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The Ubyssey Feb 8, 1968

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Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol. XLIX, No. 44
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1968
224-3916
CONFUSION REIGNS
Robbins,
Munton
elected
By PAUL KNOX
Tobin Robbins, arts 3, was
voted external affairs officer in
Wednesday's Alma Mater Society elections.
Don Munton, grad studies 1,
was elected student senator, filling a position vacated by Kir-
sten Emmott when she withdrew from university.
Ruth Dworkin, science 3, was
elected internal affairs officer.
Sally Coleman, arts 2, is the
new AMS secretary.
Robbins obtained 3,535 votes
to the 2,257 for Paul Dampier,
arts 2. Out of a total of 4,307
cast, 515 ballots were spoiled
in the external affairs election.
Robbins had campaigned on
a platform of communication
with students. He advocated
publicizing the Canadian Union
of Students, lobbying the provincial government for more
money and a student co-op
bookstore.
In the final senate race tally,
Munton, AMS vice-president,
received 3,172 votes of a total
of 6,087.
His goals as senator, are instigation of a long-range academic plan, an open senate
gallery and a residential college at UBC.
Jane Fulton, home ec. 3, came
second in the senate election
with 2,662 votes. Mark Warrior,
arts 2, received 1,274, and 243
ballots were spoiled.
Miss Dworkin obtained 2,887
votes in the internal' affairs
election, to Charles Hulton's
2,634. Barry Milavsky came
third with 1,757, and 402 ballots were spoiled.
Miss Dworkin had advocated
institution of a campus co-op
bookstore, investigation of Science I and Education I programs, and student representation on departmental curricula
committees.
Miss Coleman received 3,268
votes in the secretary race, and
Miss Soles got 2,585. A total
of 483 were spoiled out of 6,336
were cast.
Miss Coleman's platform was
academic reform, student participation in administration and
a decrease in AMS bureaucracy.
In the presidential election,
6,628 students cast ballots. Returning officer Chuck Campbell
said voting was smooth.
Final presidential tally was
not counted pending the outcome of a student court decision on the eligibility of presidential candidate Stan Persky.
— lawrence woodd photo
IT'S BEEN A HARD DAY at the office, confides student head
Shaun Sullivan during Wednesday night ballot counting.
Earlier he and other executives decided not to find out who
won the presidential race in day' s voting. Result: confusion.
Rohringer curtails
Acadia's   freedom
UBC housing director Les Rohringer has taken most visiting
privileges away from Acadia Camp residents.
In a letter to Acadia Camp president Eric Brynjolfsson
dated Feb. 6, Rohringer said the action has been taken as a
result of what he termed a disturbingly immature attitude on
the part of Acadia residents.
"The general behavior has been deteriorating and the number of drinking parties has increased," the letter says.
Rohringer said he will permit visits only on Sundays from
1 p.m. to 5 p.m. during open house, chaperoned by dons or
resident fellows.
Rohringer has extended visiting hours for the other residences on campus to 10 p.m. weekdays and midnight on weekends.
He said he has instructed dons and resident fellows to
patrol all huts in Acadia Camp and report disturbances or
parties.
In the letter, Rohringer expressed disappointment at the
need for his action.
"For years Acadia has been the leader in maturity," he said.
He also questioned the quality of Brynjolfsson's leadership.
"Instead of giving a good example in seeing to it that
standards and requisites are upheld, you have questioned people
who dared to report parties and unauthorized visits," Rohringer
wrote.
At a three and a half hour meeting of Acadia Camp council
Wednesday, a motion of confidence in Brynjolfsson and the executive was passed, but at the conclusion of the meeting, the
president submitted his resignation.
It was tabled until next Wednesday, because the meeting
had been adjourned.
Brynjolfsson was not available for comment early this
morning.
Presidency hangs
on court decision
By MIKE FINLAY
Ubyssey Council Reporter
The Alma Mater Society president selected by 6,528 students
Wednesday will not be made public until next week.
An emergency open meeting will be held in Brock at noon
today to discuss the situation.
The decision not to release or compile voting results was
made Wednesday afternoon at a meeting of four of the six
AMS executives. Secretary Penny Cairns agreed to the decision
by phone. Second vice-president Kim Campbell was not consulted.
The reason for the decision hangs on the question of Persky's
eligibility for the office of president. Opposing Persky is Brian
Abraham, law 1.
COUNT ON ELECTION DAY
The AMS constitution states that a candidate must have been
in attendance at UBC for at least two years. Persky attended
UBC during all the 1966-7 session, the 1967 summer session, and
all this year so far.
At a meeting of student council Monday night a motion was
passed that "the ballots for the AMS presidential election be
counted on the day of the election".
At the meeting, AMS president Shaun Sullivan was asked
by The Ubyssey if this meant the council had decided to make the
results public on election day. He said yes.
Asked again Wednesday afternoon if this was his interpretation of the intent of the motion at the meeting, Sullivan said
yes.
"But that was Monday," he said. "I'm going to take a very
narrow interpretation of the motion now."
Sullivan said Wednesday night "counting" the ballots does
not necessarily mean determining who won the election.
SEALED IN AMS VAULT
As a result, the ballots were counted face down, then sealed
in the AMS vault without a winner being decided.
The executive's decision to take this action came after a
letter was received Tuesday from chief justice Allan Stewart of
student court requesting the results of the election remain secret
until student court decides next Monday on the eligibility of
Persky.
If Persky wins and is found ineligible by student court, the
election will be declared void and a by-election will be held,
council also decided Monday night. Student court is composed
of seven top third-year law students recommended to council
for ratification by the law president.
ADDRESSED TO COUNCIL
Stewart's letter was addressed to the AMS council and executive and specifies that the request only be granted if it is "in
accord with any existing students' council decision relating to the
problem".
No reasons for the request are given in the letter. However,
Sullivan and court clerk Brian Webster, law 1, both said Wednesday student court could be prejudiced by the results of the
election.
Sullivan also said if the results were released, he was told
student court would grant an adjournment until Feb. 19.
An adjournment would contradict a motion passed at council
that the court must meet no later than Feb. 12. The adjournment
was earlier requested by both prosecuting and defense counsels,
but was denied.
STEWART DENIES SHAUN
Stewart did not support Sullivan's claim.
"That's Sullivan's opinion only," he said Wednesday. "The
request for an adjournment has already been denied and can
only be granted if it is made again."
Sullivan said Wednesday he did not know if the action taken
by council executive was constitutional.
"That depends on what the constitution says the council can
do and what the executive can do," he said.
"There will be a lot of shit flying no matter what happens,"
he said. "I'm in it up to my ears, anyway."
Persky Wednesday night emphasized the need for students to
remain calm during the confusion.
"It's important that we maintain the nature of the university
as a place for reasoned discussion," Persky said.
To Page 3
See: MORE CONFUSION Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 8,  1968
as-*- - »"■ *. •/
*•
— lawrence woodd photo
CAR INVOLVED in Marine Drive collision Tuesday morning displays major damage.   Campus
RCMP say accident was fortieth  to occur on   campus since Jan.  1.   Most of the 40 occurred
on Marine Drive and were minor, causing  $100 to $250 damage.
'Yanks in Thailand unjustified'
American military presence in Thailand is
unjustified, a UBC post-doctoral fellow in economics said Wednesday.
Peter Bell, who spent 10 months in Thailand
last year, told 250 persons in Ang. 110 that
insurgency in the north-east part of the country
is limited and usually non-communist.
"It certainly isn't widespread enough to
justify the presence of 75,000 Americans in the
country," Bell said.
"There has always been banditry in Thailand.
Right now it's a result of the Thai government's
neglect of the north-east sector.
"What problem there is could have been
stopped 10 years ago but the government didn't
invest money in the area."
Bell said the per capita income in the northeast sector is about $65 a year, or half the national average. In one province, there is only
one doctor for every 30,000 people.
The Thai have no history of political activity,
and their villages have no formal social structure, he said.
"The U.S. forces and the Thai government
have tried to organize the people to combat
insurrection, but this organization only makes it
easier for insurgents to come in and take over."
However, he said the U.S. is doing some
worthwhile projects, such as a four-lane highway running the length of the country.
Bell said there is little similarity between
the Thailand situation and any stage in the
development of the Vietnamese war.
"But the implications of American involvement are critical," he said.
"The U.S. is underwriting a government
which is milking the country to keep itself in
power."
Support deficiency
shakes CYC's roots
BRANDON (CUP) — The Company of Young Canadians,
already suffering budget cuts and dogged by two prairie premiers, will fold without community support, says its Manitoba
director.
Murray Smith told a Brandon University seminar the CYC
is on shaky ground.
He said the only real solution is strong support from people
in communities which have CYC volunteers. "But basically, the
Canadian people can't decide whether or not poverty is a good
thing.
"The criticism of the company by premiers E. C. Manning
of Alberta, and Ross Thatcher of Saskatchewan are symptomatic
of this contradiction,' 'Smith said.
(Last month, premiers Manning, Thatcher and Weir joined
to ask prime minister Pearson to get the CYC off the prairies.)
Winnipeg volunteer Peter Bryan told the same seminar:
"People don't understand what the CYC is really doing, but if
it's forced out I would remain.
Meanwhile, the mayor of Fort Qu'Appelle, Sask., the site
of the only CYC project in the province, wants it out.
Mayor John Maddia said most of the city's volunteers dress
like hippies, lack hair cuts and are unclean.
"Most of us are peeved at tax money being used to subsidize an outfit like this," he said. "They sure don't help our
young people."
In Ottawa the company's budget was cut by parliament —
it asked for $2.4 million and got $2 million.
Company director Alan Clarke said he is seeking private
funds to counter the government's cuts. The CYC has retained
a public relations firm to plan an appeal, and organized a series
of cross-country speeches by company officials to brighten its
image.
And in Alberta, the CYC has disregarded Manning's not
welcome warning and expanded onto the University of Calgary
famous.
Gate opens to underground
Vancouver will soon have a second underground newspaper.
Al Birnie, co-ordinating editor of the Western Gate, said
the paper will attempt to interest and involve readers in current
issues around Vancouver.
"But it will not be a hippie newspaper, because it will seek
to present news objectively," he said.
The paper will be a full size broadsheet like the Sun
and the Province. It will publish -weekly to tri-weekly.
First issue will appear Friday noon, selling for 20 cents.
It will be distributed on campus.
STUDENT SPECIALS
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* Front-End   or   Brake  Work
All work fully guaranteed
Factory-trained mechanics on duty
AUT0HENNEKEN
8914 Oak Street at S.W. Marine Dr.
Phone  263-8121
SPECIALIZED
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INTERNATIONAL HOUSE PRESENTS
MT. SEYMOUR WEEK-END SKI TRIP
FEB. 10,11
SKIING SATURDAY AND SUNDAY
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Further Information at
The International House Office or Phone 224-4535
FOLK  SONG   SOCIETY  &
THE VILLAGE BISTRO
present
THE   POPPY   FAMILY
&
BRUCE   RATHIE
Brock
Fri., Feb. 9
12:30-2:30
35c
You Don't Have To Join A Monastery
To Become A Winemaker
Now you can have a private wine cellar in your own home, within your budget.
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Stores  in Victoria, Vancouver,  Edmonton, Calgary, Toronto,
Winnipeg, Montreal Thursday, February 8, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY	
Deans step on stunts
Pago 3
— kurt hilger photo
HALF A SIXPENCE, a musical presented by the music society
opens in the auditorium tonight at 8:30 p.m.   Starring Ken
Irwin and Ann Mortifee, the show will run tonight, Feb. 13,
14 and  15.   Student admission is 75 cents.
MORE CONFUSION
From Page 1
He said the possibility that the student government may have
suspended the constitution is more important than whether he or
Abraham wins.
"It's unfortunate that doubt has been cast on the election,"
he said. "I think the executive acted in a panic."
Persky said if there was a question as to his eligibility he
■vould leave the decision to student court.
CONSTITUTION THROWN IN DOUBT
"The central fact is that our constiutional means have been
thrown into doubt. Students at our university are going to have
to be questioning the confidence they have placed in their government as a result of this action."
Miss Campbell said Wednesday she was very angry about
;he executive meeting.
"I was at home from noon until 4 p.m. Wednesday and
lobody called me," she said. "I passed Dave Hoye (AMS treasurer)
n the hall at quarter to five and he didn't tell me. They didn't
sven put a bloody message on my door."
She said she would have voted against the action had she
mown about the meeting.
"I can't understand why Shaun is doing this, unless he thinks
\braham would be all right. Oh, God."
5ULLIVAN MEALY-MOUTHED
She said she did not know how the executive thought they
lad the power to take this action.
Miss Campbell criticized Sullivan for not at least determining
he winner, and then sealing the ballots until the meeting of
tudent court.
"That guy is so mealy-mouthed it makes me mad," she said.
Abraham was not available for comment.
Last year's AMS president Peter Braund said Wednesday
Sullivan has been playing tricks all year long.
"Sure, he's within the wording of the motions,", he said.
But who in the world takes 'counting ballots' to mean counting
hem face down.
"Those saying he isn't eligible will have to go on his not
.eing here two full winter terms,"  he said. "But if they get
hat picky, then I disagree with them."
IXECUTIVE OPPOSES PERSKY
It is understood that the four members attending Wednes-
lay's executive meeting are opposed to having Persky as presi-
Lent.
Three weeks ago Hoye said if Persky ran for president he
vould run to make sure he did not get in.
A week latesr Hoye decided not to run.
"I will not run, but I will do everything in my power to
ee that Persky doesn't get in," he said.
Meanwhile, 13 presidential ballots, supposedly separated,
riple sealed in ballot boxes and locked in the AMS vault, turned
p during the ballot counting for other offices. Twelve of the
otes were for Persky.
Speakers at today's meeting in Brock will include philosophy
rof. Dr. Robert Rowan, student senator Ray Larsen, world
niversity service chairman Dave Zirnheldt, returning officer
'buck Campbell, Miss Campbell, Sullivan and Persky.
By MIKE FITZGERALD
The deans of science and engineering have
warned their students to curtail violent stunts.
The warning came in a letter to science president Robin Russell, and engineering president
Lynn Spraggs, from Dr. V. J. Okulitch, dean of
science, and Dr. W. M. Armstrong, dean of applied science.
"During recent weeks the feud between the
members of the SUS and the EUS has reached a
point where we can no longer ignore the property damage and the danger that a student
may be seriously injured," the letter said.
"On the next occasion when the joint activities of your societies result in damage to university property or injury to any student, the
common rooms of the SUS and the EUS will be
locked and will not be available for student use.
"The costs associated with such damage will
be charged against club funds," it ended.
"We don't mind the rivalry but do object
to the damage and injury," said Okulitch in an
interview Wednesday.
"It's a case of one doing something and the
other retaliating; and this goes on and on and
never seems to stop."
'Query society'
Kierans suggests
The monarchy and other British institutions
retained by Canada should toe re-examined,
Liberal leadership candidate Eric Kierans said
Wednesday.
Kierans, president of the Quebec Liberal
Federation, spoke at noon in Brock to 250
students.
Also on a panel were political science professor Don Smiley and assistant poli-sci prof
Paul Tennant.
The task of re-examining
the monarchy is too important
to become part of the platform
of a single political party, he
said.
But students should question society and not accept old
traditions at face value.
"Such a tradition is alternating the Liberal leadership
between an English-Canadian
and a French-Canadian.
"This is of little value today and will not
play a big role in the leadership contest."
For most of the hour Kierans answered
questions from Smiley and Tennant on current
national political problems.
Canadian armed forces would be insignificant in Vietnam, he said.
"We would make more of a contribution by
following the rulings of the UN and putting
our troops at its disposal."
Kierans also discussed rising costs in Canada.
"To stem inflation, we must not concern
ourselves with the redistribution of wealth, but
rather with the creation of wealth," he said.
This could be helped if the government
could create an atmosphere where young people
would feel challenged to go into business.
"I've always been a free-trader, and if we
want to do the best for our nation, we must
put pressure on everywhere, especially eastern
manufacturing," he said.
Employees affiliate
The UBC Employees Union has voted to
affiliate with the Canadian Union of Public
Employees.
Bob Black, president of local 116 of the
UBC union said members voted 242 to 26 in
favor of the affiliation.
Black said UBC employees will receive
backing from 115,000 member strong OUPE In
negotiations for a new contract. The present
contract expires March 31.
KIERANS
Asked why he chose this particular time to
issue his warning, Okulitch said he and Armstrong had pleaded with the societies many
times in the past to stop these costly fracases,
but always they went unheeded.
"It's unfortunate to have to resort to this,"
he said.
Miss Russell, in a letter to The Ubyssey,
agreed with the dean.
"It's unfortunate this step has to be taken,"
she wrote.
"However, I now suggest that all science
students refrain from activities that will result
in the loss of their common room."
Okulitch said Spraggs strongly disagreed
with the measures to stop the rivalry.
Spraggs could not be reached for comment.
I Housing  surveys
students' needs
Seven thousand UBC students will re-   ,
ceive an Alma Mater Society housing sur-   %;
vey Monday and Tuesday. <*
Every married student and one out of £.
every   three  single   students   will   receive ^
the   10-page  survey,  Alma   Mater Society h
i  first vics-president Don Munton said. d
'§ "We want to find out what accommoda-   3
II  tion at what price students want to move   3
f|  into," Munton said. «|
m        Four  sections  of questions are in the   H
|| survey: one for students living off campus;
|| one for those on campus; one for married
1 students, and a section of general questions.
1|        "Those who receive the questionnaire
H   won't   have   to   fill   out  sections   not   ap-
1  plicable to them," Munton said.
I
|j        He asked all those receiving the survey
||   to respond immediately. 8
ff        The results of the survey will influence   jf
'    the residence building program, he said.       Z
■    - - -    • *     . ,/*.+ •
Fee fie fraught
Even Santa Claus couldn't cough up second-
term fees for more than 500 UBC students.
The 500 haven't yet paid their second term
fees, chief UBC accountant John Lomax said
Wednesday.
"This includes those who haven't paid, and
those who haven't notified the registrar of their
withdrawal," Lomax said.
In addition, about 430 students have withdrawn from university since the start of the
the year, assistant registrar Kenneth Young told
The Ubyssey.
? Sperm production  i
comes to a halt
VALLEYFIELD, Que. <CUP-APENP)—
Four students at Le College de Valleyfield
have been suspended for producing sperm.
It used to be called Le Cecilien, but
student editors decided the paper's name
was too old-fashioned for a new, progressive school.
The name in the masthead thus reads
in French: "The Sperm, official organ of
the students of Valleyfield College."
The editor and three senior students
have been suspended for an indeterminate
period, and students have indicated they
will change the name of the paper, if the
administration insists.
The college has become one of Quebec's
new vocational and professional pre-uni-
versity schools. THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. Proprietor, Ubyssey News Services (UNS). The
Ubyssey subscribes to the press services of Pacific Student Press, of which
it is founding member, and Underground Press Syndicate. Authorized second
class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of postage
in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and
review. City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo.
Page  Friday,  loc.  24;  sports,  loc.   23;  advertising,   loc.   26.  Telex  04-5224.
FEBRUARY 8, 1968
What goes?
More is involved in Wednesday's weird sequence
of election events than the eligibility of one presidential
candidate. In fact, the entire democratic process at UBC
has been questioned.
The worst thing about the situation — see Page One
for details — is the insult by four Alma Mater Society
executives to the 6,500 students who voted Wednesday.
These students turned out to make their decision
regarding which individuals they wished to lead the
AMS starting this March. But now, four out of the six
elected executives have decided unilaterally that students will not learn results of the election until next
Monday. The executives say they fear the voice of the
people might sway the decision of the student judges.
A number of  questions remain  unanswered.
First, why this exaggerated respect for the whims
of the chief justice of student court coupled with an
exaggerated disrespect for the voters? The students have
voted and deserve to have their votes registered immediately, not locked up in a secret vault. Certainly student
wishes might have influence on the court's decision
Monday — and so they should. If a. majority of students
feel candidate Stan Persky knows UBC well enough
to be AMS president — whether he has been here two
years or almost two years — then tjiis is a piece of
evidence regarding the meaning of the AMS constitution
that is worthy of consideration by the court.
Secondly, why was executive member Kim Campbell
not brought into the decision ? Miss Campbell claims
she was home near her telephone all day Wednesday.
She also claims to be adamantly opposed to the decision
reached by the other executive members. Is this an
attempt to shut out opposing executive opinion ?
And finally, the big question: why did four executive members by-pass a clear decision made Monday
night by the full student council ? A resolution passed
at the meeting — seconded by Miss Campbell — states
"that the ballots for the AMS presidential election be
counted on the day of the election." There can be no
doubt that, as commonly understood, the expression
"to count ballots" means to go through the ballots and
ascertain the comparative vote totals for competing
candidates. It does not mean to turn the ballots to their
blank sides and count them.
We must conclude that four AMS executives have
made a bad mistake. We suggest the easiest way to
mitigate this mistake is to instruct the returning officer
to have the presidential ballots counted — in the usual
sense of the word — today.
"Come on, boys, hit 'em with  everything  we've got!'
Bad blood in  armory
By MIKE LOPATECKI
I gave blood for the first
time last week. As I was walking out of the armory a nurse
yelled after me: "You're not
through yet. I just pricked
your finger."
She led me back by the arm.
Already it felt numb. "You
may take a coke," she said
pointing to an ice-bath filled
with bottles. I pilfered a carton
and sat down.
"Next please." I smiled
courteously at the person next
to me. He wasn't there.
"I guess you're the last one
today," said a nurse.
When she grinned I noticed
she had long canine teeth. I
clutched apprehensively at
my neck.
"This way please." She
made me lie down on a bed.
"Would you like me to take
your scarf?"
"Muh-muh," I said. By this
time I had wrapped it all
around my head.
"My   what   fine   color   you
have.   Now  don't   worry,   you
won't feel a thing."
COARSE SKIN
I guess I'd asked for it. I
undid my belt and rolled over
on my stomach.
"We usually take it from the
arm," she giggled. I rolled over
aagin and fell off the bed. The
nurse kindly helped me back
and tied me down.
"My, what coarse skin you
have. It would help if you'd
roll up your sleeve."
But I wasn't having any part
in this. She finally got the
needle in by pounding the
syringe with her shoe. I felt
myself going down like a punctured balloon.
"It's not coming out very
fast," she said and began
pumping my arm like a crank
handle. "Nurse Jessica, would
you come here a moment. His
blood is brown."
Nurse Jessica came over and
looked at the plastic bag.
"Incredible," she said, "It
has the  consistency of  a  soft
drink."   Nurse   Jessica   began
to worry me.
Soon there were nurses on
all sides. By now my blood had
eaten holes right through the
bag. They had to put a tin
bucket under the bed.
'That's not blood," someone
said.   "That's   coca-cola.   Nothing else is so caustic."
MEDICAL HISTORY
"Girls," said Nurse Jessica,
"I believe we have just made
medical history. We have before us the first living coke
machine. Who'd have thought
it possible?"
She could already see herself in the arms of Dr. Bernard
on the front page of Time.
"How many gallons of coke
do you drink a day?" she asked
me. "It's completely replaced
the red corpuscles in your
blood."
"Well, as a matter of fact,"
I said, "I usually drink beer."
To Page 5
see: BLOOD
Can U.S. justify bombing North Vietnam?
By HILDA THOMAS
Dept. of English
The air attacks against North Vietnam began
ostensibly in response to an attack by North Vietnamese torpedo boats on two U.S. destroyers in the
Gulf of Tonkin. The Gulf of Tonkin Resolution
presented to Congress in August 1964 states in part:
"The United States regards as vital to its national
interest and to world peace the maintenance of international peace and security in Southeast Asia.
Consonant with the Constitution of the United States
and the Charter of the United Nations and in accordance with its obligations under the Southeast Asia
Collective Defence Treaty, the United States is, therefore, prepared, as the President determines, to take
all necessary steps ... to assist any member . . .
of the Southeast Asia . . . Defense Treaty . . ."
AGAINST UN, SEATO CHARTERS
The phrase which has given rise to so much
debate in the United States itself is as the President
determines, which President Johnson has interpreted
as giving him carte blanche to escalate the war.
Little attention has been paid, however, to the con-
tradicions inherent in the whole statement. The U.S.
action in Vietnam is not consonant with the constitution, which gives to Congress alone the right to
make war. No declaration of war against Vietnam
has been passed by Congress. Nor is it in accord
with the UN Charter, which forbids unilateral military action by any member state, and which takes
precedence over all other treaties of alliance, or with
SEATO, which forbids the intrusion of any member
state into the internal affairs of any other signatory,
and which requires majority agreement before any
military action is undertaken. Recently some doubt
has been expressed as to whether the Gulf of Tonkin
incident did, in fact, take place. The Senate foreign
relations committee is at present examining conflicting evidence which seems to suggest that the incident was fabricated to provide the administration
with an excuse for carrying the war into North
Vietnam. This question has yet to be resolved. However, recent state department emphasis on the involvement of Laos and Cambodia in the war raise
the suspicion that another 'Gulf of Tonkin' is in the
offing, which can be used as an excuse for a further
escalation of the war, and perhaps for the invasion
by U.S. troops of North Vietnam.
Various other reasons have been advanced to justify the continuation and intensification of the air
attacks against North Vietnam. It is argued that
the NLF was receiving massive support from the
North in the form of men and weapons infiltrated
into the South, and that the bombing would curtail
this infiltration. Official U.S. sources, however,
estimate that at the end of 1964 only one fifth of
all combatants in the South were infiltrators, and of
these the state department's 1965 White Paper can
specify only six persons out of an estimated total
of over 37,000 who were actually born in the North.
The same White Paper shows further that only 179
of the 15,100 weapons captured from 1962-65 were of
communist manufacture. (A total of 27,400 weapons
were lost to the NLF during the same period.) And
it is generally admitted that in spite of the damage
inflicted by the bombing, support from the North has
increased steadily since 1965.
BOMBS TO HURT PEOPLE
To date the total tonnage of bombs dropped in
Vietnam, North and South, exceeds the tonnage
dropped on Europe during the last World War. Many
North Vietnamese towns and villages have beer
bombed out of existence. But it should be pointed
out that the effect of massive bombing of German
cities during the last war was outweighed by the
cost of mounting the attacks, and that after the
war estimates of the damage which would be inflicted were found to have been ten times too high
Moreover, many of the bombs dropped on North
Vietnam (40-50 per cent according to the North
Vietnamese) are of the anti-personnel variety. These
cause no damage to buildings or military installa
tions, but are chiefly effective against people caughi
in the open during a raid. The North Vietnamese
claim that early evacuation of large population cen
tres and the use of air raid shelters have enablec
them to limit the number of casualties from these
bombs.
Finally, the question must be asked: assuming
that North Vietnam can be bombed to the confereno
table — a very dubious assumption — can th<
government of North Vietnam exercise control ovei
the guerrilla forces in the South sufficient to per
suade them to accept a peace treaty? In the light o:
what has happened since the signing of the Genev;
Accords in 1954 the answer would seem to be
clearly, NO- Thursday, February 8, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
LETTERS  TO  THE EDITOR
Success
Editor, The Ubyssey:
On behalf of the forestry
undergrad society and the Canadian Red Cross I sincerely
thank you and your staff for
the outstanding co-operation
you gave us with the annual
spring blood drive. Without
your support we could not
have achieved the relative success the blood drive had this
year.
CHRIS ANDERSON
forestry 3
Whos  relevant?
Editor, The Ubyssey:
It is charged that the AMS
is irrelevant.
This alienation is no different than that experienced by
voters as regards the federal
government; and the AMS are
equally remote and structured
so that opinion is not reflected.
This irrelevance has not been
overcome either by the arts
undergraduate society or The
Ubyssey. I offer the following
observations.
Thirteen per cent of the arts
students voted in the AUS
elections. The "hot tip" in
Tuesday's   editorial,   if   appli-
EDITOR:   Danny   Stoffman
City       Stuart Gray
News     . .   Susan  Gransby
Managing       Murray  McMillan
Photo      Kurt Hilger
Senior     Pat Hrushowy
Sports       Mike   .lessen
Wire      Norman Gidney
Page Friday     Judy Bing
Ass't. City      Boni  Lee
Everyone wondered why Irving
Fetish brought two shovels, until he
uncovered foiir brittle mastodon
skeletons under the creaking editorial floor. "What sort of skullduggery is this?" asked Babar. "It's
coming up in spades," answered
debonaire Irving, flipping a mammoth elbow bone out of the hole.
To his amazement, a lovely raven-
haired creature stepped out. "What's
a girl like you doing in a joint like
this?" he asked.
Paul Knox, meanwhile, in between
using all 12 fingers to churn out a
feature for the Women's Wear Daily,
sliced through election red tape and
cut his finger. Mike Finlay wound
himself up so tighuy in the red mess
that he was taken away, being mistaken for a decoration in the contemporary arts festival. Alexandra
Volkoff roasted used dromedaries
while Judy Young visited a museum
and came back armed with arty facts.
Irene Wasilewski was attacked by an
orange blorg, and whipping off her
fur muff, suffocated it. "I muffed it,"
she said.
David Salmon drove his green
Ferrari in and out, dangling a long
sharp lance at ready. Mark DeCoursey
brought a huge whip, and Red Sammy felt the back lash. Fred Cawsey
spent hours fashioning steps from
glass. "I've finally got a glassy stair,"
he said. Steve Jackson, spitting out
molten lava, smoothly handled a
mountain of copy from city desk.
John Twigg, Bob Banno and Hilda
Hoopster shook medicinal rattles in
the jock shop to drown out jocular
prattle.
Lawrence Woodd staggered around
late into the night taking staggering
pictures, as Bob Brown and Chris
Blake spilled seven gallons of acid in
the  darkroom.
'<«■<.,*,-' <?' y" *',  "
BLOOD
From Page 4
"Let's see if he has any
more flavors!" They tore off
my sleeve and there they found
a coke bottle with a needle
stuck in the cap.
"Wait, I can explain," I
cried. "I'm a thief. I have bad
blood in me."
But they took my blood anyway. A whole mickey of it.
They weren't to be cheated
this time. And when it was
all over Nurse Jessica wanted
to stick a badge into me for
being a donor, but I wouldn't
let her. Christian Science has
another convert.
cable to the AUS election
farce, only demonstrates the
irrelevance of arts "leaders"
and shows a higher intelligence
of the arts students as compared with their leaders.
The Ubyssey panned Mardi
Gras and advocated a mass
meeting to discuss senate secrecy. However, 3,000 students
attended Mardi Gras and 30
students attended the secrecy
discussion.
OTTO RIEVE
commerce 3
Technology ?
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Wow! Another exciting display of the technological aspect of the society. But it
seems that technology for UBC
engineers is limited to toilet
paper and dump trucks. This
is no doubt true but I would
like to be deceived into thinking that there is more coming
out of the campus trade school
than red automatons throwing
toilet paper from dump trucks.
Couldn't they just pretend that
they have some contribution
to make that could be shared
with the rest of us? Engineering week was a good opportunity for the horde to make up
for their presence during the
rest of the year but as usual
they blew it.
BOB   POLLARD
grad studies
100  stripes
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Please kindly publish the following clarifying the statement
of Dr. Kassis on pre-marital
sex, as published in your newspaper of Feb. 2, 1968: The religion of Islam commands sex
purity, for man and woman,
at all times,. The Holy Quran
is  very  specific:
"The woman and man, guilty
INTERESTED
IN AN
OVERSEAS
CAREER?
Mr. Ralph L. Oliver
will be on the campus
February 16, T968
to discuss the training offered at
A.I.F.T. (an intensive nine months
program of post graduate study) and
the job opportunities open to
graduates in the field of
INTERNATIONAL TRADE and
GOVERNMENT SERVICE.
Interviews may be scheduled at
The   Office  ol
Student   Services
The American Institute
For Foreign Trade
Thunderbird Campus
PHOENIX, ARIZONA
An Affiliate Of
The American Management Association
of adultery or fornication, —
Flog each of them with a hundred stripes .... And let a
party of Believers witness
their   Punishment".   (24:2)
A public execution of the
punishment is declared as a
deterrent to others. On the
other hand, no religion is as
frank as Islam in recognizing
the natural motives and treating them as clean and healthy.
The law of marriage and divorce is made easy, so that
there may be less or no temptation for intercourse outside
the  well defined  incidents  of
marriage. Sex, which gives so
much of our physical life, and
has so much influence on our
emotional and higher nature
deserves not our fear, or our
contempt, or our amused indulgence, but our reverence in
th highest sense of the term.
May God bless Dr.  Kassis.
M. MOHAMED ALL
Secretary,
B.C. Muslim Association
Ambulance
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Again   we   witness   injured
pedestrians   waiting   twenty
fe^
I
JAN 18
WK>  t0
FEB 16
In The New MUSIC BUILDING Recital Hall
TODAY-12:30 - COLLEGIUM MUSICUM
presented  by   Elliot   Weisgarber
"Western   Music,  Japanese  Tradition   in   the   Early   20th   Century"
FEB. 9-8 P.M. - SAME PROGRAM AS ABOVE
NO ADMISSION CHARGE
Postgraduate and
Postdoctoral Opportunities
Department of Pathological Chemistry, Banting Institute,
University of Toronto.
Fellowships available for graduate students to work toward
an M.Sc. or Ph.D degree with research on the basic biochemistry of renal, hepatic, metabolic or endocrine disorders. Enquiries are invited from students with a sound
education in the chemical, biological or biophysical sciences
or in medicine. Postdoctoral opportunities are also available
leading either to academic research, or to a professional
career as a clinical chemist or medical biochemist.
Festival of
SUNDAY 2 p.m.
MATINEES ONLY
FEB.  11   LAURENCE OLIVIER
"HENRY V"
FEB.  18 MARLON BRANDO
"JULIUS CAESAR"
FEB.  25 THE  BRILLIANT  RUSSIAN
"HAMLET"
MAR.   3  LAURENCE OLIVIER
"OTHELLO"
MAR. 10 JUDITH ANDERSON
1/        it   "MACBETH"
VSrSlfU CURTAIN 2 p.m.
43754W7'oth   ADULTS $2.00 STUDENTS $1.25
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE 1967-68
Effective September 29, 1967 to April 14, 1968
TUESDAYS —
WEDNESDAYS
FRIDAYS —
SATURDAYS -
SUNDAYS   —
12:45 to_2:45 p.m.
2:00 to 3:30 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
3:00 to 5:00 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.*
3:00 to 5:00 p.m.*
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
12:45 to 2:45 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
•Except when Hockey Games scheduled:
February 23, 24.
Admission: Afternoons—Students 35c. Adults 60c.
Evenings—Students 50c. Adults 75c.
Skate Rental - 35c a pair. — Skate Sharpening - 35c a pair
For further information call 228-3197 or 224-3205
minutes for the Metropolitan
ambulance. UBC, with the largest medical education complex
and the second largest campus
in Canada still does not have
its own goddam ambulance. If
our shortsighted administration
still believes the patrolwagon-
with-stretcher to be adequate,
perhaps an appeal to the alumni
association for a properly equipped ambulance is in order.
KEN DAWSON
grad studies
riECICM
itm< m
Of ACTION
rifiiiM
Of COME CRT
FREEDOM
Of CONVf NilNCf
FREEDOM
Of MIND
You get all these freedoms with
Tampax tampons— the modern
internally worn sanitary protection.
Freedom
to be active—to do what
you want to do ... when you
want to do it.
Freedom
to feel comfortable
at all times ... without
bulky contraptions
like belts, pins and pads.
Freedom
to go anywhere you like ...
with never a disposal problem,
and spares tucked away
in your purse.
Freedom
to feel confident and secure—the
peace of mind that comes
when you're absolutely sure
only you can know.
DEVELOPED  BY  A  DOCTOR
NOW  USED BY  MILLIONS OF  WOMEN
TAMPAX TAMPONS ARE MADE ONLY  BY
CANADIAN TAMPAX CORPORATION LTD..
BARRIE.   ONTARIO Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 8,  1968
'TWEEN CLASSES
Tomorrows Eyes Arts
ARTS
Free dance today, noon,
Brock lounge, with Tomorrow's Eyes.
PRE LAW SOC
Professor - student discussion
today, 1 p.m., Cecil Green
Park.
FOLK SONG SOC
General meeting today, noon,
Bu. 202.
DANCE CLUB
Today, pin classes; Friday,
Viennese.
CLASSICS CLUB
Old members night Friday,
8 p.m., Bu. penthouse. Prof.
James Russell will speak on
Greeks in the swim. Lecture
with slides.
BRIDGE CHESS CLUB
Open pairs bridge championship tonight, 7:15 p.m., grad
student centre. Faculty and
students welcome.
Draft dodgers
storm Canada
after Pueblo
OTTAWA (CUP) — The
Pueblo incident has increased
traffic on the underground
flee - the h draft railway into
Toronto and other Canadian
border points.
Canadian draft resister
groups traditionally report an
influx of draft dodgers from
American universities this time
of year, but this has been
swelled by those students fearing additional drafting for a
possible war with North Korea.
Students -are often reclassified at the end of semesters,
(accounting for the spurt of
refugees to Canada.
Groups in Toronto, the most
active, and Montreal all report
more inquiries for information
within the past week, but none
can provide statistics on numbers of American student draft
evaders who might have crossed the border.
In Toronto, Mark Satin, head
of the local committee aiding
draft dodgers, says requests for
help have been coming in at
the rate of five a day for the
past week.
VARSITY FOOTBALL
All interested in playing on
next year's football team meet
today, noon, gym 211.
JRAIC
Slides of Expo, today, noon,
MacMillan 156.
EDUCATION US
All education students who
do not have a seminar come to
a meeting today, noon, ed. 100.
FESTIVAL '68
See front page today for
schedule of festival events. Get
involved.
PEUS
Watch The Ubyssey for ed-
phys ed week events all next
week.
VCF
Meeting to discuss the big
effort, Friday, noon, Ang. 110.
FRENCH DEPARTMENT
Pierre Viala, a professional
actor, reads French poetry, Friday, noon, IH.
MEN'S INTRAMURALS
Managers' meeting today,
noon, gym 213.
SPORTSCAR  CLUB
Gs n e r a 1 meeting today,
noon, chem. 250.
NEWMAN CENTRE
Talent night and mixer Friday, 8:30 p.m., St. Mark's
Lounge.
EL CIRCULO
Prof. Coupe will give a short
talk, followed by discussion in
Spanish, today, noon, IH 402.
COLLEGE LIFE
Teach-in today, noon, ed.
1006 on position in Christ.
BOOSTER CLUB
BIG BLOCK CLTJB
Pre-victory dance with the
Organization, Friday, 9 p.m.
to 1 a.m., Brock lounge.
Tickets $1 at the door.
VIETNAM COMMITTEE
Debate-speak-out: Do war-
makers have the right to recruit on campus?, Friday,
noon, library steps. (If it rains,
Bu.  100.)
HOUSING COMMITTEE
Comprehensive student housing survey will be mailed out
this week. Volunteers are needed to complete the job. If you
can help, come to the AMS
office at 1 p.m. Saturday. See
Profs   demand   power,
'pros   need   majority
WINDSOR (CUP) — Student power be damned — the
president of the Canadian Association of University
Teachers wants faculty power.
Dr. Howard McCurdy, a biology teacher at the University of Windsor, said the professionals of any institution
should have the most say in running that institution, and in
a university the profs are the profs.
"In fact, the addition of students to the senate in
response to student pressure may have been premature. It
was done in advance of what should be major reforms in
the structure of government of the university," he said.
"Professors should have the majority of seats on any
committee or organization which formulates academic
policy."
McCurdy said students tend to see faculty as part of
the administration, which isn't true. "Students and faculty
don't know each other, don't know each other's views."
He suggested student power victories mean students
will have to accept more control over their activity from
other parts of the university structure.
"If students become involved in the government of
the university, they will become part of the gang; and when
one part of the gang does something, the other members
of the gang ought to have some say in what that part does."
wmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm*'-*: k- <^y> v
AMS  receptionist   for  further
information.
PEUS
The Cardiac Thump, annual
PE Valentine dance, Friday
night, War Amps Club. Tickets
$3.50 per couple, by them at
noon in the gym. BYOB.
PSYCHOLOGY
Prof. Robert Bolles of the
University of Washington discusses reinforcing avoidance
behavior, Friday, 3:30 p.m.,
Ang. 212.
Ell of a snowball
SHEEP GROIN (UNS)—The
entire community of Bulltit,
34 miles south of here, was
demolished and carried away
Wednesday when a giant snowball rushed down a hill behind
the town and overwhelmed it.
The snowball is believed to
have started around a kernel
of wheat which fell through a
crack in a granary atop the
hill. The rolling kernel formed
the nucleus of the snowball,
which reached an eventual diameter of 187 ells, according to
observers.
Fifteen townspeople died of
frostbite.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*. 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
CONTEMPORARY ARTS FESTIVAL
dance, lightshow. 3 great bands,
Saturday, Armouries, 9-2; $1.50.
Don't   miss  it.
DANCE TO THE EXCITING SOUND
of "The Bittersweets" at the Pre-
Med. Ball. Feb. 10th. Avalon Motor
Hotel. Semi - formal, $3.50/couple,
Bar.  Tickets at A.M.S.
CARDIAC THUMP P.E. VALEN-
tine dance, Friday, Feb. 9, tickets
3.50/cpl.   Noon  Mem  Gym.   B.Y.O.B.
BASKETBALL DANCE FRIDAY —
9:00-1:00, in Brock Lounge with
the Organization. Tickets $1 at the
floor.
HAVE A BALL FRIDAY AT THE
International Ball — Nine P.M. —
Hotel Vancouver — Tickets at the
door or from A.M.S., I.H., $6.00/
couple — Trinidad Moonlighters,
George  Cuba,   floorshow.
Greetings
12
HAVE AN INTERNATIONAL BALL
on February ninth at the 3rd Annual International Ball at the Hotel
Vancouver. Moonlighters Steel
Band, George Cuba Quartet, floor-
show. Tickets from AMS or International   House.
Valentine Greetings
12A
BE ORIGINAL — SAVE MAILING A
card. Send Valentine Greetings to
your friends with a Classified ad.
(in Feb. 13th issue). Make arrangements in the Publications office,
Brock Hall. "Deadline 11 a.m. Monday   Feb.    12.
Lost & Found
It
LOST ON CAMPUS: WOMAN'S
gold pocket-watch on Feb. 2, of
sentimental value, reward is offered,   266-7032.
FOUND: BLACK WALLET "A"
parking lot. Driver's licence inside.
Owner claim from Physical plant
dept.	
Special Notices (Cont.)
15
TICKETS STILL AVAILABLE FOR
the International Ball this Friday.
At the Hotel Vancouver. Tickets
from A.M.S. office or International
House.
Travel Opportunities
16
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE WEEK-
End Ski Trip, Feb. 10-11. Phone
224-4535 or come to the I.H.  Office.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
HELP—BUY MY '59 CHEV. GOOD
rubber, body and motor excellent.
Call Fred, 945-4754 aft 6 p.m. please.
1961 HILLMAN FOR SALE. DON'T
miss this one. As new, make offer,
Cliff   732-5588. 	
1956 BUICK 4 DR HT POWER
brakes, mech. sound, $295. Call
Stan,  224-9060  after  6.	
1955 CHEV. AUTOMATIC — RUNS
well. City tested, $125 or best cash
offer.  Call  Sheila CA  4-7145  Eve.
Automobiles Wanted
22
CASH FOR '53-54 CHEV STATION
wagon or sedan delivery in good
shape,   278-1560   evenings.
Automobile Parts
23
SEE OUR COMPLETE RANGE OF
Sports Car Accessories. 10% discount with AMS card. Overseas
Auto Parts. 12th and Alma. 736-
9805.
Motorcycles
26
LOST — BROWN BRIEFCASE AND
important note in Chem building,
phone   224-6630.        	
LOST FEB. 5 — LADIES' BLACK
glasses in car. Please leave at In-
ternational   House   or   ph.434-3797.
LOST — BLACK BRIEFCASE IN
Sedgewick Lib. Tuesday, afternoon.
Please Phone G.  Lion,  RE  6-5376.
FOUND     —     MAN'S     WATCH     IN
Brock.   Claim   Publications  Office.
FOUND — LADIES' WATCH IN
Sedge Lib last month. Claim Pub.
OfJ.   Brock   Hall.
Rides & Car Pools
14
RIDE WANTED TO THE POPPY
Family—Bruce Rathie Concert, Fri-
day,   Feb.   9,   in   Brock   Lounge.   35c.
GRADUATE REQUIRES RIDE OR
riders from Wbite Rock weekdays,
8:30,   call   Bruce,   2726.	
WANTED — RIDE TO CASTLEGAR
area. Mid-term break, phone 224-
9794,    Schwartzenhauer.
Special Notices
15
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSURANCE
rates? If you have a valid driver's
license and good driving habits you
may qualify. Phone Ted Elliott,
321-6442.
NEW MAGNETIC TAPES FOR SALE
at International House, lmil. My-
lan Acetate. 5" reel for $1.25. Hurry
while  they last.  	
UBC BARBER SHOP, OPEN WEEK-
days 8:30 till 6 p.m., Sat. until 5:30
p.m.,    5736   University   Boulevard.
BIGGEST DANCE OF THE YEAR
Saturday, Armouries, 9-2, three
bands,   $1.50,   everybody's   going  up!
THE POPPY FAMILY AND BRUCE
Rathie in Concert, Brock, Feb. 9,
12:30   to   2:30,   admission  35c.	
PRE-VICTORY DANCE WITH THE
Organization, Friday, 9:00-1:00
Brock Lounge. Tickets at the door,
$1. ■
CHARTER FLIGHT TO LONDON,
for UBC faculty and staff, May 28-
June 19. $310. For information call
Mrs. J. Paul, 732-6429 after 6 and
weekends.
HONDA-FIAT
Motorcycles -  Cars
Generators - Utility Units
New and Used
SPORT CARS
N T
O      Motora      S
R E
T       W
145 Robson H 688-1284
Typing  (Cont.)
40
TYPING  SERVICE
Mrs.   Gail   Symons
224-6435 — 3885 W.  12th Ave.
EXPERT   ELECTRIC   TYPIST
Experienced   essay   and   thesis   typist
Reasonable Rates TR. 4-9253
SECRETARIAL SERVICES — SPE-
cializing in Thesis typing. Highest
quality. Reasonable rates. Accuracy
and production guaranteed. Phone
731-1804.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Male
52
THE ACADIA CAMP GENERAL
Council requires a manager for Its
canteen. Duties to start Sept. 1, '68
include all aspects of managing the
operation. This is an excellent opportunity for a married man to gain
experience in management and administration while attending university. Housing is supplied. Applicants are asked to send a confidential complete resume of qualifications and experience, before Feb.
15, '68 to: Vice-President, Acadia
Camp General Council, Acadia
Camp,   U.B.C,   Vancouver  8,   B.C.
Help W'ted—Male or Female    53
DRIVER WITH CAR TO TRANS -
port five small children from 15th
and Commercial to UBC gates
daily at 3 p.m., phone 224-1297.
SWIMMING INSTRUCTORS NEED-
ed at Abbotsford for the months of
May and June or all summer if
desired. Good wages, apply to Mr.
W. Moxon, Matsqui Municipal Hall,
South Fraser Way, Abbotsford, B.C.
INSTRUCTION
Instruction   Wanted
61
Tutoring
64
MATH, PHYSICS, CHEMISTRY. Biology lessons given by competent
tutors. First year only, 736-6923.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Miscellaneous
32
UBC BEAUTY SALON EXPERT
styling and cutting. Reasonable
rates 5736 University Blvd.  228-8942.
Scandals
37
SELLING YOUR TEXTBOOKS? TRY
The Bookfinder. 4444 West 10th
Ave. 228-8933.
COME! LOOK! LISTEN! GIRLS
and other talent in all sizes and
shapes. Don't miss them! Fri., Feb.
9, 8:30 p.m. St. Mark's College
Lounge.        	
SO YOU'RE 21 AND LEGAL NOW
Carole, congratulations from the
carpool.	
ANN: MEET ME IN THE AUD. 8:30
tonight, I'll bring the Half A Six-
pence,   Artie.	
VOLKSWAGEN OWNERS — LOOK
for our ad in today's paper, it will
save you money on repairs, Auto-
Henneken,   specialized   service.
Sewing - Alterations
38
DRESSMAKING AND TAILORING
on ladies' garments. Alterations.
For   information   phone   263-8769.
Typewriters & Repairs
39
REMINGTON SILENT PORTABLE
with case. Clean type, even weight,
$35   cash,   ph.   evenings  731-2906.
Typing
40
EXPERT   TYPIST    -   ELECTRIC
224-6129   -   228-8384.
UNIVERSITY TYPING SERVICES,
2109 Allison Rd., 228-8414, around
the corner from World Wide Travel
next to RCMP open 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Monday to Friday.
TYPING — 25c PAGE — DOUBLE
spacing, legible work — Call Mondays to Thursdays and Sundays
after  10:00  a.m.,   738-6829.	
EXPERIENCED TYPIST AVAIL-
able for home typing; reasonable
rates,  call  RE 1-7607.
3 O O D EXPERIENCED TYPIST
available for home typing, please
call   277-5640.
FRENCH, ENGLISH, HISTORY; RUS-
sian, Library Science tutoring given
by  B.A.,   M.A.,   B.L.S.   736-6923.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
Still a few left
—  BIRD CALLS —
on   Sale  at:   Publications  Office
Brock  Hall  or  UBC  Bookstore
—  OLD   TOTEMS   FOR  SALE   —
1963,  1965  & 1966 issues  50c.
Campus Life's  25c.  Publications Off.,
Brock   Hall
LEICA   WITH   F.3.5   ELMAR   LENS,
1/1000th sec, leather case,  $55, phone
266-5472.
FOR SALE SKI BOOTS SIZE 9%
worn twice, $30. Phone 263-5929 ask
for   Bruce.
METAL SKIS & HARNESS, 205 CM.
$75. Ski Boots 9V4, $20, good condi-
tion.   Gord,   261-3831.	
SKIS: 1 PR. HEAD STD. 210 CM;
1 pr. Head Comp 210 cm; 1 pr.
Haderer boots size 11%. Tel. 224-
6279,   6-7   p.m.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
•1
MOVE ONTO CAMPUS — ROOMS
available (M) 224-9662, $40.00 mo.
2250 Wesbrook. Meal Services close
at hand. -^~*"
QUIET   ROOM   NEAR   41st   AVE.   &
MARINE   DRIVE   —   BUS
Marine   Drive   bus  line — Boy  student,    266-6927.
Room 8c Board
ROOM AND BOARD ON CAMPUS.
For three male students, double
room    accommodation,    224-7720.
LARGE SINGLE ROOM & BOARD
for quiet male student, 4595 W. 6th
nhone   224-4866.
ROOM AND BOARD ON CAMPUS
available now, phone Don, 224-9665,
after  6 p.m.
Furn. Houses 8c Apts. 63
SUITE SUITABLE FOR ONE, TWO,
three or four girls sharing, phone
327-6933. 	
FEMALE TO SHARE 2-BDRM. APT.
with   2   4th-year   girls   in   Kitsilano,
phone  738-4283. Thursday, February 8, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
Residence fees go up
across the country
OTTAWA (CUP) — Residence fee hikes across Canada
will range from $30 to as much
as $100 next year.
Canadian University Press
survey reveals most of these
increases are due to inflation,
higher costs of maintenance,
and salary increases.
Leading the parade is the
University of Western Ontario,
where new residence fees beginning in September 1968,
will top the $1,000 per year
plateau.
Other universities point to
the Western example in justifying fee rises.
Dr. Henry Endress of Waterloo Lutheran University pointed out that in Ontario universities, fees next year will be
in the $900 to $1,000 range,
and raised fees at Lutheran
from $775 to $825.
Fee hikes are also slated for
Dalhousie University in Halifax, York University in Toronto, the University of Alberta,
P.E.I.'s   St.  Dunstan's  Univer
sity, and others.
At the University of Waterloo, living costs for their student village will go from $850
this year to $960 next, rising
to the UWO plateau of $1,000
for a single room in 1970.
The fee rises are set out without students consultation, although no university operating
money is involved in residence
construction.
Residences come under federal and provincial housing
financing schemes, not education costs, and loans are re-
payed through rents taken
from students.
The Canadian Union of Students is currently on a campaign to encourage construction of more co-op residences
on campus to solve the housing
crisis.
They are invariably built at
a lower cost, and co-ops at the
University of Waterloo and
elsewhere are at least 15 per
cent cheaper than university-
owned and operated residences.
Soccer Birds out
to start good news
UBC soccer coach Joe Johnson has enough good news for
the whole campus athletic system.
Due to some weird happenings in last weekend's soccer
action, the Birds are now only three points out of first place
and sitting comfortably in third place with six games left in
Pacific Coast Soccer League play.
And this weekend, the Birds play the second place Firefighters at 2 p.m. in Callister Park Sunday.
But Johnson also has two games on the weekend against
the University of Manitoba.
The big game is Friday afternoon at 3 p.m. in Thunderbird
Stadium for the unofficial Canadian championship. The Manitoba Bisons have been claiming that they are the best team east
of Winnipeg and by their record, they are.
A second UBC-Bison game will be played Saturday afternoon in our stadium at 2 p.m. but UBC will be represented by
the second team, the Tomahawks. The Bisons would be really
insulted if they lost both games and there's a good chance.
There's more good news from the pro soccer league. A
second team, Oakland, is now flirting with UBC, tossing out
innuendos of possible scholarships.
Now, if the Birds can win on the weekend . . .
Birds California bound;
seek rugby s World Cup
The UBC rugby Thunderbirds are singing a new song, California here I come."
And while the players are "California dreaming" Coach
Donn Spence will be dreaming of the World Cup, a trophy
donated by the now-defunct Vancouver World newspaper for
the winner of the annual series between UBC and the University
of California at Berkeley.
The team leaves early Friday morning and will arrive at
Cal in time to practise before their two games against the Golden
Bears Saturday and Monday. They also have a game against
UCLA Wednesday.
Last year UBC lost the World Cup series on points, losing
the first game 11-6, while winning the second 8-5. It was their
sixth series loss in a row.
[SHELL)
WW
VOLKSWAGEN
SPECIALISTS
Large Stock of Parts on Hand
CERTIFIED  MECHANICS
UNIVERSITY SHELL SERVICE
4314 W. 10th 224-0828
Sex - Society - Poverty - Economy
Music - Dancing - Laughter
Rivalry - Prejudice
Love
half \ she
UBC AUD.
STUDENT PERFORMANCES 75c
Feb. 8, 13, 14       8:30 p.m.
Feb. 15       Noon
INDULGE
NOW IN  j
THE UBC !
AREA
TAKE-OUT and j
HOME DELIVERY j
* Chicken * Shrimp *  Ribs [
*  Fish  *  Pizza '
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CHICKEN
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[        3605 W.  Fourth Ave.       j
27
DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE
It
presents
kt
THE SCHOOL FOR SCH
Witty Comedy of Manners
by  RICHARD   B.  SHERIDAN
ANNUAL STUDENT PRODUCTION
Directed by John Brockington
Designed by Richard Kent Wilcox
FEBRUARY 20 ■ 24, 8:30 p.m.
Student Tickets $1.00
(available   for   all   performances)
SPECIAL STUDENT PERFORMANCE
Thursday, February 22 - 12:30 p.m.
Tickets: Frederic Wood Theatre Rm. 207 or 222-2678
Support Your Campus Theatre
■—^—FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE—^——
i£
w
Arts & Contemporary Arts Festival
PRESENTS
TIE MAGIC CARPET
A Multi-Media DANCE - Lightshow
PAPA BEARS MEDICINE SHOW
MY INDOLE RING
TOMORROW'S EYES
EVERYONE WELCOME
Saturday, February 10
9-2      $1.50
ARMOURIES Page 8
THfc     U BYSSEY
Thursday, February 8,  1968
SPORTS
As I sat in the Pacific Coliseum on Tuesday night and
watched the Vancouver Canucks lose 2-1 to the Seattle Totems,
I thought how nice it would be to come back to the coliseum
on Saturday to view the SFU-UBC basketball game.
But, as you can read elsewhere on this page, this is no
longer possible. The failure to realize that the game should be
played in a facility with a larger seating capacity must fall on
the shoulders of the Men's Athletic Committee in general and
on one member in particular.
That one member is Robert Osborne, the director of "UBC's
school of physical education and recreation. He is the member
with the most influence on the MAC.
The MAC has 11 members and is a president's committee
directly responsible to the senate and board of governors. It
was set up to formulate objectives and policies concerning
extra-mural men's athletics and to maintain an effective athletic
program.
AIMED AT BUILDING GOODWILL
The MAC is particularly aimed at building goodwill for the
university through sport. Osborne's action in blocking the proposed game-in-the-coliseum plan can hardly toe construed as an
act of goodwill, especially to the many UBC students who will
be unable to attend the game because there will be no room
for them.
The MAC receives money from the Alma Mater Society,
the university administration and the alumni association and
therefore representatives from these three organizations sit on
the MAC.
There are four student representatives. They are Jim Berry,
president of the Men's Athletic Association; Andy McConkey,
vice-president of the MAA; Shaun Sullivan, AMS president, and
Dave Hoye, AMS treasurer.
Berry and McConkey are relatively close to the campus
sports scene. The former is a soccer player for the UBC Thunderbirds while the latter has devoted many hours promoting
and helping run campus sports.
AMS REPS EASILY SWAYED
The same cannot be said for Sullivan and Hoye and as
such they would be easily swayed by one whom they thought
knew best. Even when they decided the coliseum would be a
good place for the game, they didn't attend the MAC's special
Tuesday meeting which was to have voted on changing the
game's location.
Sullivan and Hoye didn't know the backboards wouldn't
be available in time so that the site vote was to be scrapped,
but they didn't attend. That shows the extent of their interest
in campus sports.
Other members of the MAC include Osborne, two faculty
members, Dr. Brian Burke and Dr. Fred Webster, and Dick Penn
who represents the alumni association. The chairman, Dr. Peter
Lusztig was appointed by the president of the university.
THREE PROFS FROM COMMERCE
Burke and Webster are both from the commerce faculty as
is Lusztig. I don't doubt their competency but wouldn't it have
been better to have physical education faculty members on the
MAC, since they would be closer to campus sports?
Penn is a former UBC basketball player and manager who
has been very active in promoting UBC sports to alumni.
So far I have discussed nine of the MAC's 11 members. The
other two are Bus Phillips, UBC's athletic director, and Buzz
Moore, UBC's athletic business manager.
These two are closer than any of the others as to what
goes on in sports on our campus and other campuses. But do
they have a vote on MAC matters? No, they are both ex-officio.
They can make recommendations but can't introduce motions.
They recommended that the SFU-UBC basketball game be
held in the coliseum, but Osborne, their employer, said no to
the idea because he would rather 2,000 UBC students see the
game free than 5,000-plus pay to be spectators. It doesn't matter
to him that 3,000 or more don't get a chance to go to the game.
And Osborne, because of his supposed knowledge of UBC
sports, could simply have talked other MAC members into
squashing the coliseum idea as he no doubt did.
• *   DICTATOR NOT NEEDED
The last thing that the sports program at UBC needs is a
dictator to run it. By his unwillingness to listen to other people
more qualified than him, Osborne has shown himself to be an
autocrat.
I have talked to numerous professors in the physical educa-
„^   tion faculty and many other students and each one thinks Osborne made a wrong decision about the game.
When is Osborne going to listen to other voices and when
are these other voices going to speak loud enough for Osborne
to hear them?
The time for action is now. I would like as many people as
possible to come out on Saturday night to War Memorial Gym.
-*■* Even if you can't get inside the gym, let Osborne know that he
has screwed things up.
This is your chance for your voice to be heard. Tuum est.
11 %    .»* v
PJ   VrMftt?2V<
■   *
*  ■v.* ■
INTRAMURAL PLAYERS took time out from their noon hour soccer game Wednesday to stare
at cameraman Lawrence Woodd. This game, between engineers and foresters, is one of
many going on during lunch time. Why not have some fun and work off some pounds by
joining them sometime.
UBC-SFU basketball game
stays in War Memorial Gym
The UBC-SFU basketball
game will be played in memorial gym instead of the coliseum
because backboards could not
be built in time — Ed.
By BOB BANNO
The upcoming tilt between
the UBC basketball Thunderbirds and the SFU Clansmen
at War Memorial Gym won't
be an ordinary game.
If UBC loses, it'll mean
another black eye for UBC
athletic buffs, their football
team, having already lost to the
Burnaby school.
If SFU loses, Simon Fraser
will turn over in his grave. The
hilltoppers have been boasting
for over a year that their
Clansmen could take the Birds.
Both UBC coach Peter Mullins and the Clan's John Koot-
nekoff are quietly confident.
"We're not afraid of the
Birds but we respect them",
said Kooty. "All of them are
dangerous as far as I'm concerned."
The player Mullins fears
most is the Clan's burly forward Brian MacKenzie, a former B.C. high school tournament all-star who totes a 20
point average.
The game will see several
interesting tie - ups. Though
Kooty doesn't know yet
whether he'll go with a zone
or a man-to-man defence, UBC
will undoubtedly play man-toman.
This means that Mullins will
assign his ace, Ian Dixon to
MacKenzie. And the Birds'
rapidly - improving center
Frank  Rotering  will take  on
former team-mate Dave Mur-
phy.
Known primarily as a re-
bounder, the mobile Murphy
has been the Clan's second
highest scorer for the past two
years.
'But Mullins' main concern
is at guard where SFU's
strength is UBC's weakness.
He knows that SFU's John
Drew, Gunnar Kuehn and Bill
Robinson have speed and experience over the Birds' back-
courtmen, Phil Langley and
Bob Molinski.
"Simon Fraser's guards were
better than UBC's", said South
Korean national team coach
Jess Gausepohl, whose team
played both B.C. colleges last
week.
SFU owns a 12-11 won-lost
record against predominately
American competition. The
Birds are 13-8 for the season,
9-1 over inferior Canadian
prairie  schools.
INTERCOLLEGIATE
BASKETBALL
WAR MEMORIAL  GYMNASIUM
U.B.C. 'THUNDERBIRDS"
vs
SIMON FRASER U. "CLANSMEN"
Saturday, February 10th
8:30 P.M.
J.V. Teams Play at 6:30
U.B.C. Students — Free admission tickets may be picked up
at the Memorial Gym only —
THURSDAY from 12:30 noon to 4:30 p.m.
FRIDAY all day to 4:30 p.m.
SATURDAY from 5 p.m.
Gen. Adm. $1.00 Reserved $1.50
LIMITED SEATING
No Standing Room Permitted

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