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The Ubyssey Feb 22, 2010

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Array Grumbling bitterly about Ryan Miller SINCE 1918
We just can't help ourselves | PAGE 6
Iceholes
revere Colbert
Terminal
For seven days, hundreds
of protesters have pushed
for a national housing program to combat homelessness by setting up a 'tent
city' on East Hastings.
Their story on
Pages 4 and 5.
MONDAY   _^k _^k
2010.02.ZZ
WEATHER @ UBC           ^
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CANADA MEDAL COUNT
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NEWS BRIEFS
CANADIAN ATHLETE AFFECTED
BY MOTHER'S PASSING
Canadian figure skater Joannie
Rochette faced the tragic news of the death of her
mother just two days prior to
her singles competition, according to The Star.
Therese Rochette, 55, flew
into Vancouver on Saturday
to see her daughter represent
Canada but passed away from
an unexpected heart attack on
Sunday.
It is expected that Rochette
will still compete on Tuesday
and Thursday. She declined to
speak with media until after
her competition.
ELEVEN OLYMPIC SECURITY
OFFICERS DISMISSED
Eleven Olympic security officers have been dismissed
from the Games due to alleged
misconduct, reported CTV.
ISU spokesperson Mike
Cote said he could not specify the reasons of the removals
of the officers. He said alleged
misconduct could range from
skipping a day of work to being drunk while on-duty.
Two police officers are still
under investigation by the VPD.
PRIDE HOUSES FOR THE
FIRST TIME AT AN OLYMPICS
The Vancouver 2010 Olympic
Games is the first to host gay-
friendly venues for athletes
to promote and educate the
world on diversity, reported
The Province.
One PRIDE House is located in Pan Pacific Whistler
Village Centre Hotel, and the
other in the Qmunity centre in
Downtown Vancouver. They
are designed to promote gay
arts and culture as well as feature comfortable lounges for
socializing and watching the
Games.
Dean Nelson, community and media relations director for Gay Whistler, told The
Province he hopes that the
Houses will help to open talks
about homophobia.
LIQUOR STORES CLOSED
EARLY ON WEEKEND
Liquor stores were ordered to
be closed at 7pm on Saturday
and Sunday after the VPD saw
an extensive amount of public drunkenness in the streets
on Friday.
According to CTV, approximately 150,000 people wandered around the streets of
Vancouver Friday night, where
approximately 40 arrests for
intoxication-related incidents
were reported, doubling that
of the usual on Friday nights.
"Vancouver Police will continue to monitor the situation and,
if need be, will ask for further
closures in coming days," read a
VPD press release. 2/UBYSSEY.CA/EVENTS/2010.02.22
FEBRUARY 22, 2010
VOLUME XCI,   N°XLIII
EDITORIAL
COORDINATING EDITOR
Paul Bucci: coordinating@ubyssey.ca
NEWS EDITOR
Samantha Jung: news@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE NEWS EDITOR
Sarah Chung: schung@ubyssey. ca
CULTURE EDITOR
Kate Barbaria : culture@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE CULTURE EDITOR
Jonny Wakefield: jwakejield@ubyssey.ca
SPORTS EDITOR
Justin McElroy : sports@ubyssey.ca
IDEAS EDITOR
Trevor Record: ideas@ubyssey.ca
PHOTO EDITOR
GeraldDeo :photos@ubyssey.ca
GRAPHICS ASSISTANT
Anthony Goertz: graphics@ubyssey.ca
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Virginie Menard: production @ubyssey. ca
COPY EDITOR
Katarina Grgic: copy@ubyssey.ca
MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Tara Martellaro : 7nultimedia@ubyssey.ca
CONTRIBUTING EDITOR
Ashley Whillans : awhillans@ubyssey.ca
Room 24, Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Boulevard
Vancouver, BCV6T lZl
tel: 604.822.2301
web: www.ubyssey.ca
e-mail: feedback @ubyssey. ca
BUSINESS
Room 23, Student Union Building
advertising: 604.822.1654
business office: 604.822.6681
fax: 604.822.1658
e-mail: advertising@ubyssey. ca
BUSINESS MANAGER : Fernie Pereira
AD TRAFFIC : Sabrina Marchand
AD DESIGN : Chibwe Mweene
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of
the University of British Columbia. It is published
every Monday and Thursday by The Ubyssey
Publications Society. We are an autonomous,
democratically run student organization, and al
students are encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the
Ubyssey staff. They are the expressed opinion of
the staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views
of The Ubyssey Publications Society or the University of British Columbia. All editorial content
appearing in The Ubyssey is the property of The
Ubyssey Publications Society. Stories, opinions,
photographs and artwork contained herein cannot
be reproduced without the expressed, written
permission of The Ubyssey Publications Society
The Ubyssey is a founding member of Canadian University Press (CUP) and adheres to CUP's
guiding principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 words
Please include your phone number, student
number and signature (not for publication) as
well as your year and faculty with all submissions. ID will be checked when submissions are
dropped off at the editorial office of The Ubyssey;
otherwise verification will be done by phone.
"Perspectives" are opinion pieces over 300 words
but under 750 words and are run according to
space. "Freestyles" are opinion pieces written by
Ubyssey staff members. Priority will be given to
letters and perspectives over freestyles unless
the latter is time sensitive. Opinion pieces wil
not be run until the identity of the writer has
been verified. The Ubyssey reserves the right to
edit submissions for length and clarity. All letters
must be received by 12 noon the day before
ntended publication. Letters received after this
point will be published in the following issue
unless there is an urgent time restriction or other
matter deemed relevant by the Ubyssey staff
It is agreed by all persons placing display or
classified advertising that if the Ubyssey Publications Society fails to publish an advertisement
or if an error in the ad occurs the liability of the
UPS will not be greater than the price paid for
the ad. The UPS shall not be responsible for
slight changes or typographical errors that do not
lessen the value or the impact of the ad
CONTRIBUTORS
Tagh Sira's going surfing now, Sarah Chung is
learning how, come on a safari with Cynthia
Koo (come on a safari with Michael Thibault)
Our safaris include pygmy marmosets. Geoff
Lister's gonna have Keegan Bursaw, Andrew
Bates, Kasha Chang 'till Austin Holm takes his
Annika Westphal away. And you don't want to
know what he'll do when that happens. Blood
and salsa flying everywhere, I tell you. Paul Bucci
knew all along that Tara Martellaro was getting
wise to Kate Barbaria now (shouldn'ta lied,
Trevor Becord, shouldn'ta lied) but he didn't say
anything because he was enjoying watching the
drama unfold, the cheeky bastard. Fun fun fun
'till Virginie takes the Menard away. Everybody
was at the Katarina Grgic. It was the best place
for martinis and chocolate-covered rutabagas.
Don't diss it 'til you try it, my friends. They all had
matching Jonny Wakefields. Warning: never wear
with plaid. In fact, just don't wear plaid. Sam
Jung saw a Gerald Deo on the dock. But it wasn't
a Justin McElroy. Itwas a Krittana Khurana
V      Canada Post Sales
Agreement
Number 0040878022
Canadian    printed on^0Q%
University     'reeycledpaper
Press \__\Q
EVENTS
CLASSIFIEDS
Price Reduced. 2005 Acura
TL fully loaded, 56,000 klm. 4
doors, standard, white exterior, leather interior in good condition, $21,000. Contact calvin.
magic32@gmail. com.
Men's Rugby Calendar. 12
months. 12 pictures. SIS/calendar. All proceeds go to
the UBC's men's program.
Contact benjones.eng@gmail.
com or call at 604.838.6400.
ONGOING EVENTS
UBYSSEY PRODUCTION • Come
help us create this baby!
Learn about layout and editing. Expect to be fed. • Every
Sunday and Wednesday, 2pm,
SUB 24.
BRIGHT LIGHT TO SHOWCASE ART
AND EVENTS DURING THE 2010
WINTER GAMES • A series of temporary public art works and
events during the Vancouver
2010 Olympics and Paralympics
will feature a collection of 14
commissioned projects during
the 2010 Winter Games. The
project is a joint effort of artists
and arts organizations based in
the Downtown Eastside, who
are collaborating to produce installations and events that will
light up the neighbourhood
and showcase the community's cultural vitality. • Runs until
Sunday, Feb. 28, all day, Carrall
Street Greenway
MONDAY NIGHT COMMUNITY MUSIC
& MEAL • Like to play music?
Just want to listen? Looking
for a sense of community? This is for all members
of the UBC community who
want to have a good meal and
great conversation. All meals
are home-cooked and are
vegetarian-friendly. • Every
Monday, 6:30pm-8:30pm,
Chapel of the Epiphany (6030
Chancellor Blvd), for more
info e-mail revnathanwright®
mac.com.
NOON "FUN" RUN • Run for fun!
Walk for fun! Get healthy and
come run or walk the UBC REC
Noon "Fun" Run, hosted bythe
UBC REC Health Promotions
Department which takes participants throughout many of
UBC's most scenic areas on a
course ranging from 3 to 5km. •
Every Thursday, 12:30pm, meeting outside the doors of the
Student Rec Centre.
TANTRAMAR GOTHIC ART EXHIBIT •
Regent College Lookout Gallery
presents Tantramar Gothic,
a  collection  of work by  Dan
Steeves. • Mon.-Fri. 8:30am-
5pm, Sat. 12pm-4pm, Regent
College, 5800 University Blvd.,
runs until Monday, Mar. 1.
THE SECRETS OF TRADITIONAL
ITALIAN CUISINE • This course
takes you into the kitchens of Italian regions such
as Lombardy Piedmont and
Tuscany to sample pasta, pizza, antipasti and risotto made
the right way-fresh fish and
shellfish, hearty treatments of
meat and game and irresistible gelato. Course materials,
a chef's apron and five multi-
course meals are included in
the course fee. • Runs from
Mar. 3-31, 5:30pm-8:30pm,
Food, Nutrition and Health
(FNH) Building, $525, includes
course materials and five multi-
course meals.
ENJOY THE OLYMPICS ON BIG
SCREENS AT THE GLOBAL LOUNGE •
Free coffee, tea and hot chocolate provided to help you cheer!
• Every day until Sunday, Feb.
28, 12pm-5pm, Marine Drive
Residence, Tower 1.
MONDAY, FEB. 22
HIP HOP CLASS • Hip hop dance
originated in New York among
young Hispanic and African-
American men during the late
1960s as part of the hip-hop culture of rap, scratch music, and
graffiti art. • $8, all levels welcome, SUB Party Room.
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 24
FAUST* The UBC Players Club
presents Faust, directed by
Andrew Isaac. • Playing at
Dorothy Sommerset Studio,
runs until Feb. 27. Tickets are
$10 for students, $15 for everyone else. For more info, visit
ubcplayersclub.com.
LIMITS OF FREE SPEECH • With
the Olympics in Vancouver,
there is a growing feeling
that civil liberties are taking
a back seat to profit and entertainment. Protesters feel
silenced and unheard. CFI
Vancouver is proud to host a
discussion on Free Speech
with Radio Freethinker's Don
McLenaghen. The discussion
will begin with a short talk by
Don, after which, people will
be encouraged to ask questions, debate, and get involved
in the conversation. • 7pm-
9pm, Buchanan Room B215,
donations are welcome.
WINTER MUSIC It. TANG, CANADA
SUITE GALA CONCERT • The second part of the Winter Music
series includes renowned violinist, composer and conductor   Kangnian   Tang,   formerly
LSAT MCAT
GMAT GRE
Preparation Seminars
Exploring the Quaker Way
Come to an introductory
meeting.
Every Tuesday, 7:00-8:00 pm, 1090
West 70th Ave, Vancouver.
Information: Inessa, 604-435-3112
• Complete 30-Hour Seminars
• Convenient Weekend Schedule
• Proven Test-Taking Strategies
• Experienced Course Instructors
• Comprehensive Study Materials
• Simulated Practice Exams
• Limited Class Size
• Free Repeat Policy
• Personal Tutoring Available
• Thousands of Satisfied Students
Got a sweet event you
want to advertise?
All events are free to
be put in the paper for
UBC students!
events@ubyssey.ca
tlTHEUBYSSEYca
OXFORD SEMINARS
604-683-3430
1-800-269-6719
www.oxfordseminars.ca
a member of the Shanghai
Musicians Association and currently a member of the COCAN
in Canada. • 7:30pm, Chan
Shun Concert Hall, Chan Centre,
$25 tickets, $35 at Ticketmaster.
MONDAY, MAR. 1
UNDERSTANDING WINE: AN
INTRODUCTION (PART 1) • A wine
instructor provides an introduction to the world of wine.
The instructor will be available for wine consultation for
a half-hour after the end of
each class. Each participant
receives a starter kit, consisting of six wine tasting glasses.
Learn how to shop and read label information, discover how
wines age and learn how to
choose wines to pair with different foods. • Runs until Mar.
29, 6pm-8:30pm, Room 102,
Ponderosa Annex C, $395.
TUESDAY, MAR. 2
EXPLORING CULTURE THROUGH
CULINARY ARTS* Join UBC instructors as they help you explore the history and culture of
their countries through group
restaurant outings and discussions about your dining experiences. These courses are offered in English. The fee includes lectures, four dinners at
various restaurants and all taxes and gratuities. • Runs until Mar. 30, 6:30pm-7:30pm,
first class meets in Buchanan D
Building, $325 and tax.
WEDNESDAY, MAR. 3
WEDNESDAY NOON HOURS:
UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY STRING
QUARTET WITH DAVID HARDING •
Mendelssohn, String Quintet,
Op. 87, as well as Klezmer and
East European folk music •
12pm-1pm, Recital Hall, UBC
Music Building, $4 at the door.
SELF-TRANSLATION AND OTHER-
TRANSLATION ACROSS ENEMY
LINES: PALESTINIAN AND ISRAELI
VARIATIONS* Carol Bardenstein,
Department of Near Eastern
Studies, University of Michigan
will explore the portrays of
Palestinians in literary and
filmic representations (both
Israeli and Palestinian) and
to a more limited degree, the
phenomenon of Jewish characters translated into Arabic/
Palestinian terms in Palestinian
literary and other representations. • 5pm-6pm, Coach
House, Green College, 6201
Cecil Green Park Road, free.
WORK YOUR BA: TOASTMASTERS •
The ability to communicate effectively gets you noticed in
life and work. Get your public
speaking skills up to speed with
this workshop that focuses on
applying practical strategies to
help you become a more effective and engaging public speaking. Learn the Toastmasters
method and from the experience of veteran speakers. •
lpm-2pm, Angus 426.
THUESDAY.MAR.4
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE LEARNING
INFO SESSION • Participate in
meaningful projects led by community partners around the world
through Go Global's International
Service Learning (ISL) programs.
• 1pm-2pm, IBLC room 157, free.
For more info, visit students.ubc.
ca/global.
IDAN RAICHEL PROJECT • The Idan
Raichel Project changed the face
of Israeli popular music. The
blend of African, Latin American,
Caribbean and Middle Eastern
sounds, coupled with a spectacular live show,  has enchanted
audiences worldwide. • 8pm,
Chan Shun Concert Hall, tickets
starting at $41.
FRIDAY, MAR. 5
THE CAVE SINGERS WITH DUCHESS
AND   THE   DUKE,   MOONDOGGIES
• Come to the Pit Pub for an
evening of folk music with
Seattle's Cave Singers, and
special guests Duchess and
the Duke, and Moondoggies. •
8pm, the Pit Pub, $ 16. Tickets
can be purchased at The
Outpost and ticketweb.com.
GENDER AND SEXUALITY IN
LATIN AMERICA: READING
& DISCUSSION SESSION ON
"STORIES OF RACE, GENDER AND
CLASS" • The Liu Research
Group on Gender and
Sexuality in Latin America
aims to contribute to ongoing discussions about Latin
American gender relations,
sexual politics and feminist
theories by bringing together
graduate students, post-doctoral fellows and faculty interested in these issues. • 4pm-
6pm, Liu Institute for Global
Issues, 3rd Floor Boardroom,
refreshments provided.
BASIA BULAT • Basia's 2007
debut, Oh, My Darling, was a
success both at home and on
the international scene. It garnered a Polaris Prize nomination and praise from outlets
like NPR, who labeled In the
Night as one of 2008s great
singles. Catch Basia Bulat
live for an amazing concert.
• 8pm-11pm, St. James Hall,
3214 West 10th Ave., tickets
can be found at ticketweb.ca
or at the Outpost in the SUB.
THE FUNDRAISER • To keep
Discorder in print and inform
you on what's going on in
Vancouver's independent music scene, they're having a concert fundraiser. Includes a very
special DJ set by Japandroids
and various bands. • Mar. 5 at
8pm and Mar. 6 at 2pm, The
Biltmore, 395 Kingsway, $15
tickets.
SPORT & SOCIETY: SPORT &
INCLUSION WITH WANEEK HORN-
MILLER AND GUESTS* Join in person or online for five thought
provoking dialogues with
Olympic & Paralympic athletes
who have used their celebrity to make a difference in the
world. • 8pm-9:30pm, Chan
Centre, $ 10. For more info, visit chancentre.com.
FRIDAY, MAR. 12
A CONCERT FOR HAITI • Come enjoy an evening of live music performed by unique local artists.
Proceeds will go towards supporting the ongoing medical relief efforts in Haiti. • 6pm reception, 7:30pm concert, Graham
House, Green College, $20
tickets.
FRIDAY, MAR. 26
GLOBAL HEALTH AND HUMAN
SECURITY  CONFERENCE  2010  •
This conference will feature
speakers who are researching neglected diseases and
have first hand experience
with these issues. We hope
that this will provide a broader and more interdisciplinary
context for students interested in issues of research,
global health and development. • Mar. 26-28, Keynote
address and reception at the
Global Lounge (Marine Drive),
Conference at the Liu Institute
for Global Issues, registration
begins Mar. 1, all students are
welcome. 2010.02.22/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/3
Chan defends himself from
champion s critique
Canadian uncertain if he will continue Olympic career in Sochi
SAMANTHAJUNG
news@ubyssey.ca
"I would skate to Coldplay....
Stuff that judges would not relate to at all," said Canadian
Olympian Patrick Chan.
"Music that I actually like."
The 19-year-old figure skater,
who placed fifth on Thursday
night, was more eager to talk
about music on Friday afternoon than a certain figure skating move.
"I don't like talking about
the quad," he told reporters. 19-year-old Chan has received criticism for not performing a quadruple spin
during his program, a move
considered one of the hardest to pull off in figure skating. These critiques include
biting words from former
three-time world champion
figure skater Elvis Stojko.
"The quad separates the
men from the boys," Stjoko told
Yahoo Sports. [The Olympics is]
about 'higher, faster, stronger,'
not about 'more artistic, more
flamboyant and more musical.'
That's a recital."
The move was performed
multiple times by silver medalist and Russian athlete Evgeni
Plushenko that night. US
Olympian Evan Lysacek was
quad-free but still took home
the gold medal.
Chan, who is one of the many
Canadian athletes featured on
bus ads and billboards, talked
about the changing face of figure skating.
In Stojko's time, he said,
the sport was judged 80-20 for
technical and artistic feats; it
has now changed to 50-50.
"Things have to change.
We're in a new generation....It
rn
ooo
Media criticisms did not seem to bother Canadian athlete Patrick Chan. GERALD DEO PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
would be boring if [figure skating] stays the same," Chan said.
He claimed that his program
was no less complex without
the quad.
Things have to
change.
PATRICK CHAN
OLYMPIC FIGURE SKATER
"It's just as challenging doing
a program without a quad, because [of] just the complexity of
my footwork the spins and the
jumps on top of that," Chan said.
He also addressed that he
is going to work on improving the move. "I'm not saying
I'm not going to do a quad,"
he said. "It's tough, I mean
to have the pressure and the
stress to do a quad is a lot. It's
a big burden."
"What the judges love to
see is my skating," Chan explained. "Anyone can do a
quad but no one can skate the
way that I do. I skate uniquely,
and I skate with passion and
love."
Chan was not clear if he was
going to take his 'passion and
love' for skating to the 2014
Games in Sochi, Russia.
"[This year has] made me
really hungry, and I look really
forward to making a big comeback in a month," he said, expressing his excitement for
March's World Figure Skating
Championships.
"The next Games is a long
way. I'm going to take it day by
day." ^
FAST FACTS
ABOUT
PATRICK CHAN
• played piano as a kid
• started skating because
he wanted to play hockey
• told critical reporters that
he feels US gold medalist
Evan Lysacek deserved his
medal
• called Vancouver 2010
the "Four Seasons of the
Olympics"
• is featured in Cheerios
ads and on billboards
around town
NEWS BRIEFS
OLYMPIC VILLAGE DEEMED
SAFE AFTER INVESTIGATION
No additional security will be
implemented at the Athletes'
Village after the RCMP investigated the suspicious map of
the Village found 10km away
at Whistler on Thursday, reported CTV.
The map was said to have
'suspicious notations' in the
various areas of the Village but
information on what they were
and where the map was discovered was not released by the
RCMP.
UBC Political Science professor Michael Byers said that the
sensitivity of the security forces
on the Athletes Village threats is
pardy due to the murder of athletes at the Munich Olympics in
1972.
—Sarah Chung
SELANNE BREAKS OLYMPIC
RECORD
February 19, 2010 will be a
day that Finnish hockey player
Teemu Selanne will remember
for the rest of his life.
In his third hockey game of
the tournament match against
Germany, Selanne scored
his 37th Olympic goal, beating the old Olympic record,
which was shared by Vlastimil
Bubnik of the then-Czechoslovakia, Valeri Kharmalov of the
then-Soviet Union and Harry
Watson of Canada.
This is Selanne's fifth
Olympic appearance since his
debut on the world stage at
the 1992 Albertville Games. In
1998 at Nagano, Finland won
the bronze medal in men's ice
hockey, and they placed second
in the 2006 Games in Torino,
picking up the silver after being
defeated by Canada.
Selanne started his NHL career in 1992 after being drafted in 1988 for the Winnipeg
Jets (now the Phoenix Coyotes).
He has been playing for the
Anaheim Ducks since 2005.
—Tagh Sira
GROVES TAKES HOME SECOND
MEDAL
Canadian Kristina Groves
has taken home her second
Olympic medal this year, this
time for the women's 1500m
speed skating event, reported CBC.
On Sunday, Groves finished
behind Netherlands athlete
Ireen Wust. Martina Sablikova
ofthe Czech Republic took third
place.
Groves earned a bronze medal in the 3000m eventlast week.
—Samanthajung
Crash rounds off
disappointing day
Canadian athletes could not make
it in bobsled, speed skating
TAGH SIRA
o lymp icsedi to r@u byssey. ca
Canadian two-man bobsled
favourites Lyndon Rush and
Lascelles Brown had their
world upended Saturday night
when their sled flipped on the
13th turn of the track.
Brown commented on his
run afterwards. "I wouldn't
say [I'm] disappointed. We
were third after the first heat,"
he said. "Anyone can crash
on any track. We [made] a
mistake."
Neither athlete was seriously
injured during the crash. Rush
received what he called 'surface
wounds.'
"It's like someone punching
you all the way until the sled
stops," said Brown, describing
the crash.
The incident came on a disappointing day for the Canadian
medal count, with both of the
Hamelin brothers robbed at the
men's 1500m short track speed
skating event. The brothers
were in the lead until the third-
to-last lap. They seemed to run
out of energy and fell to the last
two positions.
It's like someone
punching you all
the way until the
sled stops.
LASCELLES BROWN
CANADIAN ATHLETE, BOBSLED
The same was true for Denny
Morrison, who was competing in the 1500m speed skating competition. Also a strong
contender going into the round,
Morrison just couldn't keep
pushing himself for the last
400m of the skate.
Rush and Brown's next competition is the four-man bobsled, scheduled to take jplace
on February 26 and 27. "vl
COLUMN
The power
of Olympic
blue
TAGH SIRA
0 lymp icsedi to r@u byssey. ca
1 won't be focusing on the
sports at the Olympics today,
however, I won't be discussing
my life as a journalist either.
Today, I'll be talking about
the power of 'Wave.' Not 'The
Wave,' which we all love doing at the hockey games (even
in the press box), but the trademark name of the blue colour
that the Hudson's Bay Company
has put on all of the Olympic
volunteer uniforms and the
people who are wearing them.
Everywhere you look around
Vancouver, you'll see someone
wearing that all-too-familiar
shade of blue. They are a helpful and friendly group of people
whose jobs are to make sure the
2010 Games operate smoothly.
VANOC has stated that about
30,000 people are working to
put on the Games, and about
25,000 of those are volunteers.
Just in the Opening Ceremonies
alone there were over 2500
volunteers who worked at that
event.
These volunteers do everything from direct traffic
to tech support. Most come
from Vancouver, but there are
some from locations all over
the world, bringing the well-
known Canadian cultural diversity into the volunteer task
force.
The only compensation these
people get is to keep the clothes
they wear while working. They
had to pay an extra $50 just
to get a backpack that matches
their uniform.
Next time you
see an Olympic
volunteer, thank
them.
The amazing aspect of this
simple blue uniform is the
sense of community it has
created.
Vancouverites are generally a friendly group of people,
but the level of community participation infused into this city
because of the Olympics is extremely high.
The folks in 'Wave' blue courteously answer the same question to spectators and tourists
dozens of times an hour, while
always telling people to have a
nice day. Occasionally you can
hear them leading cheers or
announcing when we've won a
medal.
People in uniform riding to
their posting or back home on
transit congregate together, discussing what they do and how
their day was. Complete strangers also join in the conversations, eager to find out more
about what goes on behind the
scenes at the Games.
Next time you see an Olympic
volunteer, thank them, because
without their commitment and
dedication we wouldn't be experiencing the best two weeks this
city has ever seen, tl 4/UBYSSEY.CA/OLYMPICS/2 010.0 2.2 2
"This is a true democracy'
In the midst ofthe Olympics, Vancouver's
homeless erect pavilions of their own
ANDREW BATES
western.bureau@cup.ca
In the last week, Vancouver's
Downtown Eastside has become very visible as the heart
of the Vancouver's dynamic and divisive housing movement. While featured in the
"2010 Convergence Welcoming
Committee" protests that
brought together a wide range
of social groups, the last week
has seen the movement take a
prominent position as a social
issue within the city.
Monday, a rally made up of
the homeless and their supporters went from Pigeon Park to
an empty lot on East Hastings.
The lot was originally rented by
VANOC from Concord Pacific to
use as a parking lot for some of
the vehicles in its fleet. It was
turned into a tent village where
residents have come together to
form a community.
VANCOVER'S "DOWNTOWN
EASTSIDE HOUSE"
"I've been here since '92, and
I've been on the streets for
about six years now," said
Ashley, an Aboriginal man
who sat guarding the entrance
to the tent city. "This is about
my third tent city that I've
been fighting for."
According to Eric Castavet,
a tent city organizer from
Quebec, residents hope the
tent village will attract the attention of the federal government. "We camp here to show
the government that before a
condo, we need houses." he told
The Ubyssey. "Look at that condo. You can rent that for [over
a thousand] bucks a month, but
welfare gives us $375."
In Vancouver, attempts have
been made to increase shelter space. Seven Homeless
Emergency Action Team
(HEAT) shelters have been established, although federal
funding for those will end in
April, with future funding for
the area in jeopardy.
According to Castavet, shelters are not homes, and they
won't solve the problem. "You
share a toilet with 60 to 70 people. You share the same shower. Can you imagine [being]
the last one to take a shower?" he said. "We're not looking for shelter. We're looking
for one-bedroom, two-bedroom
apartments."
Many members of the tent
village point out that housing
is necessary to become selt
sustainable. "Three-quarters of
the homeless people here, they
could go for work, but they have
no place to get ready for work,"
said Castavet, who had hoped to
find a steady job in Vancouver
after leaving his home in
Manitoba.
"We have [busy] traffic until 4:30 in the morning, so you
have one hour of sleep. You
have no clothes to change. We
cannot have a shower. So how
are we supposed to find a job?"
"WE ARE BRICKS
TOGETHER. CEMENT."
Castavet told The Ubyssey that
they have seen about an equal
How serious is the homelessness crisis in Vancouver? MICHAEL THIBAULT PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
Building homes for the community. MICHAELTHIBAULT PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
amount of support and criticism from passers-by regarding their tent village protest.
"Some of them...[honk their]
horn at us: 'Hey, good for you
guys,'" he said. "Others look at
us like we are cockroaches on
the street. Most of them, they
stop by, they walk in, they look
at it, and they walk out."
The tent village has made
it possible to get their message about housing out in
a positive way according to
Garvin Snyder, who moved to
Vancouver from Ottawa eight
years ago and now lives in single resident occupancy housing
on East Hastings.
"VANOC was going to get us
a protest playpen," he said, referring to the Olympic "free
speech zone" concept. "This
might as well be it. We're near
so many services."
Snyder says he was the
first person to spray paint the
Olympic Countdown Clock outside ofthe Vancouver Art Gallery,
a form of protest he says is only
possible in Canada. "If I was in
any other country in the world,
I never would have been able to
tag the clock and walk free," he
said.
However, Snyder emphasized that it's important to exercise those rights. "This is a true
democracy. It costs nothing to
get your message out," he said,
gesturing at his red tent—one
of hundreds that were provided by Pivot Legal Society—and
a larger tent set up as a private
space he dubbed "Downtown
Eastside House."
Many residents feel they
have been empowered by the
tent city. "The people are getting nurtured, we don't have to
go to bed with an empty stomach, and they're happy" said
Stella August, an Aboriginal
resident working with Power to
Women. "To me, that's freedom
for these people."
Castavet says that the tent city
has helped bring people together. "The community is so strong
that nobody can go through us,"
he said. "We are bricks together. Cement."
The Tyee reported Vision
Vancouver Councilor Kerry
Jang said that his party won't
support the tent city last week,
due to concerns over health
and safety. However, members
ofthe tent village have said that
they have been careful not to allow drugs or alcohol. Although
police have been monitoring
their camp, they have not had
altercations so far.
If I was in any
other country in
the world, I never
would have been
able to tag the clock
and walk free.
GARVIN SNYDER
TENT CITY RESIDENT
SEEING RED
Outside Sochi House, known
any other time of year as the
Telus World of Science, a coalition of groups led by Pivot
Legal Society deployed red
tents at a different demonstration on Friday night. The
group, who aren't homeless
but describe themselves as
supporters and concerned citizens, held a sleep-over in solidarity at the park there.
"I was looking for something
to do during the Olympics that
would be positive towards getting a national housing campaign," said Megan McKinney,
a political consultant. "This is
a solidarity movement with the
tent city."
McKinney was brought into
the event through friends, who
were organizers. "I worked
in the Downtown Eastside,
and things just keep getting
worse every year," she said.
"[Vancouver] is an incredibly
unaffordable city, and that just
gets worse and worse."
The red tent campaign has
had a few critics. Kerry Jang
has suggested that some activist groups have said to him the
red tent campaign is a PR stunt
and that the Pivot groups are
"exploiting homeless people for
their own gain."
Am Johal is the Chair of
the Impact on Communities
Coalition (ICC), an Olympics
watchdog group and partner organization in the red tent campaign. He explained in an interview that the red tents were selected not just to provide shelter but to make homelessness
more visible, an idea they took
from a campaign in Paris that
resulted in changes in public
policy.
Johal hopes Olympic attention will help strengthen the national housing movement.
"I think it's important that
[housing reform advocates]...
utilize this opportunity to
grow a movement that goes beyond the Games," said Johal.
"Obviously housing has been a
major issue."
Johal said that due to the UN
Special Rapporteur on Housing
visited Edmonton, Toronto,
Ottawa and Montreal in 2007,
they are aware of a housing crisis that spans the nation. "The
idea is that by launching [the
red tent campaign] in this context, we'll engage with housing advocates across the country and it's really aimed at getting the federal government to
reestablish a national housing
program."
AN ISLAND OF ACTIVISTS
IN A SEA OF TOURISTS
On Saturday members of the
tent city red tent campaign
supporters and activists met
in front of the Vancouver Art
Gallery. Flanked on all sides
by crowds of tourists, participants and media stood out
clearly if only for their lack of
Games-related merchandise.
The rally mixed politicians
with the homeless, as a speakers and a few city residents
stepped up to the microphone,
telling their stories and singing songs. 20 10. 02. 22/UBYSSEY.CA/OLYMPICS/5
THE
FE;CPl_E
SAY:     ^ |l
HOMESk
Protesters rally together Downtown to make their voices heard. MICHAEL THIBAULT PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
Speakers at the event included Wendy Pedersen of the
Carnegie Community Action
Project, David Dennis of the
Frank Paul Society, Stella August
of the Downtown Eastside
Women's Center and MP Libby
Davies (NDP Vancouver East)
among others. They focused on
the federal government's lack
of involvement in housing.
I was looking
for something
to do during the
Olympics that
would be positive
towards getting a
national housing
campaign.
MEGAN MCKINNEY
POLITICAL CONSULTANT
"You look at all the projects,
the billion dollar projects that
the federal government poured
into this city," said Dennis,
"and they're the only government that is not participating
or putting any money towards
homelessness, and that's a crying shame."
"The Olympics, according to
a well known real estate developer in our city, Bob Rennie,
[is] a $6 billion marketing campaign   for   Vancouver,"   said
Pedersen. "We do not agree
with turning Vancouver into a
rich resort city. We need affordable housing, and the only way
we're going to be able to do it is
to get big dollars from the federal government."
David Cadman, COPE
Vancouver City Councilor, noted that the original Olympics
plan included provisions for
social inclusivity. "We knew it
would be an embarassment if
the world came here and saw
the Downtown Eastside with
so many homeless people," he
said.
The Olympic Village project,
which was supposed to provide
30 per cent social housing, 30
per cent affordable housing,
and 30 per cent market housing, was affected by the recession. The project went far over
budget at great expense to the
taxpayer.
"They were on the verge of
going bankrupt, and we had
to step in and finance that
program," Cadman said. He
claimed that a previous Council
reduced the level of social housing to 250 units, and those are
dependant on their ability to
sell the other units to the market. "We've got to hope that they
do, or else the 250 social units
may be put in jeopardy as well,"
he added.
Cadman was noncommittal
about whether the city might answer calls to purchase the tent
city land and turn it into social housing. "We're unlikely to
be stampeded into purchasing
certain pieces of property that
might cause an inflation of
price," he said. "We're very strategic—we go in quietly, usually,
and acquire."
We do not agree
with turning
Vancouver into a
rich resort city.
WENDY PEDERSEN
CARNEGIE COMMUNITY ACTION
PROJECT
SPARE SOME CHANGE?
Many ofthe activists hope that
a national housing policy is
developed which follows a solution proposed by Dr David
Hulchanski of the University
of Toronto, which calls for all
levels of governments to devote one per cent of their budgets to housing. Johal said that
he feels public response to the
housing movement and the
red tent campaign has been
positive due to their clear
goals.
"We're getting a lot of support," said Johal. "I think that a
lot of times with activism people lose sight of what they are
supporting, and what is great
about this campaign is that
we're really specific about what
we're pushing for."
MP Davies has authored
a bill for a national housing
strategy (Bill C-3 04) which has
passed several readings. Once
adopted, it would require that
the federal government put
forward an affordable housing
strategy, so housing costs do
not "compromise an individual's ability to meet other basic
needs, including food, clothing
and access to education."
The bill would also require
financial assistance to be provided in cases where individuals are unable to afford housing and ensure that social housing provides adequate and specific facilities reflecting those
in need. In addition, the bill
includes a provision for shelters to be made available in the
event of disasters and crises.
The national housing strategy
has received support from the
NDP, the Liberals and the Bloc
Quebecois parties, but has been
opposed by the Conservatives.
Currendy, the proposed bill
waits in limbo as Parliament
has been prorogued.
Meanwhile, the tent city
grows, with over a hundred
tents already and more added
daily. VANOC's lease on the lot
expires in five weeks, at which
point control of the land will
revert to real estate developer
Concord Pacific. Garvin is planning to stay at least those five
weeks, or until they are asked to
leave. "Somebody would know,"
he said. "We'd know anyways.
Put your socks and underwear
on, we've got to move," he said.
He pointed out, however, that
Vancouver's Pordand Hotel
Society has hosted a series of
rotating three-month tent cities.
Beatrice Star, also from the
If we leave early
and just let this
go, tnen we didn't
accomplish
anything.
ERIC CASTAVET
TENTCITYORGANIZER
Power to Women movement,
echoes the organizers of the Red
Tent campaign when she said
that the movement must go on
after the Games. "If we leave early and just let this go, then we
didn't accomplish anything."
According to Castavet, it is important to stand ground. "We try
to fight for our rights, and we
lose all the time," he said.
"So this is why today, we
wake up, and stand up for everybody." tu
—With files from Trevor Record
and Michael Thibault
Eric Castavet. MICHAEL THIBAULT PH0T0/THE UBYSSEY
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U THEUBYSSEYca 6/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/2 0 10.02.22
Stephen Colbert says 'sorry
Skeptics take note of comedians apologetic move
CYNTHIA KHOO
ckhoo@ubyssey.ca
Even the seldom seen
Vancouver sun was beaming
as Stephen Colbert ran onstage
Thursday morning, yelling, "I
take it all back!" to a crowd of
Canadian fans numbering in
the thousands.
This was the last of the two-
day filming of the Vancouver
Olympics special edition of The
Colbert Report, a satirical news
show in which Colbert plays a
close-minded, far right-wing
newscaster.
Several episodes of The
Colbert Report had been leading up to his event, in which
he engaged in Olympic-
themed activities. Colbert
mocked Canadians as "syrup-sucking ice holes," disparaged Canada for allegedly giving the US speed skating team
unfair access to the Richmond
Olympic Oval, and attempted
to participate in the Olympics
by trying out for various US
Olympic teams.
Other key segments of the
Vancouver show included interviews with US gold medal snowboard cross athlete
Seth Wescott and US Olympic
ski aerialists Jeret "Speedy"
Peterson and Ryan St Onge.
Also shown was a taped interview with Vancouver South
MP Ujjal Dosanjh—where
Colbert asked which caste the
former Health Minister was
born into, leading to a palpable gasp of dismay from the
audience.
Perhaps the one sticky
point of the show was when
Colbert pressed St Onge and
Peterson on ski aerialists' apparent desire to keep pushing
the boundaries of their sport,
Stephen Colbert gets in touch with his Canuck side on Thursday in front of thousands of excited fans. CYNTHIA KHOO PHOTOS/THE UBYSSEY
citing its difficulty and danger.
Peterson's reply of "Nobody's
died yet" met a disapproving response from the majority of those present, who were
no doubt thinking of Georgian
luger Nodar Kumaritashvili,
who died during a practice run
before the start of this year's
Games.
According to UBC Marketing
Professor Paul Cubbon from
the Sauder School of Business,
Colbert taping his show in
Vancouver was a win-win for all
parties involved.
"It's a big show in the media for two weeks; this puts
him centre-stage," said Cubbon.
"Consider it informal co-branding, and he did not have to pay
for sponsorship!"
Colbert asked
which caste the
former Health
Minister was born
into, leading to a
palpable gasp of
dismay from the
audience.
Cubbon said that the event
had positive events for both
Vancouver and VANOC.
"Certainly many people appreciate the satire and mocking
humour,"  he   said.   "Canadian
celebrities are getting showcased, and it does not hurt that
on sunny days the backdrop to
the filming is a great ad for the
city."
Although Colbert is an enter-
tinaer, he is also a brand, according to Cubbon. "Because
his style attracts a certain audience, then a new brand, an
event, can benefit from association," he said.
UBC Journalism Professor
Joe Cutbirth, however, thinks
Colbert is doing more damage control with his decision
to tape in Vancouver than anything else.
"I think he's coming up here because he put his foot in his mouth
and I think he realizes it," Cutbirth
said in an interview with CTV.
"Satire works as a tool of
the powerless against the powerful," he explained. "And,
for better or worse, in this
case, Americans are seen
by Canadians as the more
powerful.
"When Stephen Colbert
discredited Canada and the
Olympics—a real source of
Canadian pride—I think he realized...he had crossed the line."
Judging by the crowds that
slept over, camped out, lined
up, waved signs and chanted on both Wednesday and
Thursday morning, it would
seem that whether or not he
crossed the line, Colbert and
his show remain warm in the
hearts of more than a few ice
holes in Vancouver. tl
immmriww%mm!i
s<«f
_______
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Students also work on the Pacific Rim Magazine, a 64-page
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Now accepting applications for September 2010
Information Session at Langara College
Tuesday, March 2, 7pm, Rm A247
Contact Giselle at 604.323.5430 or e-mail
glemay@langara. bc.ca
www.langara.bc.ca 2010.02.22/UBYSSEY.CA/IDEAS/7
D
EAS
LETTER
TO:THEUBYSSEY
1 would like to give a great big public       contacts, and also—just maybe—       encourage all readers with a proj-
"Thankyou!" to the AMS Finance       learnt some things.                                ect in mind to find out more about
Committee for administering the           The Fund administers awards of       this fund, which you can do on-
Student Initiatives Fund. This fund       up to $500 (and up to 50 per cent       line at ams.ubc.ca/funds/. A good
helped provide the means for me       of the total cost of the project) for       idea and a little extra cash can go
to attend the CPSSA annual con-       student initiatives of various types.       a long way.
ference in Halifax, Nova Scotia. 1           Not enough people know about
had a wicked time, made valuable       this fantastic resource.   1  would                                     —Sean Cregten
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WRITE US A LETTER
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EDITOR TREVOR RECORD»ideas@ubyssey.ca
PAUL BUCCI GRAPHIC/THE UBYSSEY
EDITORIAL
HOCKEY REMAINS OUR GREATEST SHARED INTEREST
Wandering around the streets of Vancouver this week, it becomes
clear how strong a bond sports can create. The city has become
unglued and electric. Something as simple as a series of athletic
competitions can make overnight heroes out of former unknowns.
Did you ever cheer for a skeleton racer before this week? Did you
know what skeleton was?
Beneath the celebration and glory, there's the secondary storyline
of our men's hockey team: whether they can win gold, and whether
they can set off a national celebration that nothing else in this country could conceivably ignite. Which is both amazing and baffling.
We are a country and a people of disparate threads. Be it history,
geography, culture or language there is no single narrative that fully
unites us, as the opening ceremonies reminded us. More than ever,
we are culturally pulled not east and west, but south: students in this
city today have more in common with those in Seatde and Pordand
than Montreal or Saskatoon.
Yet hockey remains. Shoot the puck, hit the open man, make the
save, pray for the Cup—it has somehow brought us together for generations. We are more diverse than ever in so many ways, yet there
are times when the exploits of young men in red maple leaf jerseys
can make millions of us stand still and sing our national anthem
in unison. Hockey made Canadians nervous about the Swiss. When
was the last time anyone was nervous about the Swiss?
If Canada makes it to the gold medal game, it will be the most
watched event on TV in this country, one the greatest patriotic outpourings we'll ever see, and the most resonant sporting moments
for a decade to come. That's not hyperbole.
We celebrated against Norway, held our breath against Switzerland
and hung our heads after going up against the US and failing. Now,
it's single-elimination the rest of the way, and we don't know what
will happen this week. Whatever your thoughts on hockey, fighting,
the Olympics, patriotism or nationalism are, you owe it to vourself
to watch. History like this doesn't come around that often, va
TUMBLEWEED ON WESBROOK
OK, so it's not quite like UBC has been a ghost town. But after years
of buildup to the Olympics, they seem to have really left UBC alone.
Yeah, we had some events, andyeah, there was a pretty good torch
relay that people showed up to watch/protest. But since then it has
been extremely quiet on campus, with the exception of a few women's hockey matches. Students have mosdy been gone, and those
that have been here are quiedy going about their business.
Was all that back-and-forth worth it? The university invested a
significant amount of resources into preparing UBC for this mass
influx of people: printing signage, landscaping, preparing a visitor's centre, curtailing student's efforts to try to doing something—
anything—during the Games. And for what? A few days of packed
B-Lines and not much else.
All the endless tense AMS meetings, were they worth it? At the
same time that UBC was spending time and money preparing for
the Olympics, the AMS was spending time and money worrying
about them, and we still didn't get anything out of either party.
We'll admit it. Even The Ubyssey had a few long, intense meetings
about what we would do when the Olympics finally descended on
Vancouver. And now that they are, we've been spending most of our
time learning how to shoot and edit video at the International Media
Centre at Robson Square. Shameless plug: while the Olympics are going on, check out our video feed, updated regularly, at ubyssey.ca.
Free concerts will continue to give students something to pass
the time. Maybe we'll see a few more protests downtown. Students
can learn a few things about activism and bring their energy back
to campus in a week. But for now, things are dead on campus. How
boring, tl
TOO SEXY
AUSTIN HOLM
& KASHA CHANG
toosexy@ubyssey.ca
DEAR TOO SEXY,
About two months ago, I ended
a relationship I'd been in for
almost a year. I'm comfortable
with that decision and still
think it was something that
just had to happen. Although
there was nothing wrong with
the relationship itself, it left
me feeling more like a settled,
middle-aged half of a committed couple than like a 20-year-
old still experimenting and
figuring out what she wants. I
felt stagnant and was craving
the freedom of being single
again. I wanted to be able to
go out partying with my single
friends and hook up with randoms the way I used to. And
for a while, that's exactly what
happened.
But here's the rub: recently, I've been seeing couples everywhere, and I do mean everywhere. Maybe it has something
to do with the Olympics being
in town, but it seems like everywhere I go—be it Downtown,
UBC, at a club, or the Starbucks
around the corner from my
house—there are virtually no
young single people anywhere.
This makes it really difficult to
meet anyone new or hook up.
And to make matters much,
much worse, all my friends
seem to be getting into relationships, or at least meeting solid prospects. It's got me feeling lonely, unlovable and more
than a litde crazy.
So, please, Too Sexy, tell me:
am I insane? Will I ever find
love again? And what is it about
spring that makes being single
feel so shitty?
-Am I Nuts?
HEYAIN,
First of all, we of the Too Sexy
crew sympathize with your
plight. You're right—spring
is a hard time to be single.
Something about the poignant stirrings of flowers and
new leaves really lends itself
to coupledom, which can be
hard when you're single. Add
the party atmosphere of the
Olympics to that, and you're
in a place that isn't necessarily condusive to happy solitude.
So, you want to know ifyou're
insane. Only a trained mental health professional can truly answer that question, and we
at Too Sexy are not doctors. In
regards to your newfound cou-
plevision, though, we think we
can safely tell you that you are
not, in fact, crazy. There are a
few reasons why.
The first is that normal human brain often operates according to heuristics, which are
basically mental shortcuts designed to make us faster at processing and understanding information. The way these heuristics manifest is based on
what we're familiar with, what
we're thinking about, and what
is dominating our mental space
at the time.
Any lingering reservations
you may have about singleness
and ending your relationship
may be permeating your consciousness and causing you to
"see" couples—that is, assume
that groups of two people are
dating, when in fact they may
or may not be. This is totally
normal, especially since your
friends are pairing off right
now.
Secondly, there probably are
actually more bona fide couples
in your space than usual. Given
the volume of visitors in the
city, it's likely that people are
here with their families and/or
significant others if they have
them, rather than alone. People
tend to travel in groups when
visiting strange cities, and the
nature of romantic relationships tends to dictate that those
groups include girlfriends, boyfriends, partners, etc.
So what can you do, AIN? Will
you every find love again? While
we at Too Sexy are not clairvoyant, we can almost guarantee that you will. But—and
here's the trick—you've got to
stop worrying about it so much.
Potential partners are attracted
to people who are independent,
interesting and complete, AIN,
and while we're auew you are
all these things, you've got to let
it show. That means getting on
with your life and being happy
doing it, instead of just sitting
around moping and waiting for
love to find you.
So hit some of the free
Olympic shows, take up a new
hobby, and do the things you
love to do. Not only will this
cheer you up in the short term,
but it will increase the number
of people you meet, as well as
make you irresistible to potential partners who want to be
part of your full, exciting life.
Best of luck! tJ
We here at Too Sexy get lonely
too. Help us out by dropping us
a line at toosexy@ubyssey.ca, or
ubyssey.ca/ideas.
HUMOUR
VANCOUVER'S LESSONS FOR THE 2014 OLYMPICS IN SOCHI
The Sochi Organizing Committee
is already spending an Olympic-
sized amount of time talking
about the lessons they've learned
from the 2010 Games for 2014.
The Ubyssey hasn't bothered looking into what these are, because
we were too busy coming up with
our own.
DON'T INVITE THE BRITISH
There's something about the
British character that lends
itself to pointing out the obvious, numerous flaws of an
event. All it takes is a couple of
those joyless English journalists to get in the mix, and suddenly the international media
says you are hosting the "worst
Olympics ever" which is an "international embarrassment."
Next time around, don't let the
limeys past the airport gate.
Say their invitation got lost in
the mail and if they persist,
tell them to screw a cod.
WEATHER CONTROL
The whiny dunderheads at
VANOC keep blaming these
Games'    spring   weather   on
forces beyond their control that
were impossible to plan for.
Nothing's impossible, even if
it requires tampering with the
forces of nature in a foolhardy
display of modern man's technological hubris! The Chinese
could keep the 2008 Olympics
sunny and can probably keep
the next Olympics cold and
snowy, learn from them. Open
all the fridges along the Black
Sea. Create a sun-blocking device like the one from The
Simpsons. Make a deal with
Baba Yaga (this may require
sacrificing some infants).
STOP WORRYING AND LEARN TO
LOVE (ABUSING) THE LAW
Thanks to a couple bad-egg
malcontents, some media outlets have noticed that we have
problems. But can anyone criticize you for turning into an
overbearing police state if everyone that's been calling you
one is already in jail? Your city
only has as many problems as
there are people waving signs
complaining about them. In
the words of Stalin, comrades,
"No man, no problem."
FENCES EVERYWHERE!
From barriers directing the
flow into public transit to massive fences making sure than
no one can see the Olympic
flame, people are just crazy for
cages. Cash machine in a public space? Put several rows of
fences leading up to it. Have
some breathtaking scenes of
Sochi's natural beauty distracting people from ostentatious advertisements? Put up
some big fences so no one can
check them out.
DON'T BOTHER WITH HOCKEY
Canadians are the only ones
that actually care about hockey, and it's the only thing in
the world that can make them
rowdy and disrespectful to authority. To make sure that the
Canadians still have more
than one sport they're guaranteed a medal in, replace hockey with a second set of curling events which are exactly
the same as the first two except for the addition of hourly breaks for beer and Tim
Horton's. tl 8/UBYSSEY.CA/IDEAS/20 10.02.22
HOCKEY GRAILS
TOUR VANCOUVER
The Stanley Cup, Wayne
Gretzky's skates and a variety of other hockey artifacts made an appearance at
Robson Square Friday morning. After a presentation of
the Cup to youth teams playing on the Robson Square ice
rink, it made its way into the
media centre for photos, along
with items such as Jacques
Planteau's goalie face mask,
Sidney Crosby's gloves and
a neatly dissected version
of Fox's infamous "glowing
puck" from the 1997 NHL All-
Star Game. tl
—Gerald Deo
GERALD DEO PHOTOS/THE UBYSSEY
POINT/COUNTERPOINT: THE WORST GAMES EVER?
NO ONE'S PERFECT
SAMANTHAJUNG
news@ubyssey.ca
Wins and losses aside, the local media has been upset over
comments made by international news outlets, especially
an article in The Guardian that
criticizes the Olympic Games
in Vancouver.
Lawrence Donegan, a sports-
writer who was spreading
doom about the Games before they started, has said this
could be the "worst Games
ever," questioning if the Games
should have been brought to
Vancouver in the first place.
One of the biggest complaints is about the weather.
It's too warm, some say. There
are complaints about cancelations of events due to weather.
Others grouse about the lack of
snow. The fact that lineups for
venues are too long is another
complaint, this time from tourists trying to see Olympic shows
and attractions. The torch malfunctioned on opening night.
The list goes on.
"Worst Games ever?" If a
single city is trying to host the
world, do you expect it to be
perfect? If you host a party at
your house, how can you guarantee that something won't be
broken, or that the police won't
show up and shut it down because of noise? VANOC has
done everything they could to
troubleshoot and control what
they can for the Games—that
does not include the weather,
by the way—and a few hiccups
have occurred.
Let's see the international
and local media focus on some
of the social problems that matter such as homelessness, the
Downtown Eastside and where
our public dollars are going instead of the technology malfunctions and underestima-
tions of spectators. Those are
issues that matter, and something that VANOC can do something about, til
HAVING THE WORST OLYMPICS
EVER MATTERS ABOUT AS
MUCH AS HAVING THE BEST
TREVOR RECORD
deas@ubyssey.ca
The Guardian's Lawrence
Donegan started it; he said
that the 2010 Winter Olympics
could be the worst Games ever.
A bunch of members of the international media followed
suit, and some nicknaming
them Glitch Games. This, in
turn, caused many other people in Vancouver to get defensive about the Games.
So you don't think that the international media should say
mean things about Vancouver?
Tough break, kiddo.
It was exacdy your lot that was
getting excited about how everyone was going to love Vancouver
because of the Olympics. The
Games were good because they
were going to show the world
what Vancouver's got to offer.
Given that line of reasoning, it's
kinda weird to get mad at them
for telling us how they really
feel, isn't it?
None of the criticisms
we've gotten so far have been
any worse than the ones that
Vancouver residents have been
making. The only reason anyone is getting worked up about
international media saying
these things is they desperately want their approval. What
are we, attention-deprived
14-year-olds?
The media's impression has
about the way the Games have
unfolded doesn't really matter,
in the end. Two years from now,
the lasting impact of the Games
will be whether people want to
come here to do business or to
vacation. Malfunctioning ice
cleaners will play litde part in
these decisions, and two weeks
of uncharacteristically warm,
sunny weather  will  probably
provide encouragement. To be
honest, I was hoping the weather would be miserable enough
to persuade visitors that this
is no place to live. Now, thousands of rich fools are probably going to try and move here,
driving the price of housing up
even further.
So kick back and stop worrying about what other people are saying about us. It is
perfecdy reasonable for The
Guardian to note that there
were quite a few hitches at the
start of the Olympics. The death
ofthe luge athlete was undoubtedly preventable, even if it
wasn't VANOC's fault. And yes,
our powers do stop just a litde short of weather manipulation... but maybe as the mildest
city in Canada, we should have
thought twice before pleading with the IOC to let us host
a multi-billion dollar event that
requires a lot of snow. Oh well,
too late now. tl
amS Insider weekly
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22.02.10
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ft- ^rl,,rI THE
M&mH
FINAL
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o
w
u
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3
Mar. 5th, St James Hall
BASIA
BULAT
with KATIE
STELMANIS
4U
IS OPEN FOR
BUSINESS
DURING THE
OLYLMPICS!
For a detailed list of outlet hours and closures
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