid playoff hunt
By DON MacINTYRE
"Dan Smith has scored more
points against us in the last two
years than any other quarterback
we have ever played against."
That was Alberta head football
coach Jim Donlevy's comment
after his Golden Bears were
humiliated 42-16 by the UBC
Thunderbirds in Western Intercollegiate Football action Saturday
at Thunderbird Stadium.
WIFL STANDINGS
G W L T   F    \
Pts.
Alberta
7 4   2 1   134 129
9
Calgary
6 4   2 0    91    93
8
IW
7 3    3   1   173 140
7
Manitoba
6 3   3 0  109 117
6
Sask.
6       5 0    78 109
2
Vjk"^. •     - *■ « • .     . *       ^^
—Chris bannister photo
FURIOUSLY CHASING leather orb. West Vancouver field hockey
player fends off UBC's Leslie Williams while Robin Sinclair grimaces.
UBC won 3-1 in league play at Trafalagar Park.
Smith led the 'Birds by com-
pletingan incredible 18 of 22 passes
for 340 yards, including five touchdown strikes. The UBC receiving
corps enjoyed its best day all
season, with four receivers sharing
in the scoring.
After taking a 1-0 lead on a single
by Gary Metz, the 'Birds scored
their first major on a one-yard pass
from Smith to fullback Gord Penn.
The score was set up by an Alberta
fumble, the first in a series of
turnovers that plagued the Bears
throughout the afternoon.
Slotback Paul Pearson took a 19-
yard pass for a touchdown at 3:03
of the second quarter to push the
ITBC lead to 15-0, and four minutes
later Smith found tight end Evan
Jones on a 95-yard pass-and-run
touchdown play, the third UBC
major of the half. Jones caught
seven passes for 171 yards to lead
all receivers.
UBC recovered an Alberta
tumble on the Bears' two-yard line
with less than three minutes left in
the half, and halfback Glen
Wallace scored on the next play. A
two-point conversion attempt
failed, and the score stood at 28-0.
Alberta finally scored just before
the half ended on a successful
third-and-ten gamble. Bears'
quarterback Dan McDermid found
receiver Lee McFadden in the end
zone for a 15-yard touchdown pass,
and the half ended 28-7.
UBC scored again almost immediately in the second half.
Smith throwing a 41-yard pass to
Digby Leigh. With the 28-point
lead, the 'Birds started to relax,
and the Bears started to come on,
completing four consecutive
passes. Unfortunately, the fourth
was completed to ITBC middle linebacker Kevin Konar.
UBC stalled, however, and
Alberta blocked Al Chorney's punt.
Several plays later. Bears' halfback Skip Kerr plunged over from
the two-yard line for Alberta's
second touchdown.
ITBC's defence stiffened after
that score, and the final touchdown
came in the fourth quarter as
Digby Leigh hauled in a 25-yard
strike from Smith for his second
major. Alberta's final two points
came on a conceded safety touch
as the 'Birds ran out the clock.
Dan Smith went almost all the
way for the 'Birds, giving way to
back-up Greg Gardner with only 29
seconds left. "T didn't want us to
loseour intensity," said UBC head
coach Frank Smith. "I've seen 28-
point leads evaporate before."
The victory marked the first
time in 11 years the Bears have
failed to beat UBC iri regular
season play.
The weekend's results left tlie
playoff    picture     nearly     un-
Soccer 'Birds win on tour, fall in league play
By GRAY KYLES
The ITBC Thunderbird soccer
team returned from a victorious
intercollegiate road trip to the
drudgery of their B.C. Senior
Soccer League season last week.
The Thunderbirds were defeated
by Eldorados 4-0 at Capilano
Stadium Saturday, landing them in
the First Division cellar along with
North Shore Pegasus.
"We had control of the game in
the first half but we just didn't take
the chances," said coach Joe
Johnson after the game.
"We got careless, stopped
talking and just let the whole thing
go in the second half."
The 'Birds started the game in
good form and play was even
during the first half. But the
Eldorados were all over the UBC
squad for most of the second.
Brian Dominick scored the
Eldorados' first and third goals in
the 53rd and 68th minutes. Rick
Hurley beat UBC goalkeeper Jim
Kitsul with a beautiful shot in the
58th minute while Wayne
Stonehouse kicked in a garbage
fourth goal in the final few minutes
after Kitsul lost control of the ball
after trapping it on the ground.
The 'Birds' passing was sloppy
for most of the game and the
forward line was solidly marked by
Eldorados' strong defence.
Johnson now takes his team to
Victoria for a match with the
University of Victoria Thursday.
The 'Birds meet Pegasus at Kinsmen Park on Saturday at 12:30.
ITBC must begin to improve soon
or they will be one of the two teams
relegated to the Second Division at
the end of the season.
A recent road trip through
Denver and Colorado proved more
successful for the club. They came
away with three wins and a tie in
four games, defeating Mission
Trujillo 5-0, Metropolitan State 2-1
and Pari World 4-1. They fought
Brigham Young LTniversity to a 2-2
tie in Provo, LTtah.
Field hockey team wins
The ITBC Thunderettes field
hockey team geared up for the
Canada West University Athletic
Union championships with two
wins and a tie over the weekend.
Michelle and Leslie Williams
each scored a goal and Sue Carroll
added a third as ITBC beat West
Vancouver 3-1 in Vancouver
Women's first division play at
Trafalgar Park Saturday.
On Sunday, UBC tied Meralomas
0-0 at UBC.
Tn exhibition play Saturday at
ITBC, Nancy Moore and Sue
Carroll scored to lead UBC to a 2-0
win over the LTniversity of Alberta.
ITBC plays the LTniversities of
Victoria, Alberta, Saskatchewan
and Calgary this weekend in the
three-day Canada West round-
robin tourney in Victoria.
WOMEN'S INTRAMURAL
CURLING R0NSPIEL
Saturday, October 22
at
THUNDERBIRD WINTER
SPORTS CENTER
Instruction: 9:30 - 10:00 a.m.
Bonspiel: 10 - 6:30 p.m.
CO-REC INTRAMURAL
CURLING
SUNDAY, OCT. 30
Instruction: 9:30 - 10 a.m.
Bonspiel: 10 - 6:30.
Registration Deadline is Friday, Oct. 21.
Sign-up at Co-Rec. Office,
Room 202  War Memorial Gym.
$4.00 entry fee per team.
decipherable. Whatever happens,
ITBC must win against Saskatchewan Saturday at Thunderbird
Stadium. The Huskies beat UBC
earlier this year. If ITBC wins that
game, the 'Birds will finish second
and in the playoffs should either of
the following occur:
1. Calgary loses its last two
games. 2. Calgary beats Manitoba
Friday and Alberta loses its final
game to Manitoba Oct. 29.
In the first case, the first
place team would be either Alberta
or Manitoba, depending on that
Oct. 29 game. UBC would be
second in any case. In the second
example, Calgary would be first
and UBC second, finishing ahead of
the Golden Bears on the strength of
a win and a tie against them.
Simple. If anything else happens,
the 'Birds finish the season
Saturday.
Sleep
Warm
hi a-lightweight down or synthetic
filled sleeping bag from the Co-Op.
We have a complete selection of
Camp 7, Taiga, and Co-Op bags to
choose from.
The Camp 7 Arete (shown above) is a
fully baffled down filled sleeping bag
with an excellent warmth-to-weight
efficiency. An ideal backpacking and
climbing bag, the Arete becomes a
double bag for winter with the addition of a Camp 7 Pioneer Overbag. By
itself, it weighs only 2 lbs. 7 oz.
Lifetime Camp 7 guarantee. $139
(Regular length, waterproof stuff bag
included) to Mountain Equipment
Co-Op members.
Join the
Hikers, Skiers,
Climbers and
Backpackers
Who belong to Canada's largest outdoor equipment co-operative.
Our members enjoy the lowest prices
on quality equipment such as Camp
7 down sleeping bags, Lowe packs,
Brixia boots, and Edelrid climbing
ropes.
Your purchase of one $5 share in the
Co-Op makes you a lifetime member.
Visit our stores in Vancouver, 2068
W. 4th Ave., phone (604) 733-9194,
and Calgary, 118-10th St. NW, phone
(403) 283-9598, or write for a catalogue. We ship mail order.
Please send me a Co-Op catalogue and
Information about membership.
NAME	
ADDRESS	
CITY	
PROV. CODE	
d
MOUNTAIN
EQUIPMENT
CO-OP
2685 Maple St. Vancouver, B.C.
V6J 3T7 Dept. U Page 8
THE        UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 18, 1977
Wife beating myths dispelled
Canadian University Press
Wife battering has gone on for centuries,
but has only recently become recognized as
a social problem because women are no
longer accepting abuse passively.
As more and more women come out with
accounts of the horrors of rape and wife
battery, social scientists have tried to find
an explanation for the violence. With the
"possible explanations" that have filtered
down into the literature have also come a
network of myths.
Myths associated with rape are increasingly being exposed, but in the area of
wife hattery, research is recent and
sporadic. Myths are still rampant.
As with rape, the explanation has been
presented that wife battery is perpetrated
by sick men. The rebuttal of this myth is
even more dramatic in the case of wife
battery than rape, because men of every
class, color, religion and ethnic group beat
their wives.
Wife battery is also more prevalent than
rape. The FBI estimates wife battery to be
at least three times as widespread as rape.
Statistics from social and government
agencies seem to indicate that wife battery
is largely a problem of the lower income
group. However, lower income people are
more likely to end up at social service
agencies, whereas middle and upper income
groups are better able to keep the incidents
quiet because they have the money to get
private assistance.
Statistics have been biased. Women from
every income bracket have come forward
with accounts of battering and many have
sought refuge in transition houses.
A second myth assumes that the
frustration of unemployment and economic
hard times cause wife battering. Economic
hardship is a strain, but it does not cause
wife battering. Men at the top of the
economic structure hold a characteristic in
common with those at the bottom: men in
both categories beat their wives.    .
This myth also assumes that as the
financial picture brightens, battering
diminishes. Thi sis also not true. Throughout
history, men have battered their wives in
good times and bad.
A third myth assumes that alcohol abuse
causes wife battering. Alcohol abuse, until
recently, has also been used as an excuse for
rape. But alcohol is no longer accepted as a
cause of rape: so it is also with wife battering.
As with rape, blame is traditionally
placed on the victim. The myth that women
somehow cause the beating is still
suggested. Although child abuse is abhorred
by all and children are viewed as innocent
victims, if the children and the wife are
beaten by, the same man, the woman is still
assumed to have somehow been responsible
for the attack.
The facts dispel the myths. Women who
finally appear at transition houses have a
history of appealing for help from society
through friends, relatives, police and eocial
agencies. But because virtually everyone
avoids involvement with domestic disputes,
thebattered wife is left isolated and without
any kind of assistance.
It is often assumed that battered women
must not mind abuse because they endure it
so many times and still remain with their
husbands.
But many women have no money with
which to leave. If wives have a husband to
"take   care   of   them"   and   separation
proceedings have not begun, social service
agencies are not interested in giving
assistance.
Another reason for remaining in the same
situation is fear of recrimination from the
husband.
Also, husbands have other roles than just
batterers and the woman's emotional involvement with her husband is often difficult to break. Many wives retain the hope
that their husbands will stop battering them.
One option open to the battered woman is
court action. It can be an unrealistic choice,
however, if the wife cannot leave her
husband (for whatever reasons). Living
under the same roof with someone she is
taking to court could present grave threats
to her physical welfare.
Even if the woman decides to prosecute,
the family court is reluctant to sentence a
wife batterer to time in jail. Batterers are
usually reprimanded, but if the situation is
extreme, they may get probation with the
provisio of "good behavior." If the
probation order is broken (usually
repeatedly), the batterer can get up to 18
months for a breach of probation.
SCIENCE UNDERGRADUATE
SOCIETY
GENERAL MEETING
SCIENCE UNDERGRADUATE
SOCIETY
FEE LEVY?  $1?
per
year?
YES!
of
course!!
DO YOU WANT:
ALL FOR ONLY
$1 PER YEAR!
•More dances and suds nights?
•The Sounds UV Science newsletter? Bigger? Better?
•Continued development of a speaker's program?
•Sports, the intramural program?
•Better departmental representation through better promotion?
•To develop an anti-calendar?
To Promote Science?
And more?   COME TO THE S.U.S. GENERAL MEETING in HEBB THEATRE
POLLS AT HEBB, SUB, & SEDGEWICK WED. OCT. 19
COME AND VOTE!
S CONSTITUTIONAL CHANGES     FEE REFERENDUM      DOOR PRIZES       WINNING T-SHIRT   S
& HEBB THEATRE  12:30 Wed. Oct. 19 fc

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