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The Ubyssey Mar 31, 1967

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Array Never throw
egg foo yung
Vol. XLVIII, No. 62
THE UBYSSEY
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, MARCH 31,  1967 (fffti <s
, V
—John rilley photo
IREFULLY EYEING construction of Acadia Park married student residences, married student offspring contemplate life in their new homes to be. Administration will shake down
mummy and daddy for at least $120 a month in the new units to open in fall.
"WE'RE BUGGED
Arts US money-mad
"We're bugged, totally
bugged and disgusted with the
money hang-up," said arts executives Stan Persky and Har-
ley Rothstein.
As a result arts is holding
a referendum next week asking arts students if they are
in favor of a two-dollar increase in their AMS fees.
"Here we are the only group
active in any meaningful way
and yet we have to go through
this great hassle to get any
money," said Rothstein.
The AMS executive has said
it's "a good idea," but cannot
give the referendum its entire
support because of constitutional legalities.
Persky said the expected
$11,000 in revenue would be
used to pay for the arts anti-
calendar, costing $2,500, and
$2,000 would be given to both
Special Events and The
Ubyssey.
Both expect to have their
budgets cut next year because
of the AMS lack of funds.
Persky said that all arts
dances next year would be
free.
"Also a number of publications would be made available
free to all arts students," he
said. Arts plans to hold a conference early in September on
arts and politics.
"We think people would be
willing to spend money if they
knew exactly where that
money was going. Besides arts
voted 75 per cent in favor of
the AMS fee increase."
Professor B. C. Binnings has
given control of the Contemporary Arts festival to students. Persky would add $1,000
to its $7,000 budget.
ii •*•*.-
- ^smk?^ xr"rast" 'titmmtwr- *.- sit;
./'W3C / '*«>'?A'.
Filth rag finished for now,
Phoenix rises next fall
This "filthy" rag that appears at this time three
times weekly will appear
no more this year.
All those who wish to
cleanse the diseased majority or desire the undesirable minority can now
come from hiding and de
clare   sutcklegish   for   the
wOrld.
The Ubyssey wishes to
thank all those in places
who opened their loud
mouths and made news.
With you will we begin
again next September.
Minimum
rent rat
a boycott'
By NORMAN GIDNEY
UBC board of governors has set a minimum rent of $120
per month in the new Acadia Park married student centre.
The Ubyssey learned of the secret March 14 decision
Monday. Student housing representatives Wednesday began
planning a boycott of the residence when it opens next
September.
John Dillion, a married Commonwealth scholar from Australia, said: "We'll have to boycott it, or if we're forced to get
out of Wesbrook we'll stay."
The university plans to demolish the Wesbrook huts during the summer to make room
for a new health complex.
"If they threaten to tear
down president's row, I'm sure
all students .would stay in their
rooms," he said.
Charlie Boylan, former AMS
vice-president and a grad student, said there should be a
concerted effort by graduate
and married students to organize a boycott.
Acadia Park householders'
association is distributing a
special newsletter to all housing residents.
Don Munton, AMS vice-president, said this approval of
higher rates was "continuing
the welfare state for the rich."
Munton and Boylan said
when the university housing
rates are raised off campus
rates will also rise..
Meetings were held Wednesday and Thursday among representatives    of   the   Acadia
\
A*»
— dermis gans photo
"WOULD YOU  BELIEVE ..." art?  US forges  neatly (?)
ahead with do-it-yourself community headquarters.
Park householders, married
students' wives, the graduate
students and foreign scholars.
"The Graduate Student Association will back up any reasonable proposal to the board
of governors," said SA president Bruce Fraser. He urged
married and graduate students
to see their supervisor, Patrick
McTaggart-Cowan, dean of
graduate, studies, and William
White, UBC bursar.
"This really caught students
by surprise," said Jim Slater,
a Ph.D. student and former
chairman of the graduate students' housing committee.
Slater said the new Acadia
Park residence is "not going to
solve our housing problems."
"There is an immediate need
for 800 units," he said.
"The new residence will supply only 262 units for married
and graduate students. The
greatest need is for married
students—they can't find housing off campus.
"We want all the old housing to stay. We're going to present a brief to the board of governors, the president and everyone connected with graduate
students. Everybody concerned
is going to their department
heads."
Munton, who first learned of
the castfonomic rents from
Slater, said the board's action
was a reflection of their lack
of understanding of the real
problem.
Slater suggested the grad
students examine the possibility of establishing off campus
co-operative housing.
Slater also suggested a trailer
camp for grad students as an
alternative.
"They could use the three
universities capital fund or
apply to the provincial government for a minimum $30 subsidy," said Robert Doupe, vice-
president of Acadia Park
householders."
Cost per unit of the new
structure is $17,300. Boylan
said pre-fabricated houses could
be built for only $8,000 per
unit.
"We're hot primarily concerned with the aesthetic qualities of the buildings — what
To Page 2
See: HOUSING
GENERAL
MEETING
INFO ...P. 3 Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 31,  1967
BOOK ...
...BROKERS
Commerce US books in
The Book-Broker is coming
to UBC in September.
John Cameron, commerce 3
and treasurer of the commerce
undergraduate society, said
Thursday there has been a
great need for a central used-
book sales agency for years.
Commerce students will now
provide this need.
Cameron said that between
September 10 and 30 students
wishing to to sell their used
texts, notes, cases and exams
could contact book - broker
booths situated in strategic
campus locations, including
the field house, auditorium
and armory.
For ten cents the book-seller
Housing
From Page 1
we want is low cost housing,"
said Carolyn Tiffin, representing the married students' wives.
Residents of Wesbrook were
asked what they considered
most important in student housing accommodation.
In a report published Jan.
26, 84 per cent listed "low cost"
as their first choice.
All of these students will be
displaced next summer and
most, according to the report,
will "not be able to afford the
new housing accommodation."
It says that though the university is increasing its enrolment of graduate students an
increasing percentage of them
are married.
"Unfortunately this contributes to the so-called brain
drain. Almost all the major
universities in the United
States provide adequate low
cost living for married students."
Higher rents will also prevent foreign scholars from living on campus, said two Commonwealth scholars.
Dillion, and Peter Vickery. of
the United Kingdom, both married, are on fixed budgets of
$290 per month and cannot
afford more than $100 for rent.
"It would look pretty bloody
stupid when UBC brings foreign students here and they
can't live on campus, said
Vickery.
A Commonwealth scholarship is the most generous, giving the married student an
extra $100 for his wife per
month. National Research
Council scholarships are $250
per month.
Doupe also said Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation,
in furnishing the mortage for
the new residence, is disregarding its own recommendations
for the per cent of income that
should be spent on housing.
"The CHMC facts to the
United Nations state the average should be 14 per cent.
Graduate students will be paying more than 50 per cent.
"The incomes of married students are small," he said.
"They are often smaller than
the incomes of people who
qualify for government sponsored low-rent housing."
"I'm even willing to go to
the board of governors and say
they're forcing me to prostitution," said a graduate student
with two small children.
will list the name, phone number and course of the seller.
The listings then go to the
central office where prospective buyers phone and are put
in contact with  sellers.
"Prices are set by the sellers," said Cameron.
"The book-broker will not
only provide a service to the
campus, but raise funds for
commerce.
"We hope to break even next
year, but, if the idea catches
on, we should make a good
profit," he said.
"Students will save money
and the time usually wasted
searching the field house
walls."
Rid self of US cash7
Douglas tells crowd
New Democratic Party leader Tommy Douglas Thursday said Canada must rid itself of U.S. capital within the
next ten to 15 years.
Otherwise, he said, we will
ibe under complete political
domination.
He said two-thirds of major
Canadian industries are now
controlled by the U.S. and the
proportion is steadily increasing.
"I don't think we've got
more than ten or 15 years left
to stop this trend and reverse
it," he said.
Douglas told 400 persons in
Brock Hall that U.S. owned
companies in our "ibranch-
plant economy" obey the laws
of another country.
He said U.S.-owned companies must decide whether to
send their profits home or use
them to expand their operations
here.
"That decision is not made in
Canada," he said.
He said three American companies refused to allow their
Canadian branches to mill flour
because the product was being
exported through Russia to
Cuba.
"We lose the power to make
the decision as to who we will
trade with."
Douglas said no Canadian
government has yet dared to
recognize China because it may
"incur the displeasure of the
U.S. state department."
He said Canada has refused,
to condemn the bombing of
North Vietnam on the grounds
that it is a member of the international control commission.
"Our neutrality has not extended to the point where it
stops us selling $300 million
worth of arms annually to the
U.S.," he said.
Douglas suggested the institution of a national investment corporation to regain control of the economy.
He said more foreign investment is necessary if Canada's
economic growth is to continue.
Fraham orientation
Dave Graham, arts 3, was
chosen Monday by AMS council as frosh orientation chairman for September.
Graham said he favored a
more academic approach to
frosh orientation. He plans
seminars and student faculty
coffee parties.
"I also want to have mini-
lectures by faculty in the week
before registfation to give
frosh some idea of the courses
they will take," he said.
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& MEN'S WEAR
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MERCHANDISE
• HABERDASHERY
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WITH CLOTHING PURCHASED HERE
Phone 684-6018      1051 Granville St.
FILM SOCIETY  PRESENTS
Great
Expectations
Thursday, April  6
12:30-3:30-6:00-8:30
Auditorium 50c
Pregnant Women Admitted
FREE
Fast, accurate typing
of essays and theses on IBM Electric
typewriter. Reasonable Terms. Call
Mrs. Mugridge, 684-4145 day or
263-4023 evenings.
ALL OUR SKIS ARE
GUARANTEED AGAINST
BREAKAGE FOR ONE
SEASON
10% Student Discount on
Presentation of Student
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336 West Pender St.
681-2004
Western Canada's Largest
Formal  Wear   Rentals
Tuxedos White & Blue Coats
Full   Dress Shirts  & Accessories
Morning   Coats Blue  Blazers
Directors'  Coats 10%   UBC  Discount
2500 GARMENTS TO CHOOSE  FROM
E. A. LEE Formal Wear Rentals
623   HOWE    (Downstairs)   MU   3-2457
2608  Granville   (at 10th)  4691   Kingsway  (Bby.)
RE  3-6727 (by  Sears)   HE  5-1160
PUT THE CARIBBEAN
BREEZE IH A BOTTLE.
OLD SPICE LIME FOR MEM
It's wild! Who'd believe how
much difference a little lime
makes! Old Spice Lime is
available as after shave,
cologne, talc, shower soap,
deodorant stick, hair gel,
aerosol deodorant, and
gift sets. $1.65 to $6.50. by shulton
You can't
beat
the taste
of Player's
filters. Friday, March  31,  1967
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Protest si,
Yankee no
April 15 is an International
Day of Protest against the
war in Vietnam.
On that day religious and
political organizations in Vancouver will join other groups
in cities all across North
America and in Europe with
organized marches and demonstrations.
"Vancouver's protest march
is sponsored by a joint coordinating committee of all
opposed to the war, from
Quakers to Communists" said
committee chairman Brian
Plummer.
"One of the main purposes
of Vancouver's march is to
give Canadians an opportunity to protest their country's
complicity in the war," he
said.
Anyone with an axe to
grind over the war in Vietnam is welcome to join the
march.
New C-lot
considered
Another parking area behind C-lot may be the solution
to parking problems next year.
Over 1,000 new spaces will
be needed next year. Construction infringing on the lots
will take up 250 spaces, and
750 spaces will be needed to
accommodate higher enrollment.
A new C-lot was one of the
suggestions put forward by the
student-administration parking committee.
Other ideas included a Spanish Banks parking lot with
bus service and a parking lot
on frat row on land logged by
the foresters.
Neither buildings and
grounds nor the traffic office
know of any definite plans for
new spaces next year.
— kurt hilger photo
OH THE- general meeting
was a smashing affair,
especially if you didn't get
tanked or avoided having
your budget cut.
General meet lost cool,
Jocks  remain  solvent
The  Alma  Mater   Society's  annual   three   ring   circus
happened March 23 in the armory.
Sometimes known as a gen
— kurt hilger photo
"WORSE THINGS could happen to an AMS president,"
says erstwhile AMS president Peter Braund. That's wet
snow Petey will land on.
Referendum again?
AMS treasurer Dave Hoye said Monday the AMS can
still run a good program next year despite an extremely
tight budget.
"If we don't spend any
money frivolously next year
we could run a viable program.'
Hoye said that some consideration is being given to
running another fee referendum next term.
"The program might be a
more bureaucratic one
though," said Hoye.
Shaun Sullivan said "Money
will be cut from any place we
think it's being wasted—the
budget won't be catastrophic."
'Help' cries Flynn
If you are a female, sexy,
medium height, tolerant, active and have some time to
spend with a sexy male, you
are wanted now.
B.C. Association of Student's president Frank Flynn
needs a secretary <for the association of course). If you
want more fun more often put
a note in Flynn's AMS box 17.
CAR INSURANCE
DUE?
Save with
State Form's
low insurance
rates for
careful drivers.
See me.
Jack Melflor
8455 GRANVILLE ST.,
VANCOUVER 14, B.C.
STATI FARM
INSURANCI
261-4255
STATE FARM
MUTUAL
AUTOMOMU INSURANCE COMPANY
^Sfi'Si    CANADIAN HEAD OFFICE
TORONTO, ONT.
GOOD STUDENT? _.,% DISCOUNT
eral meeting, the gathering
attracted more than 3,000 students.
First to arrive were the lady
jocks, carrying signs pleading for "80 cents" and saying
"No, no A 1,000 x no." They
got their wish — the amendments to cut the jock's straps
failed by a large majority.
Next to come were the engineers, followed by hordes of
sciencemen. The next twenty
minutes were devoted to letting the AMS executive out of
their cage and throwing snowballs and water 'bombs at the
crowd.
As his last official act, AMS
president Peter Braund climbed from his cage and opened
the meeting to the sound of
the jeering crowd.
Charlie Boylan, AMS vice-
president, read out the non-
controversial revisions which
passed without  a  whimper.
Braund then read his president's report which praised
The Ubyssey for the "dedicated service and fatiguing hours
put in by the editor and his
staff."
He also outlined the action
program of the outgoing council of the past year.
Speaking against the revision giving faculties a weighted vote on council, neo-fascist
soapboxer Dietrich Luth was
snowballed at the microphone.
This revision passed.
Most heated discussion occurred over the revisions to
cut the athletics grant. The
jocks paraded their signs
again, AMS treasurers Dave
Hoye and Lome Hudson spoke
for the revision and the red
horde and sciencemen enforced
their immaturity with more
snowballs and  water bombs.
Despite the pleadings of
AMS executives the revision
failed.
The meeting over, the usual
tankings toook place as Shaun
Sullivan, Peter Braund, Jim
Lightfoot and Eric Newell
were dunked in the remains
of the engineers pink snow.
Hundreds streamed out to
watch education students demolish an old car.
Buildings and grounds men
slowly started to clean up the
melted snow and lunchbags.
The fifty-first annual meeting
was  over.
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
COMMITTEE  MEMBERS   NEEDED:
The following committees of the World Union of
Students urgently need members.
1. Share Campaign
2. Treasure Van Sales
'3'. Program
4. Publicity
5. Book Drive
6. Scholarship
7. Seminars
Interested? If you'd like to work for the international
academic commuhity, or if you'd like to know more
about this organization, drop into the WUS office
in the Brock Extension.
POSITIONS AVAILABLE:
Written applications are invited until Saturday,
April 1 for Chairman of Academic Activities
Committee.
COMMMITTEE MEMBERS:
Applications are now being received for committee
members for the following A.M.S. or joint A.M.S.
Administration  Committees:
Academic Activities Committee
Brock Art
Student Union Building Clients Committee
Canadian University Services Overseas
Winter Sports Centre Management Committee
Food Services Committee
Book Store Committee
Library Committee
Parking and Traffic Committee
Applications for the above positions except for CUSO
must include a letter outlining qualifications, reason
for applying, and, where applicable, a proposed
program. Eligibility forms are available from the
A.M.S. office (S. Brock) and must be completed by
the Registrars Office before making application.
Letters of application and eligibility forms must be
submitted to the Secretary, Box  54, Brock Hall.
ASSISTANT CO-ORDINATOR
Applications are now being accepted for the position
of Assistant Co-ordinator for the 1967-68 school term.
A.M.S. eligibility is desirable 'but not essential. The
successful candidate must have completed one year
at U.B.C. and must have an uncanny desire for bureaucratic red tape.
Applications should be addressed to: Co-ordinator of
Activities, Brock Hall, U.B.C.
STUDENT COURT AND
DISCIPLINE COMMITTEE
Applications will be received up to March 31st for
positions on the Students Court and the A.M.S. Discipline Committee. Submit applications to:
President,
Law Students Association,
Box No.   65,
A.M.S., Brock Hall. THEUmSH
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University
of B.C. Editorial opinions are the editor's and not of the AMS
or the university. Member, Canadian University Press. Founding member. Pacific Student Press. Authorized second class
mail by Post Office Department. Ottawa, and for payment
of  postage  in  cash.
The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 244-3242:
editor, local 25; photo. Page Friday, toe. 24; features, sports,
loc.   23;   advertising,   loc.   26. Telex   04-5224.
Winner  Canadian  University  Press trophies
for general excellence and editorial cartoons.
And God fulfills himself in many ways,
lest one good custom should corrupt
the world.
— Alfred, Lord Tennyson
EDITOR: John Kelsey
City ". -Danny Stoffman
Newt   _;'.__-—_— -   Al   Birnr*
Photo -.     -_ Powell Hargrave
Page Friday Claudia Gwinn
Sports         Sue Gransby
Managing _ _        Murray McMillan
Focus _.   — Kris Emmott
Ass't. News      _      Al Donald
Ass't. City _-      Tom Morris
CUP  Bert Hill
Comes the revolution and the
last Ubyssey. Hordes of revisionists left the staff in dismay and
mental rupture. Meanwhile The
Daly Monthly, Mao Tse-jac's
personal organ of fun and games,
rose in an exciting atmosphere
and now you hold the raw product in your hands, created by
Charlotte Haire, Norman Gidney,
Val Thom, Dave Cursons, Al
Donald, Boni Lee, Ian Cameron,
Kathi Harkness and Mary Ussner.
Tending to the mental ruptures
and basket balls were Mike Jessen  and  Pio  Uran.
These swam, ran and sometimes
pictured pictures: Al Harvey,
Chris Blake, Don Kydd, Dennis
Gans, John Tilley and Kurt
Hilger.
Memo.
Danny Stoffman
Editor-in-chief,
The Ubyssey,
1967-68
Retrospect is the best position to analyze
what one has done and stack it against what
one thought one was doing. In retrospect, then,
we thought we'd pass along some of the reasons
why that accumulated around here this year.
We do so from a background of having had
the same thing done to us last year by the
man previous. We didn't listen, and we don't
expect you to. Next spring, as did he, we shall
chorus: we told you so.
The most comfortable stance for a campus
editor is bitch. H. L. Mencken said it, and we
used in all autumn: "All successful newspapers
are ceaselessly querulous and bellicose. They
never defend anyone or anything if they can
help it; if the job is forced upon them, they
tackle it by denouncing someone or something
else first."
That jolly dictum enables you to posture
very well as The Campus Cynic, cigaret hanging slackly from your drooping lips as your eyes
fearlessly water. Soon you lapse into nihilism.
The phenomenon of November Nihilism, which
nearly sent us packing into the Sun forever, is
the worst thing that can happen to you. You
see, Mencken, good newspaper man that he was,
was wrong.
We came to realize our goal should never
be success in the sense Mencken meant. To
continually denounce without suggesting alternatives is both meaningless and impossible,
because a good denunciation is an analysis of
the reasons for the failure of the denouncee,
which must lead to advocacy of an alternative.
The question of what is a good newspaper
(as opposed to a succesful one) is answered
through consistency. Mencken's newspaper and
most campius newspapers — including The
Ubyssey — exist in an empty bag of aimless
bitching. We call the bag sophisticated liberalism
of the worst sort, the Malcolm Muggeridge sort,
where the critics of a society are assimilated
by the society and correctly classified as harmless, to be tolerated with a knowing smile. Such
socially acceptable iconoclasts are unheard, just
like the poets in North America. When nobody's
listening, nobody's threatened and freedom of
speech is touted by all. But where there is no
threat, there is no change.
We formulated and adopted a mosaic view
of society and the university in it. We found
through ponder and study, that there are reasons why things happen, and all the pieces of
the societal mosaic are contingent on all the
other pieces. We tried to adopt the critical
mood described by Erich Fromm, refusing
to accept that so-called common sense which
repeats the same nonsense over and over and
makes sense only because everybody repeats it.
In that mood, we tried to move away from
news gathering via official hand-out and speech,
in favor of what people were doing. We tried to
find out why the official statement said what
it did, and tried to determine how well it corresponded to the reality around us. In most
cases, it didn't—which is why we're so irresponsible. We didn't take the word from the top as
gospel and the values of the established order
as correct values.
We tried to be consistent in our criticism,
and Med to identify thev reasons behind some
heaps of common-_a*nse nohsense. We advocated
consistent solutions and found that anything
which doesn't support the people who make the
rules is by definition irresponsible.
Liberalism emerged as the disease to fight.
To the university liberal, broadmindedness is
an excuse for indecision and tolerance a substitute for moral principle. Liberalism and
cynicism allow one to compartmentalize the
pieces of the world mosaic; they blind the critic
so he cannot see the connections.
This common kind of schizophrenia will
allow you to accept university governors without seeing their other jobs in Ihe stock exchange
board room, the university ghetto in prophylactic isolation from the world, classrooms,
devoid of human beings, student government
without students,.education with no thought or
inquiry.
We tried to climb out of the liberal-nihilistic
bag into a revolutionary bag with windows. We
tried to show ways to operate the university
from different premises, not for the sake of
mere change, but from a sincere conviction of
the incorrectness of premises which direct this
university in this city in this civilization.
If you do the same thing, you will be attacked. Consider the source of the attack before
worrying about the attack itself. Listen to
people who have a more thorough analysis than
yours — it's very easy to pitch them out of the
office, but don't — and ignore the people who
can't see what you see clearly.
But then, we don't ask you to adopt the
analysis we used this winter. We merely sug-
gets you evolve a consistent view of the world
and the forces in it. And when you discover
some answers, stick hard by them until somebody cam give you better ones. Then change.
There's no dishonor in reversing yourself; the
dishonesty is in fearful sophistry.
If your analysis and news gathering are good,
you will encounter vjiolent opposition. You
should sweat blood if you don't encounter it,
because that's when you are being ignored or
are wrong. When you are trying to change a
social order and those in charge oppose you,
you are having some effect, and they have no
choice but to oppose. Unless you should win —
then all the liberals will heartily agree.
The mass of students may not agree with
your editorial view — they are the people
moving to take a place at the top of the order
that must be changed. But The Ubyssey has
never purported, in all its 50-year history, to
represent accurately the views of all the students. It has always tried to report their doings,
and it always should.
Ultimately, the views it expresses will be
those of the people who care to work here. If
you are a minority of one, as we were once or
twice, you cannot impose your view on your
staff. But you can argue.
To the campus, your responsibility is clear:
report what people do, and tell what you think.
And never close your columns to what others
think.
It's not all an endless fight, Danny. There
are laughs, and many of them. To refuse to
laugh, especially at your own feverish struggle,
is red-eyed fanaticism. Reverence has never
been a Ubyssey virtue, and although we would
be the last to stump for retaining a. tradition
without reason, irreverence is one which
works for everyone — except the stuffed butt
of it.
You are probably entering the,most chaotic
year of your life. It will contain tremendous
rewards and ridiculous debacles. All your views
will change.
But The Ubyssey remains Canada's greatest
by decree of your friends and enemies — for
each, a different kind of greatness. You don't
edit it, you marry it — and it screws you from
then on. Lie back and enjoy it.
John Kelsey
Editor-in-chief,
The Ubyssey,
1966-67
"This great humanity has said 'enough' and has begun to move forward."
—slogan of the Third Tri-continental, Havana, 1966  pf
... a weekly magazine of
comment and reviews.
MARCH 31, 1967
ON THE COVER:
Al Harvey's and Powell Hargrove's impression of the First
Human Be-In, with Country Joe
and the Fish . . . and the ducks.
editor: claudia gwinn
assistant: judy bing
Cartoonist: Kurt Hilger
. +<.*« *«.*** *
Fat Farr flays budget cut
about   thirty
Soul
food
By  BRIAN  PLUMMER
Over the past year it has
been my pleasure to be the
chairman of the Special
Events Committee. On a
budget of $4,500 we managed to put on a program of
events. These
events fell
into three
three main
areas, classical enter-
tainment
ranging from
the controversial San
PLUMMER        F r a n c i sco
Mime Troupe to folk singers
and jazz. In addition we
managed to negotiate special student rates for countless downtown cultural
events.
All this we managed to do
on a budget that was slightly over half of last year's
budget. And now we face
another cut of $1,000 or
more.
One area of our program
that will definitely suffer is
The Festival of Contemporary Arts. Originally the Festival was a joint student
faculty undertaking with
both groups putting up equal
amounts of money. Now the
student contribution
(through Special Events) has
shrunk to a paltry $300.
This year because of lack
of funds we have been
forced to increase admittance fees to many events in
order to gain an additional
source of revenue. In former years the regular charge
was 25c for a noon hour
event and 75c or $1.00 in
the evening. Now we have
had to increase the charges
to 50c or 75c in the day and
up to $1.75 in the evening.
The result while increasing
revenue has definitely
caused a drop in attendance
because many students who
would like to attend these
events cannot afford them.
It is absurd that at a university where people are
supposed to be engaged in
thought that the bulk of student money should be spent
on buildings and sponsoring
athletic teams to compete in
far away places and so little
money be spent on speakers,
music, art, general cultural
events and soul food.
Page 6
By MURRAY FARR
Last year's SE chairman
laments lack of funds
It was with shock and utter disbelief that I read in a recent Ubyssey
that once again the Special Events
Committee is in danger of an impending budget cut.
When I took over the committee
in the spring of 1965 I stated in an
interview in this paper that rather
than reflect existing tastes, it would
be my policy to expose the student
body to new stimuli: aesthetic, moronic,
and intellectual. The committee put
everything they had into pleasing and
stimulating the entire campus.
Some of us worked 16 hours a day,
6 days a week — finding events to
bring to Vancouver, producing the
concerts, acting as a lobby to obtain
cheap student tickets for downtown
events, and publicizing the series. We
did this with one of the smallest
budgets for a concert series in the
world.
UBC has gained a reputation as
the home of one of the major innovative concert series in North America, and it did this with less money
than almost anywhere else.
I remember evenings, particularly
when the Contemporary Arts Festival
was on, when poets, artists, dancers
and filmmakers from New York and
San Francisco would say to each other
". . . Vancouver is one of the last open
cities ... we all seem to meet here . . .
... so much is going on . . ."
In 1964, UBC anticipated an artistic trend before New York, when it
produced the McCluhanistic The Medium Is the Message environment happening in the armory; again, on a minimum of money.
In Canada, there are some 40 universities and about 30 of them have
concert series. UBC, University of
Victoria, SFU, U of Toronto, U of
Manitoba, Dalhousie, Sir George Williams, Carleton and York have the
most active concert series (where
major institutions such as McGill and
Laval do nothing).
Some American universities have
budgets in excess of $100,000 to bring
in outside artistic events, and UCLA
is reputed to spend $250,000 annually
on artists fees alone. The national
American average is closer to $25,000,
where in Canada the college artist
series budgets  vary widely.
UBC has had from $5,000 to $7,000
in the past few years, while a much
smaller school in the maritimes, St.
Francis Xavier University, operates on
$10,000.
The majority of the American ser
ies book their events 1 to 1V6 years
in advance. As UBC has never had a
definite budget this far ahead, this
has not been possible, but in this weakness, there is a strength. UBC has one
of the most flexible concert series in
existence. Standard practice in the
past has been to book the major events
(fees between $1,000 - $2,500 and
higher) in the summer.
By September, the committee has
likely booked two or three major
events. Other colleges, particularly in
the U.S., will have booked from five
to 100 such major events for their
seasons, but in so doing, lose some of
their flux.
The difficulties imposed by the impending budget cuts are:
e the quality and number of 'major
events'    the    S/E    Committee    can
bring to UBC will diminish;
e the   flexibility   that   stems   from  a
cash reserve will dwindle, and the
university will not  be able  to  engage   performers   and   speakers   on
short   notice,   which   is   the   strong
point of the committee at present;
e cost to the student body for each
event will rise. Three years ago a
noon hour  event  was  25   cents  or
free. Now it is 35 cents or 50 cents
(with the odd crank speaker thrown
in for free). Major evening concerts
are now 75 cents to $1.50, but this
would have to go up;
e the over-all effectiveness of the committee's   program   would   diminish,
as lack of funds would close effective channels of publicity.
These are my suggestions:
e the AMS should set a definite per
capita   amount  of the   $29   student
activity   fee   aside   for  the   concert
budget. It has been my understanding   that   in   64-65   and   65-66   this
amount was quietly and unofficially
set   at  50   cents   per   student.   This
should   be   raised   to   $2   per   student,  which  would  give  a  concert
budget   of   $32,000.  It   would   then
be possible to hold many free major
events and to set a minimal 25 cents
fee  for   the majority  of  noon-hour
events;
e to implement this policy, a general
referendum  could be  called.  I  am
sure it would be approved as a vote
of thanks to the committee for their
work in the past,
e further   co-ordination   is   necessary
between   the   various   bodies   that
sponsor    concerts   and    events   on
campus, especially the S/E Committee,   The   Depts.   of   Theatre   and
Music,   the   Fine   Arts   Committee
and the Festival of the Contemporary   Arts.  This  would   of  necessity
be   a   full   time   and   professional
position.
There is an old saying that little
money   means  a   lot   of  imagination.
Special Events and the Contemporary
Arts Festival have amply proven this
true over the past four years.  However, UBC is one of the largest universities on the continent and accordingly   should  have   a   concert  budget
that  is  in  excess  of the  continental
average.
The campus has been the cultural
and artistic centre of Vancouver for
years, and a trip downtown will reassure one that Point Grey is where
it's happening, baby . . . and it's up
to you to keep it that way.
Values vanish
By STEPHEN SCOBIE
At a film show in New York recently, the audience politely sat and watched a blank screen for fifteen minutes,
at the end of which time the lights came
up and everybody applauded. It was a
"non-film".
This obviously marks a new tendency in the arts, to be followed by
non-poems (blank sheets of paper); non-
symphonies (a full orchestra sitting
silent), etc.
In the social sphere, Peter Sellers
has issued non-invitations to a non-party
in aid of charity. (Surely it should have
been for a non-charity?)
There seems to me to be a basic
flaw, a reprehensible timidity, in what
these people are doing. Why the need
for the screen? or the paper? This is
an unwarranted concession to bourgeois
ideas of form.
Annihilation of content must be accompanied by annihilation of form.
There is no need for a cinema to have a
non-film: you can have one any time or
place you like.
The beauty of this art-form is that it
excludes the need for any materials for
the artist to work with: for the first
time in history, art can become totally
abstract. It also—and this is the subtlest application of all—does away with
the need for an artist.
From the above considerations, the
following non-conclusion may be
drawn:
Salon slack on
people pictures
By DENNIS GANS
"I've seen enough sunsets
and seascapes to last me a
year," said a coed after seeing the UBC Salon of Photography.
If the photographers
do take more than land
and seascapes, the Salon
rarely exhibits   them.
With few exceptions these
photographs are never meaningful ones of people. Most
of the few pictures of people
are either stereotyped studio
portraits or are of quaint-
looking people. In the rest
of the pictures people are
objects to be included occasionally as part of a scenic.
In what purports to be a
UBC Salon about 5 pictures
in all were taken on campus.
Like a tourist with a Brownie, when the salon-type
photographer wants to photograph he marches down to
the beach. This campus
means nothing to him.
This type of photography
is dead and the Salon is conducting the funeral. Campus photography is not as
sterile as the Salon 'would
indicate. Photographers who
find themselves disagreeing
with the type of photography
the Salon encourages should
quit entering. Otherwise
they might begin to take
pictures, not because they
want to, but because the
people who run the Salon
will like it.
Bleah says coed of first prize picture in novice section
of Salon.
r a.v>----.4*w-vv-v?> ^4&6*---V---v- e At/f.
V /IvWk*_»-W---4-%«----&uVV^^ a
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 31,  1967 Music prof predics
head set harmonies
Page Friday's Judy Hirl
talks to music prof Court-
land Hultberg about trends
in modern music.
pf: There seems to be
many more distinct categories of music being written
today than in the past, for
example: folk songs, electronic music, Stravinsky-
type, etc. These seem unrelated to each other in terms
of style, method of performance, and criteria for judging them. Is this unique to
the 20th century?
Hultberg: The statement
you make about "unrelated"
is perhaps not exactly true
because I think they are related if one looks for a relationship. One could say
there is a relationship' between Stravinsky and Broadway musicals and show-
tunes   and   even   folksongs.
Stravinsky    has    many
folk elements in it, especially his music written for the
French ballet in the early
part of the century. Broadway
showtunes of this time reflect some of the techniques
that Stravinsky was using.
All of these types of music
are based on certain similar
principles with the possible
exception of elecronic music
which is getting away from
it. All of these for instance
would be based on some
form of tonality.
pf: What do the Beatles
communicate?
Hultberg: Perhaps a certain vitality that other forms
of music don't have.
pf: What is the appeal of
electronic music?
Hultberg: For me, it is
that it opens up a whole
new range of sounds, that
cannot be produced any
other way and can be used
in such a way that it will
sound to a listener like something which cannot be performed on instruments for
instance not only sounds
themselves, but the rapidity,
the accuracy that this idiom
has, in fact many sounds can
be produced in this way
which could not have been
produced any other way. In
the past 100 years our art has
grown towards increasing
complexity.
One has to feel caught up
with one's own age whatever
that happens to involve.
pf: A lot of popular music today seems to merge on
electronic music — they
seem to be borrowing things
from each other. Do you
categories growing closer
together?
Hultberg: After thinking
about this for a while I feel
that the medium of expression isn't going to bring anything closer together . . .
there are clarinets in Web-
ern and in jazz, the sounds
themselves did not seem to
do it. I agree that there is
more total involvement in
synthesized sounds in popular music than there ever
has been and on the other
side, that electronic music
is getting closer and closer
to a live performance situation.
pf: We've talked about
secular music for a while,
what about sacred? There
seems to be little sacred music written and that which is,
is done in archaic forms . . .
no?
Hultberg: Not as much
sacred music is written today as there isn't as much
sacred activity in our lives.
Most music used to be centered around the church but,
as in the case of some jazz,
it began to harp on the same
thing too long, and lost sight
of what was happening in
the other arts.
pf: Do you think electronic music will become stand-
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ard in churches or at least
common?
Hultberg: It's possible . . .
unprecedented steps are being taken in churches to allow more types of music
than ever before, but the
problem is, that church musicians have been away from
the centre of music for so
long, they have to hire specialists to tell them what to
play and what is good. Most
church music is now being
written by organists and
choirmasters for their own
churches.
pf: Can you think of a
new idiom in secular music
that might form?
Hultberg: Computer music,
but it will sound basically
like present forms. More
music will be made by individuals and not organizations.
Most abstract arts require a
middle man to get it off the
page.
If one decides he wants to
take up music he won't want
to have to spend 20 years perfecting his composing and
performing skills, so this is
where electronic instruments
come in. They'd allow him
to enjoy music immediately.
By pushing buttons he could
create new sounds or play a
Beethoven string quartet.
Possibly we will know
enough about physical response that you'll be able to
clamp something to your
head, attach it to a computer
and transducer and out
comes the sound that you
really want to have. No
need of learning a technique. You always hear
people say, "I had the most
marvelous melody in my
mind, but I can't write it
down." The solution is
here.
pf: Does this mean traditional forms of writing music
we have now will die?
Hultberg: I think so. The
tape recorder will make certain things unnecessary—the
computer will be the next
step. Even now many composers notate with graph
paper instead of traditional
methods.
pf 3hree
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CHINAS REVOLUTION
"The East Is Red", a film depicting the
Chinese Communist rise to power, is
being shown by the Department of Asian
Studies on
SUNDAY, APRIL 2nd
Varsity Theatre
2:00 and  4:30 p.m.
Admission $1.00 —:— Students 75c
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Friday, March 31, 1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7 FILM SOCIETY PRESENTS
Great
Expectations
Thursday, April  6
12:30-3:30-6:00-8:30
Auditorium  50c
Pregnant Women Admitted
FREE
PERSPECTIVES
THE  THEA KOERNER MEMORIAL LECTURES
Goethe's Faust: The End of a  Myth
By Professor Bernard  Blume
University of California
Tuesday, April 4th, 1967 at 12:30 noon
Buchanan  100
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Mini skirts
mono kisses
By  MARG  JONES
The writer is currently
suffering from mononucleosis, a sickness almost entirely restricted to high school
and university students.
There is a fallacy circling
this world that I am going to
curb. It is universally claimed, always with a knowing
gleam in one's eye, that
mononucleosis is caused by
kissing. Yes—kissing.
This is absurd! How could
anything so troublesome and
painful come from something so innocent and tasty as
a kiss? Unless, of course, it
was one of those long, lingering, intensely passionate,
meaningfully—but of course
not. The germs would be
passed with that first intimate touch which leads up
to those long lingering . .  .
Do you know what mono
entails?
It completely changes your
blood chemistry, increasing
the white blood corpuscles.
Now I have heard about
kisses which increase the
the heart beat, flush the
face, and even momentarily
stop tfhe  heart.
But the redness of the
heart is always constant.
(Look at last year's Valentine cards. All the hearts
are red—right?  Not  white.)
The second characteristic
of mono is a painfully sore
throat. Now admittedly some
kisses do hurt the neck.
There is the girl who kisses
the fellow a foot taller. Her
neck suddenly strains to
complete the twelve-inch
gap—becoming an elastic
band which doesn't snap
back.
Then there is the girl who
goes steady with a fellow
shorter than herself. After
a while her neck becomes
conditioned to being flexed
like an accordion, but for
the first few nights she arrives  home  a  hunchback.
However, mono produces
swelling on the neck comparable to fungus growth on
trees. This produces a hori-
ll§ii
zontal expansion as opposed -
to   the   vertical   expansion/
contraction  of kissing.
The final characteristic of
mono is the mental aspect,
which includes the 3D's:
despair, despondency and
depression. Life is at its
darkest when one has mono.
None of these apply to a
kiss. A kiss if it has a mental component, as well as a
physical one, would include
the 3L's: longing, love, and,
AHAH, lust.
It is obvious that kissing
is not the cause of mononucleosis because they could
not be more opposite.
Admittedly, opposites attract; and, therefore, any
red - blooded, well - kissed,
lusty individual will be attracted to the anemic, swol-
len-glanded, depressive mono
victim, but long before he
reaches   those   long,   linger
ing, intensely passionate,
meaningfully—the mono human will have fallen fast
asleep, exhausted. (Another
characteristic of mononucleosis.)
So wipe those knowing
grins off your faces the next
time you learn of a friend
who has mono. He is not suffering from an over-indulgence of kisses, but from
the biological and physiological ailments described:
white blood, fungus growth,
and  3D's.
Who wouldn't be sick?
ilUL
TOM JONES
Shoft
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Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 31, 1967 /
DALY
Monthly
GUARANTEED by GUM
VOLUMINOUS
THE CENTRAL KINGDOM
YEAR  OF THE  RAM
Mac Tse-jac denies senility
-*;.^«,-
,.^»Ti-w??'- •
PEERING AT counter-revolutionary skywriting, our
noble puce sun in our hearts Chairman Mac Tse-jac
swims swirling Fraser. Chairman Mac was disproving obscene rumors planted by insurrectionist
students that he has misguided People's University.
The brave chairman swam twenty   miles dodging
— hilg rse-mur photo
log booms and downstream-swimming enemies, including a jolly silly man and behatted Puce Guard.
Chairman Mac was followed by loyal followers.
"I was guided by my thought in this endeavor," he
said. "Always follow my thought, wave upon
wave," he admonished the Puce Guard.
River delivers aggressive
walrus to research bureau
A highly honored trained walrus has been named to the staff
of the newly formed animal and
mammal research bureau located
on the south shore of the Fraser
river in the southeast corner of our
great republic.
Although partially trained in his
youth by a school of our imperial-
People purged
to promote  our
present produce
New and even greater
sacrifices by the people are
required in line with the
great revolutionary purge
planned by our leader.
Chairman Mac Tse-jac.
"Taking a firm hold of the
revolutionary People's University and promoting production", is the policy put
forward by Chairman Mac.
"Take a firm hold and
produce."
ist aggressive enemy, the appointee, Dr. Rus Walherm has since
studied extensively in the fatherland and is a great lover of the
works of Chairman Mac Tse-Jac.
Dr. Walherm received his preliminary education at Marineland
of the Pacific. He later became
enlightened and began studies at
the People's aquatic school.
Born in the Bering sea, he is
the son of a great leader of the
Bering walrusses.
Dr. Walherm previously held
posts with the Communal Water
Directorate of. lower Kalimantan.
Since then he has worked with our
great comrade to the northeast-
Northern Texada copper.
"The technique will keep me
busy, but I will try to keep my
head above water," said Dr. Walherm. "This is a great challenge
to me. I must do my utmost to
follow the invincible example set
by our great helmsman, chairman
Mac Tse-jac.
"If my work is with my comrades — the people whom I love —
their companionship, and the brilliant thoughts of our beloved
leader will lead me to great
works."
Dr. Rus Walherm: "Grunt...
I'm honored"
Spurred by the invincible
thought of Chairman Mac Tse-jac
Thursday, our invincible, not-at-all-
senile leader Mac Tse-jac swam
the invincible Fraser River.
Our noble Chairman Mac paddled fiercely around log booms
and dirty, stinking pollution for 2Q
miles. Invincible, Mac swam upstream.
Obscene imperialist student
warmongers were thus proved so
wrong it wasn't even funny in their
charges that Chairman Mac Tse-jac
was bungling in his leadership of
People's Revolutionary University.
Our lovely chairman was as
robust as ever as he plowed headlong thru the mucky river.
Following in his victorious wake
were a crowd of Si no-sycophants,
including Chairman Mac's loyal
physician Geer Pat-rack, recently
awarded a Peoples' Hero medal for
his work in revolutionary non-
truth about dangers of bubble-
gum.
The fraternal mass in Chairman Mac's p.r. office, with boundless counter-revolutionary enthusiasm and a momentum that shakes
student imperialists, cheered mili-
tantly knee deep in reverent muck.
Head sycophant Daly Yho-yo
shouted passeges from the glorious
little blue book. Quotations from
Chairman  Mac Tse-jac:
"Students must be suffered
during the transition stage but
once true Macism is achieved, only
dentists and parking lots will be
around. We must advance wave
upon wave."
As he shrieked, a wave crashed over our noble Chairman Mac.
Guided by his own thought, Mac
paddled on.
Long live Chairman Mac! He
is a neat guyl
Please turn left
See the Setting Sun
Puce Guard
Called Fine
Lot Indeed
A happy group of tourists from
France, Australia and other distant
countries sat about their breakfast
table and told eagerly of their enlightenment during their recent
visit to the People's University of
British Columbia.
A young girl wearing a sequin
puce armband with matching plus-
fours entered the tourists' gathering, bearing tea leaves and hot
water. She unpacked her apple-
shining kit and cheerfully consented to answer questions.
One of the tourists who noticed
this had been told before he left
for The Great Pointed Grey by
some people who had been taken
in by the distortions of filthy city
propaganda that the "Puce Guards
are rude. You'd better beware!"
Please pore over third page
See Generous Guards Page 2
DALY     MONTHLY
Friday, March 31,  1967
Lax Movements Called
Capitalist Conspiracy
The workers, peasants and soldiers appreciate the integration of revolutionary
content with perfect artistic form which reflects their thoughts and feelings. Let
new characters of the socialist era take the stage to inspire and educate the
revolutionary people of all countries. The brilliant successes of China's revolution
in literature and art achieved under the guidance of Chairman Mac's line set
an example for the world.
'MORE and better
rr
Resist Revisionist Aims,
Be Free, Unrestrained
More than 13 million revolutionary male and female students
recently came together before the
people's book exchange building
to praise our great leader and
friend in our hearts chairman Mac
Tse-jac, institutor of the people's
revolutionary orgasm.
Carrying signs reading "Chairman Mac's thoughts are the hormones of climax in the struggle of
orgasm" and "Shun the prophylactic revisionist fetishes", the heroic
young revolutionaries chanted
songs and slogans reviling bourgeois abstinence.
Intercourse was free and unrestrained.
A great shout of people's revolutionary love went up as chairipan
Mac appeared on the people's
revolutionary book exchange
building.
Chairman Mac urged the people
to strive for more and better orgasms in their struggle against the
forces of reaction and revisionism,
surging ever onwards under the
great red bedsheet of chairman
Mac's thought.
Our great leader and red sun in
our hearts and minds which are
dedicated to the continual great
leap to the horizontal position
urged the revolutionary youth to
penetrate deeply in the ever pro
gressive search for dialectic-materialist orgasms.
At one point our great helmsman, tears rolling down his face
onto his stained pajamas, cried the
slogan of the fifth congress dedicated to the elimination of bourgeois orgasm: "Don't trust to luck,
go out and have sexual intercourse."
Students' insurrection society
chairman Sham San-sul then appeared before the moist and moaning   young   revolutionaries.
He urged the foaming young
people to remember the three ways
to simultaneous orgasms: "Thesis,
antithesis, synthesis," he cried.
Intercourse was free and unrestrained.
DALY MONTHLY
Voluminous—but infrequent—Year of the Asp.
Authorized as official line of the university
by the board of governors in concert and for
payment of homage in kind. Published by the
people's party of the University of Never-
Never Land and distributed by sheer force
to all our agressive neighbors in solidarity.
Material appearing herein may reproduce
if you aren't careful and will certainly rot
your children's minds. Letters, if they are
kind, are suggested as a politic and proper
procedure. In all cases recall the dialectic
banana and hang the expense, Gridley.
Another capitalistic plot to
undermine the greatness that will
be ours when the new order
sweeps the world has been unveiled. Mass student unrest has
been traced to the influence of
drugs imported from the capitalistic; country to the west.
The drug, in the imperialistic
tongue, is called Ex-Lax, literally
translated as 'Easy Come, Easy
Go', a typical theme of the enemies of our great state and our
great leader, Sham San-Sul. This
insidious drug is known to the
users as Who Flung Dung, in honor of the high priest of their cult.
New words are entering our
clean workers vocabulary because
of this cult. The members refer
to what they are doing as a
'movement', and the act of taking
the drug as 'sitting down.'
A poor 'sit-down' (notice how
our great phrases of the revolu-
Commune is a
Progression in
Culture Revolt
Construction of a new student
commune "which will unite the
students of the People's University of British Columbia" is now
underway it was announced today.
The Supreme Board of the
People's University of British Columbia announced a little while
ago its approval of the Students
Communal   headquarters.
Students Insurrection Society
Chairman Sham San-Sul declared
the SCH "a progressive step in
the students' cultural revolution."
Chairman Sul expounded on
the glories of the Communal
Headquarters which will be situated on the site of the present
stadium grounds. The new sports
stadium will wait until the
people's social revolution is complete.
"The new SCH will provide
revolutionary social and cultural
facilities for all peoples of the
People's University. Class struggle
will be eliminated and students,
alumni, and faculty will be
equal," said Chairman Sul.
Delay in the construction of the
headquarters was apparently due
to a "bourgeois reactionist faction
which haid taken a firm hold of
production to repress the cultural
revolution."
However, Chairman Sul and a
group of revolutionary followers
approached the Supreme Board
(which was apparently the reactionist faction) some time ago
and finally was able to convince
the Board of the need of the Students   Communal  Headquarters.
The SCH will be financed by all
students regardless of their ability
to pay in keeping with the theme
of equality.
Chairman Sul, who will shortly
publish a book of statements,
urges you "to support the SCH
and to press on with the great
cultural revolution and achieve
still better results.
"Fellow comrades of the People's University of British Columbia unite! Join your minds and
your hearts so that we may
achieve all that would be nice to
achieve!  Long live people "
tion are being defiled toy this
'movement') is called a 'Bad Grip',
and is feared by all 'movers', as
the drug takers refer to themselves. They are also known as
'Hippies', in the language of the
decadent west.
Hero San-Sul
Mac-Inspired
Personally Top
The people's glorious leader at
the People's University of British
Columbia ran around his office
three times yesterday.
"I am inspired by Mac's
thought," he told the Daly Monthly, there to interview him.
San-sul was elected by proper
democratic procedure as the leader of the glorious proletariat at
the People's University earlier
this year.
"We must remember Mac's
thought that 'Democracy sometimes seems to be an end, but
it is in fact only a means to the
same end," he said just after his
election.
"I will personally lead the
workers to greater heights," he
said.
"This is why I am in training,"
he added.
"We must progress forwards,
onwards, upwards, but never inside-out," he said.
"I will direct the People's Own
Society to provide new obstacles
to learning and teaching at our
glorious university."
"We will have referendums,
marches, and strikes to protect
imperialist infiltration by capitalists on our campus, and referendums, marches and strikes to support glorious socialists on campus
and referendums, marches, and
strikes to demonstrate sympathy
with our cause."
"With my glorious People's
executive we will reach new
heights in beauracratic stupidity."
"Even the great P.B. will not
have reached such fantastic
peaks."
San-sul then collapsed. The
comrade doctor always present in
case of worker's breakdowns said
he thinks San-sul was unable to
take the strain of the rank of
leader.
SAN-SUL Page 4
DALY     MONTHLY
JsG
WYSI-MYN
RED   'N   FORGOTTEN   —
Chairman Mac Tse-jac seems
irate over local reports that
he swam the Fraser river
without first calling on local
authorities to rid the water
of so-called "filthy elements"
which seem prevalent three
times weekly.
Usually unconfirmed reports from the secret offices
of Mac's propagandist and
general flacky Daly Yho-yo
claim that the great Puce
warrior and supreme helmsman did command all foreign
elements to leave the river
waters of the Fraser.
Opposition to these claims
were overheard in The Great
Communal but Mac overcomes everything and is expected to overcome this latest
quest for power by the irrela-
vent minority. Mac Tse-jac is
a great leader.
TRIPPIN* TO TSE — Mac
Tse-jac has again put the
right people's university before all else. In a general
policy statement presented
to three members of the Grey-
pointed council for Conformity to Justice, Mac stated emphatically that: "All drugs
are good for some and that
some are good for drugs and
some are good for some and
drugs are good for drugs."
We are proud to print this
message from our beloved
commander. Mac Tse-jac may
feel like quitting at times but
he sure knows how to say
great things. May Mac Tse-
jac have a long, long life.
NOTES FOR THE PEOPLE
—Production is reported low
this year and apparently because of local wood barons
using the people's trees for
uses other than making diplomas for the people's graduates . . . Mac Grse-gor has
been attended to by Puce
Guards for his attempts to
vacate the people's study of
imperialist Greece for the
sake of what he calls his "on-
location study of Athenean
hordes." . . . Mac Tse-jac today advocated birth-control
for all parents of local youths
who attend the people's propaganda-distortion center. The
center is reportedly overcrowded. Mac Tse-jac is our
great teacher and leader.
WYSI-MYNIAC — Overheard in the people's central
committee for cultural crap
meeting room: "The people
deserve something more than
Mac Tse-jac but Mac Tse-
jac's only true school of great
thought demands something
with less intelligence than
the people."
DALY MONTHLY
ABSOLUTELY
DIALECTIC BANANA
JSE WYSI-MYN
oh, wow
Unprepared
People's Hut
The people's drawings for the
revolutionary new sea dwellings
for followers of chairman Mac
Tse-jac will not be used because
of lack of money according to
general flackly-flunck Daly Yho-
yo.
Yho-yo claims that premier
Wac<ec has refused funds to continue the project.
The dwellings were apparently
to be built under the Pa-si-fse
ocean with people's revolutionary
balloons transporting occupants
from the sub-marine communals
onto Mac's glorious revolutionary
shores.
The balloons are an invention of
our beloved chairman Mac. Reportedly Mac received the title
of "the great helmsman" from
this particular burst of creativity.
Wac-cec denied all reports that
he refused the funds and Claimed
he would "sink the damn people's
university underwater if they
didn't stop gurgling."
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Address-
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WHY NOT SELL YOUR USED ON
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BOOK BROKER
IN    SEPTEMBER
This Diamond Ring Is Worth
All Of $1,000,000.'
(To The Girl Who Wears It.)
And 10% discount to the young man who
gives it. Which explains why most students
consult Grassies on Seymour before buying important items like jewellery. Or anything else
for that matter. Because Grassies' 10%
Student Preferential Discount Policy covers all
their merchandise. An invaluable factor . . .
whatever  the amount  you   wish   to spend.
• $200: Retail Value/$180: To Yea.
566  SEYMOUR
685-2271
Notice to All
Registered
U.B.C. Students
Regarding
REBATE POLICY
The 5% Rebate for the Current
School Year will be given
Only in the Period
Beginning MONDAY, APRIL 10,1967
and Ending WEDNESDAY, MAY 31,1967
Only   Cash   Register   Receipts   dated
April 1, 1966 an,d after will be accepted.
STUDENTS MUST PRESENT THEIR A.M.S.  CARDS WHEN
APPLYING FDR THE CASH REBATE DALY     MONTHLY
Page 3
PEOPLE'S revolutionary committee for growth and
exploitation of dialetic soybean meet in friendly discussion. Mac Tse-jac, wearing look of glorious satisfaction finds himself held back by revisionist chains
of capitalist inaction. Chairman Mac's helpful aides
offer solution for political and  artsistic stagnation
on the people's democratic soybean commune. Our
great proletarian cultural revolution is greatly
furthered by Chairman Mac's exhortations for taking a stand against the bourgeois reactionary line
in all matters of struggle.
REVOLUTIONARY BREAKTHROUGH
Dr. Computer 7040 Is New Chairman
The Supreme Board of the
People's University of British
Columbia has made a revolutionary break through in the announcement of a new Chairman
of the University: Dr. Computer
7040.
The honourable chairman was
picked in a democratic fashion by
the committee of the Supreme
Board made of Stuart Yangtshe
Keatso, publisher of the People's
Paper, Doono Millershi, president
of the Revolutionary Fishing Company and Nathanao Tao Neme-
tung, the Supreme Justice of the
People's Court.
New chairman is a long time
friend of the People's University
HOT OFF
THE CARVING
BLOCKS . . .
having been employed in the Progress Computing Office for several years.
Former chairman Mac Tse-jac,
who retired to go on to greater
revolutionary activity for the progress of the People's Republic, was
reportedly pleased.
"I think that the Supreme
Board has picked a machine which
will carry on the revolutionary
action of the People's University,"
he said.
Chairman Mac Tse-jac has always been proud of the great
strides made by the Computer
Office under his direction in its
democratic fight against counter
revolutionaries.
"This machine knows of the
revolutionary ideals I have tried
to stimulate in the People's Revolution^Excellence, researqh, higher
donations to the Struggle from
alumni and nice Capitalist Ho Rse
MaoMillan."
At the People's Convocation
this   Spring,   the   new   Chairman
will be placed on a wheeled platform so that he can be invested
with the revolutionary robes of
his office by the Friend of the
Revolution Johnshao Buchananchi,
great Chancellor of the People's
University.
Sun Yat Gundersen, member of
the Supreme Board hailed the announcement. "The new Chairman
can serve year round, 24 hours a
day. This will be a great saving
for the  People's  University.
"Because the Revolution is the
most important lesson to be taught
by the People's University followed by People's Research and also
teaching, the Supreme Board has
democratically chosen a machine
that will serve the revolution
tirelessly and teach the horrible
lessons of capitalistic imperialism.
"If    the    People's    Computer
Chairman should be found to have
' been    counter - revolutionary,    we
have only to pull the plug."
Magnificent
Scientific
Soybean
A revolutionary new soybean
has been developed by comrade
doctor Nil Sio-pear of the People's
University of British Columbia.
This outstanding scientific
achievement presents yet another
great stride forward in the magnificent effort to scale the highest
peaks of science, an effort led
under the great white banner of
Mac Tsc-jac's thought.
The revolutionary new soybean
is more brilliant in color, more
delicious in taste, and cooks three
times faster than any other soybean in the world.
"This soybean is far superior
than any developed by the American imperialist capitalists," Sio-
pear told the crowd gathered to
hear the results of his hard labor.
He was greeted with enthusiastic shouts of "Long live the soybean. Long live Mac Tse-jac-
Sio-pear first began the project
in 1867 as his project for that centennial year. Since then he has
worked hard and diligently to
reap his final results.
The first breakthrough came
when he improved the colour
from a muddy brown to a true
dialectic shade. Teaching himself
what he did not know he proceeded to develop the flavour to a
luscious banana taste.
Throughout his work Sio-pear
followed the thoughts of Mac on
"being engaged in a great and
most glorious cause, never undertaken  by our  forefathers."
Dissatisfied
With Sap of
Sustenance
The People's University of British Columbia continues the struggle to  satisfy the yen deficiency.
Chairman Mac Tse-jac has demanded that the imperialist forces
of Wac-cec cease their cruel deprivation of the People's University of British Columbia.
^'Unless the yen is satisfied,
impossible demands will have to
be made upon the already overburdened students of the People's
University. Soon many will have
to starve so the others may live,"
sobs Chairman Mac Tse-jac.
A FRANK COMPLIMENT
Mac Tse-jac
• beautifully bound
• brilliant green cover
• immediate shipment
• only $1 million per copy
{66 copies must be sold to
pay costs.) Payment accepted in People's Revolutionary
Bank of British Columbia
dollars ONLY.
Send to:
Revolutionary Publishers,
Chairman Mac Tse-jac,
1917 Daly Monthly Rd.,
Piao, North Kalimantan.
Generous Guards Pin Tourists
But, to his astonishment, the
Puce Guards he was meeting were
completely different from those
savagely slandered in the hostile
city "press". Smiling, he quite
frankly told the girl: "You Puce
Guards are excellent!"
"Yes," said their People's guide,
Johnny Chi-Wis, "few outside our
People's University know of the
true nature of our dedicated followers of Chairman Mac Tse-jac.
"They are not only well-mannered but clean," he said. "Many
shave after every meal."
A Japanese friend asked with
great  interest:   "Ordinarily,   what
do you, the Puce Guards, love the
most?"
The girl, raising her misty eyes
to the purple armband of her comrade, answered immediately: "Most
of all we love our great leader
Chairman Mac and like reading
Chairman Mac's writings most of
all, because we cannot depart from
Mac Tse-jac's thoughts for a moment."
"I'm  asking what  you  like  in
DALY MONTHLY
EXCESSIVE
YEAR OF THE DRAG
life?" said an Australian friend.
"Do you like listening to the radio,
gramaphone or television?"
"We like to listen to the radio
very much," she said. "Chairman
Mac teaches us to pay attention to
state affairs, and from the radio
we learn much about state affairs."
The Puce Guards took off their
treasured badges of Chairman Mac
and pinned them on the chests of
our tourist friends. Ladies received
a photograph of Chairman Mac
Tse-jac and a bright shining
apple.
This sincere demonstration of
friendship greatly moved our
guests from afar. ENOUGH!
By BOB CRUISE
For many of us university courses seriously impinge upon our opportunity
for getting a real education.
Each year we set aside the
summer as a period when
we will get caught up on
our  general  comprehension.
But each year we can look
back on a summer where
goals did not become clarified or our environment
demystified.
The following are some
suggested readings for anyone desirous of locating
themselves, not as objects in
a linear year-to-year dimensions, but in relation to the
real forces of progress and
reaction in their environment.
A general picture of our
political continuum is brilliantly articulated by Frantz
Fanon in The Wretched of
the Earth. It is an account
of colonialism and decolonization in general and Algerian independence in particular. The introduction by
J. P. Sartre is a piece of
poetic prose. In order to be
sure you were not just reading one side of the story,
Gerassi's The Great Fear,
Harrington's The Other
America and Melman's Our
Depleted Society provide
analyses of America and its
subordinates from the liberal
point of view.
There is a paucity of books
dealing with the interrelation of the individual and
his society. However, the
following  help   to   establish
the dynamic interaction of
self-motivation and social
coercion: Laing's Divided
Self, Maslow's Toward a
Psychology of Being, and
Fromm's Heart of Man and
Sane Society.
There are numerous books
which help to uncover
events which have too long
been protected by the Cold
War cloak. Green's Curtain
of Ignorance, Fleming's Cold
War and Its Origins, Du-
Boff's America's Vietnam
Policy, Hofpwitz's Free.-
World Colossus and a small
pamphlet with an excellent
bibliography by Graham
The American System (avail-
ble from SUPA in Toronto
for   25c).
Ramparts and the Minority of One provide alternatives to the Time-Life review
of freedom and democracy
as well as giving much well-
docum e n t e d information
each month.
Tying world events into a
Canadian perspective is assisted by Porter's Vertical
Mosaic and Park's Anatomy
of Big Business.
Internationalists are planning summer study groups
on philosophy and social
change and anyone interested should contact Bob at
261-8042 or Doug at 522-5108.
A good theme for your
summer reading program
comes from a Latin American Conference: This great
humanity has said
"ENOUGH!" and has begun
to  move forward.
IN      PERSON
SUNDAY, APRIL 9-2 AND 6 P.M.
Sweetheart Of Grand Ole Opry
JUNE
CARTER
TENNESSEE
THREE
STATLER
BROS. QUARTET
i? MOTHER MAYBELLE and the
CARTER FAMILY
i* CARL PERKINS
•fr DEBBIE LORI KAYE
Q.E. THEATRE
SUNDAY, APRIL 9
2 AND 6 P.M.
Ticket* at: Vancouver Ticket Centre, Atl Eatens Store*, Town &
Country Home Furnishings in Kerr-
isdaie-Richmond.
*riday, March 31, 1967
$120 misunderstanding
By LINDA LINELL
Latest ruomrs say that a member of the
UBC housing adminstration has declared war
on campus romances. Unable to prevent
casual entanglements, this (arch enemy of
cupid has found his answer to the problem
of permanent alliances.
Exorbitantly high rentals for married
graduate students who wish to live in the
new 275 unit Acadia Park will certainly eliminate a large number of those in graduate
studies.
And UBC will no longer provide housing
for married students working towards a B.A.
A partial rationale for this official's behavior can be deduced from one terse statement. "If we don't provide housing for married undergrads, they won't get married."
We were of the opinion that a scarcity of
suites seldom separates any serious suitors.
Having eliminated the undergraduate, our
militant official turns to the graduate. His
marriage is sanctioned but will he be able to
pay the price?
At present UBC maintains army hut
suites for its married students. Graduates
are given priority but undergrads are admitted.
In Wesbrook villa rentals range from
$41-$55 a month including heat and water
in many cases. The present units are largely
unattractive, often crowded and do not adhere to any coherent architectural plan.
Privacy is practically nil and the difficulties
of removing a generation's legacy of dirt
has caused more than one wife to collapse
in tears.
But these suites remain occupied. Individual complaints become communal jokes. Ingenuity replaces aversion and the hovels gain
character.
It is sad to witness the demolition of these
huts but lamentations would cease immediately if Acadia Park emulated the older
homes. Rents should be more reasonable and
all married students should be admitted with
priority given according to year in school.
Esthetically pleasing, luxurious quarters
are no comfort if students have to borrow
money from the university to pay the rent.
Separate play areas for children plus an
average of two parking slots per unit do not
console a mother who is forced to seek outside employment because her husband's grant
no longer covers living expenses.
Space for a nursery has been allotted and
a proposed pay care center may become a
reality. But a service averaging $10 a month
ceases to be a bargain when over $120 is
paid in rent. Surely UBC housing realizes
that this disruption of the family unit can
only result in severe marital and personal
discord as well as the possibility of academic
failure.
Sixty-six per cent of the married students
have declared incomes ranging from under
$1,000 a year to just under $5,000. Forty-six
per cent of this number earn from $4,000 a
year to less than $1,000. Even Acadia Park's
lowest yearly rental of approximately $120
is obviously impractical.
Only the higher prjced suites ar^1 open
to families with a child Wer the age of one.
Rental of over $120 a month appear ludicrous
when compared with the low incomes. Other
expenses such as tuition, books, food, and
other miscellaneous items add up to financial ruin.
UBC has recently received a legacy of
several million dollars from the estate of
DOrothy J. Killam. Five million dollars is to
be put in a general endowment fund to be
administered by the board of governors.
Surely the income "from a trust using all or a
part of this money could subsidize married
housing and lower rents.
The present scheme can only result in
disaster both to UBC's hope of establishing
a graduate student center and to the students
who lack the funds for Acadia Park.
If this plan is enacted we can only mourn
this senseless waste which allows certain
zealots to exclude married undergrads from
Acadia Park and place this accommodation
out of the financial reach of a large percentage of eligible students.
I.*.* ."■
NEW VERSION OF
A GREAT MUSICAL
ANYTHING
GOES
MARCH 30 ~ APRIL 22
STUDENT SPECIAL
Tickets on sale at Vancouver Ticket Centre, 630 Hamilton St., MU 3-3255; all Eaton's Stores (charge them);
and Town & Country Home Furnishings in Kerrisdale and Richmond.
STUDENT SPECIAL: HALF-PRICE FOR ALL EVE. PERFORMANCES, $1 FOR SAT. MAT.
there's only one korner in my little pad, dad. but its
got two shadbolts, a smith, a peter and a tanabe.
how's that for fifteen bucks ?
Actually, it's the wildest deal in contemporary poster art available anywhere. Six posters were specially created for the
current season of Playhouse Theatre Company productions by
five of the West Coast's most oustanding artists: Jack Shadbolt,
Gordon Smith, John Korner, Takao Tanabe and Fred Peter.
Now you can get a complete set of these six posters for $15.
Very limited supply. Sure beats wallpaper.
On sale at Duthie's Book Stores, Vancouver Art Gallery Shop,
Downstairs Gallery in West Vancouver, and the Art Gallery in
Victoria.
THE      UBYSSEY
Pag* 9 NOTICE
The Book Store
will be closed all day
TODAY
for
ANNUAL STOCK TAKING
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Special  10% Discount to all UBC Students
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NPD 'no problem'
By  BILL   GRAF
"There never were any
crimes in National Socialist
Germany. This slander is
only the propaganda of international Jewry and the
Jewish press.
"The war was lost . . .
not because of the failure of
the NSDAP ... but rather
because of the enemy within and international Jewry."
These statements were recently made by ranking officials of West Germany's
National Democratic Party
(Heinz von Arndt in Munich
and Stuttgart lawyer Peter
Stoeckicht). While they may
not be representative of the
party's overall position, they
are, nonetheless, symptomatic.
The National Democrats
(NPD) are the much-publicized new right in West
Germany. The party denies
any connection with Nazism,
designates itself as "national, conservative and social."
The NPD enjoyed its first
notable, if meagre, successes
in a series of local elections
at the outset of 1966.
Then in state elections in
Hessen and Bavaria in September and October the
NPD's electoral success increased 200 per cent. In Hessen eight NPD members representing 7.9 per cent of
the popular vote were seated in the Landtag. In Bavaria 15 members with 7.4
per cent replaced the Free
Democratic Party as the
third force in the state legislature.
The NPD is, above all, a
negative reaction, a protest
movement. It is the fear of
petty bourgeoisie who, in a
capitalist society—threatened from above by the large
concerns with unlimited capital, and threatened from below by a growing, prosperous labor force — fear the
pf 6ix
Spellman
By HALFDAN RASMUSSEN
From the Danish Magazine Politisk,
translated by Simon Grabowski.
No, what frightens me is not the enemy.
His loss can be endured. Our losses
worry me. However, as against the prints of
nails of Christ
war's wounds are like a scratch onto the cheek.
For us he suffered. But, in the deep of his
wounds
the sweetness of our victory is buried. When
in ashes
loss of their social and economic position.
The NPD proclaims the
"value of emotion" and of
the "soul," as well as "blood
and soil" in an "organic development based on natural
roots." It looks back on the
primitive values and
"healthy" society of a pre-
industrial world.
This kind of thinking manifests itself firstly—and this
is perhaps the central theme
of the NPD—in nationalism.
"German" values must replace "corrupt foreign influences." Every form of
emanicipation is viewed
with suspicion, whether it
be the intellectual of the
Enlightenment, the political
of democracy, the social of
Jews and workers or the
emanicipation  of the Frau.
"The Mother instead of
the Whore," proclaims one
NPD slogan. In speeches, in
articles, in the official party
newspaper, Deutsche Nacht-
richten, one finds such words
as purity, honesty, thrift,
hard work and morality,
"Corrupting influences, such
as sex, materialism and communism," reads the party
manifesto, "should be removed from in front of the
eyes of our youth."
The National Democrats
want an end to the "onesided" war-criminal trials
and the cessation of restitution payments to Israel.
They contend that the
bombing of Dresden, for
example, constituted as great
a war crime as the establishment of the concentration
camps.
By now it should be clear
that National Democratic
strength derives primarily
from the middle classes—the
farmers, the small store-
owners, the would-be and
have-been entrepreneurs, the
tradesmen, the lower-level
clerks and officials and the
independent   occupations.
The typical NPD voter is
likelier to be a protestant
than a catholic, and is often
a    refugee   from   the   East
Zone.
Unfortunately,    the    NPD
germ has found a growth-
conducive milieu in West
Germany today. Twenty
years after the war, the
prospects for German reunification are remoter than
ever. Foreign troops occupy
both parts of the country and
a good part of the former
Reich has been absorbed by
Poland and Russia. The continuation of the war-crimes'
trials subjects Germany to
constant international humiliation.
The "Grand Coalition" has
virtually eliminated parliamentary opposition, has raised taxes, and finds itself in
a rapidly-worsening economic crisis. Scandals in armaments and election "gifts"
have undermined public
confidence in the government.
The NPD's success, if present trends persist, will continue in the next few months.
According to NPD Propaganda Chief Otto Hess, the
party will capture between
15 to 20 per cent of the
popular vote in the April
state elections in Schleswig-
Holstein and something
slightly less in Rheinland-
Pfalz. "TCie party's percentage will probably be about
12 per cent in the Nieder-
sachsen elections in June.
In fact, if federal elections
took place today, agrees a
majority of pundits and academics, the NPD would capture about 50 seats in the
498 - member Bundestag.
Hess predicts his party's success in the 1969 federal election by "between 60 and 90
members."
How far the NPD goes
depends partly on the leadership and effectiveness of the
present government, partly
on the extent of the current
economic recession, and
largely on the people themselves. For, as Der Spiegel
suggests, "the problem is not
the NPD. The problem is the
Germans who cast their
votes for it."
invokes God
the camp of th? enemy is laid, a greater miracle
our   victory,   ours    and   Christianity's,    shall
confirm.
No, what frightens me, is not the war.
There is a- time for sowing and a time for
harvest.
Fm frightened by the god who equitably
'tween West and East his mighty grace divides.
Oh Lord, divide and separate!  Let perish
the infidel; the red clay crush.
Thy army ready stands. Christ's warriers pray:
Cast Satan out! Free, free us from the wicked!
<z$zvmr~
Page  10
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 31, 1967 /
Scobie blows up
By STEPHEN SCOBIE
At the end of a year, critics seem to
fall victim to a universal disease of list-
making and prize-giving: the "10 Best
Films", etc. In accordance with custom, I
present my own Awards for the Year.
These are given to films which have
had their first commercial showing in Vancouver since September 1st of last year.
This excludes (a) Film Society and Festival
Showings, and (b) revivals, and hardy annuals like Dr. Zhivago or Who's Afraid of
that lady novelist.
Here we go:
Best Film of the Year: Michelangelo
Antonioni's Blow-Up, for its total fascination of content and total perfection of style.
Best Director of the Year: Jean-Luc
Godard, for both Alphaville and Bande A
Part. Godard continues to be the most controversial and stimulating artist in cinema.
Most Over-rated Film of the Year: A
tie between The Wrong Box and Georgy
Girl, two rather dull comedies which most
critics incredibly found funny.
Most Under-rated Film of the Year:
Rapture, a sensitive psychological drama,
which ran at the Studio for two fugitive
weeks last fall, to universal lack of notice.
Biggest Disappointment of the Year:
Francois Truffaut's Fahrenheit 451, not so
much because it's a bad film as because
our own expectations were too high.
Film I Liked Best But Couldn't Find A
Place For Anywhere Else: Claude Lelouche's
enchanting A Man and a Woman.
Best Double-Bill of the Year: (cheating
a little chronologically), the Lyric's conjunction of Billy the Kid Versus Dracula
and Jesse James Meets Frankenstein's
Daughter. (Footnote: The twin theatres at
Park   Royal   afford   endless   opportunities
Film critic
picks
year's best
■
Best American Film of the Year: Roger
Corman's The Wild Angels, a neo-Gothic
parable which views the whole of human
life as one vast horror-film.
Best Actor: Paul Scofield, as Thomas
More in A Man For All Seasons.
Best Actress: Ida Kaminska, as the
shopkeeper in The Shop On Main Street.
Best Supporting Actor: the wolf which
wagged its tail in The Trap.
Best Comedy of the Year: no award,
there were no good comedies. There was,
however, one good spoof, Modesty Blaise,
and one good farce, A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum.
Most Entertaining Film of the Year: The
Professionals.
for fun combinations, such as Blow-Up and
Sound of Music. Choosing films could become a real game, e.g. Hawaii and South
Pacific, The Bible and The Wild Angels, A
Patch of Blue and Repulsion, etc. . . .)
And finally, Best Advertising Gimmick
of the Year: This must to go Don Barnes,
manager of the Varsity Theatre, who advertised King and Country (the Worthiest
Film of the Year) with the quote "Best
Anti-War Film ever made!", which quote
was credited to one Don Barnes. But a
special word of thanks must be added to
the Province compositor who, one glorious day last summer, transported the
Censor's Warning on Virginia Woolf ("Some
of the dialogue may offend you") into the
box advertising The Sound of Music.
TONIGHT & SATURDAY AT
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a Sad lesson in tfe
relia6iltty <f &>&
tnecfianical and -
economic devices.
lafinette now faows
ttie security eftnoney
in tfe Hanfi and her
out*) personal c/kques-
Ut/ten h'stsler strikes,
your friendly tank, is
as close, as your cteque
boofr.wAicA is a
proeiemfir Wis 6id.-.
lA/NlV^
tfe painless adwriiseHteHt-
did we ever tellyoa
the story of how
lapinette came to
deal with the
camputfatifc. in the
first place ?
Well, once upon, a time,
lappy used to Jaeep
her cash in a pig.itcw
thfe pig was a
p?rc!elam-pig. you
lenow the 1ype: kind
o£ acceptable in ait
aesthetic way, tutt not
overly 2>clive oirtkwise
one day, whilst" laj>py
Was dragracing' a
chap with, fer Honda.
«he braise a sprocJcet.
ttow, sprocl<efcs arenPt-
hard to £ind , hxi lap
tad left her pig in
:her pad.
ever try, to cash a
cheque drawn on, a
^gybanfc ?
•vvalkinxf fe class, <3he
passed the Campus&m/c.
which was near the
campus, naturally.
why not ? she mused
ienuxsedly.
what service! foui £md!
she was delighted,
and her very- own
pep&aval chequing
account cheqjiebcolcj
lxit even our tsctik,
can't think/ o£
everything.
She brake, another.
sprocket- dratfracszntf
yesterday.  ^        Q
lather chequebook
was sa£f and sound
an the pig <
6*n£ of Montreal
mmW /t     __       -u^. / -.£.___ *
" a aapitalpfoas*
bi-iht administration bvULHtui
Friday, March 31, 1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 1) wySjWftjftKjjjS;:^:^
Have   a Hamburger
By  KARL  BURAU
Well, first I must warn
you, never to eat a hamburger in Hamburg or anywhere else in Germany.
You could surely get into
serious trouble, for there
they aren't cannibals and it
is strictly forbidden to eat a
citizen  of  Hamburg
Well, the Hamburgers are
a proud people and love
their city. But they also have
some self-criticism and therefore humor, as is indicated
by their favourite story
about Hamburg. Here it is:
Once there sat a man
weeping terribly. A distinguished looking old gentleman stepped forward and he
said: "My dear friend, tell
me, what is all your trouble
about? I am sure I can help
you.
But the man cried: "Nobody can help me!"
So the stranger said: "Now
come on, I certainly can
help you for I am God."
But the man went on lamenting: "Not even you,
God, can help me, for I have
not been born in Hamburg."
And, naturally, God himself
turned pale, sat down beside
the man not born in Ham
burg and wept bitterly too.
So you see that the Hamburgers have self-criticism
and therefore humor. And
the Canadians have neither
for they did not invent such
a true story. Instead they
are always lamenting about
their identity, and claiming
that everything Canadian is
superior.
I shall even help them to
find their identity—the real
one—by giving them a genuine national myth.
Once upon a time there
was a man crying terribly
and evidently deeply disturbed. An elderly distinguished looking gentleman
got out of his Cadillac and
approached him in his excellent USA made suit and said:
"Take courage, my friend, I
am going to help you."
But the poor fellow answered: "Nobody can help
me."
So the gentleman said:
"Don't say so, I am God and
all-powerful."
But the man cried out:
"Even though Thou art God
and all-powerful, Thou cannot help me — I am not British born, not even English
Canadian!"    And    God    sat
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down and wept bitterly too.
The tears that dropped
from his one eye are now
called Atlantic Ocean and
the tears from his other eye
are now called Pacific Ocean.
I forgot, I really have to
apologize. Canadians could
not invent this true story—
For God IS a Britisher, or at
least an English Canadian.
Whenever I explain that
Canada is potentially per capita by far the richest in the
world and that hardly
any government can be as
stupid nor any legal political
system as poor as not to suffice in such a country, I am
always told: "But you don't
really understand. You see,
all what you say only proves
that God gave us Canadians
all this on account of our
moral and general superiority for God is just."
And this is why the Hamburgers have humor and the
Canadians  have none.
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Page  12
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 31,  1967 Friday, March 31, 1967
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  13
>   4
Tracksters tromp toes,
recording meet victory
The UBC track and field
team overran all opposition
last weekend to win both the
men's and women's open aggregate trophies at the B.C.
Indoor Championships in Kelowna.
In all, the men's team came
away with nine first places,
two of them Gordon Dong's.
He won both the long jump
and the 50 yard hurdles.
Other   first   place   finishers
were:   Ron  Parker,   shot  put;
Chip   Barrett,   50   yard   dash;
Ron Haddad, 880 yards; Dave
Aune, 440 yards; Ray Stevenson,   triple   jump;   and   Don
Scott, one mile.
In the 11 team field, total
points put UBC first, Vancou-
UBC rowers
pop an oar
but tie OS
The UBC rowing crew lost
to Oregon State University pad-
dlers for the first time but still
tied for first place in the annual spring regatta held at Coal
Harbour on Saturday.
The UBC men managed to
win five of the remaining 11
events to tie with Oregon. Both
had 34 points.
Lake Washington Rowing
Club trailed with 21 while Pacific Lutheran University and
University of Victoria tied for
third with 13 points each.
A loose oar-lock was responsible for the Birds' loss to OSU
in the senior eights, 2,000 metre
race.
The UBC shell was trailing
by less than a length when the
oar-lock of seventh man Eric
McAvity popped out of its socket. As a result, the Oregonians
cruised to victory.
SCORES
SOCCER
Victoria 2, UBC 1
•     •     •
RUGBY
UBC   13-0   and   9-9   in   two
games against UCLA.
ver  Olympic  Club  second.
In the women's events UBC
only managed to pull out one
first place but got enough seconds and thirds to beat VOC
for first place.
Jill Murray, the lone first,
beat teammate Jenny Wright
by one-tenth of a second in the
50 yard hurdles. Joanne Hetherington finished with two seconds; one in the 50 yard dash
and a close one in the 440
yards.
For   their   next   meet,   the
men's team goes to Bellingham
on Saturday to take on a strong
Western    Washington    team.
When they met here last year
UBC squeezed by with a narrow seven  point victory.
At 12:30 p.m. this Sunday in
the stadium the whole team
meets a fully representative
team from Vancouver Island.
At last year's meet, UBC lost
by one event; this time they
will go all out.
Despite the rumor that the
stadium    refuses    to    become
obsolete, this meet should be
the last event to take place in
the old sports palace.
l UBC Thunderbirds
1  chosen all-stars
> $
\ Five UBC athletes have ,
won positions on WCIAA <
all-star teams for the .
1966-67 season. ;'
In ice hockey Al Mc- k
Lean, who was the league S
scoring champion, was
chosen as the first all-star
centre. Dave Chambers,
hockey team captain, was
picked for one of the
second all-star defence
positions.
In basketball Ian Dixon
and Neil Murray were
named to the first all-star
forward spots. Phil Langley, only in his first year
of play for the varsity
squad, was selected as
one of the guards on the
second all-star team.
The teams were chosen
by the five WCIAA
coaches in each sport.
JV's tops again
The UBC Jayvee basketball team retained their Canadian junior varsity title Wednesday when they walked over
the Montreal Orchids 82-75 in Saint John, New Brunswick.
The JV's, losers of only one
game against their opposition
during their two-year reign,
took four straight games in the
seven-team, double-elimination
tourney.
They began by 'beating Monc-
ton 82-51. In their next outing
they out-hooped Windsor 79-41.
Then they met Montreal for the
SAM VANDERMEULEN
. . . top scorer
first   time   and   squeaked   by
83-79.
The JV's were led in the final
contest iby their top scorer, Sam
Vandermeulen. He potted 27 of
UBC's points.
Rick Inrig contributed 19 and
Bill Ruby sank 14.
UBC won behind a second
quarter splurge during which
they poured in 13 unanswered
points. They emerged from the
half with a 41?34 lead.
Montreal's Ray Mischook was
the game's top marksman with
28 points.
One of UBC's first string
players, Derek Sankey was ill
and missed the final game.
But coach Norm Watt said,
"I had 10 starters and no worries." Watt is in his fourth season as coach.
Thanks   for   your
Patronage   during   the
year.   Keep   in   touch
during  the  summer.
We   are   planning
Renovations  and  New
Food   items.
And don't forget
for   the   fastest   delivery
in   town
call   224-0833.
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South Brock Basement
224-3242  loc.  34
EXPO 67
EXPO 67
EXPO 67
NANCY WELLS, vice-president of the Women's Athletic
Association, whoops it up a la Winston Churchill when
referendum to cut. athletics was defeated.
CLOSING SALE
NOW
IN FULL SWING
All faculty insignia
COLLEGE SHOP
BROCK EXTENSION Page  14
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 31,  1967
THIS HERE YEAR ...
HAS  TWO  PAGES    \
Strike, money, pot  make a year
By IAN CAMERON
The first issue of the
Ubyssey for '66-'67 told us
that Bennett was in, but Bonner was out.
It also mentioned that the
housing crisis was upon us,
but the AMS was planning
co-op housing. (Ah, there,
Peter  Braund.)
The zoning laws were blamed for the shortage, but Marie
McGregor said, "Let them
cat Ubyssey sandwiches."
People picking up the student's guide, Tuum Est, discovered that it had some useful information. They were
not informed that there was
a lot more useful information
cut out.
Students lost face on their
ID cards, and the RCMP lost
face when they tried to crack
down on pot. The Ubyssey
sold sandwiches, and Point
Grey was urged to ease the
zoning laws so students could
have a roof over their heads.
Bennett decided that he
needed a bank more than the
universities needed money,
and Basil Stuart-Stubbs decided that unless the library
got more money it might as
well shut its doors.
The housing fight rumbled
on, and on, and on, through
September and into October,
as the days grew colder and
colder and the students grew
more and more desperate.
The Peak, of SFA, got The
Ubyssey Shield for the best
high-school newspaper of the
year. Macdonald (remember
him?) denied that the library
was low on the list of things
to do at UBC. Stuart-Stubbs
choked. The SUBterranean
rumblings continued. "Any
day now,"  was the cry.
The new arts program came
into the eyes of the powers
that be, but they couldn't see
the hovels the students called
home. (The polite students,
that is.)
Macdonald (him again) announced a once-a-month open-
door policy. Once a month he
opened his door. The AMS
was advised to build their
own residences. SUB took
care of that.
The arts program split the
faculty in two, each with its
own leader, two heads being
better   than   one.   McGregor
TO PAGE 15
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1867 U1967    exp067
1967
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HEAPS OF STICKY brown substance found where AMS
politicos congregate was a normal feature of this year
that was.
Univ. Blvd. (on campus) Friday, March  31,  1967
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  15
Here is the year
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 14
chuntered about the housing
crisis, which he claimed didn't
exist.
The University of Alberta,
which had left CUS at some
dark date in the past, was
joined by McGill.
Students should be appointed to positions on the university senate, said a president's
committee report. (Yoo, hoo,
Randy Enomoto, are you
there?)
CUS lost more members,
and changed its name to
CUSS, Canadian TJnion of
Some Students. The Pep
meet met, and Mac quit. Ho
hum.
Paul Krasner spoke, Halloween came and went, and
Boylan planned another fee
strike. Macdonald warned
that UBC might have to turn
away lots of students next
year if more money didn't
come.
Gaglardi didn't know when
the mud path would become
passable, and was happy to
say so. A committee, the
same sort of group that set
out to design a horse and ended up with a giraffe, was appointed to select a new president.
Christmas Carole came
again, and caused frustration.
Once again the Lower Mall
boys tried to relax girl's
housing  restrictions,  to  ease
their frustrations, and once
again lost.
The    Ubyssey    won   the
REACTION TO LES PETERSON'S speech on legislative
steps by juvenile_,fee marchers generally took this form.
Southam trophy again, yawns.
Hardial Bain returned, blasting all and sundry, yawn.
Charlie Boylan hit the news
with his constitutional revisions, and hit the skids when
it failed to pass. A Burnaby
schools' trustee called the
B.C. Assembly of Students a
Communist front organization, and The Ubyssey changed its format and content.
Students who fell ill where
in real trouble, as the health
services strangled for lack
of money. They didn't have
enough for both medical and
psychiatric staff. Clean mind,
clean body,   take  your   pick.
Peterson decreed that students should not march, as it
might disrupt something. "I
can't get into this brief just
now," he said. The students
decided to march anyway,
with or without stones.
Von Thadden almost got to
UBC, but not quite. Or did
he? UBC students decided to
strike, but Mac said no, and
Benito Braund knuckled under.
Peterson waffled some
more, and agreed to address
students   at   the   parliament
buildings, "ex cathedra."
Macdonald also thought the
march might be OK, since
the alternative was the
strike. When the marchers
arrived at the tweed curtain
they were told to go home
and behave by the Minister
of Edification.
The AMS decided that they
needed more money, like
15% more, and asked students
for same. The SUB was still
not heard from, nor was the
$15 that the students pay into
it.
Elections came and went
for some, while others were
concerned with more important things, like should we
have female cleaners in men's
dorms?
Even the board of governors admitted that UBC needed more $$, and UBC followed the USA lead by electing
an Irish student president.
The B of G kept their
doors locked, but word of
their doing leaked out anyway. One of their thoughts
was that maybe the university can struggle along without more money after all.
The AMS didn't get tnelr
fee hike, and it was discovered that the CIA is financing
CUS. Maybe if the AMS
wrote to Washington, thought
some .
Ralph Daly sent UBC Reports to parents to tell them
what the university is really
like, but they didn't mention
pot.
The  faculty   came   out   in
favor of students on the senate, and the board of governors came out  in favor of
abolishing the faculty.
The AMS claimed that there
THE   DAY  YOU   BUY  A   DIAMOND
You   are   buying   for  the  future
as   well   at   the   present   .   .   .
•
SEE  US  FOR  YOUR  DIAMOND TODAY
Varsity Jewellers
4517 West 10th 224-4432
once and for all, until next
time, when their second referendum failed. If they had
saved the money they spent
on ads, they wouldn't have
needed the fee raise.
And now the windows that
look out of the office are obscured by clouds of exams,
and so the last year goes into the books, and so do the
students.
Fare thee well.
SUCCESSFUL PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE Shaun Sullivan
mouths victory speech while loser Bob Cruise leers to the
future.
may be a student senator, and
CUSS claimed that they knew
nothing about the CIA. Both
claims were grabbed by
Buildings and Grounds to be
used on the flower beds.
OPEN   HOUSE   came   and
came, came and went, leaving  paint,   toilet   paper,   and
chicken bones over the campus.
An experimental college at
UBC was greeted favorably
by   almost-ex-president   Macdonald, and pot and acid became the new in words, along
with trip out, joint, toke, and
turn on.
Someone thought the cliff
dwelling were a good idea,
and Mac (still here?) said that
students were clean and un-
cbscene. He was known for
being out of touch.
SFU ran into some trouble,
and it started getting thicker
and deeper as Deans quit,
students threatened, and
chaos reigned.
The Board at SFU knuckled
under, and the teaching asses,
stayed. The AMS was shut up
FORMAL
AND
SEMI-FORMAL
rental and sales
Tunede, toils, white dinner
jackets, motninf c e a t s.
Formal end informal business wear — template
site ran««.
McCUISH WR^W_AR
STUDENT RATES
2046 W. 4st - Ph.  263-3610
medium  spicy
and   meat   rich
4423 West lOih
Huberman   Educational
Institute   Ltd.
TUTORIAL COLLEGE
University Subjects
Morris   Huberman,   Educational   Consultant
Knowledge and Success through Learning Power
2158 W.   12th Ave., Vancouver
FOR APPOINTMENT, PHONE
732-5535
263-4808
A & B SOUND
RECORD SALE
l.OOCs OF CAPITAL RECORDS LIST UP TO 5.29
$1.99 Mono
$2.19 Stereo
NAT KING COLE. THE LETTERMEN. PEGGY LEE.
PETE SEEGER, NANCY WILSON, THE KINGSTON
TRIO, LIZA MINNELLI, GEORGE SHEARING. JUNIOR MANCE,  BENNY  GOODMAN.
All the Great Artists — Latest Hits
Broadway Musicals — Rock and Roll
Popular — Folk Music, Etc.
Hurry down — pick out your favorite record and save.
Choose from Pope, Classics, Show-tunes.
Also Special Sale On All Pre-recorded Tapes
A«B SOUND
Open Today Until 9 p.m.
571  GRANVILLE (at Dunsmuir)
MU 2-1919 Page 16
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 31,  1967
TWEEN CLASSES
Southin speaks
IfiSMILTON COMMITTEE
Meeting of the students for
Alvin Hamilton committee, today,   noon,   Bu.   214.  Lawyer
Mary Southin will speak.
SPECIAL LECTURE
Art   curator   Brydon   Smith
discusses Marcel Duchamp and
After, today, noon, Lass. 104.
SAILING CLUB
Meeting of all members interested    in    summer   sailing,
today, noon, club hut.
PYSCH CLUB
Election meeting today, noon,
Ang. 207.
ARCHAEOLOGY CLUB
Dr. Morrison discusses archaeology in India, today, noon,
Bu. 202.
CURLING CLUB
Election meeting today, noon,
Bu. 100.
MATH CLUB
Election     general     meeting
Tuesday, noon, Ma. 204.
CURLING CLUB
Election meeting today, noon,
Bu. 100. All curlers interested
in joining a big ten league next
year, must attend.
CUSO
Anyone interested in helping
the CUSO committee 1967-68,
apply in person or writing to
Brock ext. 165 or AMS box 18.
VCF
Christian   psychiatrist   Phil
Ney speaks today, noon, Ang.
110.
BOOSTER CLUB
Girls interested  in  registering   for   cheerleading  summer
try-outs, meet in Brock ext. any
noon.
COMPUTER CLUB
Banquet   Saturday,   6:30,
Golden   Horseshoe.   Tickets
available from the executive
WUS
General meeting of World
Union   of Students  to  discuss
academic exchanges with Russia and Eastern Europe, Mon-
day,    noon,    Brock    council
chambers.
DESERET CLUB
Final meeting Monday noon,
Mildred Brock.
KOERNER LECTURER
Berkeley  professor  Bernard
Blume discusses Goethe's Faust
— End  of   a   Myth, Tuesday,
noon, Bu. 100.
FILM SOCIETY
Four showings of Great Expectations,    Thursday,     12:30,
3:30, 6 p.m. and 8:30, auditorium. Admission 50 cents.
CHORAL SOCIETY
Please return music to Brock
ext.   360  anytime  next  week.
Concert April 8, Queenie.
WUSC
Applications for WUSC exchange scholarships to Yugoslavia and the United Arab Republic due April 8. Forms and
information available in the
WUSC office. Brock ext. 257.
Pango Pango Bureau
By MURRAY GORDON
Maximilian News Services
The great sun-king of the dia-
letic black and white blorgs
resigned his post today, protesting his supply of papyrus being
cut.
The hassle arose when the
minister of national revenue
transferred 3,000 kokopecs
(the kokopec is the national
currency, with one kokopec
equalling 4.982 farthings)
from the king's chequing account   to   the   public   account.
Since the resignation, the
Great One has been unavailable for comment, however
royal servants have heard him
pacing the corridors of the imperial residence, continually
repeating, 'we are not amused.'
SPECIAL EVENTS: DIRECTIONS  '67
THE VANCOUVER ART GALLERY
APRIL 5-Michel Hyden, ' John Mills - Cockell, Blake
Parker. Concert on sculpture, poetry and electronic music
APRIL  19—Audrey  Capel  Doray  and  Associates.
Polarized light boxes—music, poetry and dance
8 p.m.     Admission 50c     Students 25c     Members Free
IRON CURTAIN?
Pretty flimsy nowadays. However, travel
to the U.S.S.R. and E. Europe is a little
different and we have more experience
than most. Come and see us at least
two months before travelling. New low
21-day fares apply to these destinations.
9-5 p.m., incl. Saturday      U   #V ^Z C N      Q
Hagen's Travel Service Lid.
736-5651
2996 W. Broadway
DEPARTMENT OF FINE ARTS
SPECIAL LECTURE
BRYDON SMITH, Curator of Modern Art at the Art Gallery
of Ontario, and organizer of such important recent
exhibitions as MONDRIAN, 1965, and DINE-OLDENBURG-
SEGAL, 1967, will give a lecture at 12:30 p.m. on Friday,
31 March, in Lasserre 104. His subject will be:
MARCEL DUCHAMP AND AFTER
SUZUKI
MOTORCYCLE
CENTRE
SERVICE   -   PARTS
3627 W. Broadway
ACCESSORIES
731-7510
COUNSELLORS WANTED
to counsel mentally retarded and physically handicapped
from June to August or parts thereof at Camp Easter
Seal, Watrus, Sask.
Apply:  Kerry 261-5944
CLASSIFIED
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
FOUND —ONE   WOMAN'S   NECK-
lace.   Phone   738-6664.
WILL THE GIRL WHO TOOK MY
green scarf from Brock washroom at one o'clock Monday before last please return it to the
publications  office  upstairs.
125.00 REWARD—TWO TURPERS
(Jacks to move a swing stage up
and down a wire rope) have been
taken over the Easter weekend
from the West half of block A at
the new Dentistry Bldg. Any information leading to recovery of
the jacks will be remunerated.
The stage was moved from the
second floor to ground level, before the jacks could be removed.
 Call   681-59X8.	
LOST"FRENCH 223 TEXT PLEASE
return—Susan Ksinan Fort Camp
No. 206 Izzy Mac. Ph. 224-9047.
Reward.	
LOS'ED MY WALLET. FANTASTIC
reward.   Lyle   Olsen   683-0704.
LOST PR. HEAVY DARK RIMMED glasses in old Arts Build-
ing. Reward. Phone AM 1-2926.
WANTED: CLUES TO THE
whereabouts of a camera lost
Mar. 29 in library stacks, 3rd
level. PLEASE!, at least the film,
to main  loan desk.
FOUND LADY'S WRIST WATCH
on main mall. Call G. Yan E. E.
Bldg. or Hut 8, Fort Camp CA: 4-
9055.
FOUND OMEGA WATCH CALL
Dove. FA 1-0322 between 11:30
P.M.  and  midnight. 	
Greetings
  12
WELCOME MOTHERS TO GREAT
Expectations Thurs. April 6 Aud.
50c  12:30,   3:30.  6:00,   8:30.
Special Notices 13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Motor bikes insured $18 and up.
Phone   Ted   Elliott   224-6707.
TONIGHT AT OIL CAN HARRY'S,
only one dollar. See our ad for one
dollar pass. Oil Can Harry's is
now under a new policy and admission is restricted to those over
_2L :	
Transportation 14
WANTED: CAR RIDERS TO MONTREAL, share costs. Phone 733-
4615.  Leaving May 14 or IE.	
Travel Opportunities 16
EXPO CHARTER MAY 6-14; FOR
information  ph.   224-6734.	
HAVE CAR WILL EXPO—MAY 14
share   cost—driving   733-7982   eves.
TWO U.B.C. STUDENTS LIKE
ride to Montreal May 5-15. Will
share driving and expenses. Phone
Leo TR -6-8721.
MONTERAL OR BUST MAYBE
both. Touring U.S. to Florida
Toronto and Expo. Travelling
time 20 days. Lvg. May 1. 1 student couple preferred. Returning
in August. Call 685-4037 after
6:00 p.m. Weekly Saturday before
6:00   p.m.   Sunday  after  5:00  p.m.
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale 21
1953 JAGUAR XK120 ROADSTER—
excellent condition, $800, or best
offer.  228-3050 days, 926.3050 eves.
'65 AUSTIN - HEALEY, OVER-
drive, low mileage, never raced,
perfect condition, new tires
($170), Walnut dash, am-fm radio,
224-6857   (6-7   p.m.).
RELIABLE RATTLER FOR SALE.
1964 Morris conv. 28 m.p.g. Bills
shown.    Ring   David   Blackbourn,
228-3278.
'59 FORD GALAXIE, PS PB V-8,
good condition, must sell. Contact Mike Martison. Phone 224-
9822.
1956 DODGE, HARDTOP V-8,
automatic, radio, heater, good
condition, $350 or offer, AM 6-8736.
1961 AUSTIN 850 STATION WA-
gon. Good condition $450, AM 6-
4290.
MUST    SELL    1957    MORRIS    OX-
ford   $225.   Phone  Rick  684-6830.
EXCEPTIONAL
1964 Fiat Europa 4-door 1221 cc.
55 h.p. Reclining buckets, belts,
rack, etc. Carefully owner-maintained. Showroom condition. 27,000
miles. Buying camper. $795 or nearest.   Lome   AM   3-3557.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Miscellaneous
34
GETTING ENGAGED: SAVE AT
least 50 percent on finest quality
diamond rings. Satisfaction guar-
anteed. Call 261-6671 any time.
WILL BABYSIT DAYS IN MY
home West End. Child over two.
Ring  MU  4-1091.
Scandals
3 9-A
PREVIOUS EXAMS REVISED
for relevance. Exams for sale,
20c. Bookstore, College Shop.
Canteens Ed. Smokeshop 1st yr.
Maths, Physics, His., Eng. 200,
EC.  200.
Scandals
39A
AMS CHARTER FLIGHT LEAV-
ing May 11th now full. Seats are
available on June 1st fit. (to Expo
and then to Europe) but there are
only 20 seats left.
This certain young lady I laud
Ran away with her skis and her bod
I  manage  to  study
Nightly dated my buddy
And hoped it would rain up on Tod
SURF'S UP ! High tide in the
Library. See tongue hang, ten,
shooting the Ridington pier. Fri.,
3:30. Hodad bombs 30 if he wipes
out. Laura Slobovia 'smile
sweetly'. Would he in his woody?
What a spectacles. Love is not
blind; a little- nearsighted maybe.
Wort kind of fool am I? Signed
Red Snapper, Silly Sally, Sir
Lancelot,   Jean-Paul.
WHAT ARE THE CIA AND
RCMP doing to people from Communist countries at our university? Find out from Dan Dorotich
at Brock council chambers, Mon.,
12:30.
I'M NOT PREJUDICED I'LL FIX
any year Volkswagen, Auto-Hen-
neken — 263-8121. Oak St. at
S.W.  Marine  Drive.
DEAN FOGAL SPEAKS ON THE
role of the Folk Song Society in
the World Today, Brock noon,
April   1st.
ADVANCE MATTRESS BENEFIT
Concert 8:30 this Friday at the
Scottish Hall, 12th and Fir. Folk-
rock, Jazz and folksinging. Get
your tickets at the door or from
THE MATTRESS. Proceeds for
renovations demanded by firewarden.
ROSES   ARE  GREEN
TULIPS   ARE   NICE
COLTART   SWIMS  APRIL  5TH
SUSAN, IF IT'S STILL MISSING
this time next month contact me
on  the  H.M.S.  Bonaventure—J.  J.
PREGNANT WOMEN-SEE GREAT
Expectations Thurs., April 6,
Aud.   50c.    12:30 - 3:30 - 6:00 - 8:30.
Sewing — Alterations
40
CLOTHES ALTERED & REPAIR-
ed-reasonable charge. Phone 224-
7141 any afternoon or later—Sunday  included.
Tailoring
41
Typing
43
TYPING — MANUSCRIPTS, ETC.
Rates on request, Mrs. E. McCartney,  Box 939,  Squamish,  B.C.
892-3798.
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING OF
essays and theses on IBM Electric typewriter. Reasonable
terms. Call Mrs. Muggerldge, 263-
4023.
ESSAYS,   THESES   EXPERTLY
typed.   Phone  733-7819.
EXP.   ESSAY   TYPIST
can  pick  up on  campus
434-9558
GOOD, EXPERIENCED TYPIST
available for home typing. Please
call   277-5640.
STUDENTS — TYPING DONE IN
my home. Essays, thesis, etc. Low
rates.   Phone   733-0734   anytime.
ACCURATE TYPING 25c SINGLE
sheet legible handwriting. Phone
738-6829  after  10:00  a.m.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
61
CLERK - TYPIST WITH SOME
bookkeeping experience required by
AMS publications office. This is
an 8 months per year job, starting
next September, so it is especially
suitable for the wife of a senior
student or staff employee. Applicant should be in the 21.35 age
group, without children, and preferably be available for at least
two terms. If interested, please
call manager of student publications,   224-3242.
3 ATTRACTIVE CO-EDS, PRE-
ferably with some sales experience for special Centennial promotion. Generous commission. Ph.
985-7337.
THE COLLEGE SHOP OF THE
Alma Mater Society requires part
time assistance Winter Session
1967/68. Hours 8:30 to 12:30 Monday through Friday. Interviews
now underway 12:30 to 1:30 Monday through Friday at the College  Shop.
Work Wanted
52
INSTRUCTION — SCHOOLS
Auditions 61
NEW TALENTS FROM GREAT
Expectations, Thurs., April 6.
Aud.    50c,   12:30-3:30-6:00-8:30.
Music
63
MONSTER HOOT - NANNY SUN-
day nite. 8 p.m. Advance Mattress Coffee House. Bring your
Guitar.
Instruction-Tutoring
64
March   Registration
TUTORIAL   COLLEGE
Experienced    tutoring   in
University
Secondary
Elementary  courses
Educational   Consultation
in Industry
THE  HUBERMAN   EDUCATIONAL
INSTITUTE
B.C.  Owned  & Licensed
263-4808       2158   W.   12th       732-5535
TUTORING IN UNIVERSITY
maths — first two years by excellent experienced tutor. No contracts.   Reasonable   736-6923.
STUDENT WILL TUTOR IN
"French. Either conversational or
written. Please leave message at
946-2750 after 8 p.m.
Special Classes
65
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
Tl
FOR SALE: WOMEN'S BLACK
vinyl trench coat. Length 40".
Paris label. Never worn. $25. Ted
White  682-9849.
4x5   LINHOF   AND   ACC.   PHONE
224-3517 evens.
16mm    SOUND    PROJECTOR.     AS
new   $175.00.   Phone   738-9641.
BIRD CALLS — THERE ARE
still a few copies of Bird Calls
available at the Publications
Office in Brock Hall. The price
is only 75c! Get yours while the
supply lasts!
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms tl
FURNISHED    SUITE    FOR    TWO
girls, $90 monthly. 879.4987 after 6.
COMFORTABLE ROOM WITH AD-
joining rumpus sitting room within five minutes walking distance
campus, $50 monthly. Enquire
CA 4-5952.
ROOM WANTED FOR SUMMER:
Kitchen privileges near U.B.C.
Phone Jane room 424: 224-9728
after  6  p. mi
MEN ONLY. SINGLE ROOM—
near gate. Private entrance—accommodation. Start from May.
224-7623   after   5   p.m.
Furn. Houses and Apts. 83
SCHOOL      PRINCIPAL      DOING
graduate work v^ishes furnished
2 or 3 bedroom duplex or house
from July 1 - August 20. Write
No. 107 - 3000 15th Avenue,
Prince   George,   B.C.
MODERN FURNISHED 1-BEDR'M
apt. available May 1 - Aug. 31.
Married students only. Kitsilano.
Phone   731-5627  after  6  p.m.
WANTED — GIRL TO SHARE
furnished apartment for July and
August.  Phone  733-2504.
APARTMENT WANTED FOR MAY
1 by 2 male graduate students.
Phone   Rene,   224-4593,   5-7   p.m.
AVAILABLE FOR SUMMER,
furnished suite for Rent—South
Granville. Phone 731-6935. Over
weekend.
FREE SUITE MAY-JUNE MAT-
be longer to mature student(s)
for 1 hr. Janitor work daily.
224-3052.
FAMILY DESIRE TO SUBLET 2
bed accom. on campus may thro
Aug.   Phone   876-3926   or   228-2428.
NEED FURN. APT. OR HOUSE.
July - August. Married grad.
733-7982  eves.
CHEAP SUMMER ACCOMMODO-
tlon. Furnished flat at 542 East
5th. From May 1 to Sept. 15th.
Call  874-9823 evenings.
Houses  8c  Apts.—Other Cities
COLUMBIA PROFESSOR, COMING
to teach summer school, would
like to exchange house with somebody in Vancouver, planning to
spend the summer in New York.
The house, located in a beautiful
residential area, 15 minutes from
downtown Manhattan, has 3 bdrs.,
d.r., attic, den and kitchen. For
further details call Rene — AM
3-8428  eves.
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