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The Ubyssey Oct 28, 1976

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Array McGeer urges higher fees
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LIX, No. 18       VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1976
228-2301
—doug field photo
DRUG PUSHERS shove bed for 25th and final lap Wednesday noon in bed race around campus. Pharmacy
team edged out gears, who lost time debating what bed is used for, and Ubyssey team, who used mattresses
to recuperate from their labors.
By CHRIS GAINOR
B.C. community colleges have
received a warning from education
minister Pat McGeer that their
provincial grants will not rise next
year and that increased costs will
have to be met by cutbacks or
hiked tuition fees.
In a letter to community college
councils dated Oct. 13, McGeer
said: "It is necessary for us to
inform you that there is little
prospect of any increased grants
for this year except for the most
essential items.
"There is no assurance at this
time that grants can be expanded
to cover increases in salary to staff
even if they should be consistent
with federal anti-inflation
guidelines," McGeer said.
"It is likely that college councils
will have to review revenue
sources such as tuition fees, hiring
practices such as replacing staff
lost through attrition and
productivity of existing personnel
in order to meet increased salary
commitments as well as increased
costs in other areas."
McGeer's letter came under
immediate fire from the Capilano
College council and the B.C.
Students Federation after its
release Tuesday.
BCSF spokesman Bill Bell said
Wednesday that McGeer's
suggestion of increased tuition fees
is wrong because college financing
formulas are set up so that tuition
fee increases do not increase
revenue.
Under the formula, the
provincial government pays 60 per
cent of college operating costs and
the remaining 40 per cent is raised
from local school taxes and tuition
fees. If tuition fees go up, said Bell,
the school tax contribution goes
down to fit the 40 per cent ceiling.
"This letter puts a lot of pressure
on colleges to raise tuition fees,"
said Bell. "If they want to use
tuition fees as a revenue source,
then they will have to take over the
entire college financing."
The   Capilano   college   council
New pub planned for Barn
By CHRIS GAINOR
UBC could have a second
student-operated pub by January
at the site of the Barn cafeteria.
Alma Mater Society president
Dave Theessen said Wednesday
administration vice-president
Erich Vogt, in charge of student
and faculty affairs, agreed to a
student suggestion at a Monday
meeting that the AMS operate a
pub in unused food services space.
"We bounced the idea off them. I
expected them to be evasive but
they must have thought about this
idea after we closed the Pit," said
Theessen.
"We now have the go-ahead and
it's just a matter of working out the
terms," he said.
The Student Administrative
Commission and Student Representative Assembly have appointed a six-member committee
composed of three members from
each body.
"The idea is that we would make
the Pit smaller and would use the
unused food services space,"
Theessen added.
A report by AMS secretary-
treasurer Bill Broddy said: "If we
act with all due haste, we could
have a fully operating English pub
within the Barn cafeteria by the
beginning of January."
Broddy's report points out that
large functions in residences have
been a major cause of property
damage. The administration
agreed one central licence holder
should be responsible for campus
events and the AMS is in the best
position to do that, Broddy said.
Monday's meeting was attended
by Broddy, Theessen, Vogt, UBC
financial aid officer Byron Hender,
and AMS director of finance Herb
Dhaliwal.
"It was pointed out (at the
meeting) that many of our problem
drinkers in the Pit do so because of
a fear of not being able to get into
the Pit during prime: time, hence
they go in early.
"What was needed was smaller
liquor outlets in locations other
than SUB."
Discussing the Barn proposal,
Broddy said, "it will hold between
70 and 100 patrons, which means
that it is small. It is far away from
SUB crowds, so they would not
become part of the exodus at 12:30
a.m.
"It is also close to Totem Park, a
residence which is known for its
violent bi-weekly beer zoos. It
would defuse the extremely explosive situation that occurs there
every two weeks.
"The Barn would also curtail the
expected lineups that result when
we reduce the Pit's seating
capacity next month," said
Broddy.
"From the AMS point of view the
option should be followed as it will
provide a service to many students
in the far end of campus. It also
conclusively resolves that we are
the sole vendor of liquor to students
on this campus.
"Also the Barn has an extremely
interesting decor which can be
speedily and cheaply converted
into a cozy English pub."
A letter from Theessen to Vogt
written Tuesday said: "It was
understood that the Barn would be
the first experimental pub, and
that other locations, including a
possibility of locating in the
proposed new Bookstore complex
would be examined as the AMS
found it feasible to start the new
operations."
voted Tuesday to write McGeer
telling him the policy outlined in
the letter will hurt college
programs.
Bell said he has learned unofficially ' that Capilano College's
budget will rise next year by only
six per cent, meaning a cutback of
about 45 sections, which would
mean the elimination of the
college's second year academic
programs.
The letter contradicts an earlier
letter from McGeer to Bell dated
Aug. 19 in which McGeer promised
no interference in college matters
similar to the Oct. 13 letter, Bell
charged.
Capilano College, which has been
hit hard by recent cutbacks, is
currently negotiating with its office workers and faculty
association.
McGeer's executive assistant,
Jim Bennett, said a similar letter
has not been sent to B.C. universities because their financing is
under the jurisdiction of the B.C.
Universities Council.
Jim MacDonald, Capilano
College council chairman, said:
"If you want to raise extra money,
you raise fees. Whether or not we
will still remains to be seen." He
declined comment on the difficulties with the financing formula.
In his letter, McGeer states his
policy is in line with premier Bill
Bennett's promise in his
Thanksgiving Day speech that
taxes will not rise next year.
"In future, grants will not be
increased by increasing taxes as
was done in the last year. Increases in grants can only come as
a result of real gains in the
provincial productivity," McGeer
said.
"The performance of the
provincial economy in the first six
months of the current fiscal year
has not been at a level which would
suggest any substantial increase in
■the coming year.
"Rest assured that I will do all in
my power toobtain as much money
for the educational enterprises as
it is possible in this time of national
restraint," McGeer said.
Until the economic picture
brightens, he concluded,
educational institutions will have
to rely on "substantial gains in
productivity" to meet their
obligations.
Moe Sihota, UBC Alma Mater
Society external affairs officer,
said McGeer's letter contradicts
earlier promises of noninterference.
Sihota said he discussed tuition
with McGeer last week when the
education minister was visiting
UBC. He promised that his
department "would not meddle in
the internal affairs of an individual
institution," Sihota said.
"He told me he could say how
much UBC will get next year,"
Sihota said. "I asked him and he
said UBC will get no increase next
year.
Fee increase ballot split
Students voting in November's fee referendum will
have a bundle of eight ballots thrust into their hands
when they go to the voting booth.
Why? Because the student representative
assembly voted 13-9 Wednesday night to split up the
main ballot on fee increases into four separate
ballots, then later added another ballot on an
unrelated issue.
Many student politicos think the move doomed any
chances the fee increase had in the referendum.
An SRA subcommittee had recommended to SRA
that students fill in a single ballot to either approve or
reject a $6 Alma Mater Society fee increase for next
year. But council members voted to have separate
ballots for:
• a $2.25general AMS administrative fee increase;
• a $2 per student grant to The Ubyssey;
• a 75 cents per student grant to CITR, and
• a $1 per student grant to intramurals.
Students will also decide in the referendum
whether to join the B.C. Students' Federation, the
National Union of Students, and whether to pay an
additional $2 per year for women's extramural
athletics.
The SRA also added a ballot proposing that spouses
of students be allowed to become honorary AMS
members.
In other business, council voted to recommend the
administration open a snack bar on campus until 11
p.m. daily.
The snack bar would provide an alternative place
for students under 19. The Pit and the SUB pizza
parlor do not allow minors.
Blast from past
Yes, tbe Pat McGeer referred to in the following story is the very
same man who is currently Socred education minister.
The story first appeared in The Ubyssey, Oct. 7,1965.
Students with first class marks should have free tuition, a liberal.
MLA told Simon Fraser Academy's Liberal club Tuesday.
Patrick McGeer, MLA for Point Grey and UBC professor, said the
provincial government should pay full fees of first class students, two-
thirds of the fees for the top half of second class students and one-third
of the fees for the rest of second class students.
"Bursary and student loan aid would then be more available for the
passing student so that everyone would benefit," he said.
He said students who attack their universities for increasing fees
had little understanding of the situation.
"They are like old-time doctors . . . who frequently bled their
patients to try and help them."
McGeer said university fees should not rise because "the very
purpose of the educational system is defeated when capable people
reject educational opportunity because the price is a deterrent."
British Columbia was feeling the cost now, he-said, of providing
insufficient funds for education a decade age.
"Our economy has been handicapped by a shortage of much larger
infusions of highly skilled people and our government resources
drained by the unskilled and unemployed. In the near future, money
must go to our educational institutions." Page 2
THE
UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 28, 1976
Pumpkin pedal on
Hallowe'en is a time for ghosts,
spooks, goblins and the Great
Pumpkin Bicycle Race.
The race is an annual event
sponsored by Rec UBC for any
interested bikers. It starts from
SUB parking lot noon Thursday
and finishes in front of War
Memorial Gym.
There are three routes, one of
which participants choose according to their ability and
stamina. The novice route is three
miles long, the intermediate route
is five miles and the Grand Prix is
10 miles, going around the campus
and out to Salish Park, then back
again.
Peters, Chow win
The first three riders in each
category win prizes ranging from
pumpkins to money to unspecified
Hallowe'en treats.
Connected with the race is the
Great Pumpkin lottery. Each rider
in the race will draw the name of a
person in the lottery. If that rider
wins, comes second or third then
the lottery winner wins $10.
Maureen Peters and Bill Chow
were elected to UBC senate in
Wednesday's byelection to fill two
vacant seats.
Peters, wife of Basil Peters,
student representative on the
board of governors, was overwhelming favorite of the few who
voted — 584 of 767 voters opted for
her. Chow, an engineer, received
280 votes.
Former senator Ron Walls, who
allowed his name to stand but did
not campaign, received 186 votes.
Christie Jung received 159 and
Kimble Mooney received 156.
The terms of Peters and Chow
expire in March. The byelection
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Monday, Nov. 1st, 12:30 p.m.
Guest Speaker:
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Tuesday, Nov. 2nd, 12:30 p.m.
FIRST LECTURE
"THE LONELY MAN
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Wednesday, Nov. 3rd,
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Lecture by
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Tickets are available at the Snack-Bar and Cafeteria Cashiers
GET YOUR TICKETS EARLY	
Attention
SCIENCE STUDENTS
NOMINATIONS ARE NOW OPEN
for the position of
SCIENCE SENATOR
To any full time Science student who is willing to
represent Science students on the university senate,
Nominations forms may be picked up at the A.M.S.
business office Room 266 S.U.B. 9 a.m. - 11:20 a.m.
and 12:20 - 4:00 p.m. These must contain the signature,
address and telephone number of the nominee and
signatures of 10 registered Science students.
Completed forms must be returned to Room 266 S.U.B.
by 4 p.m. Friday, October 29, 1976.
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Representatives will be available on campus on November 3, 4
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Students who are unable to arrange for an interview on campus
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THE
UBYSSEY
Page 3
Vandalism increase claim hit
By BILL TIELEMAN
and CHARLIE MICALLEF
RCMP Sgt. Al Hutchinson has
said he recommended a crackdown
on the Pit because vandalism on
the UBC campus has quadrupled —
but UBC authorities will not
confirm that figure.
Josh Gruber, residence coordinator for Place Vanier, said
Monday vandalism this year is
down from previous years.
And Karen Ostermann,
residence co-ordinator for Totem
Park, also said she does not think
there has been an upswing in
vandalism at Totem or around
campus.
"Considering we have around
l,200students housed at Totem, it's
inevitable that things will get
broken. But the differences between damage and outright vandalism can't be measured."
In Walter Gage residence, acting
residence    co-ordinator    June
1 •"*?"-. '"* * .''■Vv^tj
Johnson said there has been little
real vandalism. She said there is
no way of knowing whether
breakage is accidental or intentional.
Harry Atterton, public relations
officer for B.C. Hydro says there is
no real problem with vandalism on
the UBC bus routes and even no
significant increase of minor
breakage on the buses over last
year.
Dave Hannah, superintendent of
UBC's traffic and security
department said Wednesday there
has been an increase in vandalism
but he "doesn't know about"
Hutchinson's claim that vandalism
has quadrupled.
Hannah said he can not pinpoint
one troublesome area on campus.
Walter Sherstobetoff, on-the-job
supervisor of the covered pool
project, said Tuesday that since
the project began the company has
had to replace $400 to $500 worth of
boarding around the site.
"Some of the damage has obviously been accidental, cars
hit ting the barriers," Sherstobetoff
said, "but most is too extensive to
be accidental."
He said most of the damage has
taken place on weekends but
during October damage has been
minimal. "Nothing has been stolen
and we haven't prosecuted anyone
because damage hasn't been extensive enough to warrant it."
"It seems like only a few people
are involved in the damage. So why
punish the law-abiding by closing
the tavern?" he said.
University spokesman Al Hunter
said Wednesday about $1,740 of
damage has been done around
campus since mid-September.
SUB proctor Ed Trewin said
Monday repairs to lighting in the
immediate SUB area cost $4,000 to
$5,000 last year.
"Since the Pit has been closed,
it's been like Sundays around
here," Trewin said. "But high
school kids do a lot of the damage,
too."
SUB building manager Graeme
Vance said he couldn't put a figure
on the amount of damage done to
SUB because the bills are handled
by physical plant.
"It pisses me off to see students
so close to losing the freedom they
have built up for the past 10
years."
Simon Fraser University is
having vandalism problems like
those experienced at UBC but no
moves are being made to shut
down SFU's drinking facilities.
An SFU administration source
said Wednesday SFU has had
losses totalling thousands of
dollars annually due to vandalism
and related theft on campus.
But the source said the problem
HOUSING PANEI lashes out at developers
—matt king photo
Forums discuss housing hassle...
Vancouver city council is
ignoring the student housing
problem, Stew Savard, B.C.
Students' Federation spokesman,
told a panel of civic politicians in
SUB Wednesday.
Savard told the panel on housing
and transportation that many
students live in substandard
housing and even that is hard to
find.
"Students   need   more   mixed
housing, not ghetto housing," he
said.
And Joe Kellner, mayoral
candidate for the League for
Socialist Action, blamed the lack of
housing in Vancouver on
developers. He said developers
only build housing where they
think they can make money.
Kellner said that as mayor he
would take over from developers
and create "massive free public
transportation."
Bruce Yorke, mayoral candidate
for the Committee of Progressive
Electors, also attacked developers.
'There are 4,000 empty condominiums," Yorke said. He said
he would "break the monopoly of
the developers" if he is elected
mayor.
Darlene Mazari, independent
aldermanic candidate, said about
4,000students are living illegally as
tenants in single family homes.
Mazari said one of every three
.and high unemployment
Students must organize to fight
for more summer job opportunities, Lake Sagaris, B.C.
Students' Federation chairwoman
said Tuesday.
Sagaris told a public forum in
SUB about student employment
that the high rate of unemployment
for students last summer was
partly the fault of students.
She said students must do
something about unemployment
themselves "because no one else is
going to do it for us."
Students' mental attitudes are a
big problem in fighting unemployment, Sagaris said.
"They think it's too big a
problem for us to deal with, and
there's always somebody unemployed," she said.
But, she said, the issue is
especially important to students
because "if you were unemployed
you can't go back to school."
Sagaris said the BCSF's role in
combatting student unemployment
is  to   spread  information   about
unemployment.
Sagaris    said    the    federal
government cancelled an annual
survey of student employment this
year.
"We can get the figures and
distribute them ourselves," she
said.
The National Union of Students
at its October conference made
employment its first priority.
Moe Sihota, Alma Mater Society
external affairs officer, said
figures collected in an AMS survey
indicate 20 per cent of students
were unemployed last summer.
Most of these students were in
first and second year, and grade 12
students coming to university for
the first time had trouble finding
jobs as well," Sihota said.
"There was also 25 per cent of
what we call underemployment,"
he said.
Underemployment, Sihota said,
is insufficient employment to allow
students to finance their education.
Sihota said employment was
down in the forestry, tourism,
transportation and construction
industries.   All   these   industries
normally employ great numbers of
students, Sihota said.
Former BCSF member Lyle
Viereck said the federal government made the student employment situation worse by
dropping its Opportunities for
Youth program and restricting the
Local Initiatives Program.
houses in the university area
contains a room or suite rented to
students illegally.
Another panelist, Tom Simpson,
aldermanic candidate for The
Electors Action Movement, was
criticized for TEAM'S housing
policies.
"How can you work for TEAM
when you've created this housing
problem?" one student asked.
Simpson replied: "It was the best
way to get elected."
Savard called for improvements
in the Forty-ninth and Thirty-third
bus routes, heavily used by
students. A new bus route along
Twenty-fifth should be established,
he said.
Enrico Diano, aldermanic
candidate for the Non-Partisan
Association, said he has helped
push for a new bus route along
Twenty-fifth to UBC. He said
students' needs should receive
higher priority on city council.
Bus plan gets OK
Despite charges it was rubber-stamping a decision that's already been
made, Vancouver city council Tuesday approved changes in the
operation of Forty-first and Forty-ninth buses effective Friday.
The changes mean Ihe Forty-first route will be extended from the Joyce
Loop to Kingsway and Nelson in Burnaby and the Forty-ninth route
service will get reduced service. Passengers on the Forty-ninth route will
have to transfer at the Dunbar Loop instead of continuing directly to
UBC.
Sol Jackson, an aldermanic candidate in the upcoming civic election,
Wednesday accused council of acting as a rubber stamp for B.C. Hydro
because "Hydro had already announced the changes in the newspapers
before obtaining approval from city council.
"Council realized it was being used but did not do anything about it."
A public hearing on the changes will be held in January, but Jackson
said it should be held earlier because "once we get these changes, it will
take one hell of a public outcry to get the service back."
could not be attributed to student
drinking.
"I do not under any circumstances attribute this (vandalism) to drinking on campus,"
the source said.
Rose Powell, SFU student
society president, said Wednesday
there have been no complaints
from either the RCMP or the
Liquor Administration Branch
regarding the operation of SFU's
drinking facilities.
SFU security head Cal Smith
said Wednesday there were some
vandalism problems on campus
but had no complaints about the
operation of SFU's drinking
facilities. He blamed non-students
coming to SFU at night for campus
vandalism.
All of SFU's evening drinking
facilities are located in the
University Centre Building. The
building is centrally located at
SFU and is only a short distance
from the student residences.
Building manager Bill Birge said
Wednesday the SFU facilities have
a good reputation with the LAB.
Panel on
tuition fees
disagrees
By MIKE BOCKING
B.C. universities should raise
tuition fees because otherwise the
poor will have to pay more taxes to
subsidize university students, UBC
economics professor Gideon
Rosenbluth said Monday.
Rosenbluth told a panel
discussion in SUB about tuition
fees that university students are
already a privileged elite heavily
subsidized by the public.
He said taxes paid by the general
public are going to subsidize an
education system that mainly
serves the middle and upper
classes. Most university students
are from upper-income families,
Rosenbluth said.
He said keeping tuition fees low
is ineffective because it has not
resulted in universal access to
university.
Tuition fees are not the biggest
costs students face, he said. "The
biggest financial obstacle to going
to university is the foregone earnings which are given up to go to
university instead of getting a
job," said Rosenbluth.
But Stew Savard of the B.C.
Students' Federation, said
business and society in general
benefit from higher education and
they should pay for higher
education.
"Society directly and indirectly
benefits from higher education and
business and industry operate
better with an educated workforce."
Corporation taxes should bear
the brunt of education costs, said
Savard.
Moe Sihota, Alma Mater Society
external affairs officer, spoke in
favor of lowering tuition fees.
"Education is a right, not a
privilege," he said. "The principle
of universal access to education
extends today only as far as the
primary and secondary schools,"
he said.
There are class, sex, racial and
geographical barriers to universal
access to education at the
university level, he said.
Anthony Scott, another
economics professor, said "the
real barriers to education are the
high costs of living while being a
student, and the foregone earnings." Reducing tuition fees won't
help much, he said.
Rosenbluth said tuition fees at
UBC are considerably lower than
fees at other Canadian universities. He said students are attracted to B.C. universities
because fees are low. Page 4
THE
UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 28,  1976
Students aren't tools, Pat
The change in Pat McGeer
could not have been more
complete if he had gone to
Sweden to have his sex
changed.
McGeer, once a
dyed-in-the-wool Liberal, has
become a full-fledged Socred
with a built-in hardware store
mentality.
That the transition is
complete is evident in a letter
McGeer sent to B.C.
community colleges Oct. 13.
The letter warns the
colleges they had better start
looking for other sources of
funding because "there is
little prospect of any
increased grants for this year
except for the most essential
items."
But the line that reveals
how loyal a Socred McGeer
has become, reads as follows:
"In future, grants will not be
increased by increasing taxes
as was done in the last year.
Increases in grants can only
come as a result of real gains
in the provincial
productivity."
So instead of paying for
increases in education costs
from general taxes, McGeer
suggests the colleges pass on
increased costs to students,
just as companies like
Safeway pass on their costs
to consumers.
Contrast this statement to
what McGeer said 10 years
ago, before he switched to
the Socred team.
"Our economy has been
handicapped by a shortage of
much larger infusions of
highly skilled people and our
government resources
drained by the unskillled and
unemployed. In the near
future, money must go to
our educational institutions."
So now McGeer says
education    cannot    expand
. . .the next lot, ladies and gentlemen, Wilkinson's Ambulance No.
72 (detail), 1976. A finer example of some of the master's early
works, but already showing many of the confident strokes marking
his  masterpieces . . . originally drawn for a  Ubyssey feature that
never ran ... bids start at $500 .. .
without improvement in the
economy, but 11 years ago
he said the economy cannot
improve without expansion
in education.
If McGeer applied his
current philosophy to other
social services, imagine the
chaos.
Sick people would have to
pay more to get cured if the
forest industry did poorly
one particular year. Welfare
benefits could be chopped if
a drop in world wide mineral
prices led to a depression in
the mining industry.
Toll booths would be set
up along the highways so
motorists could pay more
toward the upkeep of roads.
And now students are
being asked to pay more for
their own education.
As McGeer said way back
in 1965, "the very purpose
of the educational system is
defeated when capable
people reject educational
opportunity because the
price is a deterrent."
He was right. Higher
tuition fees only keep lower
income students out of
post-secondary education
and make education the sole
right of the rich and the
middle-class.
So look back at what you
once said, McGeer, you
might find you made a lot of
sense.
Letters
Take my wife
—please
Hey, you people who put together
the best student newspaper west of
Blanca: where's your sense of
humor? . . . your joiede vivre? . . .
your funny bone???
Don't tell me your sense of
humour dried up along with beer in
the Pit.
I know it's a full-time job
practising your "serious" journalism so you can slip into your
ready-made jobs at the Sun and
Province, but why not take a few
minutes to provide your faithful
readers with a chuckle or two?
With any luck, it could become a
habit.
I know, heaven forbid that a
student should want to read
something light and frivolous in (of
all things) a newspaper (my god,
aren't students an apathetic
bunch!). But after a day of
(boring) English lectures, (mind-
boggling) math tutorials,
(exhausting) chem labs and
(depressing) history seminars, it
sure would be nice to be able to
laugh. Has the ghost of Eric Nicol
left UBC for good?
You must have heard the famous
expression: "A smile on the face is
worth 20 Ubysseys in the bush."
Sure, take a stand, complain
about student apathy, or student
stupidity (whichever is worse at
the moment) but then, have the
time for a laugh. Don't take
yourselves so seriously. One
doesn't have to be depressed to be
informed.
So how about it? Amusing
mastheads and Pango Pango
bulletins are not enough. A smile
won't crack your face, and a good
belly laugh won't give anyone a
pain in the ass.
B. Heureux
President,
Society For Unequivocal
Nonsense [FUN]
You're right, B. Heureux: a
smile won't face your pain and a
good belly laugh won't give anyone
a crack in the ass.
[Am I keeping you people
awake? Laugh it up ... I know
you're out there; I can here the
pages turning.]
But seriously, folks, B. Heureux
doesn't know his ass from his
elbow — but then, they're seldom
far apart. Nice kid, but he has
bubbles in his think tank, rooms to
let upstairs, not playing with a full
deck, know what I mean?
[Hey, what's with you people? I
should have known this was a
sleepy joint when I saw all the
hearses outside!]
The Ubyssey staff has a good
right-thinking sense of humus —
it's just that our tripewriters don't.
This machine, for example, is
kinda touchy right now because it's
pregnant. I know, because it
missed a period last month.—Staff
Milky way
Commenting on your editorial in
Tuesday's Ubyssey headlined It
was the milk, doctor, I would like
to ask what is all this crap about
milk, butter and cheese not being
good for you?
Dr. Thomas Hall, director of the
Cancer Control Agency of B.C.,
said that animal fats found in milk
and its by-products, are a bigger
killer than automobile accidents.
If   we   were   to   worry   about
everything that is said about
certain foods being the possible
causes of body diseases (and I
think that milk and its by-products
cannot be included in this
statement) then we would be living
on . . . well, let me see, I can't
seem to think of what there would
be left to eat or drink.
I say to hell with Dr. Thomas
Hall's theory. Maybe the powder
crap or skim milk which are
available to people will rot your
insides, but all I know is that from
the day I was no longer breast fed,
I drank raw milk in abundance, up
to my present consumption of at
least two, sometimes more, quarts
a day. With a blood pressure of
72/1101 am in good physical health.
I urge everyone to support their
local dairy, oh, and bartender,
make mine milk please.
Bernie Mantai
arts 1
[and son of a dairy farmer]
Pore humor
"Hey, your picture's in the
paper!"
"My picture's in the paper?
Which paper?"
"The Ubyssey!"
"You're kidding. What for?"
That was my first reaction. After
all, I never knew the picture had
ever been taken.
But then I saw the picture and
read the caption. I recognized the
profile in the picture but not what
was written underneath it.
I am not a "bored student"
reading "Coarsepore" for a
"boring" arts course. Perhaps I
am an exception to the rule. Yet, I
don't think its fair to label all
students in the faculty of arts as
"bored students reading for boring
course   which,   of   course,   is
THE UBYSSEY
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1976
Published   Tuesdays,   Thursdays  and   Fridays  throughout  the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS
or the university administration. Member, Canadian .University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room
241K  of the  Student  Union Building.  Editorial departments
2?8-2301; Sports, 228-2305; Advertising, 228-3977.
Co-Editors: Sue Vohanka, Ralph Maurer
"Quick you fuel, pass me my phlegm ruler," snarled reichs
bureaucrat Ralph Maurer. "Chris Gainor, Jan Nicol, Charlie Micallef and
Kathy Ford? Get back to the Rubyssey orifice and fredlt those snorles."
And you Bill Tieleman, Ted Davis, Brad Nelson, Nancy Southam and Mike
Socking — hurry up and write a fredllne for the whine story. As soon as
the silly editor writes the snorey list we'll have a gnus conference," Maurer
continued. Marcus Gee, Matt King, Paul Wilson, Doug Field and Paul
Vanderham wondered what the fuck the diminutive dictator was talking
about. "Jello, Heather Walker? Write a churn line for that food cervixes pic
will you," Sue Vohanka, Verne McDonald and Bruce Constantineau
through up their hands in desperation. "Why don't you speak Swahili,
Maurer. It would be simpler."
required for B.A. which, of course,
stands for bugger all."
It just so happens that I have
worked full-time at an eastern
university for 14 months. Then I
realized I liked school, studying
and, especially, what I am doing
now, medieval studies. I came
back; am presently in my 4th
year; and stil look forward to
every class.
Maybe I am one of the few who
are attending university because
they enjoy it. But then again,
maybe I am not!
Pat MacKenzie
arts 4
Elitism
Over the last few weeks on this
campus it has become obvious to
me that the often criticized apathy
of the majority of the students is
primarily a reflection of the outmoded philosophies and platforms
espoused by the majority of the
student spokesmen and reflected in
the better part of the student press.
The purpose of all education and
for that matter experience in
general must be to make us less up
tight, more understanding, more
tolerant, and in general more
willing and able to accept the world
for what it actually is rather than
flying off on emotional tangents
which in light of the real world
have no relevance whatsoever.
Take for example the question of
student fees. They amount to
approximately one-fifth of the total
cost of each student's place, so that
someone, somewhere is paying our
way. And given the current needs
of not only this country but of the
See page 5 Thursday, October 28, 1976
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 5
Adventure on the Amazon
By BRAD NELSON
The search for a model explaining how
humans crawled from the water to the land
as Darwin theorized has led a team of international scientists — four of them from
UBC — into the mysterious upper regions of
the Amazon river.
The scientists, led by UBC zoology
professor Peter Hochachka, studied an air
breathing fish called the Arapaima that
lives in the waters of the Amazon about 1,500
miles from the river mouth.
Conditions in that area of the Amazon
basin resemble those of the period millions
of years ago when aquatic animals stepped
from the water to mud and began breathing
air instead of water.
The scientists hoped the air breathing fish
could provide a modern day model for that
evolutionary stage.
Hochachka, who recently returned from
the first phase of the expedition, said in a
recent interview that local fishermen cooperated with scientists by providing live
specimens for the team to study aboard the
floating laboratory ship the Alpha Helix.
The expedition, funded by a $170,000
National Research Council grant, began in
early September when Hochachka set out
with three of his graduate students, Michael
Guppy, Helga Guderley and Ken Storey, to
study the biochemical effects of the
Arapaima's unusual respiratory system.
Another UBC zoology professor, David
Randall, is currently in Brazil, leading the
second phase of the expedition which is
studying the physiology of the fish.
Randall will return to UBC at the end of
this month.
Hochachka said on site study was an
essential part of the expedition because both
animal and environment had to be analyzed
simultaneously.
-peter hochachka photo
ARAPAIMA . .. highly vascularized lung
Few snags
The Alpha Helix, a research vessel built 10
years ago for the Scripps Institute of
Oceanography in San Diego, was fitted with
all the equipment needed by the scientists.
"Only one or two snags occurred with the
equipment," said Hochachka, "but these
were overcome with a little innovative
thinking, the local solutions to our
problems."
It had been thought, because of the
peculiar breathing mechanism of the
Arapaima and the resemblance of Amazon
conditions to those of the late Devonian
period about 330 million years ago, that the
fish could provide a model for the evolution
of air breathing animals.
The Arapaima has a highly vascularized
swim bladder  that allows  oxygen-carbon
dioxide transfer in a manner similar to that
of the human lung.
"If you hold an Arapaima under water
long enough it'll drown," said Hochachka.
"The gills serve only to regulate the ion
balance in the animal's body. A man staying
in water for prolonged periods would bloat
because he has no such organ."
However, the scientists' hopes for a model
of the evolution of air breathing animals
were soon to drop.
"On this score, our expectations weren't
realized," said Hochachka. "Unfortunately,
the air breather is more analogous to a
diving mammal like the seal or the porpoise.
"The fish gulps its air, then quickly dives
to escape anticipated surface predators —
so the fish must of necessity get the most
efficient use of that short gulp of air. It does
this by oxygen conservation — all but its
most vital organs remain anaerobic or
oxygen poor.
"This doesn't agree with the behavior of
early air breathing vertebrates who
wouldn't have surface predators to worry
about. All their organs would have been
completely operational."
Nevertheless, Hochachka said knowledge
gained during the expedition will be useful.
"About 45 abstracts have resulted so far,
and the first manuscripts should be ready by
next June."
Hochachka said obtaining the fish was no
problem, since about 80 per cent of the fish
market supply in the Brazilian city of
Manaus, near the expedition site, was
caught in the rain forest region where the
expedition was based.
"We paid the fishermen $50 per fish, or
about twice the market value, so there was
no shortage of volunteers. The only
stipulations were that the fish had to be
belo w the legal minimum size of six feet (for
which a permit was secured) and had to be
caught alive."
Hochachka said the fish, which are considered a delicacy around the world, can
grow to 15 feet in length and could require
several men to hold a single fish down.
Occasionally, two or three scientists
would accompany fishermen in the dugout
canoes.
"Floating along at night (the best time to
fish) with only a flashlight to light the way
through the dark was an incredible experience," Hochachka said.
"The stereotype jungle noises are only
heard at night, along with a few noises you
wouldn't expect to hear."
Hochachka,   who  recorded   the   alien
sounds on a tape recorder, said one of the
most unusual was a loud crack followed by a
splash. It was apparently made by the
carnivorous Arapaima jumping free of the
water and snapping their powerful jaws on
the smaller prey they pursued.
"But the jungle in the daytime was as
silent as a graveyard. If you stood silently in
your canoe, you could hear the periodic
gasps of the fish surfacing to breathe. It was
an eerie sound," he added.
Although 17 scientists and a full crew
confined to a ship for a month doesn't sound
like the ideal living situation, Hochachka
said the ship had all the comforts of a well-
stocked resort.
Isolation a myth
One of the special dinners provided was a
meal of Arapaima. "One fish fed 32 people,
and only two of them didn't like it," he said.
Although the scientists were surrounded
by water, swimming was not terribly
popular. "The only time you could swim was
3 p.m. —a few hours before the single daily
feeding of the piranha — but you still had to
keep a watchful eye for poisonous water
snakes and a nasty kind of catfish."
Hochachka, also an amateur anthropologist, said he was fascinated by the
cultures he observed in Brazil. The native
people on the Rio Negro, a river which flows
into the Amazon, live on reservations in
bare wooden huts with aluminum roofs.
"The thatched huts of the Cobachlos or
river people looked much more livable," he
said. Cobachlos in translation means mixed
breed, indicative of the cultural heritage of
the fishermen, "but they prefer to call
themselves river people. They live like the
native jungle folk using the same tools and
weapons."
According to Hochachka, the mysterious
isolation of the Amazon is becoming more
and more a myth of the past.
"The river is the best highway they have,
and it's becoming heavily travelled. Brazil
taxes Brazilians leaving Brazil for
vacations, so they are encouraged to visit
places along the Amazon river for escape."
After the first phase of the expedition was
finished, Hochachka and his fellow scientists returned to Manaus to brief Randall
and the remainder of the second phase
team. "They were conscious of our extreme
enthusiasm — undoubtedly when they
return they'll have the same euphoria that
we had."
He said he plans to write about his South
American adventures — but won't have a
chance until he returns from his latest
adventure. Hochachka left on Saturday for a
research trip to the Antarctic.
Letters
From page 4
planet in general one is bound to
ask just exactly what's in it for
"them."
There are after all four, going on
eight billion people on this planet
and it seems highly unlikely that
provision can be made for them all
to attend. Besides there are,
believe it or not, a million interesting alternatives.
This can serve as an example,
like so many contemporary issues
on today's campus, of the almost
totally irrelevant attitude of
"suburban socialism" that would
seem to do most of its thinking
from a point somewhere in the
vicinity of the waistline. For in
reality if fees rise, less of us will
attend university, the elitism that
obviously exists at present will be
that much less widespread, and in
all likelihood it will be of a higher
quality for it. It's all very well to
mouth off about equal opportunity
but if you've ever slept on the
streets of New Delhi you'll know
that going to university isn't one
hell of a big part of it.
Students, like everybody else,
have to come to grips with the fact
that at an ever increasing rate we
will no longer be living in fat,
luxurious Canada, but on lean,
hard, planet earth.
And on a small world it's one
world or no world!
D. A. Watson
Piticipaction
It wasn't until last week's
Ubyssey that I finally saw the
obvious answer to our campus's
biggest problems. Hidden amongst
the overwhelming articles on the
Pit's closure, our latest struggle, I
found a summary on our more
aged problem of illiteracy. While
pondering over both, the thought
hit me that the two are quite
possibly related.
Could it be that the 37 per cent
that failed last year's English 100
exam are the same people that are
now so outspoken and up in arms
over the closure of a campus
facility? Are these students that
constitute our campus illiterates
the same bunch that claim their
main life support has been cut off
with the Pit?
I think so. It is my suggestion
that these people should get off
their rear ends, quit complaining,
and do something constructive,
maybe even educational, as an
alternative to getting pie-eyed in
the pub.
Why don't they go to a play? It's
only a couple of dollars, less than
they would spend grovelling, and
just think of the benefits; they
could be entertained, relaxed,
support a worthy function, and best
of all, not have to listen to slurring
maroons babble on about their
latest misadventures at the
urinals.
Of course, studying is out of the
question, but why don't they see a
movie or go to a club activity? God
help me for treading on thin ice,
but if they've got the time why
don't they read a took for fun!
There are a few, I'm sure, that
are hellbent against doing
anything academically extracurricular. To those I suggest they
do something constructive to their
beer-fattened, out-of-breath
bodies.
Play a sport, join a fitness
program, go for a walk. Almost
anything is better than drinking
beer and besides it's only for 30
days.
There is still a greater problem
man the Pit closure and illiteracy
— it's student apathy that should
make our headlines Get keen and
if you don't like my [solution go ask
your mothers if they can find
something for you ta do.
John Comparelli
arts 2
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be addressed to
the paper care of campus mail or
dropped off at The Ubyssey office,
SUB 241-K.
DR. BUNDOLO
S.U.B.
TODAY
12:30 p.m.
FREE
LIVE RADIO COMEDY
a CBC production
CBU 690 Page 6
THE        UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 28, 1976
Ks^fc-^ m
Teacup
football
Nurses and home economics
students head for the turf today
to mangle each other and earn
some money for charity in the
process.
The annual Teacup football
game, complete with male
cheerleaders at half-time, starts at
V#'^*."iv'
Hot flashes
noon in Thunderbird S.tadium.
Money raised at the game goes to
the crippled childrens' fund.
More forums
The National Students' Day
committee is sponsoring open
forums on topics which concern
students, and there are still five of
the little devils to come.
Today's forum is on student
government.
Forums will continue until
Nov. 4, and the remaining ones
are on quality of education,
tuition increases, student aid and
education cutbacks.
They are held at noon in the
SUB conversation pit.
The NSD committee hopes to
stimulate interest in National
Student Day on Nov. 9 through
these forums. NSD is a day of
concern about student issues.
Tween classes
TODAY
MY JONG, KUNG FU CLUB
Practice,     5     p.m.,     Place     Vanier
ballroom.
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY
Lecture    ancf    film    about    dental
hygiene, noon, IRC 1.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Music program, noon, SUB 205.
CONTEMPORARY DANCE CLUB
Dance     display,     noon,     SUB     art
gallery.
NUS
Tea-cup   football   game for  charity,
noon, Thunderbird Stadium.
SPEAKEASY
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
CSA
Play games and make friends, noon,
SUB 216.
INTER-VARSITY
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Ian  Rennie speaks about the history
of student movements, noon, Chem
250.
PRE-VET SOCIETY
Guest   speaker   about   small   animal
medicine, 1:30 p.m., Macml 160.
STUDENT COUNCIL FOR
EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN
General  meeting, noon, Scarfe 208.
ACM
Speech  about artificial  intelligence,
noon, Civil 201.
CSA
Movie   about   acupunture   in  China,
3:30 p.m., SUB auditorium.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Vin      et      fromage,      7      p.m.,
International House lounge.
CENTRE FOR
HUMAN SETTLEMENTS
Habitat films from Japan,  Italy and
France, noon, IRC B79.
CHARISMATIC
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Speakers   from   the   radio   ministry
team,  7:30  p.m., Lutheran Campus
Centre.
'DECORA TE WITH PRINTS*
grin bin
MASKS
JOKES
PRINTS
POSTERS
3209 W. Broadway
738-2311
(opposite Super-Valu)
iDECORA TE WITH POSTERS.
George & Berny's
VOLKSWAGEN
REPAIRS
COMPLETE SERVICE BY
FACTORY-TRAINED
MECHANICS
FULLY GUARANTEED
AT REASONABLE RATES
731-8644
2125 W. 10th at Arbutus
SIMS
Group    meditation    and    advanced
lecture, noon, Buto 297.
CDU
Meeting to discuss plans for
National Student Day, noon, SUB
212A.
FRIDAY
CHINESE
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Bible study, noon, SUB 212A.
SKYDIVING CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
CSA AND CVC
Cantonese class, noon, Bu 316.
AQUASOC
General    meeting   and   film,   noon,
SUB 205.
PSYCHOLOGY
STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Guest lecturer, noon, Angus 223.
The
UBC Alumni Chronicle,
CREATIVE WRITING
COMPETITION 76
open    to
students
all     UBC
• a prize fund of $400 is
provided by the UBC
Alumni Fund
• entries are restricted to
short stories of not
more than 3000 words
•deadline for
submission is January
31,1977
• for full details call the
UBC Alumni
Association at Cecil
Green  Park, 228-3313
SALVAGE A STUDENT
TUTORS -
few dollars.
Make a few friends and a
Register with the UBC TUTORIAL
CENTRE Speak-Easy, SUB. Fee $1.
228-4557. 12:30 - 2:30 Monday to
Friday.
A programme of the UBC Alumni Association
Independent Opt
Come in and experience good old-fashioned Service!!
U.F.O. SPECIAL     $24.95
Extended till Nov./30/76
Plus Lenses
Christian Dior - Silhouette, & others 25% Off
Open 12 - 5 p.m. Sundays
44 Water St., Gastown    681-6626
GRADUATE EXECUTIVE
COUNCIL NOTICE
VACANCY — Grad Student AMS
Representative for
Grad Student Association.
Nomination forms can be obtained at Graduate Centre
Office.
Form    must    be    submitted   by   November   8   and    must   be
accompanied by a brief statement of proposals, interests etc.
1       CANDIA TAVERNA        I
13 ig
13 FAST FREE PIZZA DELIVERY 13
13 Call 228-9512/9513 13
|] 4510 W. 10th Ave., Open 7 Days a Week 4 p.m.-2 a.m. j|
I3 BlalglalaBlglalsEIalsBtalalalalsIsBlalalaB BBBBBIalalaBIsIaBIa IH
Rendale
Apple bee
Wrangler
Lee
Big Blue
Seafarers
Levi's
Brrrtania
Place for Pants
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:    Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c.
Commercial — 3 lines,  1 day $2.50; additional lines
50c Additional days $2.25 and 45c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Vancouver.
5 — Coming Events
"VOICE OF THE ANDES" Christian
Radio H.C.J.B., Equador, featured by
Film, Music and Speakers, Thursday,
Oct. 28, 7:30 p.m., Lutheran Campus
Centre.
10 —For Sale — Commercial
C.B.'s CAR STEREOS, name brands —
distributed by students — 20% - 50%
below retail. CaU us for units or just
Frank info. 733-6502 evenings.
DO-IT-YOURSELF   PICTURE   FRAMING
for people with more taste than
money — 3657 West Broadway. Open
til 9:00 p.m. Thursday.
Community Sports
OCTOBER   SPECIAL
Many  Amazing Prices  for Racquets
of AU Kinds — 50 per cent Discount
on   all   Racquet   Stringing.
3616 W. 4th AVE. — 733-1611
11 — For Sale — Private
BORN TO RACE! Moped in good condition, low mileage, new tires. $225.
Ken, 228-1602.
INDIAN SWEATER, never been- worn,
app. size 42. $45.00. Phone: 325-7045.
20 — Housing
WOMEN STUDENTS: Tired ot commuting to campus every day? Tired
of cooking for yourself? Tired of trying to study at home when "home" is
so far from the library? Why not try
living in U.B.C.'s single student residences? Vacancies are now available
in Totem Park and Place Vanier for
women students. Sign up at the
Housing Administration Office, General Services Admin. Bldg. The office
is open 8:30 to 4:30 Monday through
Friday.
AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY. Self-contained suite. Suit 2 persons. $225/mo.
13th near MacDonald. Ph. 738-1282,
after 4 p.m. Non-smokers preferred.
ONE ROOM available in home shared
by four students (law, climate, agriculture, restoration). Good location in
Kits. $120.00. 733-8015. (Russ, Kathy,
Steve, Ron.) Woman preferred.
25 — Instruction
30 - Jobs
35 - Lost
LOST:    GREY    SCOTTISH    SHETLAND
sweater near GSC. Reward! Susan,
684-1764 or message school of Architecture.
URGENT 3-R1NG green binder. 1st year
biology notes. Please contact Raydene,
736-3992, needed immediately.
WHOEVER "found" man's gold watch
in Angus 110, Monday morning, call
228-0391. Reward!
LOST: TAN COLORED binder, marked
"American Management Association"
If found please call Dave at 266-4012.
I LEFT MY FLUTE in your car Friday,
Oct. 15. It's U.B.C.'s and I can't afford
the $200 to replace it. Please call —
734-2863 or 224-3113.
70 — Services
Personal Message Service!
Pissed off at profs? Heartbroken? Scared to talk in
person? Let me deliver the
message. Call Stephen —
261-4366
FAMILY DAY CARE available for 2-
years plus, or after school care under
prof, nanny. 4439 W. 7th Ave, 228-9897
— Barb.
85 — Typing
PROFESSIONAL typing on IBM correcting typewriter by experienced
secretary.   Reasonable.   224-1567.
FAST EFFICIENT TYPING, near 41st &
Marine — 266-5053.
EFFICIENT SELECTRIC Typing my
home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat accurate work. Reasonable rates —
263-5317.	
90 - Wanted
ATTRACTIVE black female model required for Fall Fashion Show. Ask
for Ron, 738-6720.	
99 — Miscellaneous
SKI WHISTLER
Rent   cabin  day/week.   732-0174  eves.
WHISTLER CABIN CHEAPI Only $335
for 7 mths. Need people to share.
Near gondola. Call Pat after Ave,
688-5908 or Vicki, 689-0361 (fireplaoe,
too!).
LONDON BOUND? $200 one-way ticket.
Phone Tom McKeown, 986-1911, local
218. Nov. 15th deadline. Thursday, October 28, 1976
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 7
The 1976-77 Alma Mater Society Bndget
Schednles
SCHEDULE A
PROPOSED UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY ALLOTMENTS
No. of stude
nts
Agriculture
377
$    413.00
Applied Science
989
597.00
Architecture
202
361.00
Nursing
368
410.00
Arts
4,923
1-.188.00
Home Economics
396
419.00
Librarianship
126
338.00
Commerce
1,601
690.00
Dentistry
196
359.00
Faculty of Educatio
n
3,402
960.00
Pharmacy
357
407.00
Physical Education
573
472.00
Recreation
153
346.00
Forestry
340
402.00
Graduate Studies
2,759
864.00
Law
704
511.00
Medicine
327
398.00
Rehab. Medicine
327
333.00
Science
3,731
1,010.00
Social Work
135
340.00
10,818.00
SCHEDULE B
1. UBYSSEY BUDGET
REVENUE:
Advertising Display (NET)
$97,930
Classified
3,250
Subscriptions
200
$101,380
EXPENSE:
A. Administration -
Publications
16
130
Promotion
200
B.   Printing
97,000
16,330
97,000
Salaries (copy runner) 835
Honorarium (Constitutional) 1,000
Telephone and Telex 1,950
Materials and Supplies (Typewriters)
Postage 1,100
Sundry 500
Photography 650
Distribution 3,600
Staff Meals 650
C.U.P. — Fees 3,746
C.U.P. — Conference 680
Bad Debts 1,000
650
16,361
TOTAL SUBSIDY REQ'D
ADD GENERAL ADMINISTRATION COSTS
TOTAL COST TO A.M.S.
1.   PUBLICATIONS BUDGET
129,691
28,312
5,853
$34,165
Expense:
Salaries
Payroll Costs
Telephone
Materials and Supplies
Postage
Expense Account
Sundry
Repairs and Maintenance
Total
PRO RATION OF EXPENSE:
Ubyssey
Handbook
3. HANDBOOK
REVENUE:
Advertising (NET)
EXPENSE:
Administration
Salaries and Benefits
Printing
Bad Debts
Distribution
£20,800
750
575
525
390
1,250
400
125
24,815
16,130
8,685
24,815
20,000
Loss
20,000
8,685
2,500
8,500
450
200
20,335
$       335
80,305
6,730
1,800
$   88,835
1,170
500
600
4,500
4,500
9,600
3,000
SCHEDULE C
GENERAL ADMINISTRATION BUDGET
salaries and Benefits
Salaries
Car Allowance
Telephone
3ostage
Professional Services
Hiring
Audit
Legal
supplies and Stationery
'rint Shop
Revenue
Expense:
Supplies and Stationery   $1,000
Salaries 8,851
Benefits 452
'art-Time Staff and Overtime
.undry
.taff Relations
■taff Development
accounting Machine Paper
accounting Machine Maintenance
)ffice Equipment
)fflce Equipment Maintenance
otal
vmortization - Philips Machine*
otal Administration Charge
to be allocated
5,803
10,303
4,500
1,000
300
350
400
750
1,450
300
500
112,655
4,400
$117,055+
Philips Accounting Machine: Amortized over five
(5) years on advice of Philips Co.
•This is a suspense account to isolate administration expenses to
ie charged to the following areas on the following basis. These
lercentages, are based on the amount of work processed by this
epartment on behalf of the other departments or programmes.
Snmmai
REVENUE:
1
A.M.S. Fees (based on 21,000 fu
1 time
student enrolment)
—Regular (21,000 x $34)
$714,000
—Extension
20,000
Graduation Class Fees
26,200
Undergraduate Society Fees
23,050
Thunderbird Winter
Sports Centre
7S.000
$858,250
Other Estimated Income:
Investment Income
25,000
SUB Income
17,000
42,000
Total
'$900,250
EXPENDITURES:
Non-Discretionary:
Student Union Building Debt
(21,000x$15)
315,000
Graduation Class Fees
26,200
Undergraduate Class Fees
23,050
Registration Photographs
6,250
Athletic Fee
105,000
Aquatic Trust Fund
105,000
SUB Art Fund (Constitutional)
1,500
Thunderbird Winter
Sports Centre Loan
75,000
657,000
243,250
less Constitutional Margin 5%
31,162
AMOUNT AVAILABLE FOR
DISCRETIONARY USE
$212,088
DISCRETIONARY USE
EXPENDITURES:
General Administration Costs
81,939
(See Schedule C)
Subsidy to Ubyssey
28,312
(See Schedule B)
Loss on Handbook
335
(See Schedule B)
S.R.A. Budget
33,388
(See Schedule D)
S.A.C. Budget (See Schedule E)
Administration      17,600
Controlled Funds 19,700
Assigned Funds     31,300
68,050
TOTAL EXPENDITURES
212,024
Surplus
($64)
Funds Direct Controlled by S.A.C
1975/76
1976/77
S.R.A.
20%
8%
$      9,364
S.A.C.
12%
14,046
Ubyssey
5%
5%
5,852
Student Union Building
10%
10%
11,705
Pit
20%
20%
23,410
Undergrad Societies
20%
20%
23,411
Clubs
20%
20%
23,415
Activities
5%
5%
5,852
Total
117,055
Charges allocated to Building
and Pit
35,116
81,939
SCHEDULE D
STUDENT REPRESENTATIVE ASSEMBLY BUDGET
HONORARIUMS (Constitutional)
President
Secretary/Treasurer
External/Affairs
Additional Honoraria:
External Affairs
President
Miscellaneous
CONFERENCES
Out of province
In province
September conference
Referendum publicity
S.R.A. Projects
Orientation
Speakers Committee
Donations
Special and Professional
Services (legal)
Telephone
Stationery, supplies, postage
Constituency Grants (Schedule A)
External Affairs:
Travel
Telephone & Stationery
Referendum
Total
8% of General Admin. Budget
TOTAL S.R.A. BUDGET
SCHEDULE E
SAC BUDGET
Honorariums (Constitutional)
Sundry
Honorarium:
Director of Services $
Commissioner
Travel (Meeting and Conferences)
Elections
Salaries and Benefits:
Director of Finance
Coffee
Telephone
Material, Supplies and Postage
Special and Professional
Services (legal)
Printing and Duplicating
Information
S.A.C. Conference
Total S.A.C. Admin. Costs
200.00
200.00
200.00
300.00
400.00
$   1,300
300
1,900
720.00
1,500
2,000
2,620
600
6,000
1,000
2,000
800
1,500
10,818
1,640.00
460.00
350.00
2,450
$33,388
9,364
$42,752
300
300
400
$   2,400
600
600
1,000
3,500
3,000
850
900
1,500
1,000
1,000
300
Campus Conference Fund
1,500
Clubs Day
700
Clubs Benefit Fund:
Conference Grants
3,500
Special Projects
1,500
Speakers Grant Fund
2,000
SUB Management Fund
10,500
Total
19,700
Funds Assigned by S.A.C.            ,
A.M.S. Art Gallery Committee
3,000
CITR Support
(Repairs & Maintenance)
3,000
♦Operating Expense
11,000
Intramurals:
Men's
9,300
Women's
4,800
Co-lntramurals
1,200
Total
15,300
Total
31,300
Total SAC budget
68,050
12% of General Admin. Budget
14,046
TOTAL CHARGES
$82,096
Notes
$17,050
This budget is based on 21,000 full fee paying members. The
notes will help to clarify the budget by explaining some of the
expenditures listed therein.
student union building debt
This is the $15.00 portion of the AMS fee to be used to repay
the capital cost of the building.
undergradute society fees
This is the amount collected on behalf of the Undergraduate
Societies by the AMS as shown In the revenue section.
graduation class fee
This is the $7.00 fee levy collected on behalf of the Graduating
Class.
sub management fund
This fund is no longer a constituted allocation as it was prior to
the new Constitution. The amount of the fund is to be
determined by SAC as well as its administration.
sub art fund
Constitutional allocation of $1,500 for the purchase of
Canadian Contemporary Art.
registration photographs
The cost of placing photographs on membership cards. (.25c
per student).
athletic fee
This is the $5.00 extramural athletic fee established by
referendum.
constitutional margin
The constitutional margin will be 5% of discretionary funds as
upon the societies budget. There is also to be a 5% error factor
to be established for SUB and Pit budgets as a safety margin for
the society.
ubyssey (schedule b-1)
The allocation will allow the Ubyssey to publish three times per
week until the budget is spent. This amount included 66% of
the Publications Administration expense (Schedule B-2) which
supplies the support services, such as accounts receivable and
advertising sales, that are necessary for the operation of the
campus newspaper.
intramurals
This allocation allows all students to participate in many
organized sports, through teams formed in clubs and
Undergraduate Societies.
student representative assembly
This is the budget on which the S.R.A. operates itself. Included
in this amount is a portion of general administration expense
(Schedule C) which supports the S.R.A. and its direct
programmes and activities. Some services which the S.R.A. uses
are auditors, solicitors, printing and general bookkeeping.
conference grants
This is a special fund administered by the S.A.C. to aid
subsidiary organizations in sending a maximum* of two
representatives to conferences, which will be beneficial to their
membership and/or to the AMS as a whole. Written reports are
to be submitted by the delegates for future reference of the
Society's members.
speakers committee
This allocation is to cover publicity, travel and honoraria costs
of speakers invited to speak on topics of general interest to
students. Because of limited funds the Committee should avoid
large money allotments to securing individual speakers, and
instead concentrate on inviting locally available speakers, those
in Vancouver already or those willing to travel at their own
expense.
special projects
This allocation is administered by the SAC and SRA to aid
clubs and AMS designated Special Projects, i.e. Speakeasy, with
the cost of special projects. This fund was established in the
AMS Code when clubs were no longer given direct operational
grants by Council. This fund is non-accumulative.
external affairs
This allocation is to cover the cost of sending the External
Affairs Officer to B.C.S.F., W.S.S. and N.U.S. conferences.
undergraduate society support
This     allocation     represents
administration    which     is    used
Societies (Schedule C).
clubs support
This     allocation     represents
administration which is used to support clubs (Schedule C).
CITR
The $2,000 grant Is to be used only for repair and maintenance
of radio station equipment, the expenditures to be authorized
by the Building Manager. The $11,000 operating grant will be
allocated only if the following conditions are fulfilled: a) CITR
to operate as an FM cable station; b) CITR guarantee other
source of funds for the capital expenditure required to operate
as an FM cable station.
arris art gallery programme committee
This allocation Is to allow for the showing of the Brock Hall
Art Collection in the SUB Art Gallery. The allocation will also
allow the presentation of other art exhibits throughout the
academic year. The main expenses of the programme are
supervision and publicity.
undergraduate society grants
The basis of allocation for 1976/77 is 300/30/15 which means
that a $300 grant Is to be given to all Undergraduate Societies
and Student Associations plus .30c per student for the first
1,000 students and .15c for each student thereafter enrolled in
the faculty. These allotments are calculated on 1975/76 figures.
Respectfully submitted
Herb Dhaliwal
AMS director of finance
October 20, 1976
The Ubyssey is required by the Alma Mater Society
constitution to print its budget each year.
The budget will be presented to the student
representative assembly next week for first reading.
that     portion     of    general
to    support    Undergraduate
that     portion     of    general Page  8
THE        UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 28, 1976
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