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The Ubyssey Feb 28, 1969

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Array There's no
foe
like
Le Feaux
Vol. L, No. 46
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1969
228-2305
Parks
• II
rd examines beach first-hand
By  NICK   ORCHARD
Parks board officials, planners, and (interested citizens
stood on the newly claimed
grass and looked out at the
newly claimed beach at the
end  of  Spanish Banks.
Stuart Lefeaux, superintendent of parks, was explaining
how this reclaimed section resembled plans for the Point
Grey beach.
A grassy  area has been
built using boulders and old
pieces of concrete to temporarily protect it from erosion.
"It's not too pretty, but it's
practical. It will hold until we
get federal or provincial funds,
al'hough it may take years to
raise the money," Lefeaux
said.
The group then moved off
for a planned walk and inspection tour of the Point Grey
beach.
The parks board undertook
is - )t Ml**-*^**
•**■•■ i'W^ic€ v :i&^i?WXM-dmmi
* *   .* .irr'dfi-: ,'t > '•v'-sm i!Er,.«:_»*lw**M
the walk Thursday to take
another look at the situation
when plans to build a road
around Point Grey met a large
public outcry. City council
Tuesday afternoon postponed
a related road project, but
it has no jurisdiction over the
Point Grey road.
The Alma Mater Society has
officially protested the beach
development.
"People have been talking
for 40 years  about the eros-
UBYSSEY  REPORTER  Nick   Orchard   strolls  with parks board biggies George Wainborn (middle), and Stuart Lefeaux (right), Thursday afternoon along Point Grey beach.
ion," said Lefeaux, "We're
here to see what would happen if our road plan went
through.
"I don't want any publicity,"
he said. "Just call me an official or spokesman. Use the
names of my board members,
they're the ones who get elected."
A road has already been cut
out where there was once a
path, using free fill from contractors. It will eventually
spread -80 feet out to sea to
allow trucks to turn.
Lefeaux said the area below
Cecil Green park is the most
frightening part of the erosion, where houses and people
are in danger.
The three main factors causing the erosion are drainage
from the top of the cliff, water
coming through the soil layers, and erosion by the sea.
A planner said a barrier such
as a road or seawall would
give the cliff a natural angle
of repose, allowing it to cover
with vegetation.
The ultimate objective of the
board is to eliminate all erosion, although drainage and
seepage are being ignored for
the moment.
It is apparent the parks
board wants to go ahead with
its project although it hasn't
the money.
"If the provincial or federal
governments see that we are
serious    in   our   intent,   they
usually open their purses,"
said an official. "We are poor
cousins of rich governments."
George Puil, another official,
has apparently reversed his
stand. Last week in the Sun he
said he had doubts about the
project. He now seems to be
against the roadway plan.
During the tour the group
passed many elderly ladies, students, and children out for a
walk.
"This is not a student beach,
but a place for everyone,"
said a passerby. "Even pregnant ladies can get down here."
Parks board member Rebecca Watson said, "It is not a
question of a road. A walkway
but not a road. One of the big
faults has been bad publicity."
The rumor of a four lane
road is apparently a mix up
with the other Point Grey
road.
"The four lane highway was
an emotional comment, only
a two lane road is planned,"
Lefeaux said.
A major complaint by most
park board officials seems to
be the small number of people
who use the beach at present.
"We must plan for the future," Said an official, "We
are looking after everyone's
recreational interests."
At this point the group had
to head back because it was 4
p.m. and a coffee wagon was
waiting for them.
Only the smart ones guaranteed admission
By PETER LADNER
Evening classes, late afternoon
classes, early evening labs, more crowded classrooms and less study space per
student.
They all appear likely next year
after senate's decision Tuesday night
to try and admit all students to UBC
who meet the existing 60 per cent entrance requirement.
Senate decide to guarantee enrol-.
ment only to matriculating students
coming here next fall with at least 65
per cent averages. Those with averages
between 60 and 65 per cent will be
accepted "only if in senate's view the
university has the physical, financial
and educational resources to accommodate them."
Academic planning head Robert
Clark explained that most students
with averages between 60 per cent and
65 per cent could be accommodated
by more and better use of existing resources such as late afternoon, evening
and lunch-hour courses.
ONLY 800 IN 4.400
These students will makeup an estimated 80O out of the expected 4,400
student increase in enrolment next
year.
Student senators Don Munton and
Stuart Rush were the only two to vote
against the motion.
Rush called the proposal "merely a
cushion, a temporary relief clause to
mitigate public reaction to a policy of
restricted enrolment."
He said the senate does not have
enough information about the effect of
enrolment cuts on other institutions of
higher education in B.C.
Munton agreed the effect on stricter
enrolment standards on the rest of the
province must be considered.
"This restriction cannot be made
in a vacuum," he said.
Rush added that the new restrictions rely too much on high school
evaluation and don't give adequate
warning to high school students graduating this year.
But oceanography prof Robert
Stewart said his son is in grade 12 and
most high school students already know
of the possibility of a higher entrance
requirement.
Clark summed up: "This seems to
be the best in the circumstances, we
can do."
Acting administration president
Walter Gage said it is impossible to
determine what resources would be
available next fall because the three
B.C. universities haven't yet been allocated their individual portions of the
total universities budget.
"There is no question that a large
number of offices and study space will
be needed for next fall," he said.
Senate also passed in principle a
proposal from a joint senate-students'
council- committee to unify the system
of disciplinary courts on campus. Under the proposal faculty and students
will co-operate in running a court system to deal with all student prosecutions, Including academic sanctions.
The proposal now goes to faculty
council for specific measures to be
worked out. Faculty council, chaired
by Gage, is empowered by the universities act to control student discipline
on campus. There is no mention of
faculty discipline in the act.
In other business, senate:
• voted to introduce a course in
meat and egg science in graduate
studies;
• congratulated senator and former B.C. Hydro employee Hugh Keen-
leyside on his appointment to be chancellor of Notre Dame University.
Replied Keenleyside: "Some of my
concerned friends suggest that this is
final proof that I should see a psychiatrist, but I would like to just ask for
your prayers."
• laughed heartily at Walter
Gage's jokes;
• accepted several changes and
additions to existing awards, including
an athletic scholarship worth $250
available to sport stars "whose academic ability, sterling, unselfish character and athletic proficiency in the
opinion of the selectors merits the
award";
• clapped enthusiastically when
Alma Mater Society president-elect
Fraser Hodge was introduced;
• heard Director of Physical Education and Recreation Bob Osborne
emit a funny during a 45 minute discussion on what to call a recreation
degree.
A BARE NAKED B.A.
"At present some students get a
B.A. with 'recreation' written after it
and some get just a bare naked B.A.,"
hef said. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, February 28,  1969
A Flower iii a Concrete Plant
By MAURICE BRIDGE
Ubyssey Flower Child
Do you have any kind of a problem concerning UBC? If you do, put it in writing and
send it to "Flower in a Concrete Plant", Ubyssey office, SUB, or leave it in the ombudsman's
office in the main foyer.
Q. I am about to sell my car, which has
my parking sticker on it. What can I do about
getting a new one?
A. We checked with the Traffic Office and
found you should scrape the sticker off your old
car, trying to keep it recognizable, and take
the pieces to the office and they will give you
another one for your new car.
Q. I would like to use the tennis courts beside the Memorial Gym, but they are always
in use whenever I go there. How do I make
reservations to use a court?
A. There are no reservations for these
courts. They operate on a first come - first
served basis, so if you are still unable to get
a court, try getting up at 5 a.m.
Q. A lot of people on this campus have
essays to type and nowhere to type them. Is
there any place where a person can get hold
of a typewriter and a place to work in?
 Q. There is no place on this campus where
people can type, although the idea is under
consideration for next year. In the meantime,
The Ubyssey allows students to use their typewriters on Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday,
as long as they are not needed by Ubyssey
staffers.
FLASH: Did you hear what happened to the
pappa Corn Flake, mamma Corn Flake and
baby Corn Flake while they were in the bowl?
I'll tell you next week, it's a serial.
Arts general meet brings
72 to listen to candidates
Surprise! The faculty of arts is not totally
apathetic. At an all candidates meeting Thursday 50 to 60 people turned up to hear the
views of the 12 candidates.
That means 72 people turned up so there
are only 5900 apathetic arts students.
What came out of the meeting only goes
to prove as some of the candidates themselves
said "in these times it is smart to be apathetic."
What did the 72 come out to get worked
up over? Well the usual redundancies came
forth with amazing speed:
• the Alma Mater Society is a self sustaining bureaucracy
• the AUS should separate from the AMS
• the AUS should stay with the AMS but
collect its own fees — suggested 50 cents for
the coming year
• the AUS must arouse the individual
apathetic arts student out of his apathy.
Candidates for president are Dick Betts,
arts 2, Murray Kennedy, arts 3, Don Lort, arts
3,   Craig  Meredith,   arts   3,   and  Bob   Spence.
John Biller, arts 3, Nick Orchard, arts 1
and Brett Smiley, arts 1 are running for the
position  of vice-president.
Candidates for treasurer are Linda King,
arts 2 and Tom Mouat, arts 3.
Nominees for secretary are Linda King,
arts 3, and Ian Douglas, arts 2.
If you are an apathetic arts student you
don't vote today — election is on Feb. 28. All
out, let's see a good tu-m out, maybe 73.
McGill student senators resign;
charge their position is hopeless
MONTERAL (CUP) — Six of
the eight student senators on
the 62-member McGill University senate resigned their positions last Wednesday saying
their continued presence would
Saturday
benefit
for 114
Papa Bear's Medicine Show,
the San Francisco Mime
Troupe, the Vancouver Living
Theatre and various purveyors
of underground films will be
doing it most of Saturday
night.
The occasion is a benefit
dance for the SFU U4 at the
Simon Fraser University Theatre.
It begins at 10 p.m. Saturday
and goes on until whenever
it ends. Minimum donation $1.
simply be an exercise in futility.
The move came after a four
hour senate session Wednesday
failed to get as far as adoption
of its agenda. The wrangle,
primarily over an appeal to
senate by Stanley Gray, lec-
urer in political science threatened with dismissal, finally
resolved itself in an expression
of support for Principal H.
Rocke Robertson's decision to
take disciplinary action against
Gray.
The students, in a statement
released after the meeting,
charged they were second class
citizens in the senate and said
they had been repeatedly insulted throughout their five
month term by members of
the body.
The students questioned the
good faith of the senate and
said the senators apparently
did not have a necessary commitment to the general well-
being of the university.
They   said   they   could   no
longer be part of senate's
"hypocrisy and reactionary
position" and said they would
rejoin the senate only when
the body showed willingness
to debate and take action "on
the issues before the university."
The six senators were elected on an activist slate in October. Since then, senate has
been tied in endless confrontation between the students and
the vast majority of senators.
Votes normally go 54-8, sometimes, somewhat higher.
In the last five months, it
has been apparent that senate
cannot deal with more than
one or two items a sitting. Ever
since the students gained seats,
senate has met twice a month
(as opposed to their traditional
monthly sessions) and at times,
twice a week.
The student senators have
consistently accused senate of
refusing to deal with substantive issues and proceeding with
irrelevancies.
EDITORS:
Co-ordinating    -   Al  Birnie '
Ntw»      John  Twigg
City   Alex Volkoff, Peter Ladner
Associate   Paul Knox
Wire      Irene  Wasllewskl
Page Friday   Andrew Horvat
Sports   Jim Maddin
Photo   -    Fred  Cawsey
Ass't News   John Oibbs
Managing    Broee  Curtis
"John Twigg is leaving," sobbed Ann
Arky. The staff reacted with shock and
dismay, viewing with a considerable
amount of alarm the fact that our news
edjtor is selling out to the Vancouver
Slum. Paul Knox accused Twigg of being mercenary, then asked him how
much he's getting. John Gibbs wonder-
ered   who  would  now  stage  the   daily
temper tantrum over 'tween classes.
Nate Smith, the hero of the boat race,
wrote with his usual brilliance and insight. (Nate Smith also wrote this masthead). Political hack Nik Orchard orated
for the throng. They were so enthused
they carried him out on their shoulders
and almost threw him off the point
(with an anchor). Sister Wasil read the
Bible and predicted the end of the world
for a week tomorrow. (Alex, smothered
in copy, thought it was today. Eric
Bryny-er-Bjrn-er-Eric what-the-hell*s-his-
name acted suspiciously middle class as
he eagerly sloshed beer aU over the
damn place. Maurice Bridge and Peter
Kennedy worked (?) but Jack Emberly,
Frank Flynn, Charlie Hulton. Nader
Mirhady, Ulf Ottho, Laura Roff, and
Elaine Tarzwell didn't.
Ladner regaled the proletariat with
choice wisdom and sparkling wit from
the senatt meeting while Curtis went
into such a fit of ectasy over his new
typewriter that he actually used it.
Meanwhile, over in the jerk—I mean
—jock shop Rik Nyland, Dick Button
and Janice Ramsey rolled Maddin into
a ball so Tony Gallager could put him
through the hoop with one of the better
shots seen on campus this season.
The rumor from the darkroom was
that John Frizell had fallen into the
developer and turned out blurry. Dirk
Visser and Gordie Tong decided to destroy the negative.
It has come to our attention that the
masthead is one of the most widely
read parts of the paper. Watch this
space  for news stories.
PANGO-PANGO—Local capitalist pigs are outraged over a
"vicious" attack, by local pinko-pig rag, The Busybody, on one
of their lucrative plantation outlets. The shop was selling pineapples to  pineaople-pickers  at inflated  prices,
SUMMER JOB REGISTRATION
The Placement Office (Office of Student Services) invites
students to meetings in
the AUDITORIUM at 12:30 p.m.
MARCH 3, 4, 5# 6 or 7
to hear a short talk on the
summer job program and to
complete registration forms
BOOKSTORE
ANNUAL
SALE
OF
Discontinued Textbooks
PAPERBACKS - STATIONERY
and Miscellaneous Items
BEGINS
Tuesday, March 4,1969
New Titles & Items Added Daily
During Sole Period
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Alma  Mater  Society
Presidential Nominating Committee
Applications are now being received for students who
are interested in representing the university community
in its selection of a new president for UBC. Please submit a written letter containing qualifications and reasons
for interest in serving on this committee to the AMS
Secretary, Room 248 SUB, before 4:30 Friday, Feb. 28th.
Students must be in Vancouver for the summer and must
be returning to UBC in the 1969-70 academic year.
Representatives Wanted for Other
Committees
Applications are being received for students interested
in sitting on Senate Curriculum Committee, Role and
Organization of Senate Committee and the Liason with
Provincial Government Committee. Please hand in
written application forms stating qualifications and
reasons for interest in sitting on the above committees to
AMS Secretary, Room 248 SUB, before 4:30 Friday,
Feb. 28th.
Grad Class Notices
GIFTS FOR 1969:
1) Inner City Project (Legal Aid)   $6,000.00
2) Library Gift   $4,000.00
3) KindercBre    -.—.. $2,000.00
TOTAL    $12,000.00
HONORARY POSITIONS
1) Honorary President — Dr. R. Rowan
2) Honorary Vice President — Dean Elder
3) Valedictorian — Keith Lowes
4) Historian — Barbara Landels
5) Will Writer — Bob Gilchrist
6) Prophet — Fraser Hodge Friday, February 28, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
ACE PUBSTERS  Erik  Brynjolfsson,  Nate  Smith, Maurice Bridge and John Gibbs calmly quaff
their way to victory in today's boat race. That's judge Tony Hodge looking on.
Student leader sees fascism
rising in German democracy
By ERIK BRYNJOLFSSON
Fascism can re-emerge without formally
violating any democratic principles, says a
West German student leader.
Karl Dietrich Wolff, chairman of the West
German SDS (Students for Democratic Society),
was speaking to 120 people Tuesday about the
political development of West Germany since
the war.
Referring to West German Chancellor Kurt
Kiesinger, Wolff said, "The question is, how
can a man who organized Nazi propaganda in
the occupied territories during the war, return
to power after just 20.years."
Wolff attributed this "rise of neo-nazism"
to the "reactionary
tendancies of the
German businesses
which helped fascism
rise before the war,"
and to the "failure of
the old left to have a
total analysis of the
political situation."
tA' MM'^RH ,,The old  left  —
\ *> ^£fiH___H
communists,  social
democrats,   leftist
clergy   —   protested
WOLFF individual causes, but
when  they were defeated  on  an issue,  they
started to protest another one," said Wolff.
"They continued to appeal to the same structures that caused the defeat of the previous
cause."
Wolff cited as examples the issues of arming the military with atomic weapons, and anti-
labor laws "empowering the government to
end strikes with the use of the military."
"Having failed to defeat these proposals,
they are now-protesting legislation proposed to
allow the arrest of known demonstrators on
sight," he said.
Wolff said students were among the first to
recognize the necessity of a comprehensive
analysis.
"We found that change could only be
brought about if we organize against the existing structure rather than isolated issues."
The political consciousness of the students
started to increase in the beginning of the '60's.
"German business, which had relied heavily
on technicians for its growth was in a slump
and was demanding more emphasis on technical courses and less on academic courses in the
universities," said Wolff.
"And at the same time students were pressing for a greater say in running of the universities.
"Students then began to realize that a free
university cannot exist in a society that is un-
free," he said.
Wolff pointed! out that in 1965, "a massive
demonstration against the university problem
was held the same week as the massive demonstration at the American embassy against the
Vietnam war."
"In 1967, when a student was murdered by
a policeman during a peaceful demonstration,
we realized the university had told us nothing
about how to fight such situations," he said.
Students in Germany have organized "universities within the universities."
"In these critical universities, economics
students, for example, are criticizing the Key-
nesian economic analysis the regular university was teaching," said Wolff.
"These critical universities1 have almost become counter-universities so that those who are
supporting the existing institution have denied
the collection of fees by the student unions
that support the critical universities."
Wolff said when the German technical universities were opened/ by the British, it was
under the condition that they never again be
used to train for war, destruction, and exploitation.
"But the only universities that go along
with this today are the critical universities,"
sad Wolff.
He noted the students attending the critical
universities were not "drop-outs" in that they
were also attending the regular universities.
"Now we are working for an alliance with
the workers in West Germany. For example,
tne students critical of Keynesian economics
started an analysis of the chemical factories
and are now publishing over 50 clandestine
newspapers in the factories."
Asked to explain an apparent gap between
the workers and students, Wolff said, "The gap
won't continue because Germany has a history
of revolutionary workers' movements."
"And in this time of crisis, students have
shown their majority will think of themselves
as merely skilled workers," he said.
Faculty association
ignores students
By JOHN GIBBS
The UBC faculty association is not prepared to take a stand
on students.
In respect to inter-university relations, that is.
The admission was made Monday by Ian Ross, vice-president
of the association, and countered by Rob Walsh, Simon Fraser
University student president.
Why doesn't the association brief to the Perry Commission
on B.C. inter-university relations, include students on its proposed
Provincial University Commission ?
"We aren't prepared to take a stand on that,'' Ross said.
(The provincial university board proposed by the faculty
association would be responsible for the financial and academic
relations between B.C.'s universities as well as long term planning
and representation to the government. The proposed make-up
includes university presidents, faculty reps, and lay members,
but no students. The Perry Commission was set up by the Socred
government  last  year.)
But shouldn't the faculty association make its position on
student membership on such board known now while the Perry
Commission is studying the matter ?
Slightly embarrassed silence from Ross and his collegues (Dr.
William Webber, faculty association president, and Dr. John
Vanderkamp)  followed this  question.
Walsh later spoke to the subject saying in effect the association had missed the boat.
"The proposed B.C. University Commission would soon find
itself treading in deep water without representation from students," said Walsh.
He said the faculty association's proposal was very "non-
student" and as such contradicted the makeup of the university.
Both viewpoints were aired in front of the three man Cpm-
mittee on Relations Between Universities and Governments in
Cecil Green House Thursday.
The commission is a non-governmental, federal body supported by a Ford foundation grant and created by the Association
of Universities, Canadian Association of University Teachers,
Canadian Union of Students and the Quebec student union.
The commission will make recommendations at the conclusion of its study to the federal, as well as individual provincial
governments, on the relations between themselves and universities.
The faculty association presented its concept to the university to the commission. Ross said the university has a multitude of roles, including training of professionals, research, and
as a patron of the arts but that essentially its purpose was the
Platonic "search for truth."
"The university is really a community of teachers and
students, in one location, dispersing and advancing knowledge.
"Any attempt to use the university by the government or
revolutionaries should be strongly resisted," Ross added.
Walsh said the only role of the government was financing
and that all planning and academic content should be in the
hands of academics.
"The government can provide research and manpower but
not the decision making," he said.
Walsh called for a co-ordinating board for B.C.'s universities,
of competent, full-time people recently removed from the university.
"Now it's a mass part-time thing with students, teachers,
and administrators," he said, "all of whom have other primary
roles."
He cited the transfer problems between the different institutions as indicative of this need.
Walsh told the commission it was a mistake to think governments could create an "instant university".
"Governments, i.e. politicians, are incapable of having a real
sense of education," he said.
Walsh said SFU was "academically unsettled" because of
its short gestation period.
"SFU was a sociological mistake," he said. "I'd never be
party to building a university in 15 months."
BLURBLURBLURBLUR
FORUM
Commerce types and other
interested students will have
an opportunity to discuss the
prospects of "Management in
the Year 2000".
That is the topic of Saturday's campus forum, sponsored
by the American Management
Association. Fees are $1 for
students, $3 for faculty and
businessmen.
It all' begins at 11:30 a.m.
Saturday in SUB. Further information is available through
the Commerce Undergraduate
Society.
EDITORSHIP
"The day of the Hairy RED
Blorg is drawing to a close,"
said Bruce Curtis, Managing
Editor of The Ubyssey, in a
press conference at 4:26 a.m.
yesterday morning. "I hereby
declare applications for the position of Editor-in-chief of The
Ubyssey are now being accepted". Curtis said applications
must be in his hands by Mar. 5.
ADMIN. BLDG.
The UBC a d m i n i s tration
hopes to move into its opulent
new quarters March 17.
Current plans call for the
new administration building on
the corner of Wesbrook and
University Blvd. to be completed March 7 and to be occupied (you should pardon the
expression) ten days later. Page A
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, February 28,  1969
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THEUBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by the
Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those
of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey also subscribes to the
press services of Pacific Student Press, of which it is a founding member.
Ubyssey News Service supports one foreign correspondent in Pango-
Pango. Authorized second class mail by the Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes
Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City, editor, 228-2305;
editor, 228-2301; Page Friday, 228-2309; sports, 228-2308; advertising,
228-3977.
FEBRUARY 28, 1969
A hair-raising modern terry tale
By   GORDON   P.  JAMES
The university beach board is probably the
second step in a Machiavellian scheme which
will eventually be the ruination of UBC and
the   surrounding   wilderness   area.
The first step was the construction of the
four-lane section of Marine Drive — do you
really believe that the provincial government
is so concerned about UBC staff and students
that it would construct this road just so they
could get here more quickly and conveniently?
There has been a rumor going around for
the last two years that the provincial govern-
THIS FAIRYLAND SCENE may soon become ferryland, local speculators speculate.
ment was going to put a terminal for Bennett's
Navy off Point Grey — this would serve several  purposes.
First it is only about 15 miles farther from
Victoria than Tsawwassen but would definitely
shorten the driving time,  and there have prob-     ,_
ably   been   complaints   about   the   tie-ups   and
traffic   noise  there.
Also the new terminal would be shorter
from Nanaimo to Vancouver than Horseshoe
Bay is and it would eliminate the tie-ups on
the First and Second Narrows bridges, the traffic noise through West Van, and the noise and
tie-ups at Horseshoe Bay. We now have several
good  reasons   for  the   new   terminal.
Now, this leaves the Tsawwassen terminal
standing idle but, just by coincidence, there is
a super-port being built right next to it. How
simple to combine the now-unused ferry terminal with the super-port and run the railroad
line along the new-unused highway eliminating a lot of static from the Ladner and Boundary   Bay   residents.
Now we have an attempt to get approval
for the construction of a four-lane scenic drive
at the high-tide mark from Trafalgar to Alma
Road. This raises some questions & why four
lanes   and   why  have   it   theref?
However the terminal theory provides a
very good answer for both these questions.
Connect the university beach road to this road
and 'voila', you now have a four-lane, highspeed link with downtown Vancouver which
eliminates" the main reason for a terminal at «
Horseshoe Bay, which is being glutted with
traffic.
Another reason for eliminating the Tsawwassen terminal is that it will be a very messy
operation moving all that coal around and
dumping it into ships, etc. Bennett would not
want his nice ships or his precious tourists getting covered with filthy black coal dust.
With these points in mind what will it be
like  at  UBC  when  the  terminal  opens?
These thoughts only require confirmation of
the ferry terminal off Point Grey to become
major  steps  in  a  plan  to  ruin   UBC.
By BRIAN SLOCOCK
One of the liveliest meetings in the history of
Vancouver's Anti-Vietnam War movement took place
in the IWA hall Sunday. The mood of the conference
was qualitatively different from that which has
marked previous gatherings of this sort: the usual
cut-and-dry reaffirmation of old positions and application of traditional organizing techniques was
replaced by a lively and often heated debate over
the whole direction and function of the anti-war
movement. This debate revealed an increasing
awareness on the part of many activists of the need
to critically reassess where the movement has been
headed and work out a political strategy to guide
future actions.
On the negative side, the conference saw a serious division which threatens to split the anti-war
movement around the next International Mobilization, on the 5th and 6th of April. Two separate
groups emerged early in the discussions at the conference. One, led by the League for Socialist Action
(LSA) sought to limit the demands of the movement
to the withdrawal of U.S. troops and defense of
Vietnam's right to self-determination, while the
other, a more youthful and militant coalition of
forces including SFU's Students for a Democratic
University, argued for raising the political level of
the movement by holding a demonstration that would
pose the questions of the imperialist character of
U.S. military intervention and the need for anti-
imperialist actions.
Peace slogan vs. anti-imperialism
The debate centered around a motion brought
down from the coordinating committee (withdrawal
of U.S. troops and self-determination) and an amendment moved from the floor which argued for an
explicitly anti-imperialist strategy. The supporters
of the latter pointed out that the anti-war movement
had not undergone any qualitative development for
a considerable period of time and that a new strategy was clearly required. They further argued that
the movement had to undertake not only the task of
mobilizing people, but also of educating them in the
causes of the war and of relating the struggle of
the Vietnamese to the specific and concrete struggles
LETTERS page 13
Vietnam
Mobilization
that peoples are involved in here. This necessitated
raising the question of the kind of social system
that generates such problems — its imperialist
character — and launching actions designed to expose this system — anti-imperialist actions.
Those who supported the original motion were
in agreement that the cause of the war was U.S.
imperialism, but insisted that their own demands
for withdrawal of U.S. troops and defense of the
Vietnamese right to self-determination were inherently anti-imperialist. They further asserted that
the effect of openly defining the task of the anti-war
movement as opposition to imperialism would be
to reduce its base and cut it off from support of the
trade unions and the NDP.
Large numbers can be won
The supporters of the amendment countered by
suggesting that there was no necessary relationship
between the political level of the movements program and its ability to mobilize people — the experience of the European left shows that it is indeed possible to win large numbers of youth, students and workers to an explicity anti-imperialist
analysis.
The result of the debate was that the amendment, for an anti-imperialist strategy, passed by a
very narrow margin.
When the vote was announced, leaders of the
minority called for a separate meeting at the back
of the hall, often employing such derogatory catcalls as "anyone interested in building a serious
anti-war movement come to the back."
The product was as might be expected. After
the two groups had discussed among themselves for
an hour, despite the prior agreement to participate
in collective discussions, a representative of the
minority group announced the establishment of a
committee to organize a demonstration based upon
their program to take place on Sunday, April 6th
and terminating at the Vancouver courthouse. Meanwhile,  the majority group had formulated  a  pro
posal for a demonstration on Saturday, April 5th
starting from the CNR station and proceeding to
the U.S. consulate. Thus faced with another fait
accompli which seemed designed to preclude debate, compromise or cooperation, the majority group
was left with no alternative but to proceed with its
plans as a separate action.
The differences which were aired at this conference are of crucial importance to the development
of the anti-war movement but should not have given
rise to such an irrational and unnecessary split.
Principle oi non-exclusion
The principle of non-exclusion was placed in the
forefront of this most recent conference by those in
the majority: they did everything possible to maintain the unity of the movement despite the diversity of opinions that emerged.
The situation that now faces us is a difficult
one. There may still be some possibility of reaching
a unified course of action for April 5th-6th, but the
past behavior of the conference minority (the LSA
and its supporters), does not inspire me with such
optimism. Undoubtedly two marches occurring in
such close proximity, each with their own sponsoring
groups, propoganda, etc., will cause considerable *
confusion among supporters of the anti-war movement in Vancouver.
My own feeling is that radical and anti-war students now have a major responsibility to build and
support the April 5th action. The withdrawal of
the older and more experienced elements from this
action means that the lion's share of the organizing
work now falls on us. Not only is this action the
legitimate vehicle of anti-war sentiment as determined by the majority of activists atthe conference,
but its anti-imperialist thrust will serve a major
function in the politicization and education of Van-"
couver's youth and workers, and the Saturday date
makes much more sense in terms of being seen by
people and getting good press coverage.
March in solidarity with
NATIONAL LIBERATION FRONT
against imperialism
Saturday April 5, noon, CNR station * "i*     __■ ■_*   _. ♦B_r*^ri ■"I   *■» **ji*****j •*****■< i*****j|*****j*^r****-Ji-****Ji^*****J
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By STEPHEN SCOBIE
There is a new magazine going around
campus, in a small number of fugitive
copies, which offers an interesting new
concept in audience participation.
It is nameless, but the name of its
"editor" is Ian Wallace, of the Fine
Arts department. Anyone at all can
contribute: the way you go about it is
like so—
You assemble a page. It can consist of
a drawing, or a poem, or a collage, or
any random page from the book you
happen to be reading, or happen not
to be reading, or it can be the contents
of your wallet at any given time. There
is no limitation on content.
Then you take your page to one of the
5 cent Xerox machines in the Library
or SUB, and you make 5 copies of it
This costs you a quarter.
Then you take your five pages over to
Lasserre, and you find Ian Wallace's
office, and you shove them under the
door. He finds them, collects and
selects them, and about once a week or
so he assembles 5 copies of each issue
of the magazine. There are only 5
copies per issue.
These 5 copies are then given out, free,
to 5 interested people, who look at
them, enjoy them a few days, and then
pass them on to 5 other people, and so
on.
The pages all have the same basic
visual quality because of the xeroxing
process, and all share the same auto-
destructive quality. The photos will
fade in time. Each issue has built-in
obsolescence.
So keep your eyes open for a copy
(there aren't many arounnd) and think
up something wierd to contribute.
The battle continues.
Five years ago or so, Joan Baez ruled
unchallenged as Queen of folk-song. I
can remember drooling over her records, and my sudden burst of popularity when I got a copy of her latest LP
a week before anyone else did.
But recently, there has been a strong
challenge from the upsurging force of
Judy Collins (mightily helped by the
heavy artillery of Leonard Cohen's
songs). Indeed, Judy's In My Life album was a major victory, which seemed to me to give her the crown.
Joan retaliated with Joan, perhaps her
poorest album, in which the direct comparison of the two versions of "La
Colombe" scored heavily in Judy's
favour.
Then Judy produced the no-more-than-
adequate Wildflowers and Joanie got
real intellectual with Baptism. Baptism
was a tricky venture, leaning perhaps
too heavily on the dubious merits of
Henry Treece, but at times (such as the
Joyce reading, or the Cummings song)
it was really magnificent.
Now the latest round has been fought.
Judy's Who Knows Where the Time
Goes? has* a nice cover photo and a lot
of nice songs, though the Cohen items
are a bit under-par. This is made up
for by a good song by Robin Williamson of The Incredible String Band, and
the record finally touches greatness in
its final track, a magnificent modern
setting of the traditional ballad "Pretty
Polly", which I love to distraction.
Joan is less adventurous, and has fallen
back on a sure thing, issuing Any Day
No*****, a double-record set of songs by
Bob Dylan.
It is dogma that nobody but nobody
can sing Dylan's songs anywhere near
as well as Dylan himself can, but given
this initial drawback, Joan makes a
fair job of it. The selection of songs
swings from the most recent stuff to
some very old ones. It's great to hear
"North Country Blues" and "Boots of
Spanish Leather" resurrected, but
surely "Walls of Red Wing" could
have been left to sleep in peace? There
is also a curious narcissistic feeling involved in listening to Miss Baez spending eleven minutes singing a song about
herself ("Sad Eyed Lady of the Lowlands").
Any Day Now is quite a pleasant collection, but it's not madly exciting, and
that Aqua had lollops of breasts, all
bobbing around in the water, but Flamboyant scarcely has any. It is, in fact,
one of the dullest movies since about
1955, which is when (to judge from
the hairstyles, skirt lengths etc.) it was
in fact made. The director's name is
Peter Weiss, but it can't be the same
one. It just can't be.
Undoubtedly the best film in town
right now is John Cassavetes' Faces, at
the Studio. The method of improvisation works here, better I think than it
did in Cassavetes' previous film,
Shadows. Faces is pretty grim stuff,
and not all that easy for the audience
to take. It's like being the only sober
person in a roomful of drunks. Some
people have found the events incredible, but I found them all too realistic.
The vision of life revealed is in a way
savage, but not I feel entirely negative.
Whereas the predominant emotion of,
say, Bunuel in Belle de Jour, was contempt, Cassavetes' attitude is one of
rage—rage at the hideous waste involved in the events he portrays. But that
means that there's something there to
be wasted—and if Faces is an uncompromising view of the depths to which
people can sink, it never loses sight of
the initial worth of people; it is capable
of compassion. And that, these days, is
really something.
Tony Richardson's Charge of the Light
Brigade, at the Coronet, could I suppose
be described as an anti-war film, but
that's not much of a recommendation
if you're as tired of anti-war films as
I am.
And it really isn't fair, for Charge is
very much better than most anti-war
ARMED CONFRONTATION
showing at the Varsity.
in the dramatic film. The Battle of Algiers,  now
I can't really say I'm knocked out by
Joan's little drawings on the cover. As
far as I'm concerned, Judy still has the
upper hand.
Joan vs. Judy. Watch out for further
instalments!
After a period of desolation, when Vancouver's theatres could offer only
Romeo and Juliet to get excited about,
Belle de Jour to be disappointed with,
and Suddenly A Woman to laugh at,
we are suddenly flooded out with
groovy new films.
I mean, things can't be all bad when
the Vogue starts showing Aqua Sex and
The Flamboyant Sex, advertised as
"Naughty as the law allows!" when
they ain't even Restricted. Undeterred,
your faithful reviewer penetrated this
den of vice and iniquity, and discovered
films. For one thing, the tempting
parallels to be drawn between the
British involvement in the Crimea and
the American involvement in Vietnam
are all studiously ignored. There is no
barrel-thumping attempt to stress the
"relevance" of the film to present-day
politics. Indeed, its greatest strengths
are the total re-creation of a past
period, and the ironically amused, detached quality of the observation of
war's stupidities.
It is by no means rare to, see a film
which looks as if it were in another
period: Hollywood traditionally spends
millions researching details of costumes,
hair-styles, etc. But very rarely do you
get a film which sounds anything but
mid-twentieth century. One of the
things I most liked about Charge was
the whole tone of the dialogue, the
conscious stress on verbal wit in polite
conversation. Trevor Howard, having a
s ^'^MK^md^mmmu'^dd&^^
RANDOM   PAGE  from   lan  Wallace's
new arts magazine.
ball as Cardigan, fairly revels in the
coarseness of the picture he presents
<"By the Tsar's left tit", etc.); but the
prize must go to a passionate love
scene between David Hemmings and
Vanessa Redgrave (remember Blow-
Up?) which opens with Miss Redgrave's
anguished utterance, "You surely cannot be unaware of the regard I bear
for you."
Richardson's attitude is not so much
moral outrage (though we do get a fair
amount of gore, one amputation, and
the obligatory flogging scene) as ironic
amusement. The film is remarkably
funny as it observes the ditherings of
the High Command, and it is nobly
assisted by the splendid animated sequences, done by Richard Williams, which
bring to life the popular drawings and
propaganda of the Victorian period.
The modern audience finds these sequences deliciously funny; but I suspect
the Victorians themselves would have
taken them quite seriously.
Even as you surface from this week's
deluge of new films, there's next
week's. The Varsity opens Battle of
Algiers, a brilliant documentary reconstruction of civil revolution which becomes increasingly relevant to North
American Society.
Incidentally, after Algiers, the Varsity
will be showing a film of The Committee, the American satirical theatre
group, one of whose branches played
at UBC during the Contemporary Arts
Festival. This is simply a film of one
of their stage performances — there
are no cinematic innovations — but it
includes some of their best and funniest
routines.
For those of you who missed Yellow
Submarine in its surprisingly brief
downtown run at Christmas, the
Beatles cartoon film is now showing at
the Dunbar. And if you ask Manager
Ron Keillor very nicely, or bribe him
with a shrimp sandwich, he might be
persuaded to turn the sound way way
up after the little old ladies go home.
The new "Arts Theatre" down by the
Art Gallery makes an inauspicious debut with the pulpy romance slop
Mayerling, restricted to people who
think Omar Sharif has nice eyes. A
Lion in Winter, weighted down by a
cluster of Academy Award nominations, opens at the Stanley.
=li-_-_l*=^r=d******Jr*-*-*Ji^r*****^p*-**J******Jr****J*^
pfage 2wo THEUBYSSEY Friday, February 28, 1969 POISED FOR TAKE-OFF, VSO conductor Dietfried Bernet whips orchestra info lather.
By MICHAEL QUIGLEY
At his recent Vancouver Symphony concerts,
guest conductor Dietfried Bernet got a great
deal of enthusiastic applause, which I think was
rightly deserved. However, at each of his concerts, he also got a standing ovation of some sort
or other, which regular readers of this column
will know I view with a great deal of suspicion.
Precisely what is behind the notorious "Vancouver Standing Ovation"? I was always under
the impression that one remained seated except
when there was a once-in-a-lifetime performance like Ashkenazy's performance of Beethoven's Fifth Piano Concerto last season. And
then there's always the standing-ovation-as.
tribute such as those (four in one concert) given
when aging Igor Stravinsky conducted during
a memorable concert of his works four years
ago as part of the Vancouver International Festival.
With the great frequency at which VSO audiences have been leaping up and down, I wonder
if they are really so culture-starved that even
a not too exceptional run-through of Beethoven's
Fifth makes them react like high jumpers. Or
are they trying to set a new standard for rating
a symphony performance?
One can just imagine two famous performers
meeting in some European musical centre and
discussing their recent tours. "I got a standing
ovation in Vancouver," boasts one, and the
second, to his amazement, replies, "Oh, so did
I!" Pretty soon, Vancouver ovations will be "as
common as catching the plague in India", as one
of my friends once commented.
What can be done in place of an ovation, however? Aside from a sitting ovation, I- don't see
why louder applause and a few bravos and
similar expressions of enthusiasm couldn't suffice. Or you could start a "protest ovation",
such as occurred after Ginastera's Estudios
Sinfonicos last season, with a small minority
of the audience standing, another minority booing, and the rest of the audience sitting in a
somewhat confused state, an occurrence repeated this season with the contemporary works
Assassinations by Burritt and The Whale by
Tavener.
Or you could always give an ovation to the
Beethoven overture which begins the concert.
Or the noises produced by the orchestra tuning
up   .   .   .
On the subject of conductor Bernet himself, I
was reasonably impressed by his control over
the orchestra as compared with the sloppy performance under guest conductor Wyn Morris
a couple of months ago.
However, I wasn't too thrilled by Bernet's
rather conservative subscription concert programmes (Bruckner, Beethoven, Mozart, Rossini), which were probably designed to appeal
to the elderly members of the Vancouver
Symphony Society who might be hiring him
two seasons from now.
What I found most interesting, surprisingly
enough, was the Viennese Night concert on February 15, with Bernet's version of Richard
Strauss' Der Rosenkavalier Suite one of the
most exciting performances I've heard from
the VSO.
Bernet whipped the orchestra into a lather
during the erotic introduction to "the Suite and
later effectively conducted the Straussian "Viennese waltz" parodies as if they were actual
Viennese waltzes, with all the subtle rubali and
ritardandi usually found in the real thing. As
satirical schmaltz, it worked surprisingly well.
One tidbit of information about Bernet which
reached and bothered me was that he's not too
enthusiastic about contemporary music (roughly
speaking, anything after Hindemith and Berg),
but since he's quite young, I guess we can give
him time to acquire a taste for new sounds
similar to those present conductor Meredith
Davies introduced earlier this year.
However, considering what Bernet did with
the Rosenkavalier Suite, and keeping in mind
his experience at the Vienna State Opera and
the Vienna Volksoper, I was thinking that
Bernet could be a conductor who might inject
some life into the Vancouver opera scene. Perhaps we might even get to hear Berg's Wozzeck
and/or Lulu some day.
And to those present Vancouver operagoers
who shout "No! It's impossible!" to this occurrence while subconsciously Humming arias from
La Boheme, I offer the following suggestions
as to how it could be done, besides acquiring
Bernet as conductor:
First, have an advertising campaign which plays
up the sordid and sexual subject matter of the
operas; then have special prices and/or performances for students; and for the North
Vancouver jet set, bring in Joan Sutherland to
sing the female lead. Then we might see if
Vancouver's operatic tastes are really as phoney
as many people think.
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Friday, February 28, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY
pfage 3hree THE
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TO THE TRINIDAD
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Saturday, Mar. 1 - SUB Ballroom
8:30 - 1  a.m. — $1.50 per person
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DIRECTED   BY STANLEY WEESE
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STUDENT TICKETS $1.
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By K. TOUGAS
The title Faces suggests the subject and treatment of John
Cassavetes' film: human faces, masks (that is, making faces)
or grimaces, and finally, the faces or facets of these L.A.
personages. Endless roving close-ups hammer at the loud
laughter and tell-tale facial characteristics, vividly emphasizing and dissecting the individuals. Recognizing the impossibility of reproducing a true picture of America in its
entirety, the director does not attempt to generalize or
allegorize. Instead, he presents a very specific drama resembling at times a clinical observation, having its relevance within a limited social context. Characters fill in—
individuals, not caricatures—and any criticisms of American
Society come more from the viewer than from Cassavetes'
camera.
Thematically, Faces is the well-known split: public man
versus private, successful family/business image versus interior emptiness. The aging businessmen and housewives
long for intimate tenderness but are frustrated. Characters
continually want to be alone with each other, yet it is
painfully apparent that they can only successfully operate
in a crowd. Intimacy shows them unable to know the other,
themselves also remaining unknown. Covering laughter
and desire-less sex (which they know to be futile) replace
the true emotions they no longer are capable of. They toy
vainly with illusion but their business and social successes
cannot be related to a comparable interior wealth.
Noticeably, only those who make a profession of personal
relationships, the whore (Gena Rowlands) and the gigolo
(Seymour Cassel), are able to show any sensitivity and
human emotion.
Sitting in the Studio Theatre, I was immediately reminded
of Shirley Clarke's The Connection, Mekas' The Brig, and
the bulk of Warhol's work. Faces presents -the same taut,
blunt and aggressive staging emphasized by the harsh,
grainy 16mm blacks and whites. However, thankfully, unlike Warhol, Cassavetes focuses with the same exhaustive-
ness on relatively normal people—without Andy's painful
exhaustion. Strange camera angles, serpentine camera movements and depthless focus produce a dynamic motion rather
than that provided by the usual simple action of characters
in a given environment.
One of the most attractive elements of Faces is its use of
the cinematic medium to create events and situations rather
than the traditional representation of fixed actions, ideas
and relationships. Not arbitrarily predetermined, the
characters develop as the film advances, literally creating
themselves.
So, as the couple systematically lacerate their emotions to
the point of absolute silence on a staircase, Cassavetes depicts with compassion, some sentiment, and a great deal
of truth, the lives of his L.A. group. Within his primitive
art and his actor's cinema he succeeds in showing the
overwhelming sadness of those faces.
FACES  FROM FACES  belong to Gena  Rowlands and
John  Marley.
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THE     UBYSSEY
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Friday, February 28, 1969 "You'll get some fruit from the cellar for Mums won't
you Timothy, dear?"
"Yes, mother."
Timothy put down his rubber band and closed the oak door
of his over-loaded toy room as he left. The granite grated
as he closed the secret panel of the passage to the dungeon.
Water creeping from cracks beneath the steps saturated his
"Arachnia" is a short story originally submitted as an
essay in English 100. The author prefers to take shelter
behind a Japanese pseudonym.
shoes. Flickering torches created wavering and melting
shadows along the towering cylindrical wall. The twisting
staircase spiralled deep, down, down, down . . . The path
ended abruptly at the fruit-cellar.
Timothy opened the oak door and turned on the light. He
lifted the sticky jar and, as he turned around, he observed
that a large black net prevented his departure.
"How unusual" he mused.
He was much relieved to notice that it was merely the
shadow of a spider's web cast upon his route by the light.
Two boxes elevated him to a level equal to that of the
spider.
"Hello spider. I have read books about you. I shall call
you Egbert because there was a King of that name."
The spider did not reply.
Timothy climbed the thousand steps towards the top of
the lighthouse. A crack at the top told him that the end
was near. It was always a long way to the room at the top.
He deposited the jar upon the table after he had closed
the oak door to the cellar.
"I have just met a spider," he said to his artificial mother.
"Oh," she replied -artificially,  "I do not  like spiders."
"I have named him Egbert because there was a King of
that name."
"Oh," she replied. "Wash for dinner."
After dinner Timothy caught a fly on the window of his
bedroom. As he closed the oak door he could hear the sea
washing against the rocks many thousands of feet below.
He followed the treacherous path—the only one—from
which many had fallen, never to be heard from again. At
one point a loose rock fell from beneath his feet and as it
tumbled into the darkness he grasped a crack in the rounded
mountainside.
"It is fortunate that I didn't fall," he said to himself
He dropped the hapless fly into the glistening net. The
spider crept towards it suspiciously.
"I hope that you like the fly which I have brought for
you," said Timothy, humbly enough.
The spider carefully wrapped the gift and put it aside.
Timothy wished that he had eight legs also. "But I wouldn't
eat flies," he added.
The spider then hungrily gathered the succulent mummy
into his arms.
"I shall leave you to eat in peace now," said Timothy. He
left the light on as he closed the oak door.
"Only one hundred more steps to the top of the highest
tower in the world," said the guide. "This will be our last
rest. The view is worth-the climb."
Timothy hurried on He wished to reach the top first.
Otherwise it was no fun..
Timothy visited the spider very frequently for the next
three weeks. His mother wondered artificially about him.
He closed the oak door of his reading room and proceeded
towards the sweeping, gently turning staircase that led
towards the main ballroom.
"A ball in honour of King Egbert," he thought. "How
pleasant." All the kings and queens and princesses and
princes of all the neighbouring countries would be there.
Timothy strutted with grandeur and pomp down the stairs.
After all, wasn't he the king's best friend?
As he reached the bottom of the stairs a messenger approached him. "I am sorry to announce to you, your honour,
that the king is in dire trouble."
He pushed the messenger aside. As he opened the door to
the fruit-cellar he found the spider strangled in its own web.
"How unfortunate for you," said Timothy thoughtfully.
He wrapped the spider carefully in a tissue, put it in a
box, and threw it in the garbage.
A
R
A
C
II
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I
A
yS) RENT
M ACAH
BETTER BUY BOOKS
UNIVERSITY TEXT BOOKS
NON-FICTION PAPERBACKS
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and Study Guides
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SUB MALL
From Seattle-'THE LOCOMOTIVE'
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Performing Arts
((
The Whisperers,
who are they?
BRYAN FORBES'
Production of
THE
WHISPERERS
V
Stsrrinj
EDITH EVANS
ERIC PORTMAN
NANETTE NEWMAN
RONALD FRASER
AVIS BUNN AGE
GERALD SIM
MuaicCompned I Conducted by JOHN BARRY
Produced by MICHAEL S. LAUGH UN
& RONALD SHEDLO
Written hr the Screen & Directed by BR YAN FORBES
A Seven Pines Production
Distributed by LOPERT PICTURES CORPORATION
| ORIGINAL MOTION  PICTURE SCORE  AVAILABLE ON UNITED ARTISTS RECORDS  |
TODAY & SAT.
Feb. 28 -12:30,3:30,6:30,9:00
Mar. 1 -7:00, 9:15
SUB THEATRE
ADMISSION 50c
NOTE: Advance tickets for "The Good, The  Bad, and The Ugly" will be on sale immediately
after the start of each performance of "The Whisperers."
FEB. 28 - 12:35, 3:35, 6:35, 9:05 - MAR. 1 - 7:05, 9:05
GET  TICKETS  EARLY  TO  AVOID DISAPPOINTMENT
Returns-3:00, 6:00, 9:00 on March  11 ADMISSION 50c
Friday, February 28, 1969
THE       UBYSSEY
pfage 5ive Your faculty
advisor asks you
(or advice?
Think It over, over coffee.
TheThink Drink.
For your own Think Drink Mug, send 75C and your name and address to:
| Think Drink Mug, Depl. N, P.O. Box 1000, Willowjale, Ontario. The International Coffee Organization.
/fappfaes? isrjojBf/n*
pasl-haste ioa   -7
post-Sox fr mail
Money to a frienb.
p&l-dappiness is
receiving two of
So,■■—** -      -*■--   —
ffore are alternative
tneWiads of keeping
track cfwicr moxey
Mittc/i ii is only   .
■Sporlvy to rtosnuon..
of me
our lapinary compatriot
^reacts unpredictably
fo iprotfress, -we've
found?
like, how she uses
her new ■Urue
Chequing Account.
•she sends out cheques
for one cen-fc -to hei*
£riends.
so, naturally-, all her
-friends have to write
her back, io thank her
for her unexpected
ijeiverosiVy".
and ?&»*■, o£ course., •
we semd back, all he**
cancelled choices.
3o-
£or every letter ^at
l3.pin.ette sends out",
she receives iwo hack,.
it seems -to be a very
acwn-key way -to
attract attention..
i-V is also a darned sfcod
"Vvay of .keeping tradic
c£ ryour disappearing
doagn. °
So maybe you would
appreciate getting your
cneajxt<s, &isv3K9 too...
yew ueryoum
CUiiom autoyraptel
cfeques fiSryeu
fo keep?
'A. cfiecttr*)
^VJ^X
MeeAee)
Lank of montreal
campusBanK
campusbeiik'brQndt
in tbe adiiiiiudwflion. building
<J.f .peiYtion, maneger
Oiwna-^-5H>fMi«yloThxa4a«y.«5o-6BVid«7-
Enlightenment—then & now
By RONALD TETREAULT
Intellectual history is an amazingly complex
and diverse study. It embraces such hitherto
aloof subjects as history, philosophy, and literature; it serves as a link between the "humanities" fields and the social sciences, insofar as
The Enlightenment, by Norman Hampson.
Penguin.
it is concerned with the reciprocity between
ideas and their social context; and it bridges
the formidable and ever-widening gap between
the arts and the sciences, since the history of
science is quite a legitimate and important subdivision of the history of ideas. For our own
age, which has exhausted analysis and cries
aloud daily for a new synthesis, intellectual
history provides uncommon insights. Its animating principle is synthesis: through it, we may
learn that "the present is the living sum-total
of the past."
The latest contribution to this intriguing subject is Norman Hampson's The Enlightenment,
which is to be the fourth volume in a new
paperback series, the Pelican History of European Thought. The book is essentially a survey
of eighteenth-century thought and is intended
to serve merely as an introduction to the period.
Even so, Hampson provides a comprehensive
treatment of his subject.
He begins, naturally, in the century before and
ends in the century after. He sees the Bible
and the Classics, with their emphasis on the
idea of degeneration from some Golden Age,
as the two key influences on seventeenth-century thought. These engendered a pessimism
about the nature of the world, to which the
Enlightenment figures reacted with a new optimism. Hampson specifies three Englishmen,
Francis Bacon, Isaac Newton, and John Locke,
as seminal to this new movement. Having given
the English their due, he then concentrates
most of his attention on the French thinkers
of the eighteenth century to show how the seed
planted by these three men grew. He ends the
book by suggesting that the philosophies of
Fichte and Hegel, and the consequent development of National Socialism from the former and
Marxism from the latter, were the natural
evolution of enlightenment tendencies.
Hampson divides the eighteenth century into
two distinct periods (from 1715 to 1740 and
from 1740 to 1789) and structures his book
accordingly. He begins both sections with a
detailed examination of the social and political
environment of each period. Although he is
wise enough not to follow rigidly his chronological structure in tracing the development of
particular ideas, he is quite unequivocal in his
assumption that the social and political context
produces the ideas of a given age. He all but
denies that ideas help determine, or even influence, that context. He explains the confident,
inquiring, optimistic temper of the first period
by saying that "the self-confidence of the educated . . . rested on the almost universal conviction that the social order was static." He tries
to dissociate the Enlightenment from the French
Revolution thus; "Just as the Enlightenment
was not primarily political, the origins of the
French Revolution were not primarily ideological." Yet he attributes the difference in social
and political environment between the two
parts of the century to the characters of the
men who ruled: "The main difference between
the Europe of the first and second halves of
the eighteenth century lay in the character of
its rulers." History, it seems, makes ideas, but
men make history. What seems like a Marxist
philosophy of history turns out, on closer
scrutiny, to be a Carlyleari. one!
The book remains a very competent introduction to the age. The growth of the idea of
benevolism, which on the cosmic level he traces
as far back as Newton, and the development of
scientific thought, especially in biology, are
particularly well done. A thorough and critical
bibliographical note rounds out what is already
a book well worth the attention of anyone
interested in the history of ideas.
By KIM RICHARDS
"There's a shit-storm coming."
Some would say it's already here. As the black
people of the United States are unifying in
strength and power, they are becoming vocal
about    their   fight    for    liberation.    Eldridge
Soul On Ice, by Eldridge Cleaver,
Ramparts Books.
Cleaver, an admirable spokesman for all oppressed people, is not able to lie about what's
going on. He talks about the reality that the
optimistic myths of America have been trying
to hide for three hundred years.
Cleaver grew up wrong. He isn't grateful, like
an obedient native son should be, to his foster
parent, the white American culture. Although,
by keeping him in jails and in ghettos, this culture has tried everything within its power to
destroy any power he might realise, it has
failed utterly because the measures of preserving its supremacy are the methods with which
it is destroying itself
By dividing and ruling the black people the
white power system cut off all lines of communication except that of oppression. Cleaver's
book of essays, Soul on Ice, talks clearly and
truthfully to his fellow blacks. The white can
listen in, he can even sit at the back of the
room, and his active duty, because he does not
share nor has he experienced the reality that
Cleaver strongly describes, is to give his full
solidarity to the blacks and work on his own
front. The only danger is that the romantics
will give themselves to the struggle in the U.S.,
neglecting to direct their entire effort towards
ceasing the oppression of minorities in Canada,
most specifically that of the Indians.
Unlike Norman Mailer, whose cultural writing
is a platform for Mailer's egotism, be it
humorous or serious, Cleaver does not make
himself into a romantic figure. The story of his
growth as an individual is not only integral
to the story of his increasingly inescapable
political commitment but also to the history of
the liberation movement as a whole, for Cleaver
marks a boundary that has to be reached and
moved in the process of the realisation of liberation.
The essays are firm statements, fired with a
remarkable, loving intelligence, a fine sense
of humor and an uncompromising moral
honesty. They have to be read! Read Cleaver
before reading Baldwin.
The false cultural myths have to be destroyed
as does the attempt to assimilate Cleaver into
the op-pop culture, as is presently happening.
This is a period of history when the majority of .
literate art is microcosmic, esoteric and self-
pitying. The emergence of writing like Cleaver's
begins an enormous possibility for the intelle-
gence and talent of humanity. A person who is
not actively involved in his own liberation and
the liberation of all oppressed people will never
find the strength nor the power to say, as
Cleaver does, "We shall have our manhood. We
shall have it or the earth will be levelled by our
attempts to gain it."
THE
FLOATING BRIDGE
At The BISTRO
Tuesday thru Sunday
With Lights by Andromeda Voyage
at  2081   West 4th  Ave.
TEL.: 736-9920
UBC Reading
Improvement Course
Special
Student Rate $35.
Non-Students $55.
•
UBC Extension Dept., East Mall
or  Phone  228-2181
AND
THE
UGLY
pfage 6ix
THE     U BYSSEY
Friday, February 28,  1969 Year of the Anti-War G.I.
By BOB McKEE
In Seattle last week, there was
a massive demonstration of three
thousand people marching
against the war in Vietnam as a
building action for the international day of protest on April
- 6th. But, this was no ordinary
anti-war march. At a large meeting afterwards, a speaker called
out: are there any G.I.s here ?
In response, over three hundred
servicemen stood up amid spontaneous cheering and applause..
It is events such as this which
demonstrate the dramatic change
-- in the anti-war movement in
the last year. For the first time,
American troops are coming out
in support of withdrawal from
Vietnam and self-determination
for the Vietnamese. The Chicago
*, Daily News recently reported
that over half the G.I.s are now
opposed to the war. Cases of rebellion and opposition grow.
There was the case of Ft. Hood
where soldiers refused to move
into Chicago to help the Chicago police during the Democratic convention last year. There
is even an unconfirmed report
of three thousand troops in Vietnam demonstrating against the
war in Saigon, similar to the
massive meetings the G.I.'s had
in 1946, when they refused to
continue the war against the
Communist Chinese for the US
government.
This change has brought two
p, reactions. Firstly, amongst antiwar activists, it has shown that
G.I.s are not all madmen out
to get 'a Gook a day' but are
conscripted workers like the rest
of the population. They have no
choice but to fight or face a prison sentence. They have no heart
in the war either.
Secondly, the US government
has reacted to these developments predictably. There has
been a news blackout on G.I.
opposition and continual
attempts are made to harass anti-
* war G.I.s. On days of demonstrations, whole batallions stationed nearby are put 'on alert'
at short notice. Those G.I.s distributing anti-war leaflets or G.I.
papers are threatened with dis.
* ciplinary action. Such harassment was beautifully countered
recently in Seattle. Anti-war activists got two hundred prominent citizens to send letters to
the base commander protesting
harassment. As a result, the commander was forced to call the
whole base together and tell
them   that   they   could   go   on
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Friday, February 28, 1969
demonstrations as long as they
were out of uniform and it was
in off-duty hours.
These developments have not
gone unnoticed by the Vietnamese themselves. Recently,
NLF spokesmen in Cuba
praised the contribution to the
Vietnamese struggle made by
the anti-war movement. They
urged people to continue to
build demonstrations around
the theme of immediate and
unconditional withdrawal of
US troops and Vietnamese self-
determination. They urged activists not to be misled into thinking that the Paris negotiations
have made continued protest
unnecessary or irrelevant. Far
from it, the continuing success
of the Vietnamese against the
war machine depends not only
on the military prowess of the
Vietnamese but also on the
efforts of the anti-war movement. The latter must take
some credit for Johnson's demise and the bombing halt. The
weakening, through continued
protest, of the US government's
war effort can only speed the
withdrawal from Vietnam.
Canadians have their part to
play as well. As Clara Culhane, a Canadian medical nurse
from Vietnam, said when she
was at UBC, the Canadian
government is intimately involved with the US war
machine in Vietnam. It provides them with information
through its role in the supposedly impartial International Control Commission in Vietnam. It
supports them diplomatically
and above all provides them
with military aid. In recent
months, the Trudeau government has been training Cana-
adian troops in counter-insurgency warfare under the guise
of using such troops in 'peacekeeping' operations in Vietnam.
What this means is that unless
the Canadian anti-war movement takes a hand, Trudeau
will have Canadian troops in
Vietnam to bolster the weakening US troops.
It is in the light of these new
developments that the Canadian Vietnam Mobilization
Committee has called for crosscountry demonstrations on April 6th — the day of international protest, under the slogans: "Solidarity with the antiwar G.I.s"; "Vietnam for the
Vietnamese"; and "End Canadian Complicity in Vietnam."
At a recent action conference
in Vancouver, one hundred activists listened to Joe Young,
Chairman of the Student Association to End the War in Viet
nam, make the call for a mobilization on April 6th.
Unfortunately, the conference
was divided into two groups.
One group wished, not to build
an anti-war march, but wanted
a multi-issue march around the
theme of anti-imperialism. Such
a theme is not likely to be effective in building a mass anti-war
march. This has proved the
case in the US and Canada bs-
fore. As such, the anti-imperialist theme would damage the
growth of the anti-war movement and thus do a disservice
to the Vietnamese. Fortunately,
the other half of the conference
decided to continue to build
the Vietnam march under the
slogans which the NFL called
for and which will highlight
the G.I. struggle and Canadian
complicity.
This April 6th Mobilization
Committee has received for the
first time considerable support
from the working-class organizations of Canada. Vancouver
Labor Council and the Provincial NDP have endorsed the
April 6th march and have financially contributed. As such,
April 6th could herald the biggest Vietnam demonstration in
the history of Vancouver, with
both working-people and students involved together. This
would be part of the biggest
international day of protest yet.
Dashing young beau brummet
man about town page friday
editor Andrew Horvat was largely missing this week, reaping
filthy lucre from the Fed. Gov.
In his absence, pf staff searched
desperately for a surrogate of
comparable elegance—hence the
array of masculine haute couture
on this week's cover. Stephen
Scobie bravely sported a natty
blue ascot; even Maureen the
mountain girl wore blanche de
Nimes.
The Quiggles limped soulfully
by, explaining that he had been
trampled underfoot in a Vancouver standing ovation. Even
Valerie Hennell sought the solace
of solitude. But lo! Andy returned
to the printers, resplendent in a
tie by K. Hideo of Tokyo, and
all was smile's again as Maureen
the m-g celebrated another inevitable birthday.
FOLLOW THE
YELLOW BRIQUE ROAD!
PARTIES,   DANCES,   CONCERTS
For  Bookings Call:
TIM  CARROLL
688-1829
SMILE!
Have your teeth cleaned, polished and fluoridated by dental
hygiene students at the Faculty of Dentistry on campus at
a modest cost. At the same time you will be instructed in
the proper care of your teeth.
Because of limited facilities it may be necessary to
restrict the number of patients accepted for this treatment. If you are interested, please telephone for a
screening appointment at:
228-3623
or see Miss J. Faulafer in Room 122, John Barfoot McDonald
Building, Faculty of Dentistry.
RETURN
MARCH 11
SUB THEATRE
THE
WHISPERERS,
who
are
they
BRYAN FORBES'
Production of
'THE
WHISPERERS"
EDITH EVANS
ERIC PORTMAN
A Sr>*n **■■«■-■ Pr.-rfuf/«.-.
Dntr.butrtt by LOFERT HICTUHtS CORPOHATIDN
Today & Sat.
SUB THEATRE
Intermedia
Presents
FILMS OF THE
KUCHAR BROTHERS
Fri. & Sat. 8:30 p.m.
575 Beatty 2nd Floor
Admission  by Donation
DEAN'S
RESTAURANTS
Full
Dining
Facilities
Take-Home
Service
PIZZAS - CHICKEN
HAMBURGERS
4544 W. 10th 224-1351
5688 Yew at 41 st    266-7188
Hours: Weekdays 7 a.m. to 11 pjn.
Sundays   10  a.m.  to  11   pja.
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better circulation of the eye's natural moisture and air so
necessary for proper wear. And best of all, they don't "hide"
your eyes.
NOW BY POPULAR DEMANDI-with every original pair of
Vent-Air contact lenses you Will receive a spare pair at no
extra charge . . . tinted grey, blue, green, or brown as
desired. LOW MONTHLY PAYMENTS.
Vent-Air lenses are available only in our offices. Come in
for your no-obligation demonstration today . . . you may
see without glasses tomorrow.
10%  DISCOUNT WITH A.M.S. CARDS
AVAIIAEUONLV   AT
KLEAR VISION CONTACT LENS CO.
HOURS: 9 A.M. to 6 P.M. dally incl. Sat.; Mon. to 8 P.M.
Suite 616, Burrard Bldg. ubc
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III! 17907   aV9H9W Vancouver> B*C- Mu 3-7207
NIU 0-/ZUI   aWr.fMI^B      please send me your fit* Illustrated IwqkM
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I
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.4
THE     UBYSSEY
pfage 7even VOLKSWAGEN
SPECIALISTS
Large Stock of Parts on Hand
CERTIFIED MECHANICS
UNIVERSITY SHELL SERVICE
4314 W. 10th
224-0828
DUTHIE  BOOKS
Now 4 Locations to Serve You
OUR  U.B.C  BRANCH
4560 W. 10th AVE.   -   224-7012
and  at
919 ROBSON   -
1032 W.HASTINGS
670 SEYMOUR ST.
684-4496
688-7434
-   685-3627
DUTHIE BOOKS
Banking is
hotter
than ever,
AT TWO NEW U.B.C.
CAMPUS BRANCHES
Bank of Montreal's present Campus Branch will be
closing shortly and there will be two brand-new
branches on campus to serve students and faculty.
1. IN THE STUDENT
UNION BUILDING
especially designed for student needs.
2. IN THE ADMINISTRATION
BUILDING
Choose the branch that fits in. best with your daily
curriculum and we'll be glad to have your account
transferred without any inconvenience to you. Next
time you are in the bank, let us know which branch
suits you  best. Or  just drop us a  line.
New Branches Open
March 10th
Bank of Montreal
Canada's First Bank
Musical Backsides
By VALERIE HENNELL
A man who has been performing and recording
for almost half a century and has become a
living legend of the folk tradition is back in
Vancouver this week.
Josh White Sr., good-will ambassador and the
original folk and protest singer, is at the River
Queen on Davie Street until March 8.
Since his first recording in 1920 Josh has performed all over the world, releasing hundreds
of records and becoming an internationally
famous figure in music.
His style, which almost defies classification in
contemporary terms, might be described as
folk-blues. He sings ballads, work songs, and
spirituals, caressing the guitar as if it were a
woman and speaking the message of freedom
for all: black, white, red, whatever. His feelings on the racial issue are summed up in a song
called " Colourblind" which points out that if
the world were colourblind there would be no
distinction between black and white or any
other colour, and no one would have any
excuse for racial prejudice.
A molecule is a molecule, son,
and the damn thing has no race.
Another song reduces man to his chemical
components, showing that every man's the
same with his skin off.
What kind of performer is Josh White? A very
rare kind who can break a guitar string at the
beginning of a song and go right on singing
while he strings and tunes his instrument in
time to come back playing by the end of the
song.
The kind who can reach right out into an
audience and make people become part of
him as he performs.
The kind who makes you wonder just what all
the discrimination is about.
Tot meet Josh White is a heart-warming experience. You can meet him until Mar. 9 at the
River Queen or in the SUB Ballroom at noon
next Tuesday and Friday. He will be in concert, with Ann Mortifee, Vancouver's outstanding female folksinger who has performed with
him several times throughout the past two
years.
Tuesday's  concert
mission is 50 cents.
runs  from  12:30-1:30.   Ad-
pfage 8rghf
Friday's concert is from 12:30-2:30 for 75 cents.
It's a small price to pay for such high calibre
entertainment. Don't miss it.
Two Sagittarians, a pair of Capricorns, and a
Gemini. These are the stars that comprise The
Floating Bridge, a Seattle-based group of extremely competent musicians presently performing at the Village Bistro.
In its original form the group, entirely instrumental, was made up of Joe Johansen, lead
guitar; Rich Dangel, lead guitar; Joe Johnson,
bass guitar; and Mike Marinelli, drums. Their
vocalist, Pat Gossan, "just fell into the group"
last August when they assumed their present
name and proceeded to release their first
album.
The name, The Floating Bridge, is not specifically derived from assocation with Seattle's
architectural phenomenon; rather, it just "floated up out of thin air" and became representative of the group's aim "to bridge the gap between several different kinds of music: blues,
jazz, rock, and folk."
It is a gap that they effectively conquer, and
they certainly have the talent to back their
attempt. For many years Joe Johansen has held
the unofficial title of best guitar player in the
Northwest; he has been involved in music for
over a decade, and his skill is an obvious reflection of this. Mike Marinelli's drumming is
versatile to a point of fascination. He is undoubtedly one of the most accomplished drummers to ever hit this town. With the added instrumental dexterity* of Joe and Rich the group
produces a very tight and yet highly improvisational sound. Their instrumental version of "A
Day  in  the  Life"   combines  several  musical
THE     UBYSSEY
styles which balance perfectly and provides
exceptionally good listening.
Vocalist Pat Gossan sings right down the middle, around the edges, and over and beyond the
music. Unfortunately, his powerful voice is
often obscured by the inevitable echo of a club
as small as the Bistro. But in the song "You
Got the Power'' it is obvious that it is Pat
who's got the power and the listener who gets
the message. This song is a Floating Bridge
original, like most of their material. Jazz, blues,
folk, rock, it's all there in varied combinations
which are often startling and predominantly
effective.
These are not musicians of the commercial
smile school. When they play they are entirely
wrapped up in what they are doing, as a unit,
and thus their visual audience appeal and contact is negligible, although in context this is
relatively unimportant.
In July The Floating Bridge is leaving for a
European tour which begins on the French
Riviera and progresses through TV network
shows in England, Denmark, Sweden, and
Norway.
This will likely be your only opportunity to
see them before their tour. The Bistro's new
light-show (Andromeda Voyage) and improved
decor (stain-glass windows, murals, and mauve
toilet paper) are great improvements atmospherically.
Also playing here this week is another Seattle
group, the Locomotive, featured until Sunday
at the Big Mother. This is their first Canadian
appearance, and for the six months they have
been together they show a great deal of potential.
Playing in the group are John Ussery, lead
guitar; Skip Morehouse, organ; Bill Stroum,
bass guitar; and Russ Hammerer who pounds
out a locomotive beat on the drums.
The sound is vital and driving. Performing
original material almost exclusively this band
provides exciting entertainment by virtue of
their dynamics and enthusiasm.
Asked what is interesting and unusual about
the Locomotive, John Ussery answered non-
chant ly, "Me!" As the foot-stomping lead guitarist and singer of the group he provides much
of the momentum for their music. Unfortunately it is not always possible to hear his vocals
over the instruments but nonetheless it is always obvious that he is right in there providing locomotion.
Added attraction at the Big Mother is the
light show which now includes about half an
hour of a ballet in silhouette which can only
be described as beautiful.
Mother Tucker's third single release ("Little
Pony" and "Pot of Gold") will be on sale here
early next week. Their first album, Home
Grown Stuff, recorded by Duck Records and
distributed by London, will be released in
about a month. The group plays at the Big
Mother March 4-10 and at the Bistro for the
last week of the month. They leave April 1 for
a 6-week tour of Eastern Canada, playing in
Toronto, Montreal, and possibly New York.
On campus tonight at 9 are Tomorrow's Eyes
and the Painted Ship at Place Vanier. Satur-,
day there's Commerce's Blue Chips Ball at the
Ponderosa, featuring Tomorrow's Eyes. The
Patch, and A Trio Plus One. Off-campus on the
same night Papa Bear's Medicine Show does its
thing complete with mime at 1625 Nantoa St.
(27th and Granville). Dance starts at 8:30.
Death came to a well-known member of the
central Vancouver feline community Monday.
Caesar (puudycat) Gibbs was mauled to death
by a dog in the presence of a postman and hor-'
rified onlookers.
Caesar, a sweet cuddly, lovable pussy was six
month old, having originated with the SPCA.
The assailant, a mongrel of unknown origin,
was reported to be a vicious beast.
Caesar's grief-stricken owners fondJy remember him as a sincere individual with a mind of.
his own.
Funeral rites were performed (by the Rev.
GitvSs; following the assassination in the owner's backyard. His soul is at rest. -*-
Friday, February 28, 1969 Friday, february 28, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 13
Bedfellows
Open Letter to Carey Linde:
When you chose to cast aspersion upon my husband's integrity, on the last day of the
campaign, I remained silent
out  of  deference to the  fact
* that your mixed bag of conventional Yankee wisdom leaves
you at a loss to understand
Canadian politics.
But when you chose to make
oblique references to my marriage, in the name of Truth,
Beauty, Goodness and Motherhood, I felt duty-bound to reply. Even the P.M. says the
bedroom is  a personal affair.
I put it to you: Can a marriage between a Conservative
and an NDP'er foe saved? . . .
that's right, I'm a socialist!!!
(which must foe the second
most important exposee of the
year).
You're wrong, Carey, dead
wrong. It needn't be an 'incestuous' arrangement ending
" in -miscarriage'. Why I can obtain affidavits from my mother
and my doctor swearing that I
am not Les' sister and that I
have never had a miscarriage.
t But you're such a nice guy
for trying to understand. Maybe you should write a personal
advice column. We could syndicate it under the name of
Dear Abbie.
Mary Horswill
Couch cash
* Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
The folly of university spending has risen above the insignificant heights of the bell
tower.
Approximately four to six
thousand dollars has been
spent on the refurbishing of
Buchanan Lounge. Twelve new
settees (in bilious colors) and
twelve    classically   structured
LETTERS TO  THE   EDITOR
metal and wood coffee tables
await the arrival of a yellow-
gold carpet to complete their
metaphor.
Undoubtedly this was done
with the best of good intentions — which goes to show
that there is indeed a gap between the student and the ad-
minisration. (Have THEY ever
been to Buchanan Lounge at
Mash-hour?)
Perhaps this action was taken
to augment the food services
which I understand are soon
to include soup and hotdogs.
Won't they look yummy on the
yellow-gold rug — especially
decorative with the normal
hues or spilt coffee and cigarette butts and ashes!
Anyone believing that THEY
can improve us by giving us
nice furniture ought to look in
the  room  opposite   Buchanan
102   arid   next   to   the   men's
washroom. It has an unmarked
door, on  the outside.   If  you
have a queasy stomach look at
it after the cleaning ladies are
finished with it, i.e., 8 a.m- I
understand THEY spent $4000
on that.
So to whoever THEY are,
Whoever THEY may foe.
Give us back our furniture,
(That's my only plea.)
And to carve with a letter—
Perhaps a piece of driftwood.
We don't promise to be better,
But we promise to foe good.
J. SAIT
arts 3
Unionize!
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
The Arts Undergraduate Society has failed to involve arts
students in any corporate programmes because its executive
has failed to project an image
with which an arts student has
anything in common.
Majors in a subject can find
that basic common ground for
communication. Hence departmental unions, whose growth
illustrates the 'need for community'. They justify their
existence not only by providing contact opportunity and by
countering this university's
fragmentation and anonymity
but also by contributing significantly to the academic atmosphere of the departments.
I hope that arts students voting today will take into account the relative importance
that the candidates attach to
these unions. We urge that arts
sudents elect an executive that
can ensure that the unions can
be functionally autonomous and
effective.
JULIAN WAKE
asu chairman
ROD IRWIN
literary union chairman
Fatuousity
Editor, The Ubyssey. Sir:
Sometime in March, you are
going to be asked to cast a
ballot for or against an increase in the Athletic fee. The
average athletic fee in every
other Canadian university is
$15 per person. UBC students
pay $5. The proposed increase
is $6, which still puts us well
below the national average.
The bulk of this increase will
be devoted towards improving
the men's and women's extramural program while the
remainder will be used to extend the intramural program.
The arguments against the
proposed increase seeem to be
threefold. In the first place,
it is argued that the number of
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FRIDAY
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SUNDAY
12:45-2:45
2:00-3:30
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12*45-2:45
7:30-9:30
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FREE — Public Skating Admission. Present this advertisement to the cashier
at the Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre prior to March 31, 1469. It will
be honored for one free public skating admission at one of the above times.
SKATE RENTAL OR SHARPENING — 35c
FREE — The Arena A Curling  Rinks are available FREE through tho  P.E.
programme 4 hours per day, Monday-Friday inclusive  (U.B.C. students).
people who participate in extramural athletics does not
justify the expense. I contend
that the athletic achievement
is the thing that justifies the expense — not the number of
people. Most extramural activities justify the expense.
Secondly, extramural athletics to most people on this
campus is equated with football. The important point to
remember is that the football
team is only one part of the
extramural program and unfortunately it reflects unfairly
on all the rest. The extramural
program encompasses twenty-
five sports, many of which
might be dropped if this increase is not realized.
Thirdly, it is argued that a
university   should   foe   known
for its academic achievements
not its athletic prowess. I believe that a well developed
extramural athletics program
works hand in hand with academic achievement. They are
mutually beneficial to the development of a university's
image. For example, Harvard,
Oxford, and Cambridge universities are well respected for
their athletic achievements in
addition to their prestigious
academic reputation. Extramural athletes work hard for
this university and deserve
your support. I urge that you
vote, yes, for the Athletic fee
increase on the March referendum.
LANCE CAREY
arts iv
(Ed. note: The only reason Mr. Carey's vile and illogical letter receives space
is that we went to high
school together.)
TREEB
From the tyranny of Eastern Colonialism, from Eastern
thought control, from R.C.M.P. "red squads" on the
campus - FREE B.C. FROM CANADA.
Friday evening at the Queen Elizabeth Theatre will be a
wild and woolly night with Bob Reeds leader ofthe B.C.
separatists debating Allan Hasson, the Hot-Scot of CFUN
Resolved: That British Columbia become an independent
nation.
Doors open at 6 and sharp at 6:30 the Granville
Barnstormers, Calm Waters, Portage Paul, Vem Dash,
Johnny West & Country Allan Lee present a one-hour
program of Canadian Country Folk Songs.
This is not for musicial snobs, but you'll enjoy original
arrangements - about the fall of the 2nd Narrows Bridge,
the High Arrow Dam, the Kettle Valley Line, Mad
Trapper Johnston and other distinctly Canadian Country
Folk Music*
At 7:30 sharp, the GREAT DEBATE begins, meeting over
sharp at 9.
Tickets at $1 and $2, advance sale at The Barn, 1138
Granville, 684-2028, or at the box office Friday Evening.
Proceeds to muscular dystrophy research.
OUEEN   ELIZABETH THEATRE
TONIGHT AT 6 P.M.
B.C. SEPARATIST ASSOCIATION
Contact
Lenses
$49
50
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At These Locations Only
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VANCOUVER
—        Opp. The Bay
NEW WESTMINSTER
675 Columbia      —      Opp. Army & Navy
NORTH VANCOUVER
1825 Lonsdale
—        681-6174
521-0751
987-2264 Page 14
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, February 28,  1969
Commission says
reinstate editor
MONTREAL (CUP)—A commission of inquiry called by
the Canadian University Press
to investigate the recent dismissal of georgian editor David
Bowman has recommended
the editor be reinstated.
Bowman was fired by the
Sir George Williams University
student council on Feb. 14, just
three days after the violent
eruption at the school. He was
fired the day after the school's
communications board had refused to take action against
him.
"FINANCIALLY IRRESPONSIBLE"
The council had based its decision to fire Bowman on alleged financial irresponsibility
on his part. But the commission rejected the financial arguments as unjustified and called the dismissal a "political"
one.
At one point, student president Manny Kalles, testifying
before the commission, said
the firing was "a political
move" in "the game of politics".
Council members were clearly upset with the quality of
the georgian this year and implied that was the real reason
for the dismissal. Kalles and
Don Rosenbaum, educational
vice - president, repeatedly
scored Bowman for producing
an inadequate paper. They cited
a lack of campus coverage and
several judgment mistakes
committed by Bowman.
PAPER "ABOVE AVERAGE"
The commission agreed Bowman had made several mistakes but said the mistakes in
themselves were not sufficient
UofW sends
bail to SGWU
WATERLOO (CUP) — The
University of Waterloo student
council Monday allocated $10,-
000 bail money to be forwarded to students arrested at Sir
George Williams University
earlier this month.
The motion passed overwhelmingly and brought loud
cheers and applause from some
250 student spectators.
The council voted the money
and condemned the Canadian
bail system after a Toronto
area student arrested in the
computer centre addressed
them.
He said the high bail set in
Montreal courts totalled over
$100,000 and many of the
people arrested could not raise
enough money to bail themselves out.
One student councillor, summing up the council position,
said: 'It's not the issue whether the demonstrators were right
or wrong that's in question. It's
our duty as students to help
these kids out of jail."
The meeting was the first
for the newly-elected "moder**
ate"  council.
basis for a judgment of incompetence and said the mistakes
in any case would probably
never be repeated. They found
the georgian an "above-average" paper.
A major point of contention
was Bowman's decision to allow
the occupying black students
to produce one edition of the
georgian — and in the process
allow several allegedly libellous statements to appear in
the paper.
The commission drew up the
following conclusions and recommendations:
e it believed the firing on
the charge of financial incompetence was illegitimate and
recommended that Bowman foe
reinstated on an interim basis
pending a council review of
the affair with an eye to evaluating Bowman's journalistic
ability.
COUNCIL CEDES RIGHTS
e it recommended that publishing rights be ceded by the
council to a communications
bqard, more representatives of
the SGWU community.
e it recommended the georgian managing board be given
the right to set its own publishing schedule to allow it to
expand in times of crisis without running the risk of being
accused of financial irregularity.
• and failing the reinstatement of Bowman, it forwarded
to tiie executive of CUP its belief that the georgian under
interim editor Norman Lazare
stands in contravention, of the
CUP Statement of Principles
that require the student newspaper to be free of student
council influence, it claimed
the georgian is being produced
by members or close associates
of the student council — a situation it called a clear case of
conflict of interest. The commission recommended that if
the situation continued, the
CUP executive should initiate
proceedings to expel the georgian from OUT*.
Rentals and Sales
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JIM ABERNETHY, MANAGER
2046 W. 41st 263-3610
Women's sports
Continued from Page 15
travelling to a ski meet at Schweizer Basin, Idaho.
There are two teams entered and both are expected to do I
very well, as they did in the recent Pacific Northwest Meet where |
they won first and third places.
BADMINTON
The women's badminton team is the other team to travel I
this weekend as they are going to the WCIAA championships
in Calgary.
With a team composed of Sandra Kolb, Jane Bubord, Linda
Westlund, and Margaret Pallot, the girls are the strongest team
on paper.
Both Coca-Cola and Coke are registered trade marks which identify only the product of Coca-Cola Ltd.
UBC Reading
Improvement Course
Special
Student Rate $35.
Non-Students $55.
•
UBC Extension Dept., East Mai!
or  Phone   228-2181
That group really gives
you the cold shoulder.
So fight ice with ice. Bribe them with a bottle of ice-cold
Coca-Cola. For Coke has the refreshing taste you never get
tired of. That's why things go better with Coke, after Coke,
after Coke.
Authorized bottler of Coca-Cola under contract with Coca-Cola Ltd.
WOMETCO (B.C.) LIMITED
1818 Cornwall, Vancouver
*
CAMPUS
POST OFFICE
TO MOVE
On Monday, March 3rd the Post Office will be taken over
by the Federal Post Office Department and will be moved
from its present location in the Bookstore to the new Administration Building at the corner of Wesbrook and University
Boulevard.
It will be known as "Postal Station U" and the hours of operation will be from 8 a.m. to 5:45 p.m. Monday through Friday.
The Telephone Number Is 228-8717 Friday, February 28, 1969
Ttti       UBYSSEY
Page 15
SPORTS
Judo team
sweeps mat
The UBC judo club and
some of its Canadian cousins
went south to Kent, Washington to compete in a Judo
Competition.
The Canadian teams did extremely well as they beat the
Americans who have been importing competitors and coaches from Japan.
UBC sent three men down
to compete in classes of Black
belt and under.
Charles Maingon, UBC, came
second in the light weight division losing to Tuk Tsumura,
an American.
Ron Joyce, UBC, a blue
belt, also won a second place
medal in the heavyweight division.
He lost out to a senior Black
belt, Jack Phillips who recently won the overall championships at a recent Vancouver tourney.
The competition was a round
robin, on a point system. This
meant that each competitor
fought a number of fights.
The club is considered to
have done very well as some
of the competitors at the meet
were of Olympic and Pan Am
quality.
— dick button photo
Intramural
results
Wrestling
Winners: 123 lbs., B. Greene,
Rec; 130 lbs., D. Turley, PE.;
137 lbs., W. Backasti, PE.;
145 lbs., G. Caufield, Phi Delta
Theta.
152 lbs., B. Duncan, PE.; 160
lbs., T. Parlee, PE.; 167 lbs., J.
Taylor, Union; 177 lfos., C. MacLeod, PE.; 191 lbs., B. Pollock.
Braves win semi finals     «• -rec Vo"eybal1
The ice hockey Braves kept
on the winning track as they
won the first game in the semifinals by defeating the Richmond Rockets 9-3.
After regular league play
the Braves ended up in first
spot with a near perfect 19
wins, 1 tie, for the season.
The Braves definitely have
a much better club than their
nearest opposition in the league
and it is this lack of competition that causes them to slack
off now and then.
Coach Andy Backogeorge
summed up this years club,
"when they want to, they
really play well and our greatest fault is lack of competition."
In the first game of the semifinals the Braves played two
great periods of hockey and
then eased off for the final
period to defeat Richmond.
Period scores of 4-2, 7-2 and 9-3
showed the Braves letting up
in the final frame.
Goalscorers for UBC were
Ken Lemmen with 3, Bill Cartwright 2, and singles by Roy
Sakaki,    Ernie    Lawson,   Joe
Petretta and Frank Lanzeretta.
With a continued team effort
the Braves should advance to
the finals.
SFU will come to the Winter
Sport Centre on Sat. March 8
to take on  the Braves  in  an
exhibition game. The Clan
from the hill will attempt to
carry on the winning tradition
of its team, but UBC's wining-
est team will not let up under
stiff competition. Game time
12:15 p.m.
This Friday at noon, co-rec.
volleyball with start. All men
and women on campus may
participate, just show up at the
Memorial gym where referees
and instructors will be on hand
to organize and set up the
games.
Womens sports
TRACK
The women's track team is travelling to Winnipeg this weekend to compete in the Western Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic
Association championships.
The girls are expected to do very well, as they are going
back to defend their own title.
Anne Covell, a member of Canada's Olympic team in Mexico,
will probably lead the girls to team victory, by winning her
three individual races, the 50m., 300m., and 800m. races.
Anne will definitely be helped by other performers like
Pat Mills, who will be competing against her arch-rival Eva
Adamovich in the long jump. Both girls have won a major title
each, Pat at the Achilles International and Eva at the Alberta
Indoor Championships.
Sue Mathie will probably be the busiest runner of the day,
as she will be running in eight events.
Other team members are Maralyn Whitehead, Carol Kitchen,
Lisa Bechansen, Leona Sparrow and Gerry Raymond
SKIING
The women's ski team is off on a trip also, as they are
Continued  on Page  14 — see WOMEN'S SPORTS
Soccer
Starts March third.
Basketball
The Engineers beat Education 5 in the basketball, Division one finals by a 39-34 score.
They win the Beta Theta Pi
Intramural Trophy.
The engineers fell behind
early in the game and were
kept there by a tenacious Education dfense.
They surged ahead in the
last five minutes and pulled
their victory out of the fire.
The game was slightly anti-
climatic as they said that their
toughest game was the semifinal match that they played
against PE the week before.
Clearance Sale
TWO DAYS ONLY - FEB. 28, MAR. 1
WS&Px.wk**-
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DON'T FORGET SALE LAST FOR TWO DAYS ONLY
TODAY & TOMORROW  -   DOORS OPEN 9 A.M.
VARSITY SKI SHOP
Ivor Williams Sporting Goods
4510 West 10th Are.
Vancouver 8, B.C.
Open Friday till 9:00 p.m.
Just Two Blocks Outside The Gates Page 16
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, February 28,  1969
VCF
VCF's first major drama production
—Mime—today noon, SUB party room.
CHINESE VARSITY
Stew Cuthbert Car Rally — Sunday
1:30 p.m., start at 42nd and Cambie,
25 cents per person.
THE  UBYSSEY
Applications for position of Editor in
Chief for '69-70 term are now being
accepted by the managing editor.
WOMEN'S GOLF TEAM
Girls interested in golf clinics and
games please contact Lauris Innes at
278-1116, or Heather Munro, 263-6677.
PIZZA wiaM'A
'Across the street from Fraser AcmsH
Full Facilities *****
Dine In  - Take. Out -  Delivery
1381 S.W. Marine    263-4440J
I
DANCE
Dance  Friday night at Place  Vanjer
to Tomorrow's Eyes and Painted Ship.
VISITING LECTURER
Prof.   Douglas   Young.   McMaster   U..
on   Nausikaa's   Laundry   today   noon,
Bu. 104.
CANOE  CLUB
First meet Tuesday noon, SUB  125.
PHRATERES
Ski films SUB auditorium Monday and
Wednesday noons.  50  cents.
'tween
classes
EL  CIRCULO
Slides of Portugal and Spain, Monday
noon. I.H.  402.
EXPERIMENTAL   COLLEGE
Karl    Burau:    Ethics    and    Teaching,
Monday  noon, Bu.   100.
KALAMU UKUJUIKE
President, National Union of Biafran Students
Buchanan 106
12:30 March 7
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Student Discount Given
WE HAVE AN OFFICE NEAR YOU
HELLENIC  CULTURAL  SOC
"Some Greek Animals" — lecture by
Dr. H. Edinger of classics, Monday
7:30 p.m.. I.H. Greek dancing follows.
AQUA SOC
First boat dive of ling season Sunday,
March 2.
ALPHA OMEGA  SOC
General    meet    Monday   noon,    SUB
212A.
THE  PIT
Pit will be open tonight from 4:30 to
midnight. New members please pick
up cards.
ANTHROPOLOGY, SOCIOLOGY
Union general meet, SUB  113, Tuesday noon.
SPANISH   DEPT.
El Lindo Don Deigo, I.H. tonight
and Saturday. 8:30 p.m. $1. students
75 cents.
AFRICAN  STUDENTS
Dance, Trinidad Moonlighters Steel
Band, Saturday 8:30 p.m. SUB ballroom.   Bar.
SOCREDS
General meet Tuesday. Bu. 224. Elections.
EUS
Mixer for chicks  and engineers  8:30
tonight, SUB ballroom. Girls 25 cents.
ALLIANCE   FRANCAISE
Meeting noon today, I.H. upper
lounge.
SAILING CLUB
Regatta this weekend at K.Y.C. Party
Saturday 8 p.m. SUB party room.
General meet March 5, elections.
LEGAL   AID
Free legal advice every Monday, Wednesday, Friday noon. AMS VP*s office.
ARTS  U.S.
Arts free concert, folk blues, SUB
Ballroom today noon.
GERMAN   CLUB
Those interested in weekend ski trip
meet  in  SUB  213 noon  today.
CUSO
Information session, sound and light
show, returned volunteers speak, noon
today. I.H.
COUNTRY BLUES
SUB BALLROOM
FRI. 12:30
A.U.S. Free Show
BUSY "B"
BOOKS
Used   University Texts
Bought and Sold
146 W HASTINGS
Opposite Woodwards
681-4931
NEW YORK
COSTUME SALON
RENTALS
WHITE DINNER JACKETS
TUEXDOS,  DARK  SUITS,  TAILS
COLORED JACKETS
SPECIAL   STUDENT   RATES
224-0034 __ 4397 W. 10th
CLASSIFIED
RATES:  Students, Faculty 5s Clubs*—3 lines, 1 day 75*0, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publication Office: 241 STUDENT UNION BUILDING,
  UNIVERSITY OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
PAPA BEARS AT 1625 NANTON ST.,
(27th & Granville) Sat., March 1st.
8:30- 12:00.  Adm.  $1.50 each.
GIRLS, YOU ARE INVITED TO A
Mixer with the Engineers tonight
8:30 - 12:30 in S.U.B. Ballroom. Girls
only 25c. *
TONIGHT AT  PLACE  VANIER  Tomorrow's Eyes & Painted Ship, Upstairs & Downstairs, 2 bands, 2 dances
$1.50,  Light Shows  too.
PAPA BEAR'S MEDICINE SHOW AT
Totem Park Fri., March 7 from 9-1.
DANCE TO SPRING AT TOTEM
Park. Fri., Feb. 28, 9-1. Girls .75.
Guys 1.00. Couples 1.50.
IDES OF MARCH, FRI. 14-16 ALL
night dance. Floorshow starts at
10 p.m. Friday. Dance, starts at
12:00 p.m. Breakfast at 4:30 a.m.
Saturday. Admission SI. At International  House.   Drinks  served.
Lost k Found
13
HITCH - HIKING, I LEFT THE
Phenomenology of Internal Time
Consciousness in a car. Will driver
please phone 224-1766.
FOUND NUMBER OF KEYS ON 2
rings at University Blvd. Please
call 228-8254 Alex.
LOST TUES. BROWN WALLET I.D.
needed $20. Reward. Phone David
263-6860 Buch.   (?)  oi* SUB  (?)
Rides  8c  Car Pool*
14
Special Notices
15
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance premium? If you are age 20
or over you may qualify. Phone
Ted   Elliott.   299-9422.
NEED SKIING LESSONS CALL JO-
Ann. 731-2872 evenings. 6-7 p.m.
COMPLEXION PROBLEMS? FALL-
ing hair? Get scientific treatment
and advice for home care. Vera
Ratkai, Skin anti Scalp Consultant.
Phone 731-5063.
ANDROMEDA   VOYAGE  AT   PLACE
Vanier.   Fantastic  Friday  No.   2.
TODAY THE WHISPERERS 12:30,
3:30, 6:30, 9:00 SUB Theatre. Adm.
50c.   Coming  next.  Persona.
ANY   RESIDENT   MEAL   PASS  $1.25
at P.V. tonight.
AUTOS FOR SALE (Contd.) 21
NEED CAR OR PARTS? '51 PON-
tiac. Running condition $50. Call
327-4396 after 6 p.m.	
'63 BEAUMONT CONVERT. RADIO,
Auto-6. Power top exc. cond. Best
$1,000  takes.  731-7586.
Autos Wanted
22
Automobile—Parts
23
WIRE WHEELS ! ! ONLY $14.00
each, off '66 Healey. Good shape,
no rusted spokes. CaU Andy at 738-
2610 anytime.
Motorcycles
26
100%   FINANCING  (OAC)
LOW COST INSURANCE
NO PAYMENTS TIL?
SALES  •  SERVICE  •  PARTS
^J •       PERFORMANCE
ni   HONDA
3712 W. 10 @ Alma
228-9077
Scandals
37
DOGS WHO WISH TO INCREASE
only their Reading Speed not accepted into UBC Reading Improve-
ment Program. Extension (228-2181).
WHISPERS AND OTHER FREAKY
Noises today and Sat. SUB Theatre.
Adm.  50c.  Silence  is Golden.
MULTI - MEDIA VIEW OF THE
Child's Environment from Within a
Plastic Bag. An experience you'll
never forget. March 5th to 7th. Inner City Service Project. 2196 Col-
umbia Street.  7:30 p.m. 50c.
SAVE STAR TREK SEND A LET-
ter of protest to NBC TV, Burbank,
Calif.
Sewing & Alterations
38
Travel Opportunities
16
Information Wanted
17
ANY PERSON KNOWING THE
whereabouts of Jean Gregg please
contact R. W. Quartz, 3582 West
31st.   263-7369.
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
FOR SALE 1962 CORVAIR. NEW
clutch. Excellent running condition.
Winter tires.  224-9017.
GGGGQQQQGGQGGGQGGQGGGG GGQGQG GG GGGGQQ GGGG
•59 RILEY 1.5 LITRE, LEATHER
buckets, four on floor, radio, and
snow tires. Good condition. 266-6161.
'62    SPRITE.    GOOD    CONDITION.
Best offer.  255-2546 after  5:00.
1967 HILLMAN STATIONWAGON,
exc. condition, pullman seats, new
battery. Phone 731-5034 after 5:30
p.m.	
1956 VOLKSWAGEN IN GOOD CON-
ditlon, phone 224-9460, 4-6 p.m. R.
Anderson.
'57 FORD FAIRLANE 500.— Broke —
must sell. New plugs, pts., etc., good
tires. Best offer over $200 takes.
Ph. 224-9853. Ask for Dan Jenkins.
•59    CHEV.    6    CYL.    STD.    $100    OR
best offer. RE 3-3144.
FOR DRESS-MAKING AND MEND-
ing. Phone Jill at 731-1540. Low cost,
Fast service.
Typewriters-Rental 8t Rep.
39
RENTAL   SPECIAL
Excellent  &  near  new typewriters  &
adding   machines   at   low   rates   with
option   to   purchase   avail.
WEST POINT PRINTERS & STNR'S.
4514 W. 10th Ave. Ph.  224-7818
Typing
40
EXPERT   IBM   SELECTRIC   TYPIST
Experienced essay and thesis typist.
Reasonable  Rates —  TR 4-9253
Help Wanted—
Male or Female
53
WANTED!    SALES,    MEN   OR   WO-
men   part-time   earn   $60   to   $100  per
week.   Full   time   $150   and   up.   Car
desirable.   For   further   information
call Mr.  Reid 435-6488 aft.   6 p.m.
INSTRUCTION
Special Classes
Tutoring
63
64
EXCHANGE TUTORING — FREE
French Lesson in exchange for free
English Lesson. Call Marie 987-5841.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR  SALE
71
BOOKS OF INTEREST FOR RADI-
cal thinking people include works of
Marx Engels, Lenin, Trotsky, Malcolm "X", Che Guevera, etc. and
many other stimulating books —
periodicals "New Left Review",
"Monthly Review", "Guardian"
(U.S.), "Gramma", "Workers' Vanguard", etc. Vanguard Books 1208
Granville.
CANVAS — BORLAP — TOWELS —
remnants. Drapery Material. Western
Company, 3594 W. 4th Ave., 731-
8770.
FOR SALE. GIRL'S BICYLCE.
Phone 224-9460 between 4-6 p.m. R.
Anderson.
HANDMADE    SANDALS    $9    UP.
Phone 733-4013.
GUITAR AND WEIGHTS FOR SALE.
Must sell soon! Going cheap low
moneybln!   Details  Allan  224-9866.
ARAN FISHERMAN KNIT SWEA-
ter,  pullover.  Size 10.  738-0667.
FOR SALE FRAMUS GUITAR AND
case, etc. $90. Call Jim after 6.
Phone  327-7533.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
BEAUTIFULLY FURNISHED NEW-
ly decorated bed sitting room, dignified priv. home. Point Grey Road.
% block from beach. Telev. (desk
(incl., automatic washer) dryer in
basement free. $60 mo. Only student
or Fac. fem. Non-smoker. Call 731-
2867.
SLEEPING   ROOM   FOR   SENIOR
male student. $50 monthly. 224-1754.
2 RM. SUITE — SINK, GAS, STOVE.
Quiet. Serious non-drinking student
only. Kits. $12.00 week. Call 738-
7049.
STAFF OR SR. STU. (F) SHARE
unf. apt. kitn. & D.R., owm room,
new stove, fridge. MU 5-2540.
TYPIST AVAILABLE FOR EFFICI-
ent essays, reports etc., in my
home,   North   Vancouver.   988-7228.
EXPERT TYPIST, REASONABLE
rates.  325-1192.  Mrs.  Docherty.
ESSAYS & SEMINAR PAPERS EX-
pertly typed. 25c per page, 6c copy.
Fast efficient servle. Phone 325-0545.
ESSAY & THESIS TYPING — MRS.
Hall, 434-9558.
Help  Wanted—Female
51
WANTED PART-TIME RESEARCH
Assistant—Campus. Ideal job married woman. Hours at applicant's
convenience. Science degree preferred, not essential. 228-3086, 228-3767.
Help Wanted—Male
52
UMPIRES! AND MANAGERS NEED-
ed for several Little League Baseball Teams in East End and during
summer. Please phone Wilma or Jim
255-9097.
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD ON CAMPUS:
$85 a month at D.U. Fraterniy
House; good food, short walk to
classes, quiet hours for study, phone
228-9389,   224-9841.	
ROOM AND BOARD, FIJI HOUSE.
Fantastic food $85 month. Phone
Gary Goodman  5-7.  224-9769.	
ROOM & BOARD IN ST. ANDREW'S
Hall. Male only, double room. 224-
7720 or 224-5742.
Furn.  Houses   &   Apts.
83
MALE   TO   SHARE   3   BDRM.   APT.
$60. Call Bob after 6:00, 874-6231.
FULLY    FURNISHED    ONE    BED- <
-room     basement    suite.    Kits.     $80
month   for   2   mo.   starting   Mar.   4.
Phone Judy 732-7336,  987-2922 after
6 p.m.	
ALL     MALE     HOUSE     REQUIRE
three   more.   Very   quiet  and   clean. ;
3rd & Burrard. Ph. 738-0784 or 736-
7128 Paul.

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