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The Ubyssey Jan 28, 2010

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 NOW I'M IN A WHOLE NEW WORLD WITH YOU SINCE 1918
v •
BARACK OBAMA
DIFFICULT BREAK-UPS
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FARMER'S MARKETS
TRYING TOO HARD
ORGANIC FOOD
PORTLAND, OREGON
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w    SEE WHAT THIS GUY LIKES.
WES ANDERSON MOVIES
SUBTITLES
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GIFTED CHILDREN
DIVE BARS
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MARATHONS
ROCK CLIMBING
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LIBERAL ARTS DEGREES
EXPENSIVE STROLLERS
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RECYCLING
PAGE 4
STARTHfy
&
GET A JOB AlSTARBUCKS
GRADUATE AFTER FIVE
YEARS...AND BECOME THE
MANAGER AT STARBUCKS
QUIT YOUR JOB
is the amount that the university
has proposed to increase tuition fees
for the 2010/2011 year. They also
want it to go up by four per cent for
international students. UBC wants
your input. Don't want to keep
making lattes? Find out how you can
make your voice heard on PAGE 3.
BECOME A C- STUDENT PUE
TO WORKING LONG HOURS
GO TO SCHOOL SO YOU
CAN GET A BETTER JOB
•
GET A JOB AT STARBUCKS
TO FAY FOR SCHOOL
MONDAY _W± ^%
2010.01.Z8
WEATHER @ UBC           ^
29 LIGHT RAIN
30 SHOWERS
i^i^^^ >^E8il]fllHBH
31 SHOWERS
5:03   «, ■ _.
SUNSET _^K-
UBC BY NUMBERS
74 DAYS'TIL END OF TERM
2 DAYS OF SCIENCE WEEK LEFT
4 DAYS'TIL ENGINEERING WEEK
2 WEEKS SINCE ARTS WEEK
ENDED
NEWS BRIEFS
MAN BANNED FROM SUB
A man has been banned from
the SUB due to alleged engagement in inappropriate
sexual physical contact with
women.
SUB security sent out an e-
mail on January 25 notifying
students of the perpetrator.
He is described as Caucasian,
approximately 5'7" with short
dark hair, clean shaven, in his
late 20s to early 30s, wearing
dark glasses and using a white
cane. He appears to be visually impaired, and allegedly engages in inappropriate physical contact with women who
come to his aid.
SUB security is warning
students and staff not to approach him, and to instead
contact SUB security.
CRIME REPORT
JANUARY 20 Complainant advised that while parked at the
Fraser Parkade, an unknown
suspect smashed the front
windshield.
JANUARY21 Break and enter
to Thunderbird Parkade, lights
and control panel stolen, police are still investigating.
JANUARY23 Mischief to Totem
Residence. A fire extinguisher was discharged into a resident's room. Suspect was
wearing a white sweater.
Police are still investigating.
JANUARY 23 Two Caucasian
males driving a black SUV approached the complainant attempting to sell high end
speakers for a good price.
Males stated they needed to
sell the equipment to move
back to Ontario. The speakers were found to have no serial number. Police are warning students to be aware of
this incident as there was similar incident last week with
the suspect driving a different
vehicle.
JANUARY 24 Police responded
to a break and enter to Rogers
Wireless in the Village where
a rock was thrown through
the window. Police are still
investigating.
JANUARY 25 Koerner Library
was hit with a number of
thefts where the suspect(s)
targeted students' backpacks,
wallets and laptops. Police are
warning students to not leave
their belongings unattended,
even for just a minute.
JANUARY 25 Police located two
males attempting to steal bicycles from the bike rack at
Gage Towers. 2/UBYSSEY.CA/EVENTS/2010.01.28
JANUARY 2ii, 2010
VOLUME XCI,   N° XXXVI
EDITORIAL
COORDINATING EDITOR
Paul Bucci: coordinating@ubyssey.ca
NEWS EDITOR
Samantha Jung: news@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE NEWS EDITOR
Sarah Chung: schung@ubyssey. ca
CULTURE EDITORS
Kate Barbaria : culture@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE CULTURE EDITOR
Jonny Wakefield: jwakejield@ubyssey.ca
SPORTS EDITOR
Justin McElroy : sports@ubyssey.ca
IDEAS EDITOR
Trevor Record: ideas@ubyssey.ca
PHOTO EDITOR
GeraldDeo :photos@ubyssey.ca
GRAPHICS ASSISTANT
Anthony Goertz: graphics@ubyssey.ca
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Virginie Menard: production @ubyssey. ca
COPY EDITOR
Katarina Grgic: copy@ubyssey.ca
MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Tara Martellaro : 7nultimedia@ubyssey.ca
CONTRIBUTING EDITOR
Ashley Whillans : awhillans@ubyssey.ca
Room 24, Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Boulevard
Vancouver, BCV6T lZl
tel: 604.822.2301
fax: 604.822.9279
web: www.ubyssey.ca
e-mail: feedback @ubyssey. ca
BUSINESS
Room 23, Student Union Building
advertising: 604.822.1654
business office: 604.822.6681
fax: 604.822.1658
e-mail: advertising@ubyssey ca
BUSINESS MANAGER : Fernie Pereira
AD TRAFFIC : Sabrina Marchand
AD DESIGN : Chibwe Mweene
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of
the University of British Columbia. It is published
every Monday and Thursday by The Ubyssey
Publications Society. We are an autonomous,
democratically run student organization, and al
students are encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the
Ubyssey staff. They are the expressed opinion of
the staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views
of The Ubyssey Publications Society or the University of British Columbia. All editorial content
appearing in The Ubyssey is the property of The
Ubyssey Publications Society. Stories, opinions,
photographs and artwork contained herein cannot
be reproduced without the expressed, written
permission of The Ubyssey Publications Society
The Ubyssey is a founding member of Canadian University Press (CUP) and adheres to CUP's
guiding principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 words
Please include your phone number, student
number and signature (not for publication) as
well as your year and faculty with all submissions. ID will be checked when submissions are
dropped off at the editorial office of The Ubyssey
otherwise verification will be done by phone.
"Perspectives" are opinion pieces over 300 words
but under 750 words and are run according to
space. "Freestyles" are opinion pieces written by
Ubyssey staff members. Priority will be given to
letters and perspectives over freestyles unless
the latter is time sensitive. Opinion pieces wil
not be run until the identity of the writer has
been verified. The Ubyssey reserves the right to
edit submissions for length and clarity. All letters
must be received by 12 noon the day before
ntended publication. Letters received after this
point will be published in the following issue
unless there is an urgent time restriction or other
matter deemed relevant by the Ubyssey staff
It is agreed by all persons placing display or
classified advertising that if the Ubyssey Publications Society fails to publish an advertisement
or if an error in the ad occurs the liability of the
UPS will not be greater than the price paid for
the ad. The UPS shall not be responsible for
slight changes or typographical errors that do not
lessen the value or the impact of the ad
CONTRIBUTORS
It was a late night in the castle. Once owned by
heiress Samantha Jung, it was now a place of
desolation. The wind sounded like Sarah Chung's
singing. Erica Weiss was afraid to enter the room:
she had heard horror stories about lovers Mark
Maclean and Gerald Deo being caught in the pantry
making special brownies and brutally killed by
Anthony Goertz. The portraits of Keegan Bursaw and
Kai Green hung eerily over the fireplace. Suddenly,
a cry was heard from Virginie Menard. Erica rushed
to the end ofthe hall, only to see Katarina Grgic and
Larisa Karr sobbing. Kate Barbaria, Jonny Wakefield
and Danielle Zandberger freaked and ran out of the
castle. Kristen Harris, Kathy Yan Li and Trevor Becord
bravely venutred up the creaky stairs. Paintings of
Kasha Chang, Austin Holm and Fatemah Meghji eyed
them as they passed. Jonathan Lerner lurched from
the corridor, spewing blood on them. Tara Martellaro,
Chibwe Mweene and Krittana Khurana screamed, as
if possessed by Nessa Aref, Mona Malek and Nick
Pezzaros spirits. A chandelier fell, crushing Annika
Westphat and Sophie Baider. Ashley Whillans and
Maria Cirstea tried to getaway, but all the doors and
windows in the castle slammed shut
V      Canada Post Sales
Agreement
Number 0040878022
Canadian    printed on^100s%
University     'reeycledpaper
Press \__]Q
EVENTS
CORRECTIONS
In the January 25 issue, in the
News brief titled "AUS to redo
Arts Week," we said that AUS
will be holding a second Arts
Week during Science Week.
We would like to make a correction that AUS will be holding events during the collaborative Elections Week that
AUS, SUS and EUS will be doing in March. The Ubyssey regrets this error.
ONGOING EVENTS
UBYSSEY PRODUCTION • Come
help us create this baby!
Learn about layout and editing. Expect to be fed. • Every
Sunday and Wednesday, 2pm.
KOERNER'S NIGHT • Join us for
open mic night every Monday.
Listen to the different flavours
of music, all while enjoying a
nice cold beer or a competitive
game of pool. • Every Monday,
8:30pm onwards. Koerner's Pub.
NOON "FUN" RUN • Run for fun!
Walk for fun! Get healthy and
come run orwalkthe UBC REC
Noon Fun Run, hosted by the
UBC REC - Health Promotions
Department which takes participants throughout many of
UBC's most scenic areas on a
course ranging from 3 to 5km.
• Every Thursday, 12:30pm,
meeting outside the doors of
the Student Rec Centre.
AFRICA     AWARENESS     WEEK •
Participate in the on-campus dialogue about African issues. •
Opening Night, 6pm-7:30pm, af-
ricaconferenceweekeventbrite.
com.
MONDAY NIGHT COMMUNITY MUSIC
&MEAL* Like to play fun music?
Just want to listen? Looking
for a sense of community? This is for all members
of the UBC community who
want to have a good meal and
great conversation. All meals
are home-cooked and are
vegetarian-friendly. • Every
Monday, 6:30pm-8:30pm,
Chapel of the Epiphany (6030
Chancellor Blvd), more info
revnathanwright@mac.com.
DRIPPYTOWN: VANCOUVER'S COMIC
ARTISTS ON DISPLAY • Want a different take on Vancity? The collection features contributions
from six local comic artists
whose work provides a look at
life in Vancouver. • Continues
until Jan. 31, Rare Books and
Special Collections in IKE, more
info at puddingsocklivejournal.
com.
CARDIAC CARE WEEK • The ladies of Alpha Phi invite you
to have a heart, and help fight
cardiovascular disease during
Cardiac Care Week! There
will be a booth in the SUB,
complete with Heart and
Stroke pamphlets, merchandise, Wellness and Nutritional
Store info, and (possibly) roses and chocolate for sale.
All donations collected will
go to the Heart and Stroke
Foundation of BC & Yukon. •
Feb. 1-4, 10am-3pm, SUB.
HUNGRY FOR JAPAD0GS?* Fill your
empty stomach and help fund-
raise for Science grad 2010! •
Jan. 25-28, 10:30am-5pm in
front of the SUB.
TANTRAMAR GOTHIC ART EXHIBIT • Regent College Lookout
Gallery presents Tantramar
Gothic, a collection of work
by Dan Steeves. • Mon.-Fri.
8:30am-5pm, Sat. 12pm-
4pm, Regent College, 5800
University Blvd., runs until
Monday, Mar. 1.
FIDDLER ON THE ROOF* The Gilbert
and Sullivan Society of UBC in
partnership with John Oliver
Secondary School is pleased
to present Fiddler on the Roof,
the beloved Broadway classic about family and community, prejudice and perseverance, love and duty, new ideas
and of course, tradition. • Feb.
3-6, 7:30pm, John Oliver
Theatre, 530 E. 41s Ave (at
41st and Fraser), $20 general
admission, $15 students.
THURSDAY, JAN. 28
JACKSON KATZ ON MASCULINITY'S
TOUGH GUISE • Internationally renowned speaker, Katz will be
presenting an evening public talk on Tough Guys: Sexual
Violence, Media, and the Crisis
in Masculinity, one of several events organized for UBC's
Sexual Assault Awareness
Month during January. • 6pm,
Hebb Theatre.
ARTS     CAREER    EXPO     2010    •
Wondering about career options? Come discover the diverse career options available
to BA grads at the Arts Career
Expo. This event is intended for
all year levels and all majors.
Listen to Arts Alumni speak
about their profession whilst
providing insight into their transition from university to the
'real world'. • 4:30pm-8:30
pm, SUB Ballroom, $10 at the
door.
ICE CREAM SOCIAL AT THE PIT •
CiTR 101.9m presents the Ice
Cream Social at the Pit Pub!
Join us for a night of 50's and
60's dance tunes provided by
Tyler Fedchuk and Cam Dales.
Support your independent
campus radio station by coming down to the Pit and partying with us! • 9pm, The Pit
Pub, $3 Canadian, $3 shots
of Cyclone, $4.50 Rye, $6.50
doubles, $5 cover after 10pm.
FRIDAY, JAN. 29
COLD FUSION • On the last day of
Science Week SUS presents the biggest, baddest party of the year with a
full live performance from BC's own
underground favourite, You Say Party!
We Say Die! • 19+ event 8pm-12am,
SUB Ballroom, $8 tickets presold at
the SUB Booth in the SUB Concourse
during Science Week
The Winter Games are coming to UBC.
Get Ready,
Follow us on Twitter ©UBCWinterGames
www.ubc.ca/2010
Get Involved. Get Around. Get Smart.
SATURDAY, JAN. 30
EXHIBITION INDIA 2010* Presented
by the UBC Bhangra Club, this
is one show that combines the
sounds, sights and vibrancy of
India in an entertainment-filled
night of entertainment. All ticket proceeds go to BC Children's
Hospital. • Jan. 30, 6pm-9pm,
Bell Centre for the Performing
Arts (6250-144th St), $15, For
tickets call Harman (778-865-
3216) or Puneet (778-24-4235).
GAZA REMEMBERED • One Year
Later. Hear Dr George Bisharat,
Dr Mads Gilbert, Dr Joanne
Naiman and Dr Hani Faris speak.
• 7:30pm, Alice MacKay Room,
Vancouver Public Library, 350
West Georgia, free, RSVP at
MuslimCommunityCenter. com.
SUNDAY, JAN. 31
MALAYSIA-SINGAPORE NIGHT • Ever
wondered what phrases like "Like
OMG, so sianz loh!" and "That
guy's so atas siaz, cannot tahan his
attitude!" mean? Whatever your inclinations and curiosities, join us for
a night of epic performances, mind-
blowingly tasty food and choose-
your-own cultural immersion experience with Malaysia Singapore
Night 2010! • 5pm-8:30pm, SUB
Ballroom, $15 tickets.
MONDAY, FEB. 1
VOICE MASTERCLASS WITH RUSSELL
BRAUN • Co-presented with the
Vancouver Symphony Orchestra,
Jemini Foundation and Vancouver
Academy of Music. • 2pm-4pm,
Recital Hall, UBC Music Building,
more info at concerts&nterchange.
ubc.ca.
FOUR-LEGGED RACE • Part of
Engineering Week: you and
two friends. You have six legs
between you, right? Wrong. In
this race around campus, your
trio will have to decipher clues
as to the campus locations,
and be the first to get to all of
the locations and back to the
Cheeze. Dry and fluid races are
available. • 5:30pm onwards,
everywhere on campus, mostly the Cheeze.
TUESDAY, FEB. 2
G0DIVA BAND MARCH • Come
out with the Godiva Band and
march around campus loudly
for Engineering Week. Bring out
your instrument if you have one.
• 11am-12pm, The Cheeze.
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 3
PARANORMAL ACTIVITY • The UBC
Film Society presents Paranormal
Activity (14A, 87 min). • 9:15pm-
11:15pm, Norm Theatre, $4 general
admission, $2 for members.
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m          >
JELL-0 WRESTLING!
Science students sparred off in a tub of green Jell-0 for the
Science Undergraduate Society's annual Jell-0 wrestling event.
AMS elections candidates, including VP administration candidate Ekaterina Dovjenko and presidential candidate Natalie
Swift (seen here) joined in the fun.
Check out our slideshow of the event at ubyssey.ca.
GERALD DEO PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
EWS
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EDITOR SAMANTHA JUNG »news@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE SARAH CHUNG »schung@ubyssey.ca
^       ---   -.,..   .^,--3?
Tuition to rise by two per cent—again
Four per cent increase proposed for international students
SARAH CHUNG
schung@ubyssey.ca
Remember that queasy feeling you got from paying your
tuition at the beginning of the
term? Get ready once again
starting May 1, 2010.
The university has proposed
a two per cent increase for all
domestic tuition fees and a four
per cent increase for international tuition fees.
UBC has been increasing tuition fees since the provincially-
instituted tuition freeze ended
in 2001 following the election
ofthe BC Liberals.
Though tuition fees have
been increasing each year,
some students are fine if the
increase in fees will be used to
better services.
"I don't want to pay more...
but if it benefits students or
staff then sure/' said second-
year Science student Dima
Pelipeychenko.
Other students are more upset about the continuing increases. "It's a rip-off because
I'm already paying so much,"
said second-year Science student Kevin Yang.
The biggest blow is to international undergraduate students, who will face a four
per cent increase in their
fees. This means an increase
of just over $800 based on a
30-credit course load, which
brings their annual tuition to
$21,118.03.
The increase is usually determined after the province announces the annual tuition increase cap (which is dependent on inflation).  Last year,
however, the province was slow
with the announcement.
"We were waiting for the
province to advise what the cost
of increase was—it was very late
lastyear. This year, we [started]
without it. But that does allow
time for student and board consultations," said Anne DeWolfe,
executive coordinator of the
UBC VP Students office.
However, if the province's
estimate is lower than two per
cent, then the university plans
to lower its proposed increase.
If it turns out the provincial estimate is higher than two per
cent, the increase will remain
at two per cent.
Student fees will also stay the
same. However, co-op and student exchange program fees
may also be increased by two
per cent.
"The two per cent...helps to
cover the increasing costs ofthe
program," said DeWolfe. "Most
of the costs for co-op exchange
are staffing."
A two per cent cost-of-living
increase is being proposed for
all professional and research
programs as well.
Fourth-year international student and Student Senator Azim
Wazeer accepts that the university has to increase tuition.
"[The] university is doing what
is fiscally responsible," he said.
"They are simply reflecting the
true cost of education on an annual basis."
However, Wazeer does not
like that UBC has the second
highest international tuition
fees in Canada.
"I have no problem with the
four per cent raise as a stand-alone
issue," he said, "but why our base
amount is high compared to the
rest of Canada doesn't sit as well
with me."
Currendy international student fees do not fall under the
provincial two per cent cap on
tuition. In addition, international students do not have as
many resources available for
them in regards to financial
aid. They are not eligible under
UBC's Policy 72, which states
that "no eligible student will be
prevented from commencing
or continuing his or her studies
at the university for financial
reasons alone."
DeWolfe said that international students are exempted
from this policy for two reasons. "One, they do not qualify for Canadian domestic student loans and that is a criteria for the bursary. Two, to obtain a Visa, they must show they
have the financial resources to
attend university," she said.
However, the 2010/2011
tuition proposal allocates one
per cent of the four per cent
increase to help increase financial awards to international students. The remaining
three per cent is based on a
higher education price index,
which is a UBC-specific index
used to measure the increasing costs of international programs and services.
UBC is conducting a student
survey on the proposals from
January 26 to February 9 at students.ubc.ca/tuitionconsulta-
tion. Students can visit an information table in Irving K. Barber
Learning Centre from 11 to
2pm on February 5. tl
STUDENT
SURVEY
This is part of a student
survey to be conducted
by UBC between
January 26 to February 9
regarding the proposed
2010/2011 tuition
increases.
1. To what extent would
the proposed two per
cent tuition increase be
an impediment to you
continuing your studies?
A   It is not an
impediment
B    It will create some
financial pressure but I
could manage
C   It will seriously
impact me and I would
have to consider
delaying my studies or
not returning to UBC
2. Your tuition currently
pays 28-30 per cent of
the operating cost of
your UBC education. The
government grant and
investment income pays
the balance. Is the 28-30
per cent range:
A   Too high
B   An appropriate
range
C   Too low
COMMENT
How an effective AMS should operate
MARK MACLEAN
Columnist
What does it take for AMS leaders to represent students well?
In the past few months, this
question has come to the forefront with the fall from grace of
AMS President Blake Frederick
and AMS VP External Tim Chu,
and with the accompanying drama of political posturing that
has dominated the AMS. As students vote in this week's elections and referenda, they might
give careful consideration to this
question.
The AMS Council does not
operate on consensus. Instead,
it votes in order to reach decisions. Granted, such votes generally come after discussion and
debate, but a simple majority is
all that is needed to pass most
motions. Moreover, a prevalent populist perspective in the
Council Chambers makes it difficult for elected councilors and
the executive to press agendas
that they cannot demonstrate
have wide support within their
constituencies.
The best AMS
presidents have
represented students
by standing strong on
issues without turning
every encounter into a
battle.
Frederick and Chu lost the
confidence of Council through
their choices of political actions,
and their failure to fully engage
them in their decisions, and
hence they became ineffectual in
their attempts to raise important
issues like tuition costs and access to university education. As a
result, the AMS has not lived up
to its responsibility to students to
examine critically such things as
UBC's plans for tuition increases.
Even though Council operates
on a "majority rules" basis, an effective AMS president would understand how to build a broad
consensus amongst councilors
when dealing with difficult issues. This is particularly important if their plan is to champion
issues that divide Council along
political lines. They also would
understand the importance of
listening to minority voices,
and know when and how to give
weight in their own agenda to issues that may affect only a minority of students.
The present referendum question on a Council seat for students with disabilities stands out
as such an issue: if this question
fails, the AMS needs to ask itself
how well it represents these students in its current model of student government. Certainly other groups of students who feel
underrepresented are waiting in
the wings, so this question has
broad implications for the AMS.
To represent students well, the
AMS must have an effective working relationship with the university. This does not mean that they
need to agree on all issues with
the university, nor does it mean
that the AMS president cannot
engage in public acts of political
protest against university policies and actions.
However, the best AMS presidents have represented students
by standing strong on issues without turning every encounter into
a battle. One hopes that the next
president can build the support
from diverse constituencies fhat is
necessary to be an effective advocate for students at UBC. tl
Mark Maclean is a UBC
Mathematics professor. He chaired
the original meetings that led
to the founding of The Ubyssey
Publications Society, and chaired
some of the meetings surrounding the Coca Cola deal in the mid-
90s. He has taught former AMS
President Michael Duncan, current
AMS President Blake Frederick
and student Senator Geoff Costeloe
when they took Science One.
Say yes'
to Access
ERICA WEISS
Columnist
I'm the chair of the "Yes" committee for the referendum question on funding for Access UBC.
When I was a student at UVic,
I participated in a vibrant and effective advocacy group: Access
UVic. At UBC I was surprised to
find that an on-campus organization of students with disabilities
doesn't exist.
The Disability Advocacy
Centre at UVic is one of the few
success stories within the history of post-secondary disabled students in Canada. Students with
disabilities often attempt to organize and are met with resistance.
A student-funded group
could lead the way to greater accessibility and understanding,
Too often students with disabilities face barriers at university
or fail to make the transition to
employment despite their educational attainments. UBC is
the principal university in this
province and there should be a
dynamic advocacy organization
here. This is why I am excited
to create a chapter of Access at
UBC.
Fundraising is the critical
first step. This would offer students with disabilities a space
to meet, share experiences and
organize. It would cover the
cost of support staff and undertake the long-term initiatives
that are needed to increase understanding, acceptance and
success for students with disabilities. Community building,
education and political action
are all needed.
If the referendum passes,
funding would not begin until September. During the interim, the legal and administrative structure would need to
be put in place. The AMS and
Access would obviously need
to include measures to ensure
accountability.
The AMS VP who received
our petition was careful to ascertain whether there is an existing
non-profit society before accepting our question for this referendum. I assume the AMS would
need to verify our bona fides,
and that a professionally drafted legal agreement would need
to be created before any funding
would begin.
Obviously, any money contributed by students at UBC
must stay at UBC.
The names of universities cannot be registered as independent
non-profit societies. Access UBC
would refer to a new chapter of
the registered non-profit society
Access Association of Disabled
Students, with Access UVic as the
founding chapter.
It is up to students to decide,
but I hope that Access UBC will
be embraced, tl 4/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/2010.01.28
CI
EDITOR
ASSOCI/
u
KATEE
VTEJO
LI
ARBARIA
NNYWAI
[URE
.»culture@ubyssey.ca
(EFIELD »jwakefield@ubyssey.ca
STUFF WHITE PEOPLE LIKE COM
HITS CLOSE TO HOME FOR THEUBYSSEY
_^               #9 MAKING YOU FEEL BAD ABOUT NOT GOING OUTSIDE
#46 THE SUNDAY NEW YORK TIMES
#101 BEING OFFENDED
Stuff white people like
An interview with Christian Lander
#103
self-deprecating
humour
#49
vintage
#101 scarves
#131
following
their dreams
#40
Apple products
#119
plaid
#1
coffee
JONNY WAKEFIELD
jwakefield@ubyssey.ca
"In a communist system, no
one's going to pay 80 dollars
for yoga pants."
So says Christian Lander,
the man behind the wildly popular blog Stuff White People
Like. We're sitting in a non-de-
script noodle house on Davie
Street, and we're discussing
the death of the young urban
professional.
Does he foresee the fall of
yuppiedom any time in the near
future? Lander replies in a perfect deadpan, "ask Karl Marx."
Asking a guy who less than
two years ago was a no-name
copywriter in Culver City,
California, to predict the fall
of North American urban consumer culture seems like a tall
order.
But since that time, the
30-something grad school
dropout from Toronto has created one of the most popular blogs on the web, landed
an unheard-of book deal, and
earned a spot on the New York
Times best-seller list. He's led
many pea-coat-wearing, Whole
Foods-shopping Prius owners to look at themselves a little more critically. Or at least
made it easier for them to
laugh at their own bullshit.
And he owes it all to The
Wire.
Lander relates to me the
history of Stuff White People
Like. In January 2008, he and
Myles Valentin, blog cofounder-
turned professional gambler,
declared that they did not trust
any white person who did not
watch the HBO crime drama.
What were white people doing instead of watching The
Wire?
Yoga. Standing still at concerts. Getting divorced.
By March 2008, Lander was
riding his fixed gear bicycle
around Beverly Hills, shopping
around for talent agents. By
July he was releasing his first
book.
Lander has been called,
among other things, a comedian and a social critic. "An
asshole, usually," volunteers
Lander. "But what I am more
than anything is just a really
lucky guy. When you buy a lottery ticket, you say 1 know I'm
not going to win, but wouldn't
it be awesome if that happened?' I didn't even have
the 'wouldn't it be awesome.'
I was like 'This is just for my
friends,' and it just blew up."
Lander's stop at UBC is one of
several on his current speaking
tour. At his stops, he recounts the
story of his rise in internet fame,
which he makes clear is the "lowest form of celebrity."
"This is the story of how all
that spirals, and where you land
yourself."
Lander has landed himself in
many places where he did not
quite fit: the office of talent agent
William Morris. Conan O'Brian's
couch. The steam room at the
Vancouver Sheraton. Lander and
Valentin grinned as they recounted how they were upgraded to
14th floor suite, flashing the door
card at anyone who gave them a
"you're not supposed to be here"
look.
But at the root of Lander and
Valentin's satire is a kind of
anger.
"In the 50s and 60s there
was that whole idea of 'Keeping
up with the Jones,'" said Lander
during his talk to the 40-some
people who turned out at The
Norm on Monday night. "That
ethos hasn't changed. We're
still as competitive as ever,
but we've changed what we're
competitive about. So it's no
longer that. It's who has the
smaller carbon footprint,
whose kid can speak more languages, whose yoga pants cost
more money."
Most of that anger is self-
directed. Lander counts himself among the white people he
lampoons.
"We fixed that," said Lander
sardonically of the Iran election riots. "What's trendy now?
Hang on, look at all these green
Twitter profiles! I better change
what I'm doing!"
While Lander recognizes the
hypocrisy of who he is, he can't
escape.
"To get away from it is
hard," he says of hipster culture. "There really isn't an
alternative. Like what? Go
be a Republican and vote
for Sarah Palin, drive an
SUV and live in a cookie cutter house? That's one of the
biggest ways you can rebel against it, but that's not a
good thing at all."
So barring an uprising of the
working class, white people as
described by Lander are here to
stay. What's the solution then?
At the end ofthe day, it's about
assholes.
"The whole thing out of it is
maybe not to get away from it,
just don't be such an asshole.
That's the message." tl
BRENDAN ALBANO PHOTO ILLUSTRATION/THE UBYSSEY
FASHION FILES
Lose your V-card on Main Street
KRISTEN HARRIS &
DANIELLE ZANDBERGEN
Contributors
So maybe last week you were
coerced into going shopping on
Robson, and perhaps you spent
too much—it's intoxicating, we
know. When you start flipping
through racks of $400 T-shirts,
suddenly the one that is seventy
percent off seems to be an absolute steal.
Does it matter that it is
bright green leopard print?
Well, only the day after when
you introduce it to your cliquey un-designer-y wardrobe
and they don't play well together. It has a spat with your
plaid coat and the red leggings
and there's a huge jumble of
clothes on the floor—not a
good scene.
What do we propose as the
solution? Vintage shopping. It
requires a litde more walking
and a litde more hunting, but
getting interesting pieces for
good deals is hard work no matter where you shop.
If you are a seasoned veteran
of vintage, the following may
be basic knowledge, but for our
fellow newbies, a good place to
learn the ropes is Main Street.
It has a number of thrift and
vintage stores, and the added
bonus of being far enough away
from UBC that the hipsters
don't steal all the good stuff, but
close enough thatyou can get to
campus and back in an hour.
Here are a few shops to try.
C'ESTLAVIE
3247 Main Street
We've had the most luck with
this place with good deals and
interesting finds. It's a small
store, but it has a good variety and it is well-laid out. The
cheery pink exterior is also
enticing.
BOHEMIA GALLERY
3243 Main Street
This shop has a great atmosphere. The owner is friendly,
seems genuinely interested in
finding a good fit for her customers, and is open to negotiation.
The stock is more or less unedited, which means that there will
be more mall brands hanging
out with actual vintage, but
the occasional gem does turn
up. The good vintage items are
snapped up quickly so act fast if
you like whatyou see.
SOLID THREADS
2-3851 Main Street
It looks a little small and dodgy
from the outside, but it is definitely worth checking out.
Solid Threads is possibly one
of the best stocked stores in
terms of quantity, especially
for all of your heavy-hitting basics: chunky knit sweaters, cowboy boots and ray-bans. If you
can make your way through the
mothball-scented hat corner,
you'll come out with some usable layering items.
FRONT AND COMPANY
3772 Main Street
If nothing else, we were first
intrigued by their elaborate
window displays. Mannequins
hang from the ceiling, reclining amongst mounds of pillows, dressed elaborately in
vintage gowns. Inside, they
have a varied vintage shoe collection, and you can find everything from octopus rings to designer vintage vests. The store
is well organized, with separated sections for vintage designer, new clothing, and your
ordinary non-designer stuff.
It's not the best place to treasure hunt, but you can always
be assured of finding something that catches your eye. tl 2010.01.28/UBYSSEY.CA/SPORTS/5
OLYMPICS PUT HOCKEY TEAMS IN THE PENALTY BOX
The T-Birds' hockey teams have a pair of "home" games this weekend
as they begin their final month of their season displaced by the Olympics.
The men's hockey team faces Saskatchewan at Burnaby 8 Rinks, while
the women face Manitoba at George Preston Arena in Langley. Last
Wednesday was the final day the teams had access to Thunderbird
Arena. Since then, they've had practices at the Arbutus Club.
"Is it a distraction? Of course it is," said women's head coach Nancy
Wilson. "But how are we going to deal with it? You can do any number
of things, but the best thing you can do is keep moving forward."
Hockey honcho responds to criticism
Dragicevic slams article, offers his take on why player quit the team
JUSTIN MCELROY
sports@ubyssey.ca
"He's a shitty coach. Put that in
there."
A former player on the men's
hockey team unloaded on head
coach Milan Dragicevic after
UBC was blown out 8-0 in a
must-win game last weekend.
He quit the team a few weeks
ago, and had a bone to pick.
As sports editor, I thought his
rant was interesting and provocative—and was the sort of
thing someone might say after a
8-0 loss. I did put that in there.
His quotes made the paper on
Monday.
On Tuesday the phone rang.
More than once.
It turns out hockey players
and people from UBC Athletics
don't like it when their coach gets
cussed out in the campus paper
by a player who quit the team.
"Your article proved to me
that your newspaper is not
credible, rather just another Mickey Mouse operation attempting to catch the public's
eye with trashy news," said one
person in an e-mail.
Give this to athletes—when
one of their own is criticized,
they rally around the flag.
Should I have left out the
quote? I don't think so. People
should understand we're free
to print things that are both
positive and negative. The
team has struggled all year,
and a person who quit the
team blamed the coach to a reporter. Students have a right
to know that.
The problem was that I
didn't give Dragicevic, who
has been head coach since
2002, the chance to respond
in the article, or even let him
know the comment would
run.
As a result, he felt blindsid-
ed. He, and others, were offended. And that's fair.
Given that, and given that
we strive to fairly show all the
sides of an issue—though sometimes not in the same article—
I got in touch with Dragicevic.
We met up yesterday morning.
"I think Ron Maclean got
chasticed pretty good for saying
one side of the story about Alex
Burrows," he said to me, referring to a biased segment the
Hockey Night in Canada host
did on a Canucks player.
"He never got die other side
of the story. And that's the lesson to be learned. It's never
good to blindside people without getting the other side of the
story right away."
Your article proved
to me that your
newspaper is....just
another Mickey
Mouse operation.
E-MAIL TO THEUBYSSEY
Dragicevic was more interested in talking about the player who made the offending remarks though.
"I feel that on a team, there
are three kinds of players:
There are players who really care for the program, leaders, guys who care about everyone. You have your other group,
that are low-maintenance, don't
cause any trouble, just show up
and play. And you just have other guys with personal agendas,
they just care about stats, how
much ice time they get. They're
selfish...teams are better off
without those sort of players."
You can guess what category he placed his former player
under.
"Players have to be accountable for their play and if they're
not playing well, or up to par,
then they get ice time taken
away. In [his] case, he thought he
needed a bigger role with us, but
bis play on die ice didn't show us
he was rveady to handle a bigger
role."
Despite his strong words,
Dragicevic wanted to make clear
that he wasn't making a personal attack.
"This is strictiy hockey-
based," said Dragicevic. "He attacked me personally [but] I'm
not here to attack a student athlete. But we are here to judge
them as hockey players."
While it's fair to say he didn't
appreciate the remarks, he understands the frustration of fans.
The T-Birds have lost 15 of their
last 20 games, and have underwhelmed this season. With only
six games left in the season,
the team is playing as much for
pride than anything else now.
"I'm not happy with our record," said Dragicevic. "I'm the
head coach; I take responsibility for that. If I could go back four
months and do things differently, absolutely, 100 per cent."
The T-Birds are moving on. They
may not have much of a chance at
the playoffs, but when you're an
athlete, you never stop competing.
"We learn from these things,"
said Dragicevic, "and hope it
doesn't happen again, and I hope
everybody learns from this."
He leans in. "Everybody.
Everybody," he says^in case his
point was missed. "SI
Men's hockey coach Milan Dragicevic coaches his T-Birds at a
practice last semester. GERALD DEO FILE PH0T0/THE UBYSSEY
A Two Year Degree
for University Grads
achelor of Computer Science
APPLY NOW for Fall 2010
www.bcs-ics.cs.ubc.ca
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bcs-info@cs. ubc.ca
Application Deadline: Feb. 28, 2010
Contact Giuliana: (604) 822-2213
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Make your vote count!
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For more information, visit www.ams.ubc.ca/elections
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production@ubyssey.ca 6/UBYSSEY.CA/IDEAS/2 0 10.0 1.28
D
EAS
YOU SAID IT
IN RESPONSE TO "MICHAEL DUNCAN'S ELECTION PICKS [JAN. 26, 2010]":
While I believe Mike has very valuable input, it is my understanding that he is Natalie's campaign manager or is
heavily involved in her campaign. If I am incorrect, then disregard my comments. If not, then I believe extending
this opportunity to Mike is a bit unfair and one sided. Just my two cents.
—Alex Monegro
[Editor's note: Mike Duncan is technically not Natalie Swift's campaign manager.]
DO YOU CARE?
WRITE US A LETTER
feedback@ubyssey.ca
EDITOR TREVOR RECORD»ideas@ubyssey.ca
ANTHONY GOERTZ GRAPHIC/THE UBYSSEY
EDITORIAL
TUITION HIKES MEAN $9 MORE PER CLASS
So UBC has raised tuition by two per cent for domestic students
and four per cent for international students. Once again, your
already over-taxed wallets are screaming out for help. But, like
many reasonable people, you think, "Well, with the falling purchasing power of today's dollar, and the massive structural deficit
UBC is facing, two per cent just ain't that bad."
You're right, chum. That's just about nine bucks more per course
for domestic students—just one pitcher at Koerner's you will have to
put off. Except that a pitcher at Koerner's is now $ 11.50, the minimum wage isn't getting any higher, and housing costs in Vancouver
are catastrophically high. So, nine bucks more per course?
There really isn't any recourse against UBC. As students, we have
very litde say in what goes on in the murky darkness of the Secret
Board of Shadowy Governors. UBC wasn't set up to be a democracy, but BC was. And a good chunk of us are full-fledged enfranchised
citizens of BC who have a right to have a say in where government
funding goes. Many of us are very valuable future citizens of BC, so
the government should have a vested interest in keeping us upwardly mobile and educated. High tuition rates do not help.
We're planning on leaving CASA, an organization which lobbies
on behalf of universities, so we're going to be focusing on our own
lobbying efforts. Mr Future VP External: if you've got lhe chops you
claim you do, let's see that excess funding go to lobbying the BC government. And let's not worry about those foolish things the AMS can
do nothing about and shouldn't concern itself with, and worry about
something very real to every student—education funding. tl
OUT OF THE OLYMPIC LOOP?
Olympic road closures at UBC have already begun, effective this
past Monday. Were you unaware of this? You aren't alone.
UBC is doing a terrible job at communicating the impacts of the
Games to students and residents. Quite a number of students undoubtedly tried to access Thunderbird Parkade via car on Monday
just realized they could only do so along East Mall.
Sure, UBC has a website, ubc.ca/2010, and you can sign up for a
"Games Time" newsletter for Olympics updates. But how many students know about it or have signed up?
The university has a broadcast e-mail system, which they can use
send out notifications and updates. However, this e-mail system has
not been used nearly enough to communicate to students the impact of the Olympics on campus.
In September, VANOC held an open house to inform students
about the Olympics. VANOC representatives estimated a total of
about 150 people attended throughout the day. This open house
was the only information session that VANOC has held at UBC for
the general student body. A lot of changes have been made since
then and an update would seem appropriate—but we haven't heard
a peep.
The AMS University and External Relations Committee is looking
to write a report that will hopefully be a comprehensive look at the
impacts before, during and after the Olympics, including road closures. It's a great initiative, but it comes a bit too late. The Olympics
are a few weeks away, and creating and disseminating the report to
students in such a short time seems almost impossible.
Where can I park? What if I'm staying on campus? Will the libraries be open? What are the hours for food oudets? The list of questions goes on and on. The word "due diligence" has been thrown
around a lot lately—let's see some on this campus, tl
TOO SEXY
KASHA CHANG
& AUSTIN HOLM
toosexy@ubyssey.ca
Beloved readership,
We hope you're enjoying this
balmy January, as we at Too
Sexy surely are. The bulbs outside our window are sprouting, tricked by the warmth
into believing it's spring. Our
inner pessimists know that
these tender tendrils will inevitably meet their demise in the
inexorable frosts of February,
but still. It's nice. It's like love,
and the ineffable renewability
thereof, or something.
[Editor's note: Nice? Beautiful
flowers, tricked into blossoming
too early, are doomed to die. That
sounds like a Cinema Politica
film. The dastardly El Nino turns
Flora del Ivierno, an underage
Tijuana orphan, to prostitution in
this week's iMucho Sexo!/
Anyway, enough sentimentality. Here's this week's letter.
Dear Too Sexy,
Last term I dated this chick in
my res. It was pretty cool for a
while, since she was so close,
but with all the other people around it didn't feel like
we had to be together all the
time. Anyways, now we're broken up and I swear to God, I
see her more often than before
we split. She's everywhere, always. The break-up was not a
gentle one and I can feel her
wretched stank eye burrowing
into the back of my head every moment I'm in or around
Vanier.
Tell me how to fix this incredibly awkward and hostile situation, Too Sexy. Failing
that, advice on how to get someone evicted from res would be
golden.
-Stank Eye Victim
Hey SEV,
Exes can be awkward. Seeing
exes immediately post-breakup is really awkward. And exes
you basically have to live with
are the awkwardest. So, how to
deal?
Well, that depends what ex-
acdy we're dealing with here,
SEV. You say you see her more
than ever—is that because she
just lives near you, or is she
actively following you around,
hanging out at your old haunts?
If the latter, it may be time for
some evasive action. Yes, it's
avoidant; yes, it feels juvenile;
and no, it won't fix the underlying "incredibly awkward and
hostile" situation. But under
the circumstances, SEV, it's
about the best you can do. The
most important aspect of getting over break-ups (particularly those of a messier nature) is
closure.
It's a great idea to get some
distance on the issue, come to
terms with where you are post-
relationship. This also helps
to prevent dwelling on morose  thoughts   of why things
went wrong. All of those aims
are seriously impeded by having to constandy see the person
you just ended the relationship
with. And we're not just talking
about you. All these things also
apply to your ex, even if she is
stalking you. For the good of
her closure process and yours,
you must avoid her.
You may be thinking, "but
Too Sexy, if my hostile ex is following me around, won't avoiding her make her even madder
and more determined?" In the
short term, the answer is yes.
But as they say, SEV, time
heals all wounds, even those
caused by deep-seated relationship disagreement. Still, you
should attempt to hold onto the
moral high ground. Don't act
like a dick when you do have to
see her, because this isn't going
to improve the situation.
This means that you should
try to be less than obvious about
the fact that you're avoiding her.
So when you see her, say hi. Be
friendly. Don't be weird, but
don't prolong the interaction.
Try your best to act cool with the
situation, even if you aren't. In
short, don't run away from her
when you meet, but if you know
she's going to a certain party,
don't plan to go to that party.
Also note: avoidance of dickery
means that under no circumstances should you attempt to
get this person evicted from res.
Of course, it may be that post-
break-up paranoia has led you
astray, SEV. It's entirely likely
that this girl is not, in fact, following you around with the intent of making your every waking moment awkward and ruining your life. It may be that you
see her around simply because
you a) live in the same building
and b) developed some of the
same habits, hangouts and routines while you were together.
In this case, your best bet is
still to try to diffuse awkwardness when you do encounter
her, and avoid her whenever
possible. Try switching up your
schedule and routes through
campus, or eating in a different
part of the caf than usual.
In an ideal situation, you and
your ex would be cool with each
other, SEV. Unfortunately, the
trauma of ending a relationship
you were both invested in often
prevents this, at least immediately post-break-up.
The current situation is like
salt in a wound, and that's a
place salt just shouldn't be. If
you both get some cool-down
time, it's likely you can have constructive conversations about the
end of your relationship, be alright with each other again, and
maybe even remember why you
were friends in the first place
and re-establish those ties. But
for now, constant contact and
superdickery are just going to
prolong the agony, tl
You've got questions. We've got
answers, or at least some platitudinous mumblings designed
to make you feel better. Solicit
our help at toosexy@ubyssey.
ca.
STREETERS
WHAT DO YOU THINK OF STUFF
WHITE PEOPLE LIKE1
YASMINNURMING/l/7s3
It's definitely stereotypical, but
offensive, I don't know, it depends on how you take it. I [take
it] with a grain of salt and as a
joke. I think equally..traditionally white people have poked
fun at other ethnicities, and
what-not, and made fun of them
or stereotyped them; so I think
it's okay every once in a while.
RUDOMIGWAGWAArte 3
I don't really know much about
it but I think.. if it's coming from
white people generally people would say it's more acceptable, just because it's poking fun
at your own community. But I
think if it's someone from another race it would probably be
considered more offensive.
SAMMI HU Science 2
I think it should be taken as a
joke. There are plenty of other
blogs that people write and express their stereotypical opinions. And I don't think that people
should get offended or anything.
RACHEL DAVIES Arts 2
I've seen the blog, and I don't
know, it's pretty accurate...It's
definitely stereotypical, but
there's stereotypes for a reason, I guess you could say..Not
to myself but I could see how
other people could find it offensive...For instance one of
them is "What white people
like, they like Dave Chappelle,"
[but] if found that some of his
comments were insensitive to
white people then definitely
you wouldn't like the book, tl
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Khurana and Chibwe Mweene. 2010.01.28/UBYSSEY.CA/IDEAS/7
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Teachers' information session
Saturday, February 6, 2010,10:30am - 12:00pm
We invite teachers to join us for an information session and open house to:
• learn about Crofton House School • find out what it is like to work in a premier independent
day school for girls • view our outstanding facilities • meet, mingle, and network with some of
our talented and dynamic teachers over a cup of coffee.
No RSVP required. To find out more about our school, please visit croftonhouse.ca
3200 West 41st Avenue, Vancouver, BC.
Please enter through the main doors on West 41st Avenue.
€
Crofton House School
Est. 1898
We educate girls for life.
The following Referendum Questions are being put to students during this year's AMS Elections.
A more detailed version can be found on the AMS Elections web site (www.ams.ubc.ca/elections)
1) Do you support the amendment of the AMS Bylaws as presented, based on the recommendations of
a consultant hired to review the operations of Student Court and of a special AMS joint committee, for
the purpose of revising the rules concerning Student Court?
This revision would make Court decisions binding as soon as they are sent to Student Council, increase
the amount ofthe fine the Court could levy on individuals, require that the Court include judges from
faculties other than Law, require that there be judges from at least two faculties hearing any case,
eliminate alternate judges, remove the Court's power to interpret the AMS bylaws & its power to rewrite
referendum questions, and set out new rules for referendum questions.
2) Do you support the removal of Blake Frederick from the office of President?
3) Do you support the removal of Timothy Chu from the office of Vice-President External?
4) Do you support the AMS establishing a $5.00 refundable Engagement Levy to help improve student
engagement by encouraging voter turnout and funding engagement related projects?
5) Do you support indexing the current and future fees ofthe AMS to the Canadian Core Consumer Price
Index (CCCPI)?
6) Do you support the amendment ofthe AMS Bylaws as presented, for the purposes of enabling
Student Council to remove an individual from a position as an officer of Council, and other amendments
as outlined?
• The Bylaws would be amended as outlined in Bylaw Amendments 2010.
7) Do you support an increase in student fees beginning September 2010 of $1 per part-time student
and $2 per full-time student per semester to be directed to the Access UBC Association of Disabled
Students for the purpose of increasing accessibility, participation, and inclusion for all people with
disabilities on campus and in society?
8) Should the AMS actively lobby for reduced tuition
fees and increased government funding?
9) Should the AMS create a voting seat on AMS Council for
students with disabilities by amending Bylaw 5.2(a)?
our UBC community
Can't fit it all in a letter? Want to go more in depth with your thoughts?
Ask Trevor if you can write a perspective about it, e-mail ideas®ubyssey.ca.
PERSPECTIVES
Eyes in Gaza with
Dr Mads Gilbert
FATEMAH MEGHJI
Students for Palestinian
Human Rights
Giving a frightening new edge
to the word "siege," Israel's
complete blockade of all incoming and outgoing traffic to
the Gaza Strip last winter kept
human exchange at a near-
standstill. Only two doctors
were able to enter the Gaza
Strip: Dr Mads Gilbert and Dr
Erik Fosse, who have recently co-authored a book Eyes in
Gaza, soon to be published in
English.
In addition to serving at the
notoriously overcrowded Al-
Shifa Hospital, the two became
common faces in the media
worldwide, being the only two
foreign doctors in the region.
They were seen on Al-Jazeera,
BBC, CBS, Fox, Democracy Now
and CNN, acting as a Palestinian
voice in a time when it was stifled. As if witnessing the utter
chaos there was not enough,
these doctors were soon accused of faking a hospital scene
which appeared on CNN.
Nobody can hide
the truth of what
went on in Gaza
during Operation
Cast Lead...
Gilbert confirmed that over 90
per cent of the patients he saw in
the Al-Shifa were innocent civilians, and there was no doubt that
chemical weapons, the likes of
which he had never seen before,
had been used. Gilbert also said
that it was the most horrific and
traumatizing experience he had
gone through. This would be expected from a regular doctor
who was seeing warfare for the
first time, but Gilbert has volunteered in multiple war zones,
including Beirut in 1982. One
might think that has desensitized him, but that's not the case
for Gilbert—it was Gaza that gave
him nightmares.
Nobody can hide the truth
of what went on in Gaza during
Operation Cast Lead—over 1400
Palestinians perished, 400 of
which were children. People like
Gilbert continue to prove that
solidarity with Palestine is becoming mainstream. It's no longer a controversy that Israel is an
aggressor state, just like it's not
a controversy that Darfur and
Sudan are going through humanitarian crisis. The publishing of
the Goldstone Report, a 545-page
document commissioned by the
United Nations Human Rights
Council, only attested to this fact.
It's time to wake up and smell
the blood of innocent people being massacred and encaged.
Few eyewitnesses from Gaza
have been able to leave, as the
region remains under a blockade enforced by Israel and Egypt.
Gilbert will be speaking on 16
campuses across North America
in the upcoming weeks, including one at UBC this Friday hosted by the SPHR. The tour has attracted controversy, but nobody
can deny the stories that Gilbert
presents as an eyewitness nor
the photographs that he shows.
And for the pro-Israel lobby, this
remains a threat, tl
The SPHR is hosting a visit
from Gilbert at UBC on Friday
January 29 at 6:30pm. Tickets
are available for $10 from the
Outpost. Details can be found at
sphr.org or by e-mailing sphr.
ubc@gmail.com.
Constructive dialogue
has been diminished
JONATHAN LERNER
Contributor
On October 26, 2009, The
Ubyssey ran an article in
which representatives from
the Solidarity for Palestinian
Human Rights (SPHR) Group
and the Israel Awareness Club
(IAC) both called for more constructive dialogue and a reduction of rhetoric on campus. The IAC was thrilled at
this news and was extremely
hopeful that the SPHR would
end their long-standing practicing of inviting speakers to
campus who spend the majority of their time on stage vilifying Israel and who have little
to say about where real progress can be made in the peace
process. It seemed a new era of
cooperative dialogue was on
the horizon.
Yet these dreams were
dashed this month when the
SPHR announced its January
guest speaker would be none
other than Dr Mads Gilbert, a
man widely known for his outrageous and extreme remarks.
He is not just a speaker who has
lots to say against Israel and litde to say about obtaining peace.
He has actually attempted to
justify and glorify the deaths
of Canadian and American
citizens.
Just a couple of weeks after
the 9/11 attacks which killed
thousands of civilians (including Canadians) Gilbert told
the Norwegian newspaper
Dagbladet that "The oppressed
also have a moral right to attack
the US with any weapon they
can come up with." When asked
if he supported a terror attack
on the US, Gilbert responded by
saying, "Terror is a bad weapon, but the answer is yes, within
the context I have mentioned."
Gilbert is also a member of
the Norwegian Maoist 'Red'
party, a political group aimed at
a "social revolution" in Europe,
with strong ties to an organization called Palestinakomeiteen,
which in January 2009 organized a violent event which saw
the vandalization of the Israeli
Embassy in Oslo.
There was genuine hope that
constructive dialogue was coming to UBC, which would foster
discussions of peace and reconciliation. Unfortunately it seems
that the SPHR's extremism is
just beginning, tl 

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