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The Ubyssey Sep 15, 1992

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 ' Ubyssey Special Edition
(.-
, -jx7tr >) =?
INSIDE:
Bicycle Thief confesses (p.3)
Karen Young reviews The
Good Woman of Bangkok.
Karlyn Koh features Queue.
■^-^^^ ILEGIT1MUS NON CARBORUNDUM
POW
Vrjl. 1, No.1
Vancouver, British Columbia, September 15,1992
QUOTE OF THE DAY
"...everyone stands in
line and hits you with a
metal spoon as you walk
by...."
— Arthur We, Page 5
HUMAN RIGHTS
Widowed mother faces deportation
BY LILLIAN AU	
A UBC researcher is
desperately trying to fight
the deportation of his 55-
year-old mother to China.
"If my mom was deported, I
would consider it a severe
punishment, a torture," said
Dr.DongQuing Wei, holding her
deporting notice.
"She lived like an animal...we
were the poorest family in the
village," he said. "Even though it
w;is very hard for her, she didn't
want me to come and work in the
fields. She didn't say 'help me
survive.' No. She said you should
go to school and get well educated,
which I did."
His mother supported her eight
children after Wei's father died
when he was ten-years-old.
"She doesn't want the children
to suffer. I don't want her to
suffer," he said.
Wei fears for his mother's life
in China because of his presidency
with UBC's Chinese Students and
Scholars Assoc, which took an
active anti-government stance after
the Tiananmen Square massacre.
But Wei said his mother was
rejected by Immigration Canada
because of insufficient
compassionate and humanitarian
grounds to grant her refugee status.
And a recently proposed
immigration law, Bill C-86, he said,
would eliminate any hope of an
appeal.
The bill calls for immigration
quotas on family members who will
be processed first come, first
served. And it eliminates appeals
on refugee status decisions.
"She doesn't have priority,"
Wei said. "Canada claims to be
multicultural, but it doesn't seem
to respect other cultures," he
said.
The bill prioritizes
dependents, but only spouses and
children can te considered as
dependents.
"In the C.iinese culture, the
mother and father are a very
important par: of our life, we
have to support them, this is our
culture," Wei said. "She is the
woman who sacrificed her life
for me...I feel very guilty."
Bill C-86 is the first
proposed update since 1976 on
an immigration system that has
received 250,000 immigrants last
year, triple the figure in 1984.
The cost-cutting bill divides
immigration applicants into three
major categories. Immediate
family such as children and
spouses are prioritized. But only
parents who apply before a set
quota is reached can stay in
Canada.
Victor Yukman Wong,
director of the Vancouver Assoc.
of Chinese-Canadians, said the
bill not only will cut costs but
also genuine refugees and
immigrants.
It is a "cop out," Wong said.
A preliminary refugee
hearing, which determines the
credibility of a refugee, would be
eliminated so that decisions can
be made in six months rather
than the usual one to two years.
A right to appeal is removed
unless an illegal measure is
identified, he said.
"The right to appeal is a very
basic tenet in our society," Wong
said. "Our government doesn't
seem to extend that right to
refugees which is really unfair."
Wong believes that if a wrong
decision is made, there will be
virtually no way of reversing it
Wong said the proposed new
law may give immigration officers
too much discretionary power.
"The power allocated to
immigration officers is excessive
and dangerous...they're going to
screen out the real refugees with
this bill."
But Lois Reimer of
Immigration Canada said the
initial hearing has a 95 per cent
acceptance rate.
"Everyone was going
through," she said.
The immigration system, she
said, has been plagued by
backlogs and blatant abuse by
illegal claimants.
Said Rob Johnston of Lower
Mainland Fraser Valley Canada
Immigration: "I don't believe
immigration officers will have
unreasonable powers under the
new proposal.
"They will have powers
similar to those held by custom
officers. With the new system,
officers will be given the power of
search which will...stop claimants
from coming in twice, stop
welfare fraud, and help identify
criminals."
-~?i.t$f'
Av ■ v
f*  . *   y
Victor Yukman Wong says genuine refugees will be turned
down under BMI-C86 and that refugees cannot appeal a
decision. photo by don mah
Independence vs
the Asian family
SFU's Chad Griffiths clashes with UBC's George Gomes. See Sports p. 13. PHOTO by pon mah
BY KAREN YOUNG
MANY Chinese adults in
Vancouver are living
with their parents in
obedience to an age-old tradition.
Accountant Jenny Jung, 33,
said she is tired of being
supervised at home.
"It's constraining when you
want to do other stuff and they
want you to do it their own way,"
said Jung who helps her father's
business.
Jung has to be home on time
for dinner.
Now financially secure:, she
is planning to leave home despite
her parents' disapproval. They
want her to stay at home until she
gets married.
Jung's two younger sisters
and brother—all adults—also live
at home. Her older sister who
doesn't live at home is married.
Continued on page 11
YiDan Xie: A lucky person
BY HAO LI
Among 700 mainland Chinese students
chomping mooncakes, YiDan Xie was the
luckiest person.
She won a round trip ticket from
Vancouver to Beijing in Friday's lucky
Chinese Moon Festival draw at UBC—only
two days after she left China.
She has a year to use her ticket. But like
her colleagues in UBC's Chinese Students
and Scholars Association, the physics pupil
feels lucky to be in Canada.
After the Tiananmen Square massacre,
China's government clamped down on
student abroad policies. Only 200 students
have since managed to reach UBC, a sharp
decline from previous years.
"The biggest problem for Chinese
students is how to deal with the cultural
challenge," said CSSA president ZhiYi
Zhang, the festival organizer. "Most of the
students are in their late twenties, even
thirties."
"They grew up in a very typical
eastern culture. They encountered
western culture shock as soon as they
got here. Many of them have not been
able to solve this problem."
The 500-member CSSA helps
isolated students socially with
magazines, newspapers, videotapes and
films from China, and gatherings such
as the Moon Festival.
"Often they find themselves in an
embarassing situation, not making
friends with the local young people,"
Zhang said. "Because of their language
problem, they feel depressed,
especially when treated
unfairly."
The Chinese consul in
Vancouver appointed the first
CSSA executives in 1984 when
the first group of mainland
Chinese students arrived in
UBC.
But UBC research engineer
Dr. PingNan Shi said the
Chinese consulate created
campus arm to control the
students.
Continued on page 11 Tuesday, September 15,1992
POW
Vol. X No.1
kMM4M4MUMUM
CLASSIFIED • 822-3978
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES: AMS cardholders - 3 lines, $3.00, additional lines, 60cents, commercial - 3 lines, $5.00, additional lines,
75 cents. (10% discount on 25 issues or more). Classified ads payable in advance. Deadline 4pm, 2 days before
publication. Room 266, SUB, UBC, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A7,822-3977.
11 - FOR SALE (Private)
84 HONDA SCOOTER, 150 cc,
13,000 km. $900. 272-1781.
FOR SALE TWO MATCHING
cream colour love seats. $120 for
both. 266-3253 after 6 pm.
20 - HOUSING
ONE ROOM with shared cooking
& 1 bath. Full furnished, direct
buss to UBC, $250/mth incl util.
Call after 6 pm, 875-8929. Male,
N/S.
30-JOBS
WE NEED CLASS instructors/
assistants for MAC, PC & UNIX
classes. Call the program
coordinator-CCEat: 822-4966.
SOCIAL SCIENCE editorial
assistant needed. Must be eligible
for work study pgm. Call Dan
Perlman, 822-6138.
TUTORS req'd for all subject
areas, esp ESL. Teaching/tutoring
exp. an asset. Pis. call 737-8838
after 10 am.
GREEKS & CLUBS RAISE A
COOL $ 1,000.00 EST JUST ONE
WEEK! PLUS $1000 for the
member who calls! And a FEE
HEADPHONE RADIO just for
calling 1-800-932-0528, Ext 65.
40-MESSAGES
St. Anselm's Anglican
Student Group
- Introductory Meeting, Sun. Sept
20,7 pm
- Refreshments provided
- We look forward to seeing you!
Location: SL Anselm's Church
Hall
Chancellor Blvd. Across from
UBC Golf Club
Phone: Brian 224-3642 or St.
Anselm's 224-1410
50-RENTALS
BIKE RENTALS.
Rent with option to purchase 1992
Kuwahara 21 spd mtn bike. Only
$149 for Sept/92 to Apr/93. 669-
2453.
85 - TYPING
PROFESSIONAL typist, 30 years
exp., wd processAyping, APA/
MLA, thesis. Student rates.
Dorothy, 228-8346.
- ON CAMPUS -
Confused about APA? Unsure of
thesis requirements?
Does your resume need help?
DON'T PANIC!
AMS WORD PROCESS-ZING
will do it for you!
Room 60, SUB (Across from
Torts)
Still on summer hours: M-F,
10am - 5pm
Drop in or call 822-5640
WORDPROCESSING
Fast-friendly-frugal
Call Mark, 731-1344
99-BED AND
BREAKFAST
Parents in town, new faculty,
visiting conference personnel?
Try UBC Gates Bed & Breakfast,
private suite. 228-9079.
SPEAKEASY STUDENT SUPPORT PEER COUNSELLING AND INFORMATION CENTRE would like
to invite all new and returning students to visit us in CUB 100A and 100B M-F 11:30am - 1:30pm. We exist
to offer you: peer support network for UBC students, counselling by phone (822-3700) or on drop-in basis,
information on every subject imaginable (info line 822-3777), referral service, tutor registry. We are looking
for people to volunteer for the 1992-93 school year. Applications are available at the office door, 100A.
UBC CALENDAR
Tues. Sept. 15th
Hillel/JSA: hot lunch, Hillel
House, noon. Discussion w/ Col.
Gissin on territorial compromise,
2:30.
Wed. Sept 16th
Hillel/JSA: Torah study, Hillel
House, noon.
Gays & Lesbians of UBC: 1st
general mtg. Everyone welcome,
SUB215,noon.
Fri. Sept 18th
University Christian Ministry:
"On the Boulevard: Coffee
House" featuring Donnie Hackett
& band, Lutheran Campus Ctre,
8pm.
LSAT GMAT
GRE
Preparation Seminars
Next seminars:
LSAT:   Sep 19-20
GRE:    Sep 25-27
GMAT:  Oct 2-4
Call: 222-8272
Spectrum Seminars™
DISCOVER THE
COMPETITION
low low prices
free services
laser printing
UNIVERSITY VILLAGE
2nd FLOOR
2174 WESTERN PARKWAY
VANCOUVER, B.C.
224-6225
Fax: 224-4492
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
M-TH8-9 FRI 8-6
SAT/SUN 11-6
International Relations Students    f
Assoc/Political Science Students
Assoc.: beer garden w/ band,
BUCH lounge A200,4pm.
Global Development Ctre:
organizational mtg, SUB218,
noon.
Mon. Sept. 21st
UBC Trotskyist League Club:
public forum "Labor Must Smash
Racist Immigration Law,"
SUB212, noon.
Global Development Ctre:
organizational mtg, SUB218,
noon.
UBC Junior Mens Volleyball:
tryouts for men born 1973 or later,
Osborne Gym B, 4:30pm.
OF UNCLAIMED
LOST & FOUND ARTICLES
Thursday September 17
4:30pm-6:00pm
BROCK HALL Room 106 (1874 East Mall)
Student OPINIONS
Dave Lee
grad student
"There appears
to be a
deficiency on
the amount of
public education
amongst the
student
population on
suicide. There
should by an
increase in the
level of
awareness and
suicide rather
than shunning
and fear."
-BY STAN PAUL
Marnie McComb
Physed 1
"There should
be more
scholarships for
sports...it would
help the
program by
bringing in a
higher level of
players. I don't
want to depend
on my parents
and student
loans to pay off
my education. I
play field
hockey so I
cannot work."
Jim Nielson
English Lecture
I "can't stand
American
television culture
and capitalism in
general—its
willingness to
package
anything and
making it into
entertainment,
taking little
people's pathos,
a victim of
AIDS, and
packaging them
into a news
item."
PAID P ARTTaPANTS REQUIRED:
GENTTAL HERPES TREATMENT
STUDIES
Volunteers whohavegenitalherpes are requiiedfor testing
of a new agent Females must be using birth control
Volunteers will receive either a new study drug or a look-
alikeplacebo,amtainingnoactivedmg.Noother antiviral
medication may be used during the study period.
If you are interested in findin -* out more please
call 822-7565 for details.
An
Thu
Fr
Satu
Pla^
sday • Sept
lay • Sept.J
Liday • Sei
12N00N-5.00PM
. 17
18
. 19
UBC
Botanical
Gardens
6804 S\V
Marine
Drive Vbl. 1, No.1
POW
Tuesday, September 15,1992
NEWS
SUBWAY busboy vented out pain in art
BY EFFIE POW
H
E left China like many
academics after the
Tiananmen Square
massacre and quietly worked two
years as a busboy in UBC's
Subway cafeteria.
"It is very painful to be
between two cultures," said Gu
Xiong, 38. "I think my art comes
from this pain."
Gu had been a talented
printmaker in Sichuan, China.
Soon after arriving in
Vancouver, he worked 17 hours a
day at three jobs: washing cars,
doing laundry and making pizza at
the Flying Wedge.
He quit those jobs when he got
the busboy job.
His struggle in Vancouver, he
said, reminded him of the Cultural
Revolution in China when
academics were forced into hard
labour. Gu, then 17, was sent with
many students to rural areas,
where he worked four years.
Despite the busboy job, hi* art
still earned respect from the Diar-.?
Farris Gallery which offered him a
solo show last September: Gus
World One piece was entitled
Common Objects Made Alike,
Come to Life When They Are
Killed.
Others showed trashed food
trays and Coke cans, inspired by
his life as a busboy.
"I like the word "classic' on the
Coke cans because for the
Chinese, classic is good," he said.
"The students at the cafeteria
Printmaker Gu Xiong, 38, worked two years as a Subway
busboy. photo by cheryl niamath
Work by Gu Xiong depicts his busboy experience at UBC's
Subway cafeteria.   "Cafeteria" 1991.
City bicycle thief confesses
To the owner ofthe Norco Triathalon that was taken on Sept, 9 at
Safeway.
I don't have your address so I'm putting up posters to tell you I am
sorry for the inconveinence [sic] and I'm not a theif[sic]. whether you
beleive that or not doesn't mean it is not the truth. So once again I am
sorry.
P.S. I already had some "Found" posters made up by the time the
police came to my house. Signed: RLX. #876-3927
BY LILLIAN AU
AN HOUR AFTER Richard
Lawrence Kowalko took someone
else's bike, police arrived at his
doorstep.
A friend of his four-year-old
daughter informed police
Wednesday that the single father
had stolen a bike. But unlike the
Italian film classic Bicycle Thief,
his child did not know about his
theft.
"I let temptation and greed
get the best of me," said Kowalko.
The unlocked Norco
Triathalon was parked in front of
the Safeway on E. Broadway.
Kowalko spotted the ten-speed
while locking up his own bike.
"I went inside to get some
stuff and when I came out the bike
was still there unlocked," he said.
"When I went home I realized I
forgot to get some sugar. I went
back to Safeway and that was
when I decided to take the bike."
"I (thought I) should take it
because someone else will," he
said.
LAW
It's free and it's legal
BY TERRIE CHAN
THEY operate from a
trailer outside UBC's law
building. Inside students
receive criminal or civil cases of
those who can't afford a lawyer.
"It's like a small law firm,"
said law student Michael Libby of
UBC's 17-year-old Legal Clinic.
Forty per cent of the cases
involve criminal law. Others
involve family law, small claims
court actions, and wills of under
$20,000.
Second-year law students—
trained for negotiations, ethics and
trials—go to court for the clinic
which is part of a 15-credit
experience course.
"We help those who face
fines or probation, or a possible
criminal record," said Joyce
Thayer, a former caseworker.
The law students defend
cases only in Vancouver,
Richmond and the North Shore.
But sometimes Burnaby
residential tenancy disputes are
handled.
Those who can afford a
lawyer are rejected.
Each student may handle 25
cases under the supervision of
three practising lawyers teaching
at UBC.
"We get hands-on experience
to put the theoretical to practise,"
Thayer said.
The clinic accepts some
clients who would not normally
qualify for Vancouver's Legal Aid
which defends those who might
go to jail but can't afford a lawyer.
Administrator Nancy Wiggs
said UBC's Legal Clinic closed
between 600 to 700 cases last
year. However, the number of
cases rejected reached the
thousands, she said.
"We make a balance between
the course and cases," Wiggs said.
UBC Legal Clinic 822-5911.
Law Students Legal Advice
Program (volunteers) 822-5791.
Legal Aid (Vancouver) 687-1831,
LawLine 660-4673.
Spurred by a deep sense of
guilt, Kowalko said when he
arrived home he immediately
started making up "Found" notices
for the bike.
He didn't demand a reward
for the bike, he said.
Meanwhile the stolen bike's
owner called the police.
Police cruising in his
neighbourhood tracked down
Kowalko when his daughter's
friends informed police of the hot
possession.
"My daughter's friends
showed the police where I lived,"
Kowalko said.
Kowalko showed the "Found"
posters to the police after
admitting he stole the bike.
"After they arrested me for
theft, they told me that I shouldn't
lose any sleep over it. They said at
most 111 have to write an apology
note to the owner."
But Kowalko said he has had
bouts of insomnia over the stolen
bike, so he put up nine notices of
apology around the Safeway on
Saturday.
"I am not going to pick up
stuff I find anymore," Kowalko
said. "I let the devil come into my
life. I hope I don't get a record."
Kowalko, who is employed as a
press operator for a printing
company, said money is tight for
him. So far, he has not heard from
the owner of the bike.
Crown council will decide in
three months if any charges will be
laid.
Said Kowalko: "I kind of
think I won't get charged."
crush the cans after they drink,"
said Gu who studied in 1986 at
Banff School of Fine Arts. "It was
like me—crushed and thrown
away. But my life was not just
crushed, I stood up after the
process and built a new life.
Gu was hired last month by
UBC's fine arts department to be
a printmaking technician. His next
show at Diane Farris Gallery
appears late October.
"I came to Canada for freedom,
but no one gives you
freedom...those who have
freedom don't understand what
they have."
Gu said language difficulties
took away much of his
expression.
"It was very hard and I was
upset and isolated. I could
understand and feel something,
but couldn't explain."
Gu organized the China Avante
Gaide Show which closed three
hours after its February opening in
1989: an artist fired a gun at her
work as part of her performance
art show. The 500-piece
contemporary exhibit was the first
of its kind in China. Police closed
a second opening after a bomb
threat.
Most art schools in China
nourish traditional art, but frown
upon contemporary an, Gu said.
"They don't like discussions of
contemporary things," he said. "In
art school if students can copy the
teacher they are good."
Gu protested everyday with his
students and turned down a
second Banff School of Fine Arts
invitation because he was excited
about thechanges taking place in
China. He would later do artwork
about the demonstrations and be a
part of group show at UBC's
Asian Centre.
"The demonstrators in
Tiananmen Square were in there
for me and other Chinese, but
when the army killed them they
killed the hope for China. I
thought I must leave China
because there is no hope for me."
He accepted another invitation
attend Banff ails centre and left
for Canada.
"In the airplane, when I saw
the Yangtze River meet the ocean,
I cried because I didn't know
when I would return."
Gu's dream is still to be a
teacher. He recently taught
Chinese woodcutting at Emily
Carr College of Art and Design; it
was his first teaching job in
Vancouver.
"At first I felt there was a
barricade between two cultures—
me and the students. I was
nervous but when the class started
I felt closer, closer, closer to the
students."
Gu previously taught at
Sichuan Fine Arts School where
he reformed courses had not
changed in 35 years, after his
return from Banff in 1987. At the
end of the term, the students of his
first-year drawing class created an
installation that towered to the
classroom ceiling. They used
chairs and drew on the ceiling and
floor. "The school was shocked,"
he said.
His class had a domino effect
on the entire school. Tuesday, September 15,1992
POW
Vol. X No.1
Mac to School
"Ignite Your Future" at UBC!
Mac Classic & StyleWriter Printer
$1399
This bundle is designed for those individuals with
smaller budgets who demand powerful technology
that's easy to use at an affordable price. The
Macintosh™ Classic™ can easily handle word
processing, spreadsheets analysis, and a variety of
other home, office and classroom applications.
The Classic comes complete with a built-in monitor,
keyboard, mouse, system software, 4 MB of RAM and
a 40 MB internal hard disk. For a limited time, the
Mac™ Classic comes bundled with an Apple®
StyleWriter® ink-jet printer all at a super low
back-to-school price. The StyleWriter is a small,
quiet and convenient printer that features 360 dpi
resolution and Apple's TrueType™ font technology.
Mac LCII & StyleWriter Printer
$2399
This bundle is designed for those discriminating users
who require solid performance and full colour technology.
The powerful Macintosh LCII comes complete with a
12'' RGB monitor, keyboard, mouse, 4 MB of RAM,
a 40 MB internal hard disk and System 7™ and
HyperCard® software. For this back-to-school period,
the Mac LCII is partnered with the StyleWriter ink-jet
printer at an affordable student price.
Coupled together, this dynamic duo will undoubtedly
help you conquer assignments, term papers, exams,
and letters home!
If these two bundles donH grab your attention, choose from 1) other Apple
bundles to help you get a head start on your academic career.
Hurry in today for a hands-on demonstration. Offer available until September
26th to all UBC students, faculty and staff.
UBC
Computer  Shop
Call: 822-4748* Fax 822-8211
E-Mail: computer ©tiookslore.ubc.ca
Hours
We are open to serve you:
Mon, Tues. Thur. Fri 8:30-5:00 pm
Wed 8:30 am - 8:30 pm * Sat 9:30 am - 5:00 pm
: BOOKSTORE
6200 University Boulevard
Call: 822-2665 (UBC-BOOK)
Authorized Dealer
Promotional product packages arc subject to availability. Apple, the Apple logo, StyleWriter, User Writer, "The Power to Be Your Best", are registered trademarks, and, Macintosh, Mac, TrueType, System ',
PowerBook ate trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc. Classic is a trademark, licensed to Apple Computer, Inc. HyperCard is a registered trademark of Claris Corporation. Vol. X No.1
POW
Tuesday, September 15,1992
NEWS!
Delta computer animator
faces off against Brett Hull
Loony animator Arthur We, 24, "toons" his skills
"A typical day begins by
going into the office where
everyone stands in line and hits
you with a metal spoon as you
walk by. That is how you know
you are ready for the day."
BY BIANCA ZEE
WELCOME to the
world of Arthur We,
24, where he wields
his pen as a cartoon animator. His
offbeat personality and creativity
seem to be prime ingredients for a
successful animator.
"Look up the word
dysfunctional in the dictionary and
it will give you an idea of what
my co-workers are like," said We.
Bom in Brunei, a Malay state
on Borneo, We has chosen a
vocation untraditional for many
Chinese.
Growing up in Delta, We
knew as far back as his childhood
that the cartoon industry was his
calling.
"I was a comic-book nerd,"
said We, who is in SL Louis
meeting Brett Hull. "I stayed
home watching the Looney Tunes
and Bugs Bunny shows. Chuck
Jones the creator was definitely
my mentor."
In 1988, We took a two-year
Kwantlen College fine arts course.
"It's your portfolio that
employers notice and gets your
foot in the door," said We, adding
there are very few women in the
field.
At Gordon Stanfield
Animation, We helped bring Bart
Simpson to life in the popular
sitcom The Simpsons.
The Simpsons clan all look
quite simple to children but to the
trained animator eye, "each
character has to be right on model
and scale and (producers) are very
picky," said We.
We also worked on
Beetlejuice, an afterschool cartoon
based on the Hollywood movie.
Each day We is immersed in a
fantasy world where cartoon
characters act and react as
humans. With just a few quick
strokes of his pencil, We can
render lively and expressive
characters.
In the recently debuted
PHOTO BY DON MAH
Saturday morning show Stunt
Dawgs, cartoon characters parody
real-life situations.
"They are a bunch of rootin'
tootin' misfit stuntmen who are
battling a Hollywood producer
gone bad," We said. "It's really an
attack on Hollywood itself."
The animation industry is
growing rapidly in Canada, he
said.
"The work is seasonal, which
means most of the shows premiere
in the fall...there are always
projects out there," We said.
We recently switched from
television animation to computer
animation at Vancouver's Radical
Entertainment
He designs Nintendo games
on IBM computers. An average
computer animator earns about
$30,000, he said.
His employer is currently
working on Brett Hull hockey
game and sent We to meet Brett
Hull in person.
"We'll probably buddy
around with him and play poker,"
said We.
Tough job.
This year at \_J LJ O
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available across campus.
For information call 822-5574
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An Important Notice Concerning
The Student Recreation Centre
Contribution
Charitable income tax receipt forms for the $40 Student Recreation Centre
Contribution are available and may be picked up at the following locations:
AMS Business Office - SUB Room 266
Intramurals Office - SUB Room 66
Development Office - Mary Bollert Hall.6253 NW Marine Dr.
All requests must be received prior to December 31,1992.
Students who do not wish to contribute to the cost of construction of the
Student Recreation Centre may apply in person to the Intramurals office,
Room 66, SUB to have their contribution applied to subsequent
installments of tuition fees. The deadline for doing so is October 2nd at
4:00pm.
Student contributions to the project are matched dollar for dollar by the
provincial government and are fully income tax deductible. Designed and
intended for Intramural and Drop-in student use, the facility is projected to
open jn 1994. Your contribution is needed to make this project possible
and will help to solve this campus' acute shortage of recreational facilities.
Be part of the tradition of students helping to build a better university and
leave a legacy for the future.
UBC SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA
welcomes players of Orchestral
Instruments, especially strings.
Please join us for an exciting
season of great music. Non-music
majors especially invited.
Call 822-8246 Tuesday, September 15,1992
POW
Vol. X No.1
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POW
Tuesday, September 15,1992
piHiiiF'lMHi ■*■.■!■ ".i "I"*1
FEATURE
Ciao, bonjour: Learning to see in Italy & France
Story and Photos
By Cheryl Niamath
I never actually saw the real David,
the one Michaelangelo carved out of
marble as an emblem for the city of
Florence. But I saw a lot of fakes: little
plastic Davids, their body parts all out of
proportion to each other, arranged by
height on tables in the markets and on
carts outside every major tourist attraction.
14th Century stairs at Fontainebleu,
a chateau outside of Paris
I was lucky to be in Italy, not   Davids in a Florence market headed
as a tourist, but as a student For the
month of May, I studied photography through the Emily Can-
College Florence Program with
nine other people from Canada
(there were about 40 people in the
program, studying photography,
drawing, printmaking and etching).
Our photography instructor,
Marian.tried to get us to look
beyond the "photo-magnet"
postcard-type photographs of
places and objects that everyone
has already seen. Through the lens
of my camera, I saw thousands of
things that I probably would have
missed if I'd been concentrating on
seeing all the important galleries
and sights your're supposed to see
in Italy.
for bookshelves in other countries
In Venice, where we went one weekend, we avoided San Marco
square and its crowds of loud American tourists during daylight hours and
went to take pictures (and hunt for cheap food—always a challenge) in
narrow alleys hung with laundry and desserted parks miles away from the
nearest museum.
Even after the Florence program ended and I went to France, I'd keep
hearing my teacher's voice: "Now this is a photo-magnet. Does the world
need another photograph of (fill in the blank: the Eiffel Tower,
the Arc de Triomphe, an old woman with a terrier)?"
Dolls' heads for sale at
a Paris flea market
San Marco Square:
shadows at night
Sometimes I couldn't help
it I took pictures of the Eiffel
Tower and Notre Dame. I even
bought a mini Eiffel Tower,
which now graces my bookshelf.
I have photographs of the
things that caught my eye.but
also of the things I usually
wouldn't notice (unless
discomfort brought them to my
attention). I took pictures of
staircases, for instance,
because it seems like in every
place we stayed, from the
cheapest of hostels to two-star
hotels (we could only afford it
once), we were given rooms at
the very top of very steep
staircases (Elevators? Ha! This
was Budget accommodation).
In Italy and France, I
learned that there are other
ways to see than the way you
grow up seeing. You grow up
with certain ideas in your mind
about what's worthwhile to
look at, and what you don't
have to pay attention to. But
when you're suddenly in a
different culture, you don't
always know what you're
supposed to take for granted,
and you notice a lot more. At
least that's what happened to
me.
I never bought a David
though, and sometimes, much
as I hate to admit it, I almost
regret it. He would have
looked perfect right next to my
Eiffel Tower. 8 Tuesday, September 15,1992
POW
Vol. X No.1
WORLD
r*f>
•^|§^^v^
^
***,
/
f
%
MALAYSIA:
Into the heart of the east coast
Afflicted with cataracts, an elderly man strikes up a smile.
BY MA CHIA-NIEN
AND DAVID LOH
EAST COAST,
MALAYSIA—
Distant from the din of
the nation's bustling
capital Kuala Lumpur, a
tropical jungle secludes a
tranquil village where 200
Malays live in straw and
wooden homes.
There are no
telephones.
Soda pop, the only
mark of the West, is sold
in the village's only store.
Kampung Janka is
accessible only by a
humid, 90-minute boat
ride upriver through an
iguana-filled tropical
jungle where temperatures
hover around 35 C.
continued on page 9 Vol. 1, No.1
POW
Tuesday, September 15,1992
WORLD
Malaysia: continued from page 8
In this peninsular
country of southeast Asia,
three dominant cultures—
Malay, Chinese and
Indian—form a population
of 18 million. But only
Malays live in Kampung
Janka.
Young Malay
children, hoping to garner
enough attention to be
photographed, yell the
only English they know:
"Hello!" and "Hove you!"
Raw sewage runs from
straw and wooden homes
into an adjacent river. But
the spirit of the people,
mostly wearing sarongs, is
uplifting.
A woman breast-feeds
her new-born son on her
porch and welcomes us.
Another woman offers a
sugar cane pancake, a
local snack similar to a
chocolate bar.
Many elders are
afflicted with cataracts,
but can't afford an eye-
operation. One man, his
eyesight completely
obstructed by cataracts,
greets us with a refreshing
smile, sitting before his
wooden home.
In the village's
periphery lie three holes,
five feet deep, three feet
wide, where villagers sift
for gold. Hand-sized
spiders hang from
surrounding trees.
We later returned to
the coastal city of Marang,
the nearest mapped urban
centre. Miles of white
beaches caipet the city's
hot ocean front and
hundreds of tropical fish
swim near the shore in the
crystal blue water.
About 25 km down
the coast, dozens of
fishing boats moor at the
rotting docks of Duyong
village, where
domesticated animals
roam freely on dirt roads.
A boat-builder close by
puts the finishing touches
on the hull of his wooden
fishing boat.
"You're from
Canada?" He said in
Malay. "You must have a
good life."
At a local school,
Islamic children play
freely in the courtyard.
Meanwhile at the end of
the road a young girl plays
alone in front of her home,
oblivious to the new
visitors to the village.
•Stef^--
iiIiiiiii    1
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*•  .     ■*•:
J*    , 10       Tuesday, September 15,1992
POW
Vol. 1, No.1
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HEALTH
Face in textbook studying
—not bv choice
BY FARHAT KHAN
I REMEMBER the embarrassment I felt after having
fallen asleep in yetanother second-year philosophy
class.
I would think to my self, "It happened again!" I had
tried everything—sitting in the front row, sitting in
front of the professor so that I could maintain eye
contact with him. Nothing worked.
Fifteen minutes into each class my eyelids would
get that uncontrollable heavy feeling, my head would
jerk as it started to fall forward and before I knew it, I
was flat out asleep right before the profs eyes! It
wouldn't have been so bad if this only happened once
in awhile, but I would fall asleep in every class.
While at school I took no special notice of my
constant fatigue. I just kicked myself for being lazy and
not getting enough sleep.
It was a long time before I understood that my
constant tiredness was the result of thyroid disease.
(The thyroid gland produces hormones that regulate all
body fuctions.)
Each time I sat down to do my homework, my face
would invariably be down in my textbook. I would
awaken to the find the pages rippled and wet from my
drool.
"Let's study Farhat's style—with our faces in the
books," my family teased. I just silently endured it
I took the second term off in my second year
because I was not doing as well in school as I had
hoped.
The following summer I had a general medical.
check-up before I went to a French immersion program
in Quebec. My doctor said my eyes were protruding
unusually and did a blood test
Four weeks later, a thyroid supplement was rushed
to me in the mail to compensate for a severe deficiency
in thyroid hormone production.
Needless to say, I had been falling asleep in all my
classes in Quebec as well. It was an incredible relief to
realize it was not "just me!"
That was four years ago and now I know a hell of
a lot more about the thyroid gland and thyroid disease.
Frustrated, I searched for more information on my
own; the doctor only prescribed the pill.
I have been able to cope with my disease by being
more educated about it. However, this does not mean it
is no longer difficult. My whole lifestyle will always be
affected; it is an ongoing everyday struggle.
There is not a cure yet, but what is most frustrating
and frightening is the subtle symptoms of the disease.
Symptoms that any person experiences in everyday
living—fatigue, weight gain/loss, depression,
resdessness, nervousness, irritability—thatdon'ttrigger
any kind of alarm or concern.
Thyroid disease can be dangerous and even fatal
if it is not diagnosed early.
The following information on thyroid disease is
basic and should not be treated as medical advice.
WHAT IS THE THYROID GLAND?
The thyroid gland is a small gland, weighing
only 25g, at the base of the neck. The hormones it
secretes are essential to all growth and metabolism.
The gland is a regulator of all body functions.
WHO HAS THYROID DISEASE?
About 200 million people worldwide have some
form of thyroid disease. In Canada thyroid disorders
affect about 1 in 20 people. Thyroid disorders are
between 5 to 7 times more common in women.
THYROID DISEASE
Thyroid illness is divided into hypothyroidism
(under-active thyroid) and hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid). The primary symptoms for each are
as follows; however, each individual's experience
will vary.
HYPOTHYROIDISM
• weak, slow heart beat
• muscular weakness and constant fatigue
• sensitivity to cold
• thick, puffy skin
• slowed mental processes and poor memory
• constipation
HYPERTHYROIDISM
• rapid forceful heartbeat
• tremors
• muscular weakness
• weight loss in spite of increase appetite
• restlessness, anxiety and sleeplessness
• profuse sweating and heart intolerance
•diarrhea
• eye changes
THYROID FOUNDATION OF CANADA
Write to 540-810 West Broadway, Vancouver, BC,
V5Z4C9 or call 266-0700.
PUBLIC EDUCATION PROGRAMS
Free information programs are held every third
Thursday of the month (excluding December).
Programs begin at 7:30pm at 806 West 10th Avenue
(TB Seal Auditorium).
September 17: The Thyroid Gland-Nature's Bow
Tie and Why We Wear One; October 15: Your
Thyroid Gland Gone Wrong-^\n Overview of
Abnormal Functions; November 19: ThyroidFunction
Testing.
i$!Z!jfiQjmiiimm)
ARTS
Whose "Chinese Art?"
.J
BY KARLYN KOH
Mention Chinese art, and
images of calligraphy, sublime
landscape paintings and slim,
graceful poems are conjured up. It
is precisely this stereotype of
Chinese art that Queue, formed in
early 1992, is trying to dismantle.
"Queue" refers to both the
braided hair worn by men in
Manchu China, and the Cantonese
word for bridge. The group wants
to promote and produce
contemporary Chinese art through
the bridging of differences.
Cynthia Low, one of Queue's
committee members, says the
existing mainstream culture is
void of contemporary Chinese-
Canadian culture.
"There is a frustration with
the concept of what Chinese art is,
and [with the concept of] the
traditional Chinese art which the
media focuses on," she says.
Many Chinese-Canadian
artists are working in Vancouver,
among them Paul Wong and
Richard Fung (video), Brenda Joy
Lam (film), Shawna Beharry
(performance), Sky Lee and
Larissa Lai (literature). However,
there was always the need to
create a support group for these
artists.
"Non-Chinese speaking
Chinese-Canadians feel the need
to create an identity, a Chinese-
Canadian identity. [There aren't]
many formalized networks for
Chinese-Canadians," Low says.
Self Not Whole, an exhibition
concerning Chinese-Canadians
held at the Chinese Cultural
Centre last fall, sparked Queue's
beginning.
"Queue came out of [the fact
that] Chinese-Canadians feel
disenfranchised by traditional
Chinese culture and contemporary
popular culture," she says.
Queue helps Chinese-
Canadian artists, who are working
with the issues of race, put up
shows, but are as yet unable to
provide financial support. Two
people working with the help of
Queue are Anna Chang and Karin
Lee. Chang is doing an oral
history on Chinatown and Lee is
documenting the history of
Chinatown cafes like Pender
Street's Hong Kong cafe, which
recently closed.
Contact Queue at the Chinese
Cultural Centre 687-0729. Vfol. X No.1
POW
Tuesday, September 15,1992        11
NEWS
PHOTO BY ROSA TSENG
Air Monks: They wear highiops and show the Zen of Basketball
China Project: First steps to employment
BY HAO LI
The lives of 8,000 Mainland China students, who
were studying in Canada before June 4, 1989, were
drastically changed by the Tiananmen Square massacre.
Those who successfully applied for landed immigrant
status could not find suitable jobs in Canada despite
being highly educated. Language, and cultural
differences are some reasons why they held jobs
unrelated to their fields.
China Project was organized two years ago by
Cindy Chan-Piper, a civic architect, to help these new
immigrants to find jobs. But the project will not be
continuing.
"We're trying to get more funding, but it is very
difficult because the federal government is not going to
do that kind of funding again on that kind level," she
said.
The federal government, however, may fund
another project, the Pacific Training Project, which
will help immigrants from Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan,
South Korea and other Pacific countries. It will be
modelled after the China Project, which received
$300,000 in funding. Five hundred students graduated
from China Project and 90 per cent found study-
related jobs.
Frank Hai Yan Wang, former UBC graduate and
International House counsellor, said China Project
participants were frustrated with their work situation.
"They did not like what they were doing and they
were all professionals in China, such as accoutants,
engineers, reporters or athletes," he said.
Some China Project graduates established the
non-profit First Step Society last year to share their
successful experiences. However, the society of more
than 100 members is only surviving with membership
fees and donations.
Chan-Piper, First Step Society vice-president,
said they have successfully raised funding for a
program to help filmmakers from China. A proposal
to help artists from China is also being considered, she
said.
"We will try to provide the opportunity for every
new immigrant if they want to participate," she said.
Chan-Piper predicted it will take years to achieve
its goal. "For many years to come our main membership
still will be people from China, but we do not want
close our doors to the other groups," Chan-Piper said.
INDEPENDENCE from page 1    	
She is restricted by Chinese norms which stresses
that children stay with their parents until marriage—
despite a Western respect for independence.
The clashing values are pressuring a generation of
Chinese-Canadians dependent on parental support to
choose sides.
"Before, when everyone else was moving out, it
was kind of em harassing that I was still living at home,"
Jung said.
She'll allow her future children to leave home once
they have a steady job, she said.
Free-lance photographer Phillip Chin, 26, lives at
home with two sisters also in their twenties.
"I am expected to stay at home. My parents prefer
me to stay because they want the family to be together.
"It doesn' t help me be independent," he said. "I feel
I haven't totally grown up yet."
Chin predicts a couple generations will pass before
the Chinese domestic rules disappear.
"The majority of younger generations will not
respect them," he said. "The Westernized world
teaches you to be independent, to look out for just
yourself."
But Chin would prefer his future children stay
at home until they are mature enough for
independence. Chin said he would test his kids'
maturity by observing how they handle trips on their
own.
Civil servant Mike Sun, 30, said, "nothing is
more important to me than the family unit. We must
respect our elders."
Sun lives under his parents' roof with an older
brother who even has his own house. Sun helps his
parents out financially and his parents also rely on
his English skills.
Both Sun and Chin said they'll take care of their
parents in their old age. Most Chinese elderly parents
live in their children's homes.
CSSA from page 1
Two years late*, with elections, CSSA had more
independence and "freedom to represent Chinese students
on behalf of their interests," he said.
"The Chinese consulate still has a very strong
influence on CSSA...they have also attempted to use
other channels to control Chinese students," Shi said.
When the massacre angered Chinese students at
UBC, newly elected CSSA executives stood up to express
the feeling of the students. The old executives which
failed to respond were impeached by outraged members.
However, the Chinese consulate considered the
action a rebellion and severed its ties with UBC' s Chinese
students. CSSA lost financial support.
Only when newly elected CSSA executives, mainly
students arriving after 1989, promised to remain neutral
did funding resume.
Students from China in Canada during the massacre
became new immigrants under a special humanitarian
clause in the Immigration Act.
But the clause was not applied to many students
from China arriving since 1990.
'Those who don't have immigration status see going
back to China as their last choice," said Zhang who
arrived in 1990. "They are very careful when dealing with
sensitive issues, and they don't want to be in
trouble."
"Though democracy and freedom are good
goals, we have to start from the basics. We can't
just use empty slogans. We must do some practical
things for our Chinese students."
His words echoed a PhD candiate who arrived
in 1991 from China.
"Chinese students...are more interested in
practical benifits," Luo said. 'The new students do
not want to talk about politics but the older students
are more open."
But said Shi: "I think CSSA should play a
leading role concerning democracy and human
rights [in China]. This is the reality everyone has to
face."
Dr. DongQing Wei, CSSA president during
1989-1991,declined tocomment on whetherCSSA
should play a more active role in democracy.
"I don't want to criticize any one," Wei said.
"We helped a lot of Chinese students setde
down in Canada and we have the only permanent
Goddess of Democracy statue in the world at the
UBC."
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Valid from Sept 15-30   4:30pm - 8:30pm 12       Tuesday, September 15,1992
POW
Vol. 1, No.1
Applications are now being
accepted for positions on the
Student Administrative
Commision.
Application forms are available in SUB 238 and must be
handec in by 4:00 pm on Friday, September 18,1992
to SUB 238.
For more information, contact the Director of Administration, Caireen Hanert (SUB 254) at 822-3961.
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the business community. Chartered Accountants come from a
wide variety of backgrounds. They have degrees in arts,
science, law, education, business and other disciplines. They've
made their degrees work for them. The excellence of their
professional training is recognized internationally. Right now,
we're taking applications for the Graduate Admission Program
for graduates with non-business degrees. We'll prepare you
with all the prerequisite accounting, economics, and computer
courses necessary to apply to enter our CA Program.
If you would like to discover the key to a multitude of exciting career opportunities, please join us for an informal information session; Tuesday, September 22, 5:00 - 7:00pm, Faculty
Club Ballroom, U.B.C., (XX Crescent Road, Vancouver.
To RSVP or for more information, contact Ken Ruffelle at
the Institute of Chartered MB Chartered
Accountants of *U^A       Accountants
British Columbia, 681-3264. Ajil     of British
 Coluirvbia
ARTS
Mulroney's whim helps
creates HK filmfest
BY MORGAN
MAENLING
A FILM festival may
have originated in
the recesses of Brian
Mulroney's brain.
At a trade trip to Hong
Kong more than two years
ago, he negotiated with the
Hong Kong government
about a festival exchange.
Festival Hong Kong 92
will be held October 2 to 18
under the umbrella of the
Vancouver International Film
Festival (VIFF). Hong Kong
92 consists of more than 50
innovative films from a
variety of genres that will
cover diverse subjects, said
Helen Yagi, VIFF publicist.
One of the highlights is a
complete retrospective of the
Taiwanese director Edward
Yang. The Actress, for
which Hong Kong actor
Maggie Chung won the best
actress award at the Cannes
Film Festival, will also be
showing. The film features a
strong female character.
While Vancouver hosts
this festival, a sister
Canadian film festival will
be held in Hong Kong this
year.
SPORTS
.-•V?VU -fir,*-* - * i
■-".?■€
** ■**.**,
Shrumbowl action heats up. See next page
PHOTO BY SIOBHAN ROANTREE
Community Sports
to
10% off the regular price of
every item in the store for all
UBC students, faculty and staff.
Wide selction of skates, hockey
equipment, balls, racquets,
soccer equipment etc...
Open seven days a week
3355 W. Broadway 733-1612 Vol. 1, No.1
POW
Tuesday, September 15,1992       13
SPORTS
UBC 39
SFU 20
MVP Yamaoka gains 230 yards
BY MARK NIELSEN
THERE were marching
bands, mascots,
parachutists, water
balloons and flying roles of toilet
paper. But there was also Brad
Yamaoka.
The second-year running back
ran for 230 yards and three
touchdowns to lead the UBC
Thunderbirds over cross-town
rival Simon Fraser University
Clan 39-20 in the annual Shrum
Bowl clash before 4,101 fans.
What's more he carried the
ball 37 times to set a new school
record, eclipsing the old mark of
35 set by Glen Steele in 1984 and
tied by Jim Stewart in 1990.
Not bad for a guy who told
reporters after the game that he
was "just doing his job."
Perhaps a reaction more
indicative of his performance
came from Thunderbird defensive
back Jordan Liberman who came
over and gave Yamaoka a big slap
on the back.
"I love this guy and you can
print that," he said.
Nevertheless, as Yamaoka
indicated, he was not the sole
reason behind the Thunderbirds
win — their first over the Clan in
four years.
The game was essentially over
by the end of the first half. By that
time the Thunderbirds had a 29-3
lead, holding SFU to 99 yards
total offence, sacking SFU
quarterback Dino Bucciol three
times and putting together four
touchdown drives.
Even the special teams got in
the act as UBC's Matt Dawson
blocked an SFU punt and Matt
Young recovered the ball in the
Clan endzone for a two-point
safety to open the scoring.
And in his first start of the
year, UBC's Vince Danielsen
showed some remarkable poise
while the Thunderbird offence
took advantage of the extra down
provided by American rules. Some
examples:
• In a third down and 16-yard
situation, Danielsen found wide
receiver Sean Graham on a 27-
yard completion to put UBC at the
SFU 14-yard line. That led to
Yamaoka's first touchdown — a
four-yard run to put UBC up 9-0
with the convert.
• On the next UBC drive, Graham
roped in a 40-yard pass from
Danielsen for a touchdown and a
16-0 lead with the convert
• In a third down and 15-yard
hole, Danielsen scrambled to
within inches of a first down and
then handed off to Yamaoka on
the next play to keep the drive
going. Three plays later Yamaoka
scored a 19-yard major for a 22-3
lead with the convert.
(SFU's Jamie Paradis had
kicked a 28-yard field goal at the
start of the second quarter to put
the Clan on the board.)
• Third and 15 once again, but this
time it is Yamaoka who spins and
twists far enough to set up a
successful fourth down gamble.
Fifth-year offensive linemen
Shrum Bowl victory in three
Three plays later, Graham snares
an eight-yard pass for the major.
UBC 29 SFU 3.
SFU scored an unconverted
touchdown early in the third
quarter. But the Thunderbird
defence stiffened on the next drive
and held the Clan to a field goal
for a 29-12 lead.
Then UBC's Mark Nowotny
kicked a 28-yard field goal and
Yamaoka got his third touchdown
on a 13-yard run to make it 39-12.
SFU got another major in the
Troy Hardwick (I) and Mike Williams (r) celebrate first
years.
dying seconds and made a two-
point convert for the final score.
The Thunderbirds racked up
408 yards total offence — 308 on
the ground — to the Clan's 305
yards.
BIRD BITS
About the only bright spot in the
first half for SFU was linebacker
Paul Zuccato who made 12
tackles.
• The Clan's star defensive
PHOTO BY DON MAH
lineman Doug Peterson did not
play because of a hamstring
injury.
• SFU leads the overall Shrum
Bowl series with eight wins, seven
losses and one tie.
• The Thunderbirds head to
Edmonton to take on the
University of Albeta Golden Bears
this Friday. The Bears lost to the
University of (Zalgary Dinosaurs
36-31 in the annual Shrine Bowl
game in Calgary on Saturday.
«•**•«.
Slk-Jfe *&M».« M
Shrum brawl
HEADHUNTING: SFU's Craig Norris (60) loses head over sack by UBC's Dave Mclauglin
PHOTO BY DON MAH
BYCHUCKIENHO
As seen from one side of
Thunderbird Stadium, the T-birds
beat up on the Clansmen
convincingly by a 39-20 score.
But from the opposite side, the
hillside, where fans from both
schools huddled to watch the
game, the battle did not seem
nearly as lopsided.
With SFU fans entrenched on
the left hillside and mainly UBC
diehards on the right, the annual
Shrum Bowl turned into more
than just an athletic showcase
between the football ideals of two
universities. More than twelve
times during the game security
officials were forced up the hill to
break-up the fighting which
seemed to flare up for the
strangest of reasons.
One reason was the Shrum
Bowl tradition of launching water-
filled balloons—essentially a
harmless prank. But the
temperature dipped so quickly
during Saturday night's match and
the wind chill made it so cold that
some fans were getting annoyed at
being drenched. At least one SFU
fan came prepared—"I brought
ten filled balloons and a change of
clothes."
Another reason has to do with
alcohol. Unlike previous years
when the beer garden was located
at the bottom of the hill, and fans
had simple access to beer, the
alcohol sales this year were
located to the far ends of the
stadium. An official from the
UBC Athletic Department
confirmed that beer cans as well
as hard liquor bottles were found
on the hillside.
At least one outbreak started
when some SFU fans charged into
a crowd of UBC supporters and
ran off with a  T-Birds
intramurals cap. The baseball cap
with the stuffed, yellow
thunderbird on top was wanted by
the band from Simon Fraser who
wanted to "rip the beak off."
Stadium security noted that it
was the same group of people
from both sides who were
responsible for most of the
disturbances. Ten ejections were
made with a number of them
spending time in the RCMP
holding cell until after the game.
In the future, the Shrum Bowl
may introduce a barrrier or fence
to divide the SFU fans from the
UBC fans on the hill. No one has
said, however, how that would
stop water balloons from being
thrown. 14       Tuesday, September 15,1992
POW
Vol. 1, No.1
EDITORIAL
KaHynKoh EffltPvw Karen Young       Terrie Chan
Arts Editor Editor Newt Editor       Newt Editor
Brenda Wong     Ckeryl Niamath       Ron Tseng Lillian Aa
Newt Editor        Photo Editor        rhoto Editor      Newt Editor
Stan Paid
Zee       Wanda Chow     Charlet Nho
Columnist        Sports EtRtor
Raid Peschiera HaoU John Gray        Ma Chia-nien
News Editor Newt Newt Editor       Photo Editor
Keith Leung       Chan Wong
Editorial Edraor
DavM Loll       Sharon Undoret
Newt Newt Editor
Vince |hi     Lucho Van Isschot
Newt Editor       Newt Editor
Mark Nielsen        Faihat Khan
Sports Health
Newspaper Design: S.J. Ahn, 822-6881
Arts editor: Yukie Kurahashi
Fringe Layout: Helen Willoughby-Price
Fringe reviews: Cindy Dowsling
Advertising: Omar Diaz, 822-3978
D/*"\l A /      A Uh«s->y Sp*d»l Etlon, puUMw-J
■ 1   I l/V     n»wr. <•"-*• *• «*>*•«• smsIm.
■ X_*r WW T«t 122-2301        Fwc KO-V2J*
We want to write about our communities, we want to photograph
the people we see around us everyday, and we're doing just that
This is the first edition of Pow, a special project of The Ubyssey.
It will continue to publish if you take the same opportunities into your
hands.
Why is Pow necessary?
Monday's Globe and Mail reported the public opinion poll that
the government used to drive for Bill C-86, a potentially racist law
trying to squeeze out immigrants and refugees from Canada. One-
third of 1,800 adults surveyed stressed we should "keep out people
who are different from most Canadians," and at least half said they
were "really worried that they may become a minority if immigration
is unchecked."
Though unsaid, we know "Canadians" mean white people, not
Asians or Latinos. When they talk about keeping out "different"
people, they don't mean stopping immigrants from England or
Holland. And we find a government putting these feelings into a law,
an attack on all people of colour, starting with the most vulnerable—
immigrants and refugees.
At the same time, we find "objective" journalism, the assumed
"mainstream," is actually only the perspective of a certain section of
white people. So right there that excludes 24 per cent of this city:
people of color. And it is people of color who are under attack with
this new law. So this newspaper, in defense, by reporting the
everyday going-on's within our communities, we're showing the
human face beyond the hype about Asian youth gangs and invading
refugee hordes.
The paper is operating with a different system from The
Ubyssey: editors will rotate and anyone who wants experience
editing or other newspaper roles will get a chance. You can be photo
editor, assignment coordinator, sports editor, typesetter, page designer,
whatever you want There are no limits to how many can assume
positions.
The paper will come out twice a month, giving people plenty of
time to work on interviews, profiles, investigations or photographs.
Production happens on the weekend and not overnight As much help
will be made available: if you need a translator, sources for stories,
writing tips, interview skills, or any other support.
Pow is here for people who might not think about working on
a newspaper. If you have a heavy course load, curfews, language
difficulties, or are uncertain about your skills, Pow is for you.
This is just a beginning—your views, ideas, concerns, and
participation are needed to make it work. You can participate to the
fullest; there is not a set group of people controlling Pow.
Pow is just an idea. It needs you to make it real.
Call 822-2301, SUB 241K.
FRINGE
l$y Cinch Dowsling
KRKCTIONaS,
EJACULATIONS,
EXHIBITIONS
Sept. 10-13, 18
Becoming and being romantically
involved w ilh someone is often associ
ated in the west with an individual s
reason lor heme, as well as personal
happiness. Hui whal happens when
things start breaking down.' F.rections.
Ejaculations and Exhibitions takes us
through this "romantic journey."
It is a play that is adapted I'roni
the poetry and prose of Charles
Bukowski. The play is about lose and
a violence, and more
kes the pla\ iniercsiitm
ilience mem
bers can relate, albeit not lo the same
extent, lo the behavior ol ihe couple
It disturbs the psyche
Msts in tins relationship
s are callable
ol. Il is the horror ol giving up one s
soul lor the sake ol not being alone.
Both performers do a great job at
show ing the mulii-dimcnsionalily of
their character's role. I he female
character is played by Rhonda
Schull/. and ihe male pan is played
ice he does
Schakleniose's pc
especialh wi
il expressions a:
ESTABLISHED PRICK
Sept. 12, 13, 16, 18, 19
Established Price is an intriguing
play that examines whal happens lo
four business people when the
company they have worked lor is
taken over.
Their individual tragedies exist
not as a result of loss of or lack of
money, but because Ihe company was
their meaning in life.
What happens lo ihese men when
their entire existence becomes
meaningless is sad to see, but even
more disturbing is thai their company
is lheir entire mcaninu of existence.
SHOOT THE WOMEN FIRST
Sept. 11-13, 16-19
Shoot the Women First is a play
based on the Baader-Meinhof group.
The group was formed to combat
right-wing government policies in
Germany in the I97()'s.
Gudrun Ensslin played by Jill
Dowse, and Ulrike Meinhof played by
Naomi Cooke are the two female
revolutionaries involved in the
Baader-Meinhof group.
In the play. Ulrike is confronted
anti somewhat tyrannized by Gudrun
inlo taking a more active role in the
revolutionary movement. The play
looks at how good political intentions
can also become as insidious as the
institutions they are trying to oxer-
throw.
Passivity is substituted for
violence. Eventually the two women
end up in jail where they commit ihe
of the movement: they both la
own lives.
The script anil the intense
for the good
xuh take their
performances given by both actors
make lhc play a compelling piece of
theatre.
ECHOES
Sept. 11-13,16/17
Escaping from a world of pain
into a world where you don't have to
confront your demons is what the play
Echoes is about.
The two characters Tilda
(Mairzee Almas) and Sam (Dax
Belanger) have created their own
world of make believe, where they
can hide from the painful world of
reality.
The life they have created is one
of fantasy. Their imaginary world of
harmony is interrupted by shattering
bouts of lucidity. Their lucidity is a
continual reminder that although they
may be able to run, they cannot hide.
While the premise of the play is
an interesting one, it is too long and
too drawn out The acting by Almas at
times is quite good, but at other times
her gestures appear forced.
UNTITLED LADY
Sept. 13-15,17-19
The play Untitled Lady probably
doesn't deserve a title to begin with.
It is an amateurish production
that has little if anything to offer. The
acting ability (or lack thereof) of the
performers makes this play, almost
unbearable to watch.
The plot is friled with loopholes
and inconsistencies. It is unclear
exactly what profound statement (if
any) is trying to be made.
GULLIVER'S TRAVELS
Sept 10,12-17
Gulliver's travels isn't about
Gulliver; it's about Swift, and it isn't
a documentary.
It's a high-energy show encompassing everything from dancing and
singing to drama.
The show consists of actors from
Russia, Canada, England, and the
United States. The cast does a superb
job of entertaining and it is doubtful
that you will leave without a smile on
your face, or a Russian melody in
your head.
STRAIGHT FACED
Sept 10-14
Straight Faced is a play which
looks at women's issues and friendship.
The strong bond between the
characters is quite evident in spite of
their considerable differences. The
play attempts to tackle too many of
the problems that exist for women. It
would have been much more thought-
provoking had the script attempted to
look more closely at two or three of
these problems.
How is it possible to muster up
empathic understanding about
bulimia, suicide, abortion, wife
battering, miscarriages, AND artificial
insemination within a sixty-minute
timeframe?
Unfortunately, every time the
lights go off and then on again, we are
confronted with another horrific
female problem. The play makes it
seem like the problems of women are
completely endless.
LIES
Sept 10-12,18-20
Lies is not your typical theatre
performance.
It is a series of skits based on the
premise of lies (note the title). While
there is some innovation and creativity in this performance, on the whole
it becomes quite boring.
The performance too often takes
the form of didactic lecturing. The
subtleties are missing, and one feels
like once again we are being hammered over the head with p.c. dogma.
THE DAY ROOM
appearing at the
Vancouver Fringe Festival
September
16 Wed
17 Thur
Fri
Sat
Sun
18
19
20
6:30
6:30
7:15
7:15
7:15
Arcadian Hall
2214 Main St, Main Floor Vol X No.1
POW
Tuesday, September 15,1992       15
COLUMN
A journey through modern-day Turkey
BY WANDA CHOW
A 20-HOUR bus ride
from Athens ended
on the dark, hushed
outskirts of Istanbul at
4am. It was quicker than
the 38-hour Greek and
Turkish trains which wait
motionless for hours at
borders. A din of voices
outside the bus soon
revealed itself to be a
crowd of anxious cab
drivers all shouting,
"Taksee! Taksee!"
Out of spite for their
pushiness, we walked towards the
old Roman city walls of
Constantinople. The cab driver,
unwilling to believe that we were
seriously determined to walk,
pursued us for 20 minutes. After
we trudged for two hours through
poorly lit, deserted streets to the
city centre, we understood the
need for a cab.
Instead of hot, desert
conditions, that morning greeted
us with cold and dampness.
Shrouded in mist, the Blue
Mosque and neighbouring Aya
Sophia mosque were against the
rising sun as the eerie cries of
minarets broadcasted the morning
prayers.
Inflation is such a problem that old postal rates were
crossed out and new ones simply printed onto existing
stamps—Wanda Chow in Istanbul
A bureaucratic banking
system converted our British
pounds suddenly to tens of
thousands of Turkish lira,
practically worthless outside
Turkey. We were caught between
budget traveller's prudence and
wanting to unload it all before
leaving Turkey.
We entered markets and
found silver, embroidered clothing
and carpets. Turkish headgear that
had been banned decades earlier
during a national Westernization
campaign, are still banned to
Turks and only sold to tourists.
English, French or Japanese-
speaking males who offered us
tips, such as removing shoes
before entering mosques, just
happened to be related to owners
of respectable carpet shops.
AGGRESIVE sales tactics
were common, since
everyone sold the same
merchandise, but were balanced
by generous hospitality. Lots of
small, tasty glasses of hot apple
tea were offered. A homesick
Turkish-Canadian from
Vancouver, searching for fellow
Canadians to chat with, and,
judging from a display of business
cards from Canadian officials, do
business with, gave us our first
Turkish tea.
More reminders of the
Turkish economy were at the local
post office. Inflation is such a
problem that old postal rates were
crossed out and new ones simply
printed onto existing stamps.
While our purchasing power was
great, we searched for the best
deals, to the annoyance of local
merchants.
Trying to be inconspicuous
failed miserably. My companions
covered their blonde hair to avoid
harassment Although I had dark
hair, being Chinese seemed to
incite more curiosity for some
Turks than all the blond hair in
California.
I was the only Chinese person
I had seen during our stay and was
constantly asked: "Where are you
from...No, where are you
REALLY from?"
Zealous carpet salespeople
asked: "Japonais? Konichiwa?"
Those who we had befriended
shouted: "Photo! Photo!"
No women in Turkey could
be seen working in businesses. In
Istanbul, women often wore skirts
and let their long hair hang freely,
unlike the women in central
Turkey. Some women offered
sunflower seeds, perfume, even an
address.
Local fare included doner
kebabs (seasoned lamb, salad,
fries and sauce in large chunks of
bread), sweets (Turkish Delight,
helva, puddings), the strong and
rather crunchy Turkish coffee. The
traditional breakfast, often served
early (4am) during long, overnight
bus trips, usually consisted of a
hard-boiled egg, cheese, jam (rose
flavoured), tea, olives and all the
bread you could eat. We were
guaranteed, if nothing else, to be
well fed.
The roads woe varied in
condition from smooth, paved
blacktop to ragged disaster zones.
The main strip in Istanbul was to
be the future site of a tram system,
an unexpected touch of modernity
amid old world attractions.
Having experienced a minibus
ride through heavy, chaotic traffic
and survived, I'd say it couldn't
hurt
This torn-up street led me to
my most lasting memory of my
stay. I was leaving Istanbul that
evening alone and city-buses to
the bus station had been diverted
because of road conditions. On the
bus was a well-spoken man
heading the same. Instead of just
telling me where to get off, he got
off as well. The road was flooded,
so he pulled me up onto the old
Roman wall ;ind guided me
through puddles and walkways
until we reached the hectic bus
station. He got me the bus
information, put my backpack on
the bus.
He said goodbye, telling me
he hoped I wouldn't catch a cold,
and turned away, stopping only
when I insisted on a handshake
and a chance to say thank you.
Then he was gone. Turkey
left an impression of friendliness
that other places would be hard-
pressed to match.
TO COME
Anna Kam writes on
Chinese family life.
Franka Cordua-von
Specht write about
a Native
community in Old
Crow, Yukon.
Marita Luk writes
about social issues.
Charles Nho
reports on crime at
UBC.
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4576 West 10thAvenue (Across from Safeway) •Monday—Friday: 8:00am to 8:00pm • Saturday 10:00am to 6pm 16       Tuesday, September 15,1992
POW
Vfol. X No.1
ARTS
MOVIES
Thai prostitute seen
as small change
BY KAREN YOUNG
INACROWDED Bangkok
bar, a male foreigner looks
at a Thai prostitute and says:
"Look at her—20 bucks!"
The true horror in The Good
Woman of Bangkok, though, is not
that the customer has reduced the
woman to a sum of money, but that
the woman herself believes that she
is only worth as much as her price
tag.
Money draws the dividing line
in the film. The foreign men have it,
the Thai prostitutes do not. The
women only have the currency of
flesh, and they become the nickels,
dimes, and dollars that pass through
the hands of so many men.
The dividing boundary is most
apparent in the relationship between
the film-maker, Dennis O'Rourke,
and the focus of the film, Aoi. In the
introduction, O'Rourke blandly
states that at age 43, his marriage
broke down and he went to Thailand
to make a film about a prostitute. He
bought Aoi in a bar, slept with her,
and proceeded to spend the next few
months making a movie about her
and her life.
O'Rourke's film clearly sympathizes with the prostitutes and condemns the men, but it also inadver-
tandy casts the film-maker himself
asoneof the antagonists. Thecamera
provides an even more concrete
boundary between the exploiting
white man with power and the
exploited Thai woman who is
destitute and weak. In this case, the
man pays the prostitute not only to
use her body but also her life.
At the end of the movie,
O'Rourke attempts to redeem
himself by buying Aoi a rice farm
for her impoverished family and
consequently, a new life for herself.
He is surprised to find her working
at a massage parlour a year later.
She explains, "It's my fate."
The film-maker did not realize
the severe damage done to her self-
esteem by all the men she had encountered, including himself.
Too many customers defined
her as a price for paid sex and she
came to believe that her only value
was that figure.
GALLERY
Museum filled with
historical delights
BY BRENDA WONG
AMSTERDAM—The Rijks-
museum may be one of the most
under-rated art museums in northern
Europe.
Both the Dutch masters and
ceramic sculpture collections are
well worth the mammoth run.
Rembrandt's The Nightwatch
jg. overwhelms its viewers. The dour
P bourgeois military figures appear to
*• glow from within, radiating a golden
j| light-
p "Rembrandt is a must see but
the ceramics are very interesting,"
said UBC student Mirja Adams.
A few common yet intriguing
items include baby China shoes and
a blue China bird cage.
The emotionally stirring
sculpture depicts hatred. A junior
centaur and chubby infant are
fighting, tearing each other's hair.
Macabre and misogynous
railing sculptures represent
mourning and penitentwomen. They
date back to 1656 from the city bank
or town.
Rembrandt works are exhibited in this modest gallery
**********************************************
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733-3999
WEST BROADWAY
MORE GREATER VANCOUVER LOCATIONS...
3495 North Road, Burnaby
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2773 Barnett Highway, Coquitlam
22430 Dewdney Trunk Road, Maple Ridge
1065 Columbia St., New Westminster
972 Marine Drive, North Vancouver
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8900 No. 1 Road, Richmond
8180 No. 2 Road, Richmond
3546 Kingsway, Vancouver
1674 Davie Street, Vancouver
7289 Knight Street, Vancouver
2696 E. Hastings Street, Vancouver
VIDEO
mW
^
Rent one movie -
get a 2nd movie
rental of
equal value
FREE.
Illllllill
002040
• Valid Sept 8 - Dec 17, 1992
• Not to be combined with
any other offer.
!
.%%v
VIDEO
Rent one movie -
get a 2nd movie
rental of
equal value
FREE.
002041
Valid Jan 4 - April 30, 1993
Not to be combined with
any other offer.

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