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The Ubyssey Sep 27, 1973

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Array Pit opening  delayed year
By VAUGHN PALMER
A union jurisdiction dispute will
probably delay the opening of the
new SUB Pit for one year.
Alma Mater Society co-ordinator
Joanne Lindsay told an AMS
council meeting Wednesday a
strike by 34 pipefitters will most
likely delay installation of ventilation and air conditioning for the
facility until April — which would
mean a September opening.
And AMS vice-president Gordon
Blankstein told council without the
ventilation the Pit would make a
better steambath than a pub.
The delay centers around a
strike by the Vancouver local of the
Pipefitters Union against four
international ventilation and air
conditioning equipment
manufacturers.
Because Vancouver accounts for
only a small percentage of the
industry's business that dispute
probably won't be settled until
April when all contracts between
the  international  union  and  the
international   companies   expire.
"And the dispute could go on a lot
longer," Lindsay said.
Until settlement,.the Vancouver
local has declared "hot" all
equipment manufactured by those
CLEAN SEAS CANADA LTD. workers rake and shovel oil-soaked
peat moss next to damaged British freighter Arawan. Peat moss,
which absorbs 20 times its weight in oil, will be loaded into barrels
—andy garner photo
and removed by tug. Clean Oil Canada is an oil spill clean-up
company co-owned by Gulf of Georgia Towing and Burrard Inlet oil
refineries.
companies including the controls
for the Pit system purchased but
not installed before the strike.
Ironically, Wilson pointed out,
the 34 men are now working for a
fifth company, formed by the other
four companies and they will install air conditioning equipment.
But the work they do for the fifth
company isn't guaranteed and
should the controls malfunction
and wreck the machinery the AMS
would have to foot a $60,000 bill,
Wilson said.
Wilson said there are other
alternatives open to the AMS but
he rejected all of them.
He said the AMS could:
* try to pursuade either union or
management to make a special
case of the AMS because it is a nonprofit society. But he said both
have already been approached and
the union is making no exceptions
and management will wait until
April.
* declare the project finished in
which case ownership would revert
to the society and the UBC administration could do the installations. But Wilson said the
Canadian Union of Public Employees,-which does administration
work, has already said it will honor
the hot declaration.
* make an application for an
injunction claiming the hot
declaration is unduly inconveniencing the society and
preventing the use of $250,000
worth of facilities. But he said
since the strike is legal it is highly
unlikely a judge would grant such
an injunction.
* open the Pit with only ventilation (no air conditioning) which
would keep some air circulating
but when outside temperatures
dropped the cold air would wreck
the expensive machinery.
"We're stuck," Wilson said.
"Basically we're a very small cog
in an enormous dispute and neither
side is interested in settling our
particular problem.
There is a temporary Pit
operating Monday to Friday from
4:30 p.m. to 11 p.m. in the SUB
ballroom.
Over  beach   plan
Administration  unconcerned—say citizens
By LINDA HOSSIE
The UBC administration's lack of concern
over the erosion of the Point Grey cliffs was
unanimously condemned at a citizen's
forum held under the auspices of the
citizen's council on civic development at
Queen Elizabeth School Wednesday night.
A panel of representatives from the
Vancouver Parks Board, Swan Wooster
Engineering and the Committee for the
Preservation of Wreck beach detailed their
views on the controversial Swan Wooster
plan for a sand and gravel fill along the cliffs
and Wreck beach.
The only concerned parties not
represented were UBC and the provincial
» government.
The university's lack of concern was
blasted by irate citizens trying to stop the
Swan Wooster project.
"If the university is not concerned why
are we spending one-third of a million
dollars to keep the cliffs from falling
down?" one citizen asked. "It alludes me."
Jim Bolen, who described himself as an
' "eco-freak", said "I don't care if the Cecil
Green building falls down. I don't care if
three million dollars of buildings fall down.
"I think we've come to a situation where
buildings don't count so"much anymore."
In a highly emotional confrontation
citizens grilled the panel members on their
opinions and ideas.
Ron Blunden, listed on the agenda as a
r consulting engineer,  described   the  Swan
Wooster plan as a "stop-gap measure that
will destroy once and forever any notion that
the beach is a natural area."
During the question period, Blunden said
he felt the plan would be ineffective in
curbing erosion.
"Point Grey is an exposed promontory,
almost by definition an extreme erosion
area," he said.
"If you create the beach there all of the
natural processes are going to work to
remove it."
He said that since the original drafts of the
plan Swan Wooster have added stone groins
which will be placed at 350-foot intervals
along the beach.
"I don't consider that natural," he said
amidst applause. He added it indicated
Swan Wooster couldn't have much faith in
their plans.
"It's pennies to doughnuts that once you
create a headland you create a bay on the
side of it," he said pointing out it is the bays
on the sides of two concrete observation
towers on Wreck beach that are causing the
most serious erosion.
Jack Wood, a Swan Wooster representative, fought citizen reaction with the
details of the problem and his companies
proposed solution.
"Due to some forces, I guess of the
vegetation being taken off the cliffs in the
area of Cecil Green Park, the erosion seems
to be increasing," he said, citing overall
erosion at a foot a year.
Wood emphasized that the plan was drawn
up in an attempt to "keep the beaches as
natural as possible, to put on a sand beach
underlaid by natural gravel "
The gravel will contain stones up to six
inches in diameter. According to Blundon
these will act as battering rams against the
cliff surface if the sea loosens and carries
them in with the tide.
The sand surfaced will be six inches above
the highest tide ever recorded, Wood said,
adding that logs washing up on the beach
would protect the sand from washing away
to a certain extent.
Wood agreed some sand, however, will
wash away by the action of the waves and
periodic maintenance of the area will be
necessary.
Art Cowie, Vancouver Parks Board
chairman, said the board would undertake
any maintenance necessary.
Wood said as Cowie has already promised
no road will go in around Wreck beach this
would mean bringing in sand by barge at
high tide, dumping it and coming back by
barge with machinery to spread the sand at
low tide.
Citizens at the meeting didn't seem to
share his confidence.
A majority demanded that a guarantee be
made by the university that the necessary
steps would be taken to curb run-off and
seepage before the Swan Wooster plan is
even considered.
"I don't think you know what you're
doing," one empassioned citizen accused.
Cowie, who said he was pressing for
"minimal access" to the beach, could not
guarantee any maintenance plan. The
original Swan Wooster project called for a
gravel bed covered with sand extending for
a distance of 3700 feet along the beach.
Recently the government put a ceiling of
$350,000 on the project so Swan Wooster was
forced to reduce the strip of beach to 3100
feet.
Wood would not agree that a smaller
section could be tested first before the entire
3100 feet was gravelled.
"I am definitely not pleased with the cutbacks," he said but refused to state how far
he would be willing to reduce the project if
government money were reduced.
"You've got to have enough beach to
absorb the energy of the wages," he said.
Cowie explained at this point that he had
found Wood adamant in refusing to agree to
a project covering the beach under an area
of 3100 feet.
The fact that Wreck beach is popular as a
nudist spot was not a major discussion point
at the meeting but it did come up.
Cowie said although he himself would go
to a deserted beach on one of the Gulf
Islands to sunbathe in the nude he did not
feel the parks board has any complaints
about nudists on the beach.
Blundon said the scheme rang of "the first
stages of persecution," and the "first stages
of a roadway."
The problem of the roadway is still not
solved.
Cowie said that even if Swan Wooster
brings their materials and equipment in by
barge a temporary road will have to be built
from the barge dock to the fill area.
Citizens said they felt it was likely this
road would remain.
As one citizen put it, summing up all the
citizens feelings, "It's alt a bit iffy at the
moment." Page  2
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 27, 1973
Esso propaganda on tube
ESSO TO EXXON.
—larry manulak photo
.but Imperial all the same.
By BJORN STAVRUM
A citizens' consumer group has accused Imperial
Oil of broadcasting "political propaganda" last winer
on their Hockey Night in Canada advertisements.
In a brief to the Canadian Radio-Television
Commission, the group, the Association for Public
Broadcasting in B.C., has complained Imperial Oil
used the advertising format to "convince the viewing
public that Imperial Oil had created a great benefit
for Canada."
Two specific advertisements are singled out in
the complaint. One concerns the job multiplier effect
of the construction of a new refinery in Edmonton.
What the advertisement does not say is refineries in
Winnipeg, Regina, and Calgary will be closed, thus
causing loss of jobs.
The association's brief stated the advertisement
"drastically overstepped the boundary between
common telelvision advertising (objectionable and
one-sided propaganda that it might be), on the one
hand, and information on a matter of public concern
and political interest, on the other."
Many politicians including the premiers of both
Saskatchewan and Manitoba have criticized the
phasing out of the refineries because of subsequent
job loss.
The second advertisement lauds the environmental protection work the company carried
out in the Mackenzie delta. What this advertisement
does not reveal is Imperial Oil was instructed by
federal agencies in 1971 to suspend certain operations
in the Mackenzie delta because of failure to comply
with conservation rules, the report claims.
This claim is supported by recent briefs from the
Canadian Scientific Pollution and Environmental
Control Society, the Federation of Ontario
Naturalists and the Science Council of Canada, the
association brief says.
A third item in the complaint asks for a public
hearing into the misuse of advertising time for
company "political propaganda" and of the effects of
advertising by foreign-owned companies on Canadian
public opinion and the Canadian economy.
The association has asked for free and equal time
on Hockey Night in Canada to present counterarguments with the licensees, CBC and CTV,
covering production costs.
"There is nothing illegal about the ads. They
weren't lies. It's just that a hot political issue was
created especially in Winnipeg and Regina when they
began   to  close   the   refineries,"   said   Vancouver
lawyer, Eric Rice, association spokesman.
"We felt that with the size of the audience in that"
time slot, advertisements could be very influential,
and that a balanced point of view is highly desirable,"
said Rice.
"Because Imperial Oil was guilty of omission of
certain important facts, their advertisements
became partisan and political in nature, and
therefore at variance with the broadcasting policy in
Canada," he said.
"What in effect we are asking the CRTC to do is to
make a policy decision on advertising," said Rice.
Asked what the association might expect from
the CRTC, Rice said: "It's hard to say. They would bp
careful about the kind of thing we are asking for*
They don't like interfering with individual programs.
They would be very cautious because their decision
could have far-ranging effects.
"When you have a monopoly on prime time,
freedom for everybody to express themselves could
be affected," Rice said. "We are just asking for equal
time."
Construction of the Edmonton refinery will
reduce the number of employees in Winnipeg to 27
from 156, and a similar reduction is expected in
Regina.
Ed Sherry, spokesman for the Oil, Chemical and
Atomic Workers Union in Edmonton, said Tuesday
Imperial Oil intends to phase out its Calgary refinery
by August, 1974.
Sherry said he expects some of the Calgary
employees to be offered jobs in Edmonton, but he said
there has so far been no company guarantee. He said
about 100 men are still employed at the Calgary plant,
down from a peak of 125.
Gordon Pollard, Medicine Hat News legislative
reporter, said in a telephone interview Tuesday there
is currently a serious attempt by the remaining^
Calgary employees to buy out the refinery there and
run it on a co-op basis to supply the immediate
Calgary market.
The co-op would produce 15,000 barrels a day,
making it a medium-sized refinery.
"A co-op on this scale would be unique in North
America as far as I know," said Pollard.
He said Mohawk Oil is prepared to sign an
agreement with such a co-op.
In the meantime, Rice said the association has
had no reaction from Imperial Oil.
The company was unavailable to comment on the
charges.
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J Thursday, September 27, 1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Help sought in replacement
By JAKE van der KAMP
A presidential selection committee is seeking a replacement for
administration president Walter
Gage following his decision to
resign by June 30, 1975.
And in a letter to the university
community, Beverly Lecky, board
of governors member and chairwoman  of  the  committee,   has
asked for help from faculty,
students, staff and alumni to make
the selection.
Lecky said the committee
prefers someone who is under 55
years old, a Canadian citizen and
outstanding in his or her profession
and a good administrator.
"These are only preferences not
binding rules," Lecky said Wed
nesday. "We are fully prepared to
accept a non-Canadian who is
suited to the post."
There is no set date for closing
the nominations. However, the
committee has said it would like
names in by Oct. 25.
The committee is also asking for
views on what attributes a
president should have.
"We would like to hear what
people think the office of the
president should be and get
opinions on issues likely to face the
president," said Lecky.
If you are interested in
nominating someone send a letter
to Lecky in room 107 north administration building, main mall.
Your letter should contain as
%%*%?•
FORESTRY UNDERGRADS DEEP into their work during
Undercut festivities this week. Engrossing as this all may appear, it is
economically unfeasible to use coins cut from valuable B.C. timber
for  mahogany  panelling  in  the B.C.
Think bigger boys.
—mark hamilton photo
parliament building offices.
much personal and academic
biographical information as
possible about your nominee and
should state reasons for your
choice.
All letters will be treated with
confidence by the committee,
Lecky said.
"We have not yet decided
whether to release the names of the
nominees after we have screened
them — possibly doing so could be
embarrassing to certain
nominees," she said.
The committee held its first
meeting in the beginning of July
and is holding another today.
It consists of 24 members, six
from the board of governors, three
from the senate, four from the
faculty, three from the committee
of academic deans, three from the
Alumni Association, one member
of the non-academic administration,  and  four  students.
The students are Brian Loomes,
president of the Alma Mater
Society; Susan Van der Flier, arts
3 and Susan Waechtler, a graduate
student. A second undergraduate
will be chosen to replace Mike
Sasges, co-editor of the Ubyssey,
who resigned from the committee.
Members include UBC chancellor Nathan Nemetz, labor
professor Noel Hall, head librarian
Basil Stuart-Stubbs, classics head
Malcolm McGregor, geography
professor J.K. Stager, pharmacy
dean B.E. Riedel, science dean
George Vokoff and bursar Bill
White.
Committee members were either
appointed by the board or elected
by faculty, senate or AMS council.
The committee has advertised
for a replacement in several
publications, both in Canada and
abroad.
"We selected publications likely
to be read by prospective candidates," Lecky said.
The committee has received 54
nominations, with only three from
UBC.
"We certainly hope to get a
better response here," Lecky said.
AMS  studies  lawyers   report  on  SUB,
say  'you'd  win  some and you'd lose  some
By VAUGHN PALMER
Would the Alma Mater Society
win an arbitration decision in its
dispute with the administration
over the SUB lease?      »
Maybe so, say the AMS lawyers.
9 AMS treasurer John Wilson
won't make public full details of
the legal opinion prepared by the
society's lawyers at Wednesday's
council meeting because, he said,
the administration might find out.
But essentially the lawyers say
the AMS would win some of their
demands but might lose others,
Wilson said.
The dispute with the administration first flared this spring
^ien the AMS failed to gain increased supervision and maintenance of SUB under the
agreement by which they lease the
building from the administration.
Over the summer both sides
negotiated a settlement which
would have granted society
demands in return for the administration gaining a 10 per cent
cut of SUE', booking revenues and a
priority summer convention
agreement.
Council voted Wednesday to
postpone consideration of the
agreement until further
examination of the lawyers
agreement.
^jAnd they appointed graduate
studies rep Bob Angus and law rep
Gordon Turriff, both advocates of
further negotiations to the AMS
negotiating team.
Turriff told council the lawyers
say the administration would lose
the revenue percentage and
conventions agreement in arbitration, but on the other hand the
society might not get its desired
services.
"It's a question of do we want the
administration to grant certain
services such as proctors and
maintenance of fixtures, in return
for a substantial cut in our
revenue," asked Turriff.
Wilson said the lawyers made
quite clear that the booking and
convention clauses represent giveaways on the part of the AMS.
But the lawyers are unsure
whether the administration is
obliged to provide more proctors
and to maintain fixtures which are
not part of the building.
"I agree with council's opposition to the 10 per cent cut,"
Wilson said. "If there were some
way to get these services without
that concession I would say 'go
ahead' but there's no way."
AMS vice-president Gordon
Blankstein told council the administration cut would be about
$2,600 this year. But he said at an
earlier meeting he thinks the
administration might use the
concession as leverage for additional revenue in the future.
Angus had previously told
council he doesn't think the additional services represent much of
a     concession    on     the     ad
ministration's part. For example,
Angus said, the administration
would provide more proctors but
would not pay for repairs caused
by vandalism while those proctors
were on duty.
Wilson pointed out that an escape
clause in the conventions
agreement would permit the
society to cancel (within 30 days)
anytime it wanted to.
He said copies of the legal
opinion will be available should
AMS councellors wish to inspect it.
AMS lawyers have estimated it
would cost the society $2,500 to
$3,500 if they have to go through
arbitration.
In other business, council
refused to rescind a motion sending two AMS councillors to the
October convention of the National
Union of Students in Edmonton.
Council voted Sept. 19 to send
Bonnie Long, AMS external affairs
officer, and Teri Reynolds,
agricultural undergraduate
society rep, to the convention.
However, Bill Moen, arts undergraduate society president,
said the campus would best be
represented by AMS president
Brian Loomes because the NUS
had adopted an increasingly more
political stance than first anticipated.
He said Reynolds, a member of
the Students' Coalition executive
last year, was on the NUS's first
central committee and that she
was "service orientated".
Long is also a member of the
Students' Coalition which during
the last election favored student
services over political issues.
Cheech Chong tickets on sale
Tickets are selling fast for the Oct. 20 Cheech and
Chong concert in the War Memorial gym.
And when that's over the Alma Mater Society has
signed the Beach Boys to play the gym Nov. 4.
AMS special events co-ordinator Gordon
Blankstein said Wednesday 800 tickets have been
bought for Cheech and Chong after only one day of
sales and the concert could be sold out by the
weekend.
A total of 4,500 tickets are available, 3,000 to UBC
students at $3 each, and another 1,500 at $4 each for
off-campus people.
Tickets will be $5 at the door but Blankstein said
he doesn't expect any will be left by that time.
But tickets for the Friday Murray McLaughlan
concert in the SUB ballroom are moving slowly and
Blankstein said the Alma Mater Society could lose
$1,000 on the event.
He said the society would have to take in $2,000
just to break even and only 150 out of 1,000 $3 tickets
have been sold.
The society cleared $550 on the Sept. 14 John
Mayall concert in the gym Blankstein said.
And he said he expects a further profit of $700 to
$800 on Cheech and Chong which would more than
cover any loss on McLaughlan.
The AMS has an arrangement with a downtown
backer who will take 10 per cent of the net at the
Cheech and Chong concert, he said.
The society will get 10 per cent and the remainder
will go to the performers.
It costs the society $250 to rent the gym and so far
there has been no damage to the administration-
owned facility, Blankstein said.
Tickets for the concerts are available at the AMS
business office in SUB.
Blankstein said tickets for the Beach Boys
concert won't be on sale for another two weeks. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 27, 1973
Ooze blues
Monday morning's oil spill that desecrated Ambleside
Beach brings home some very stark realities.
And people have to realize the size of Monday's grand
piss-off is but a speck on the water compared to what will
happen when Atlantic Richfield's refinery at Cherry Point
gets operational and the huge oil-tankers start negotiating
treacherous Juan de Fuca Strait.
But of course they won't be doing that very often if the
U.S. Senate doesn't approve the construction of one of the
great non-issues of the century: the Alaska oil pipeline in its
upcoming vote on the issue.
In any case, the main thrust of the argument is avoided
by discussing the means of bringing the oil down — for the
end itself is unnecessary.
A very good argument can be made for the case that the
whole damned oil crisis has been manufactured by
American and British oil monopolies.
Why? So they can make more and more profits from
tapping the Alaskan oil fields and bringing them south along
our coast. Madison Avenue and the oil companies have been
trying to bring this point into the minds of the American
people and especially their legislators by their incredible
"oil-shortage" campaign of the past two years — and making
record profits in the meantime.
And the end result is another rip-off case of corporate
imperialism through the imminent spoiling of our coastline.
What can we do about it? Sweet fuck all really. The
powers in Ottawa could, but hardly want to do so.
So there is the border protest at Peace Arch park on
Sunday at 2:00 to show the U.S. oil monopolies and senate
what we think.
So support SPEC and Greenpeace in opposing this
barbarism being imposed on us. Be there on Sunday. Buses
leave from SPEC at 2007 West Fourth at 11 a.m.
The child is father of the man
Letters
Commend
I have worked for the university
for 30 years (alas) and am a
graduate. Having read the Sept. 20
Ubyssey, I thought I should like to
write and commend you on it.
Perhaps some sense is percolating throughout the world after
all! I was interested in "The poor
and the super poor" and especially
in "Women now". It is encouraging
to see some evidence of thinking at
this academic institution which I
have found so bereft of thought.
Keep it up!
P.S. The other day I resurrected
an Old Ubyssey, 43 years old, from
1930. The names of Himie
Koshevoy and Nathan Nemetz
appear in the masthead.
Ann McCullough
agriculture science faculty
Thanks for the letter. If you
would have gone back 44 years to
the 1929 masthead you would have
seen the name IY1.F. McGregor,
aka Malcolm McGregor, current
classics department head — Eds.
Thank you
Thank you to Linda Hossie for
her editorial "Women now" in the
Sept. 20 issue.
In February, 1971 Robin Morgan,
a feminist from New York, spoke
to about 1,000 persons at the
University of Manitoba. She stated
she would not answer any
questions from men and any she
received and suspected were the
products of a male mind would be
destroyed. We cheering females
unfortunately drowned out her
reasons. I can only guess — female
chauvinism?    Revenge?    Bigotry
9
This attitude frightens me, not
only for the reasons Hossie stated,
but for the reactions it causes.
Fright? Yes — who wouldn't be
fearful of the embarrassment
(publicity?) suffered when
physically thrown out of a public
meeting? This fear shows up in
frequent interruptions of lectures
on campus — "Man was is now
able BEEP! This was not a sexist
remark. Man meaning mankind,
etc., etc." Besides wasting my
time, the profs (curiously male)
who do this are, to say the least,
simplifying the issue.
How peachy if women's
liberation simply meant finding a
new word for mankind.
Is this a male way of dealing with
problems he wants to avoid or is
scared of — for example, concentrating on trivialities? Or have
feminists refused to listen when he
said anything else.
Me thinks the ladies doth protest
too much.
Rosemary Lawrence
GSA
Regarding the question before
the graduate student association as
to the mandatory assessment of
Alma Mater Society fees upon
graduate students, it occurs to us
this is not the question that should
be put before the grad students. To
our view the situation is this:
* Grad students are faced with
paying two fees to two essentially
similar organizations; the sum of
these almost equals present UBC
faculty club fees;
* These two organizations do not
offer services or facilities of any
kind a student could hot obtain off
campus or simply not use and still
complete his or her education, i.e.
they are not essential in any way;
* The apathy, and at times
antipathy, so abundantly
demonstrated by grad students
toward the AMS and GSC means
simply that most grad students, if
they had their choice, would
probably belong to only one of the
organizations — perhaps neither;
* There is a substantial minority
(at least in the department of
microbiology) of grad students
who are married and have small
children. These students have little
time to use GSC-AMS facilities and
certainly have no extra money to
spend on them;
* Any position that adult human
beings (i.e. grad students) should
be forced to belong to
organizations totally peripheral to
their chosen goal — an advanced
degree — and are not to be trusted
to decide whether such memberships are in his or her best
interests is insulting and
degrading. It flies in the face of the
democratic principle where
citizens should have free choice
wherever the public is not involved.
We therefore propose grad
students:
* Disband the GSA and return
our debt-ridden facilities to the
mortgage holders or allow it to
continue on a voluntary basis to all
who wish to join;
* Make membership in AMS
optional for grad students — after
all, grad students could be issued
library cards denoting their lack of
such status — and bar them from
using AMS facilities;
We believe this would result in a
fair and equitable situation for all:
those who want the benefits of
membership in non-essential
organizations could enjoy them
and pay for them, while others who
choose not to pay would have their
own money to spend as they like.
What we want, then, is a GSA
poll to present these two questions:
Would you belong to GSA if you
had a free choice?
Would you belong to AMS if you
had a free choice?
Our personal feeling is the GSA
executive would not dare conduct
such a poll because the grad'
students' rejection of GSA would
be certain.
So that is it — we challenge the
GSA executive to conduct this poll.
We suggest all grad students
feeling as we do should send a
letter to The Ubyssey.
Thomas L. Edwards
Denis Maynard
Mary Gisslow
Dale Gregerson
Rob Watson
W. Ramey
Rob McMaster
Marion Lee
Mark T. Muller
graduate studies, microbiology
Clarification
A couple of points in connection
with the graduate student
association — Alma Mater Society
mini-crisis need clarification. The
headline "GSA may take AMS to
court" in Tuesday's Ubyssey is
hardly accurate. The GSA "may"
also fly to the moon, sponsor panty
raids or commit mass suicide, but
it isn't likely. There is no
suggestion whatsoever at this time
that the GSA executive plans to
take legal action against the AMS
or anyone else.
All we are doing is complying
with a directive given us at the first
GSA general meeting of the year —
that is, obtaining a legal judgment
of several questions which have
come up. The GSA executive's
position remains unchanged — we
do not believe secession from the
AMS is justified in any way, and we
believe it is only fair that graduate
students pay their share of services such as The Ubyssey and
SUB, the same as everyone else.
We hope a legal investigation of
the situation will clear the air and
therefore are happy to go through
with it.
When we say last week's opinion
poll was a warning to the AMS to
shape up, we are not acting from a
narrow sectional point of view. It's
our belief that a vote in almost any
undergraduate society would have
produced approximately the same
job. The vote is more a symptom of
a general malaise within the AMS
than of any particular graduate
student grievance. It's for this
reason that we don't think  any
problems will be solved by splitting.
Finally, a letter in one of the
papers last week implied that we
had threatened to resign if the vote „
on AMS membership went against
our recommendation. This of
course was a complete falsehood.
We stated that we would not
preside over a secession of
graduate students from the AMS
and that is still our position. But
seeing as last week's vote was
simply an opinion poll, we are still
together, and we plan to continue
in office for the foreseeable future.
Paul Knox
vice-president -
graduate student association
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be signed and, if
possible, typed.
Pen names will be used when
the   writers   real   name   is also
included for our information in
the letter, or when valid reasons «*
for anonymity are given.
Although an effort is made to
publish all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
letters for reasons of brevity,
legality, grammar or taste.
r
MWSSIY
SEPTEMBER 27,1973
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS
or the university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room
241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977.
Co-editors: Vaughn Palmer, Michael Sasges.
Gary Coull, Vaughn Palmer, Ryon Guedes, Mike Sasges, Linda Hossie,
Jake van der Kamp, Dru Spencer, Lesley Krueger, Don Hubbert, and Rick
Lymer voted to swoop down on the Tree Boat Race like wolves on the fold.
Seizing a huge piece of chintz, perfectly balanced for killing, they pissed in
Jamie Craig's Pink Lady and squeezed him into a lovely black strapless
evening gown with scoop neckline and transparent crotch panel. Kathy
Baird, Marise Savaria, Dirk Visser, Allan Doree, Tom Barnes, and Peter
Leibeck could only gaze on in wonder.
J Thursday, September 27, 1973
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
Plank
Changes for UBC women are
indeed not coming fast enough
when Ihe student newspaper of this
university distributes the sexist
rantings of the forestry undergraduate society Plank and
students at this university write
such offensive material.
It is one of the anomalies of our
society that most sensitive people
recognize racism and bigotry and
condemn it, yet so few recognize
blatant sexism. The offensive
allusions and derogatory attitudes
towards women evidenced in the
green sheets in your paper
Tuesday should not be condoned.
One could dismiss the paper as
juvenile but it is from such juvenile
by
attitudes that  discrimination
adults is produced.
Joyce Searcy
acting women's dean
The Ubyssey stands guilty of
distributing the Plank. The insert
was run as an advertisement. As
stated on the Plank editorial page,
The Ubyssey's editorial staff had
no control over its content nor over
the people who wrote it—Eds.
Kick
To the creep(s) who swiped the
pages pertinent to French 220 of
The Song of Roland from two
English translations: May your
conscience give you a good kick in
the ass.
Mary Szewczyk
arts 2
$5 pore cleaning
By MURRAY McMILLAN
The following is another all-inclusive crap on Recreation UBC,
an administration controlled body which is charging students $5 for
any use of gym or recreation facilities.
Rec UBC director Ed Gautschi has said the fee is being charged
because UBC has no room for casual athletes.
This is written by one of those undesirable casual athletes, a fine
arts student and former Ubyssey hack who used to wile away the flab
running the circuit — until the $5 fee was levied.
The place is filled with masochists.
Either that or there are a lot of grotty bodies around who like to
work hard at becoming grottier. They sweat. Everyone does, it's
true, but there are many people around who work hard at it. They
run, swim, kick bits of inflated leather around a field. Things like
that.
Those activities seem perverse enough, but now tthere's an extra
kink added. They're being charged to do it. Recreation UBC wants $5
from you (if you're a student) or $10 (if you're staff or faculty) for the
privilege of cleaning out your pores.
It's about the same as being charged a dime to.use the toilet in a
bus station.
Rec UBC was introduced a year ago with the promise of great
things. But what do you get for your $5?
Use of gym and recreation facilities, use of equipment, some
instruction, some supervision. But in many cases what's provided
now is nothing more than what was provided free before Rec UBC
arrived on the scene to stick its smelly hand into your wallet.
An example. On the third floor of the gym there exists a chamber
of horrors which is also known as The Circuit. Persons addicted to
such activities make their way around it grunting and groaning,
lifting weights, running stairs, doing horrid things like sit-ups (with a
five-pound weight beind the head). Disgusting — but some people get
off on that sort of thing.
The circuit's been there for some time. Several years in fact. Up
until a year ago it was free. Now it's part of Rec UBC. You're supposed to have a $5 sweat card to use it. But there's nothing new there.
You're getting no new facilities to justify the $5 charge.
In fact, the circuit probably costs less to operate now than it did
two or three years ago. At that time it was open limited hours and a
student was paid to take the weights and equipment out of storage
and set them up each morning and to put them away each night.
Even at the rates paid students for such joe jobs, the amount involved over a year must have been considerable.
Now the weights and equipment are left out at all times. That
labor cost has been eliminated.
The equipment must be long paid for. There's no rent to pay.
If the campus community wants extended services in some
areas, it doesn't seem unreasonable to ask those who use them to
contribute to their cost.
But to charge students a fee when no service is being provided is
outrageous.
FREE
VANCOUVER
SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA
today"
War Memorial Gym
12:45 -2:15 p.m.
FOR NEW 8 USED
BOOKS
• TEXTBOOKS
• PAPERBACKS
• MAGAZINES
* MONARCH NOTiS
* SCHAUMS OUTUNB
* COUS NOTiS
* LARGEST SELECTION OF
REVIEW NOTES IN
B.C.
*   WE TRADE USED
POCKETBOOKS
CASH PAID FOR TEXTS, ETC.
BETTER BUY BOOKS
4393 W«t 10th A v..
(n*ar Varsity Theatre)
224-4144 Open 11 a.m.-8 p.m.
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
* Browns * Blues
* Greys * Burgundy
* Tux-Tails * Velvets
* Double-Knits * White
Parking at Rear
BLACK & LEE
Formal Wear Rentals
631 HOWE 688-2481
ASSOCIATED STORES:
613 No. 3 Rd., Richmond 278-5031
1395 Commercial 255-2939
3336 Cambie 874-7630
4154 E. Hastings, Bby.        299-9225
4273 Dunbar 224-4870
636 Brentwood, Bby. 299-0828
324 W.Hastings 681-8456
611 Main St., Van. 681-5710
422 E. Columbia, N. West. 522-5710
4441 E. Hastings 298-2030
10%  TO U.B.C. STUDENTS
WHERE IT ALL BEGAN
MGB
BGT
MIDGET
AVAILABLE
RIGHT NOW
GOOD COLOR
CHOICE
GORDON IMPORT
.UTOS.LTD.
WW.lOthAv
7338105
*^      AUTOS. LTD.
3695 W.lOth Ave.
Authorized
Deolar
D«w.«Lic.No.D1943
SALES      SERVICE      PARTS
Rudy & Peters Motors Ltd
VOLKSWAGEN SPECIALISTS
225 E. 2nd Ave.
Quality Workmanship
Competitive Prices
Genuine Volkswagen Parts Only
All Work Guaranteed
Complete Body Repairs and Painting
879-0491
Jh Morse and Buggy frays
SAFETY LENSES WERE ALMOST UNKNOWN
Western Optical
Company Ltd.
10% DISCOUNT FOR STUDENTS
1774 W. 2nd 736-8055
AskusaboutaStudentloan.
It pays to get an education.
Education costs a bundle.
At the Commerce, we know.
And, we can help lighten the load.
Talk to a local Commerce
manager about a student loan.
He can help you get it. And,
he can help you keep it in check
with proper money management.
CANADIAN IMPERIAL
BANK OF COMMERCE
You and the Commerce. Together we're both stronger. Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 27, 1973
Hot flashes
Relations and
lessons
The   Lutheran   campus   centre
offers   an   opportunity  to   learn
how to relate to others in the
context of a small group. Growth
group meets 7 p.m. Tuesdays at
the Lutheran campus centre, or
phone Don Johnson at 224-1614.
Want to learn guitar, recorder,
'Tween classes
TODAY
VARSITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Paul     Stevens     —     the     human
condition.   Noon   SUB  auditorium.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Election strategy meeting noon SUB
212.
SCIENCE FICTION SOCIETY
General   meeting,  bring dues, noon
SUB 213.
PHILOSOPHY STUDENTS' UNION
Steering    committee    elected    and
membership  drive  east  mall   annex
116.
DEAN OF WOMEN'S OFFICE
Free     concert     by     Vancouver
Symphony,     war     memorial    gym
12:45-2:15.
AMS ELECTIONS COMMITTEE
All  candidates  please attend, noon
AMS conference room.
UBC KARATE CLUB
Practice gym E 7:30 p.m. T. Shutou
will put on a karate demonstration.
Final GI collection will be Saturday.
UBC CYCLE TEAM
General meeting noon gym foyer.
STUDENT LIBERALS
General     meeting,     discussion     of
national    convention..    Noon    SUB
213.
UBC WARGAMERS
Practice Napoleonics, micro-armour
noon SUB 119.
FRIDAY
WAAAAAAAAA
Women's tennis tryouts 4:30 p.m.
M.G. tennis courts.
TROTS
"B.C. union of high school students
— which way forward?" panel discussion 8 p.m. 1208 Granville.
SKYDIVERS
Meeting for first jump course and
rides  for  weekend  noon  SUB  125.
WAG
All students, staff and faculty welcome noon SUB 205.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Meeting noon IH iounge.
KAMPUS KRUSADE FOR KRIST
AGAPE   life  meeting  7   p.m.   Gage
towers lounae.
SATURDAY"
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Shennana Gebanna (fun and games
night) 8 p.m. SUB 212.
KARATE CLUB
Practice 10 a.m. gym E.
SAILING CLUB
Sailing instruction for new members
10 a.m. Kits Yacht Club, foot of
Balsam.
weaving, macrame, banner design
or batik? Classes are held
Wednesday nights at the Lutheran
campus centre running for six
weeks. No charge except for
materials.
Nutrition
Volunteers are needed to work
on a nutrition conference to be
held at UBC in January.
Students interested in
nutritional needs, vegetarianism,
fasting, alternative diets, food
processing  and   high   food costs
should contact organizer Les Rose
at 733-2739.
Dumonf speaks
French anthropologist Louis
Dumont from the University of
Paris gives the first of three
lectures on "Signposts in the
Genesis of Modern Ideology"
Thursday noon in Angus 313.
The two remaining lectures will
be held Oct. 1 and 2 in the same
room.
Dumont, author of 11 books,
wrote "Homo Hierarchicus"
which contends that ideologies
play a more important role in the
evolution of society than
technological or economic factors.
SCHOOL'S A
FIGHT SCHOOL
BLUES WITH DENIM
BLAZERS, OLD
FASHION PLAID
SHIRTS AND A PAIR
OF BAG CORDS.
4481W. 10th
Royal Centre
Barry Greenfield
"LIVE!"
Tomorrow Night 8:30 p.m.
September 28    S.U.B. Ballroom
L
HIS NEW ALBUM
AVAILABLE SOON FROM
ItCJl
RECORDS
& TAPES
incarnation
An incarnate lama of the Kakya
sect of Buddhism will speak on
both imper manence and
enlightenment through
compassion at International
House Thursday 8 p.m.
Admission is 50 cents.
Cass begs
David Cass-Beggs, B.C. Hydro
chairman, will discuss power
development and the environment
in B.C., 8 p.m. Thursday in the
planetarium auditorium.
Cass-Beggs will answer
questions from the audience, and
besides, it's free.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines, 25c;
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c;
additional days $1.25 & 30c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241 S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
COPE DANCE, SATURDAY. SEPT.
29th, 8:00 p.m. Ukranian People's
Hall. Bar. Rock 'n Roll. Admission, Students unemployed $1.00,
others $2.00. Buy a membership
and get in free.
Lost 8c Found
13
LOST: PRESCRIPTION GLASSES
jjear Angus lawn. $5 reward. Return—Gage  56-A5.
LOST: SILVER WIRE FRAMED
glasses in red case. Sept. 19th.
Phone Patsy Cho-Sik immediately.    521-3402.
Special Notices
15
FREE!
Roll   of   50'   or  56'
■Ef       Kodak   or   llford
B  &  W   Bulk  Film
with    the    purchase    of   a
WATSON BULK LOADER
At $17.50
Limit: 1 Fer Customer on
presentation of Student I.D.
tfje %tni ano gutter
Cameras!
3010  W.   Broadway 736-7833
DISCOUNT STEREO EXAMPLE:
AM-FM Stereo receiver. 2 speakers, turntable, base, cover and
cartridge, list $200. Your cost
$125. 2-year parts guarantee.
Call   325-0366   for   savings.
U.B.C. BEAUTY SALON NEAR
Campus. No appointment necessary.   5736  University Blvd.
"WANTED — JEWISH PEOPLE 20-
30 from out of town and Vancouver for non-structured, non-
organizational functions. For information Ph. Days 731-4161,
Eves.   738-4062.
TWO VANCOUVER SYMPHONY
season tickets for sale. Sell at
cost.   Phone Bob,   224-4625.
Special Erents
15A
FREESEE THURSDAY. SEPT. 27
Van. Symphony Orchestra Free
Concert, War Memorial Gym,
12:45   p.m.-2:15   p.m.
C.U.S. SPONSORS "OKTOBFR-
fest" Oct. 5. Tickets available
from A.M.S.  office.
UNDERCUT '73 SUB CAFETERTA
Saturday, September 29. at 8:30.
$3.50/cpl. Guaranteed good times
with Hank and the Hobos.
Trarel Opportunities
16
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
BRIGHT YOUNG PhD. CANDI-
date in geology is seeking part-
time girl-friend. Applicants must
have good typing skills. Familiarity with geology and/or. thesis
typing preferred. Contact Gary
Medford,  Geology,  UBC.
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
'65 AUSTIN 1800 F.W.D.. NEW
trans, and motor parts. $650. ph.
263-5392  eves.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Babysitting & Day Care
32
DAYTIME BABYSITTER FOR 18-
month-old, 3 days/week (your
place); phone 733-9849  (eves.).
Scandals
37
WATCH   FOR   "OKTOBERFEST"
COMING  SOON
BERTHA — COME TO UNDER-
cut '73 with mel Peddled my
-  -  - for the  ticket.  — Butt.
EMPLOYMENT
Typing
40
EFFICIENT, ELECTRIC TYPING
my home. Essays, Thesis, etc.
Neat accurate work. Reasonable
rates.   Phone   263-5317.
Help Wanted
51
ONE DATE FOR UNDERCUT '73.
Must be blonde, 38-28-34. 5'7",
immaculate but dumber than
shit.  Apply FUS office.
VOUNTEER NEEDED AT GRAN-
ville Centre. To work with emotionally disturbed children under
the supervision of child care
specialists — morning or afternoon per week for at least one
term.
MUST   LIKE   CHILDREN
Apply in writing to Irene Small,
Volunteer Co-or,dinator. Granville
Centre,   4305   Granville   St.,  Vancouver 9,  B.C.
WAITRESSES, DANCERS. CASH-
iers, hostesses; up to 13.50 per
hour. Contact Mike Hamilton,
684-3426 or 524-8581. (Call No.
1125) answering service.
Work Wanted
52
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Music Instruction
61
PIANO LESSONS BY GRADUATE
of Juilliard School of Music. All
grade   levels   welcome.    731-0601.
Special Classes
62
Tutoring
64
Speakeasy SUB Anytimel
228-4557 - 12:30-2:30
TUTORIAL
CENTRE
For Students and Tutors
Register Nowl 12:30-2:30
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
LAB COAT -
petit, good
7632.
< LADY. MEDIEUM/
condition.    Ph.    224-
Rooms
81
MATURE WOMAN WANTED TO
share house on N. Van waterfront with two others, hi hr.
from UBC, $125. 926-6119 or 733-
5786.
Room 8c Board
82
JAPANESE MAN INTERESTED
in learning English, like to board
with Canadian family, willing to
pay $130 per month. Please telephone Mr. Mori. Mr. _Hoshi, 437-
3210 after 6.
Unfurnished Apts.
84
AVAIL. OCT. 1. KITS AREA. 1
bedroom unfurnished suite. $110.
Ph.  732-0381 Thursday, September 27, 1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
Women's athletics
sfs.
By RICK LYMER
When UBC was first established in 1915 there
were no athletic facilities.
There was, however, a constitution for the
student body which then contained about 175 female
students.
In the constitution there was contained the idea of
women's athletics. It set forth that there should be a
women's athletic association and that tthe
association president be a member of the student
council.
Women's college athletics in B.C. began even
prior to the establishment of UBC. From 1906 to 1915,
when university students attended the founding
McGill University College of British Columbia,
women were active in two sports: basketball and
field hockey. These teams relied completely on public
and private facilities. This reliance continued during
the first session of UBC, 1915-1916, with the addition of
two more activities: swimming and ice hockey.
Another important step was added that first
session, an intermural program. This consisted of one
sport, basketball. First, second and third year arts
students were involved. The approximate female
enrolment at UBC from 1915 to 1918 ranged from 150
to 200.
During the First World War, the women's athletic
program deteriorated. This was halted only at the
war's close.
A large factor in the comeback was a rivalry
between UBC and the University of Victoria which
opened as an affiliate. This athletic rivalry continued
on an increasing basis. Each year "invasions" were
staged by the visiting university. Damage to the ship
carrying UBC during an "invasion" ended this era in
1945.
Lack of facilities continued to hamper
development of the sports program during the '20s
and '30s. Another factor was the small budget
available for sports. In 1925, $182 was the women's
athletic association's budget. This was added to by a
woman's rooster club who sold rooster's hats at
meets.
In 1929 the first university gymnasium was
opened. It was financed mainly by the students via
stunts, $2 self-imposed taxes and an AMS bond issue.
It cost $40,000. The gym gave UBC teams the chance
to practise more often at much less expense.
In 1930, women's sports recieved two boosts. The
women's UBC basketball team won the world
championship during the Olympic games held at
Prague. Also during the year, the women's big block
club was founded.
During the Second World War, women's sports
again hit a period of decline. Much needed gymnasium time was taken over by drilling
requirements.
However, in 1942, as part of compulsory war work
requested by the women's undergraduate society
there was one hour a week keep fit class organized by
the women's physical education instructor. An offshoot of this was a heavy emphasis and revitalization
of the women's intramural program.
After the war, there was a heavy demand by
returning veterans and an increasing student body on
the available facilities. There were several stop gap
measures used while the War Memorial gymnasium
was being financed and built 1946-1951.
An RCAF hangar was transported onto the
campus, reconstructed and opened in 1948 as an
athletic fieldhouse for sports such as archery, tennis,
badminton, golf and track. There were also army
huts moved in and used for dance classes. After the
War Memorial gym opened, a large outdoor swimming pool was added in 1954 for the British Empire
Games.
With the enlarged facilities came a reorganization of the department of athletics. It
evolved into the physical education department in
1945 and began granting the Bachelor of Physical
Education degree. In 1952 the department received
school status.
This year also was important to women's
athletics. The women's athletic committee was
formed and faculty were no longer on the women's
athletic directorates.
At present, the women's athletic committee is
running on a budget of $29,600. Its program is extensive but cramped due to monetary problems. They
have about 19 sports ranging from the traditional
basketball to skiing. The women on campus are
looking for expansion, both competitively and
organizationally.
Sports comments
By DON HUBBERT
1) Why should the women's
athletic association even have to
consider having fund-raising
events in order to get together
enough money for women's sports?
2) With all due respect to Dal
Richards, and his contributions to
Vancouver football, how about
canning those bloody CFL fight
songs played at home games.
3) Our thanks to Ruth and Joyce
in the athletic office for ensuring
that we get copies of all sports
Women strong
Sue Rich, vice-president of women's athletics, said Tuesday the
teams should be strong contenders again this year.
Many veterans have returned and tryouts are underway. She and
president Laurie Wilson hope the upcoming season will equal last year's
records.
The first big event is the Canada West University Athletic
Association field hockey championship at Victoria Oct. 12-14.
Fencing is being returned to the national intercollegiate level this
year. Tennis and golf are expanding into city leagues.
In 1972-73 UBC won three of four national championships: swimming, basketball and volleyball. This was only the second year the four
had been held.
UBC won CWUAA meets in track and field, gymnastics and cross
country.
releases as soon as they are done.
And a belated happy birthday to
Ruth on her 21st.
4) Our congratulations to the
Birds rugby team on their highly
successful tour of Britain.
5) Further Congrats to Brinsley
Stewart and the UBC cricket team
on winning the championship.
6) We could use a couple of
photographers to cover sports
events for us. Anyone who could
spare some time, once or twice a
week, come on in and sign up.
Apology
We wish to issue an apology to
the Thunderbird head coach Norm
Thomas. We knocked him Tuesday
in Sports Comments for lack of cooperation after Saturday's game.
We now know that Norm would
prefer us to see him Mondays when
he is more relaxed. We unfortunately didn't find out until
after Comments came out. Our
apologies.
*>>■■■. .*hp*.«.MiAtt> J
—dirk visser photo
UBYSSEY SPORTS REPORTER Rick Lymer jumps off one-metre
board Wednesday as he starts his way to the top of the Empire diving
pool. Lymer will attempt three-metre board Friday noon. Exercise
will prove average campus dork can do anything.
Women's sports
This year in women's intramurals we have tried to introduce a wide
variety of activities in an attempt to satisfy the changing needs of
campus women. We offer, of course, the classic intramural sports such
as volleyball, basketball and badminton. But, hockey, marbles, squash
and a bonspiel are among a dozen other activities offered.
At present, there are 25 organizations, sororities and clubs composed of 1,300 women participating in intramurals. All female staff,
faculty and students at UBC are eligible for the program.
The women's intramural program is run by the students and funded
by a discretionary grant from the Alma Mater Society. The AMS has
allocated 12 cents towards this program for each woman on campus.
Why not take advantage of your 12 cents and join women's intramurals?
It is simple to become involved in the women's program. One way is
to contact the intramural unit manager of the organization you're interested in joining. A second method is to visit the intramural office in
War Memorial gym 202A or phone 228-5326.
A third possibility is to attend an organizational meeting of the
intramurals which are held noon Fridays in room 213 of the gym. All
teams must be represented at the meeting to be included in the regular
schedule.
PEUGEOT
SALE
... an
unexpected
buy
T point
reus
Est. 1930
3771 W. 10th Ave.
224-3536
F.U.S. Presents
UNDERCUT '73
with
HANK and the HOBOS
Saturday, September 29
8:30 P.M.
S.U.B. CAFETERIA
Full Facilities $3.50 COUPLE
TICKETS AVAILABLE FROM FORESTERS OR F.U.S. OFFICE Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 27, 1973
Education
cash
By ASAD SHAH
University of Manitoba
It has been estimated that
almost two-thirds of the heads of
low-income families have no more
than elementary school education.
A university degree will increase
one's life time earnings by 75 per
cent. In other words, education is
worth cold, hard cash.
Being born to a poor family
means that as a child you must
learn to undervalue yourself and
retreat into a smaller world that
has been ordained for you. With
few exceptions, the fate of these
poor children is sealed before they
even walk across the threshhold of
schools that would have failed
them in any event.
Both hardships of economic
support while attending an
educational institution, and the
incompatibility of the values expressed through the education
system with those of the environment in which the poor must
live create a contradiction which is
irreconcilable — resulting in
almost every case, in the aborting
of the individual's education.
The demand for high educational
attainment, often unnecessarily
high levels, by the employers,
locks the door to opportunity for
the vast majority of the poor. The
senate committee on poverty found
that "89 per cent of low-income
families were headed by persons
who had not completed high
school."
Once a family has sunk into
poverty, the chances of the next
generation rising out of it are very
slim.
Now, more than ever, education
means opportunity. Education
costs money and regardless of how
free it may be, lower income
families tend to take their children
out of school at an earlier age and
put them to work. Lower income
families are obviously penalized
when it comes to higher education,
which in Canada has always been
prohibitively expensive. A recent
study indicated that the cost of a
year's university education is
about $2,800.
The education levels of the
family heads were very likely
influenced by the income and
related circumstances of their
parents; and their circumstances
in turn are likely to influence the
levels attained by their children.
The richest class has more than
twice as many students in the
school as the poorest section of the
society.
A student from the top 25 per
cent of the population
economically and of the top 25 per
cent in ability has 87 chances out of
100 of going to college. A student of
the same measured ability but
from the bottom quartile
economically has about one-half
the chance. Further, the
economically disadvantaged have
a much lower chance of even
finishing college.
The parents of 50.6 per cent of
university students are either
proprietors and managers or
professionals. These classes form
only 15.6 per cent of the labor force.
On the other hand, the parents of
only 5.1 per cent of university
students are from laborers
although they institute 20.5 per
cent of the labor force. Thus,
chidren whose fathers are in the
highly paid professions have 10
times as many students in the
sample than they would have if
representation were equal.
Whereas only 4.6 per cent of
family heads between ages 35-65
years had a university degree,
their children constituted 20.6 per
cent of the university enrolment.
On the other side of the scale, only
26.5 per cent university students
came from parents having
elementary schooling, constituting
53.7 per cent of the family heads.
Though there are many reasons
as to why people end up at a particular place in the occupational
hierarchy, one must look to the
class structure which prevails to
fully, or even adequately, comprehend the persistence of class
oppression and exploitation.
The present division of labor
serves the needs and priorities of
the owners of capital and not the
needs of the vast majority of the
people.
The owners of capital want to
perpetuate their rule and
reproduce the hierarchical divison
of lahor from generation to
generation.
If we are to change this situation,
if we are to create an environment
of equal opportunity, we have to
remove those class differences
which contradict the very basic
values of a democratic society.
We must remove the social and
psychological barriers to
educational opportunity and increase the accessibility to
educational institutions to such an
extent that all Canadians can
contribute their full talents.
Only then can our human
resources be utilized fully.
We must also overhaul our
educational philosophy so that the
class differences are not perpetuated and reinforced at the
educational institutions, but rather
reduced or eliminated.
PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION OF FAMILIES BY INCOME GROUPS AND EDUCATION OF HEAD,
1971
ELEMENTARY
SECONDARY
NON-
SCHOOLING
SCHOOLING  .
UNIVERSITY
UNIVERSITY
INCOME CROUP
0-4
s-t
YEARS
YEARS
SOME
COMPLETED
SOME
COMPLETED
SOME
DEGREE
PER CENT
UNDER $1,000
2.6
2.7
2.3
1.7
2.7
0.9
1.1
1.3
$   1.000-$   1.999
8.4
3.8
1.8
1.2
1.6
0.7
0.8
0.4
2.000-    2.999
12.4
6.5
J.6
2.2
1.8
1.0
1.6
1.0
3.0OO-    3.999
17.8
9.3
5.3
3.5
2.7
2.3
2.0
1.1
4,000-    4,999
10.4
7.4
5.0
3.5
2.8
2.2
2.3
1.6
5.000-     5.999
7.5
7.9
6.2
4.8
4.7
4.4
4.7
1.5
6.000-    6.999
7.7
7.9
6.7
5.3
4.4
5.3
3.5
2.0
7,000-     7,999
4.9
8.5
7.3
6.7
6.5
7.2
5.1
2.5
8,000-    8,999
6.0
7.8
8.7
9.4
10.4
8.5
5.8
4.0
9.000-    9.999
5.2
6.7
8.5
7.8
6.8
9.7
5.3'
4.7
10,000-  11.999
5.6
12.5
15.5
16.7
16.6
17.2
16.9
9.9
12.000-   14.999
5.5
9.4
15.2
18.5
19.3
21.5
18.8
17.8
15,000-  24,999
5.3
8.9
12.4
16.6
16.4
17.9
25.4
34.2
25.000 AND OVER
0.9
0.9
1.5
2.0
3.3
1.2
6.7
18.1
TOTAL
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
10O.0
100.0
10O.0
AVERAGE INCOME
$6,420
$8,276
$9,895
$11,147
$11,474
$11,346
$13,437
$19,002
A SUB FILMSOC PRESENTATION
Thurs.        ^" "^.     Fri. 7:00
s& 9:30
rhonty  python
NOW FOR
SOMETHING
COMPLETELY
DIFFERENT
Sat.     X. y    Sun.
7:00 & 9:30     ^-. ^-^^ 7:00
SUB Auditorium        50*
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
RING DAY
September 28, 1973
These exclusive designs were created for the University of
British Columbia. One side features THUNDERBIRDS in bold
letters above the Thunderbird. The other side features your
personal grad year dates and the official university seal.
Many options are available for students to personalize their
official university ring.
The centre ring is a signet bearing the official university seal.
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA is spelled out
around the seal.
FREE OPTION
All students who place ring orders on the above ring day will
receive a free personal option.
Your official Josten's   representative
John Haines, will be at The Bookstore
Friday, Sept. 28 between the hours of
9 a.m.-2 p.m. to give you personalized
service.
AVAILABLE AT:
the boohstore
A NEW WAITING LIST
for   students  wishing
for   the   spring   term
will   be   started   October   1
Residence   accommodation
(beginning December 1).
The current waiting list expires November 30. All
students on this list who are still  interested must
re-validate their names for the new waiting list in
person  11:30-2:30 Thursday,  Friday and Monday.
(Please bring AMS card.)
Available rooms are assigned each day at 12:30 to
the first persons on the list present.
OFFICE OF DIRECTOR
OF RESIDENCES
SPECIAL FILM PRESENTATIONS:
PRINCE SIHANOUK
OF CAMBODIA VISITS
CHINA'S NORTHEAST
also: the  celebration of  the  23rd  anniversary of the
People's Republic of China.
OLYMPIA THEATRE, 2381 E. HASTINGS
September 29 - 1:00 & 3:00
September 30-12:00
Admission: Donations
BANQUET: MARCO POLO THEATRE RESTAURANT
90 E. Pender
$6.50 per person
Tickets at China Arts & Crafts Ltd.,
33 E. Hastings
J'
A little bashful about "popping the
question"?
Then    why    not    let    a   flashing
Grassie-Firbanks diamond do your
proposing for you? It will express
your love with far more eloquence
than mere words!
We  have a fantastic selection of
diamond engagement rings —all the
wanted styles — in your required
quality and price range.
Do come  in and look them over
(without obligation of course).
(A) Lovely diamond in graceful T8k
yellow gold mounting
from $300.
10% DISCOUNT AT OUR VARSITY STORE
The students, faculty and administrative staff of UBC will be
accorded 10% discount privileges on all purchases at our 10th
and Sasamat store.
* 566 Seymour
* 599 Seymour
* Pacific Centre
* 107 E. Pender
* Park Royal
* Brentwood
* Victoria
* Kelowna
* Kamloops
©rassie
rairBanKSj
Since IS86
Varsity Store   :   4517 West 10th
Tel. 224-4432

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