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The Ubyssey Oct 15, 2012

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 <* i »Page 2
wmntiiiiMam
w&
What's on
HIS WEEK, MAY'
New SUB Sustainability Art Showcase:
12 p.m -1:30 p.m. @ the SUB
There will be four sculptures on display in the SUB all week. A mechanical
tree, floating gardens, an interactive hourglass and clouds that generate
light are all in competition for a spot in the new SUB. Free.
ip^h
BIKES »
Purpleand Yellow Volunteer
Night: 6-9 p.m. @ the Bike
Kitchen
Have you ever wanted to fix your
own chain? Or perhaps be that
awesomestrangerthatcan help
people change a tire on the side
of the highway? Come learn at
the bike co-op volunteer night!
GENDERD
Who needs feminism?: 12-2
p.m. @ theSUB
What does feminism mean to
you? Come out to the Gender,
Race, Sexuality and Social
Justice Undergraduate Student
Association's event to discuss
your personal experiences with
feminism and social justice.
The Sorrows of Young
Werther: 7:30 p.m. @ Frederic
Wood Theatre
Based on the novel of thesame
name by Goethe, this stage
adaptation is the second show of
Theatre at UBC's season. Come
for a modern twist on this tragic
tale of unrequited love. Tickets
$10-22.
BZZR»
Superhero Beer Garden: 8
p.m.-12 a.m. @ MASS
Dress up likeyourfavourite
superhero and have a drink
with other superheroes. Let all
yourweird Wonder Woman/
Superman fantasies come to life.
Tickets $2. Drinks $2.19+.
Got an event you'd like to see on this page? Send your event
and your best pitch to printeditor@ubyssey.ca.
This Week at The Norm
Wednesday 5-Sunday 21
To Rome with Love: 7 p.m.
Take This Waltz: 9:30 p.m.
Tickets are $5 for students, $2.50 for FilmSoc members.
Learn more at UBCtilmsociety.com!
'JJthe ubyssey
Coordinating Editor
Jonny Wakefield
coordinating@u byssey.ca
Managing Editor, Print
Jeff Aschkinasi
3rinteditor@u byssey.ca
Managing Editor,Web
Andrew Bates
webed itor@u byssey.ca
News Editors
Will McDonald*
Laura Rodgers
iews@ubyssey.ca
Senior News Writer
Ming Wong
Tiwong@u byssey.ca
Culture Editor
Anna Zona
culture@ubyssey.ca
Senior Culture Writer
Rhys Edwards
•edwards@u byssey.ca
Sports + Rec Editor
CJ Pentland
sports@ubyssey.ca
Senior LifestyleWriter
ZafiraRajan
zrajan@ ubyssey.ca
Features Editor
Natalya Kautz
featu res@u byssey.ca
Video Editor
David Marino
video@ubyssey.ca
Copy Editor
Karina Palmitesta
copy@ubysseyca
STAFF
3ryce Warnes, Josh Curran,
Peter Wojnar, Anthony Poon,
veronika Bondarenko, Yara
De Jong, Lu Zhang, Ginny
Monaco,Arno Rosenfeld,
Matt Meuse, Hogan Wong,
Rory Gattens, Brandon Chow
3CTOBER15.2012
BUSINESS
Business Manager
Fernie Pereira
3usiness@u byssey.ca
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VOLUMEXCIVI ISSUEXII
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LEGAL
The Utyssey is the official student newspaper of the University oi Brmsn Lolumbla.
t is published every Monday
andThursday by The Ubyssey
Publications Sociely. We are ar
autonomous, democratically
•un student organization, anc
all students are encouraged tc
aartlcipate.
Editorials are chosen anc
written by the Ubyssey staff.
They are the expressed opin-
on of the staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views ofThe
Jbyssey Publications Society
or the University of British Co-
umbla. All editorial content
appearing In The Ubyssey Is
work contained he
ae reproduced without the
expressed, written permission ofThe Ubyssey Publications Society.
The Ubyssey Is a founding
member of Canadian University Press (CUP) and adheres
to CUP's guiding principles.
Letters to the editor must
ae under300 words. Please
nclude your phone number,
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J PS shall notbe responsl ble for
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OUR CAMPUS
ONE ON ONE WITH THE PEOPLE WHO MAKE UBC
Kathleen Handfield is constructing a bright future for the AMS Art Gallery.
<AI JACOBSON PHOTWHE UBYSSEY
Handfield helms art gallery
Sarah Bigam
Contributor
Kathleen Handfield has found
an unexpected home at the AMS
Art Gallery.
"The gallery's never closed.
[I] live here, essentially," said
Handfield, who is the commissioner of the gallery. "It's lots of
work. But fun work."
Handfield explained that
she initially got into art history
because "two of my friends had
gone [into art history] and they
absolutely loved it."
As commissioner, Handfield
manages the space and the
AMS's permanent art collection
of 73 pieces. She also organizes
weekly shows at the gallery.
Handfield's favourite part
of the job is the opportunity to
meet lots of people. She said she
was worried that people might
be less likely to get involved
since UBC is such a big school,
but she's been impressed with
the number of people who come
by looking for a place to show
their art.
"People are really proactive
in the way that they want to get
involved, which is refreshing,"
she said.
Handfield holds an undergraduate degree in art history
from Queen's Universtiy in Ontario. After her time at Queen's,
she came back to Vancouver
and enrolled in the one-year
Diploma in Accounting Program
at Sauder.
Handfield said she's happy to
be back in Vancouver. "I'd been
away from home for a long time
and I decided that to stay on
campus and be close to friends
and family and kind of involve
myself back in the city, that
would be the best option."
She plans to get involved in
the business side of running an
art gallery and help artists who
are "starved for money." She
said she would eventually like to
work in a larger gallery and become more involved in management and fundraising.
When she's not in the gallery,
Handfield's main hobby is fen
cing. She fenced competitively
in high school and continued
with the sport at Queen's,
though she had to bring down
the intensity in favour of course-
work. Now she fences with the
UBC Fencing Club.
"[The] UBC Fencing Club and
I have become good friends....
That's awesome that it's here
and it's available," she said.
Handfield said the art gallery
serves a crucial role on campus.
"I think the art gallery is
important because it allows
students who might not have
otherwise had experience going
into art galleries or had experience showing their own work [to
do so]."
Handfield said she gets
students from many different
departments, such as chemistry
and physics, who haven't had
any experience showing their
work. "I think that's what a
student gallery allows you to do.
You don't need to be a professional artist to show your work;
you just need to have passion."
First
person to
enter The
Ubyssey
offices and
hug David
Marino
wins 100
free
copies of
the paper.
Great for
sleeping on!
COME BY THE UBYSSEY OFFICE
SUB 24, FOLLOW THE SIGNS
WOT M?
f*C£ YW* PHCBI&S M
FRIGHT NIGHTS
6 MSI^wsp
-1«<-T' -rn FRIGHT HOUSES      RIDES        GRUESOME COMEDY ACT
^S WEDM5DM «* OCTOBER \7 T0 ft ^ w m
SAVE $3 ONLINE
HI    M FHIGHTNIGHTSXA tNewsl
EDITORS WILL MCDONALD + LAURA RODGERS
MONDAY, OCTOBER is, 201
UNIONS »
U.S. ELECTIONS »
UBC sends email
with partisan
election info
<AI JACOBSON PHOTWHE UBYSSEY
CUPE 116 and UBC have scheduled talks this Friday and Saturday, but the union plans to continue strikes until an agreement is signed.
Bargaining resumes between CUPE 116 and UBC
Will McDonald
News Editor
After 12 days of job action, the
support and service workers of
CUPE 116 are going back to the
bargaining table with UBC. But
this doesn't mean that the strikes
will end.
Colleen Garbe, CUPE 116 president, said bargaining sessions have
been set up for Friday and Saturday. However, she said job action
would continue until the union
reaches a collective agreement
with the university.
"The employers opened up
dates and we definitely will be
meeting next week," said Garbe.
"But our actions are going to
continue until we get a collective
agreement."
The most recent location hit
with CUPE 116 job action was the
Thunderbird Residence commons-
block, which was picketed last
Friday. The building houses about
25 Student Housing and Hospitality trades workers.
Accordingto UBC Director of
Public Affairs Lucie McNeill, any
repairs or maintenance needed in
the residence on Friday was done
by management.
"It's carpenters and plumbers and so on who [were]... not
available to do maintenance on the
residences, the kind of services
they would provide usually,"
said McNeill.
CUPE 116 has said they want
their job action to have as little
impact on students as possible.
However, Garbe said workers in
other student residences have
asked for pickets.
"They're all begging us to take
them down, and we can only do so
much in one day, so we're building
on that," said Garbe.
The union has witheld all
custodial services across campus
since Thursday. An overtime ban
for all CUPE 116 workers has been
in effect since Thursday as well.
Accordingto McNeill, managers
have had to do all the cleaning
on campus.
"We've had managers who've
gone around cleaning toilets in
buildings and doing whatever is
necessary," said McNeill. "Different units and buildings would have
different plans.... [It's] managers
who have been doing the absolute
essentials."
Garbe didn't say how long it
will be until custodians go back
to work.
"[Cleaning is] hard work,"
said Garbe. "[Managers] need to
respect the members that do that
work,... and if they're in doing that
work, maybe they'll have a better
understanding," said Garbe.
On Thursday, the Nobel Biocare
dental clinic on campus was also
shut down at midday when all
CUPE 116 staff walked off the job.
McNeill said that some dental
students were affected by the
closure. "Dental students — the
ones that were affected were the
ones that were there working on
patients. So they had to finish the
patients or complete the work on
the patients that they were seeing
at the time."
Garbe said although job action
will keep going until an agreement
is signed, she hopes that it won't
harm the union's reputation with
the public.
"We hope that everybody
supports us and this will be shortlived and we can get back [to]
doing what we're doing... and just
keep UBC thriving," she said. Xi
—With files from Laura Rodgers
NEWS BREFS
UBC gets new Canada research
chair appointments
The Canadian government will give
new funding to 13 Canada research
chair positions at UBC.
Atotal of $11 million will be
given to the chairs, with eight new
appointments, two advancements
and three renewed positions. UBC
has 186 research chair professors,
thesecond-largestnumberin
the country.
The newly appointed chairs include researchers studying climate
change, spinal cord injury and
inner-city medicine.
"I am honoured to join this group
of leading investigators," said new
chairand UBC neuroscientist Teresa
Liu-Ambrose.
UBC researchers releases first
video of rare seahorse species
UBC's Project Seahorse has
released the world's first footage of
a rare West African seahorse. The
video shows the seahorse being
caught and released unharmed by
Senegalese fishermen.
In a joint project between Imperial
College London, the Zoological
Society of London and Project
Seahorse, researcher Kate West
shot the rare footage off the coast
of Senegal. "Essentially no research
has been done on this species, and
nothing is known about its habitat,
life cycle or numbers," said West.
Around 600,000 West African
seahorses are exported annually for
use in traditional medicine. Xi
STUDENT SOCIETY »
New AMS
harassment policy
doesn't include
unions
Laura Rodgers
News Editor
The AMS has a new way to deal
with complaints of harassment or
discrimination, but it doesn't apply
to everyone.
A rewritten policy for AMS employees, volunteers and appointees
sets out grounds for discrimination
charges concerning age, race or
sexual orientation. But it cuts out a
provision that previously existed for
years: the policy no longer covers
anyone alleging that they've been
discriminated against based on
union activities.
"I think if a member of a union
is concerned that they're being discriminated against based on their
union membership, that's something they can bring to their union,"
said Hans Seidemann, engineering
rep on AMS Council and head of the
AMS Legislative Procedures Committee. "That's a whole different
ball game from what this policy is
intended to prescribe."
During the AMS's negotiations
with its security guards, who
voted to join the COPE 378 union
in 2011, key union organizer Irfan
Reayat filed a complaint alleging
he was harassed and demoted
because of his union involvement.
Reayat opted to file his complaint
through the Labour Relations
<AI JACOBSON PHOTWHE UBYSSEY
AMS security workers held a one-day strike on October 4th. In the AMS's new harass-
mentand discrimination policy, union membership is no longer listed as a reason for
lodging a complaint.
Board rather than opt for the AMS's
internal procedure.
Negotiations between the AMS
and its security guards continue,
though both parties say they are
"within a dollar" on wages and
there are no other topics still left on
the bargaining table.
The document says that any category covered by "applicable human
rights legislation" is also fair game.
Charges of anti-union discrimination are dealt with provincially
through the Labour Relations Code,
and this will likely leave anyone
lodging a complaint of anti-union
discrimination to work outside
the AMS system and pursue other
avenues.
"Union members weren't the only
group that were left off the new
[policy]," said COPE 378 spokesperson Jarrah Hodge. "I think that
the omission does raise questions.
"I would be interested to know
what their rationale was for that,"
Hodge continued. "It is curious that
there were the union groups... and
also things like gender identity left
off the new list."
Seidemann explained that the
redrawn policy doesn't cover union
affiliation because it is "not a personal characteristic."
"This is intended to be a policy
on issues that make up a person,
as opposed to membership in an
organization," said Seidemann.
"If I'm a member of a knitting
club, and someone is like, 'I don't
like knitters,' that's not necessarily
the same as being attacked based on
my religion."
Seidemann said that the new
policy was mostly drafted by the
AMS's lawyers, who drew from
both old policy and a document
prepared by AMS Equity Commissioner Brett Sinclair. It's also
been expanded so that complaints
to include a new informal resolution method for individuals who
don't want to launch a formal
complaint. Xi
PHOTO JUSTIN SLOAN/FLICKR
The email mistakenly linked to a website
supporting Democrat Barack Obama in
the upcoming U.S. presidential election.
Arno Rosenfeld
StaffWriter
The Office of International Student Development (ISD) at UBC
accidentally emailed information
supporting the Democratic Party to
American international students.
With the U.S. presidential election coming up at the beginning of
November, the ISD office wanted
to help U.S. citizens studying at
UBC vote.
At the end of September, an
email was sent from the ISD office
to the 1,393 U.S. citizens studying
at UBC. The email included a set of
instructions on how to vote using
an absentee ballot and provided
a link to votefromabroad.org, a
Democrat-supporting site.
"[My office] was contacted by
a partisan group a few weeks ago,
with information about how students could register to vote abroad,"
said Michelle Suderman, associate
director of ISD. "We cleaned up the
announcement,... because what they
suggested we send in the email was
partisan information."
But the office later realized they
left a link to a partisan Web site.
On Oct. 4, six days after the first
email was sent out, ISD sent out a
mea culpa.
"We realized after sending the
email out that the website link contained partisan information for the
Democratic Party," the email read.
"We had no intention of supporting
one party."
The new email included a link
to the U.S. government website for
voting abroad and repeated that
absentee ballots are available in the
International House. "We thought
we checked [the website] thoroughly
enough," Suderman said. "A student
contacted us to say that ifyou drilled
down far enough on that website
you actually do get to partisan information about a particular party."
While the home page doesn't
display any party affiliation, if one
clicks the "About" link, the third
sentence says, "[This site] is provided as a public service, in English
and Spanish, by Democrats Abroad
for the use of all overseas voters,
regardless of party affiliation."
The page also offers examples of
races narrowly won by Democrats
as evidence of why it is important
to vote.
"Once I saw the word 'Democrat,'
that was all I needed," Suderman
said. "We regret any confusion this
may have caused for students."
The U.S. consulate in Vancouver
typically sends UBC information
about voting abroad to give to students, and Suderman said this was
this first time Democrats Abroad
had sent the school an email.
Suderman said that the email
from the student who alerted them
to the partisan information was
"quite hilarious."
"He actually commented that he
would actually be... very happy for
us to endorse the Democratic Party,
but that we probably had made a
mistake." Xi NEWS    I    MONDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2012
TRANSIT »
TransLink cancels student transit improvements
10-year plan doesn't include increased #99 service or rapid transit to UBC
Micki Cowan
CUP B.C. Bureau Chief
VANCOUVER (CUP) -
TransLink's newest 10-year plan
is a mixed bag for students.
The 2013 Base Plan, which
TransLink rolled out in September, highlights the company's
financial plans for the next three
years and a looser schedule for the
following seven. The plan is updated every year, sometimes gaining items, sometimes losing them.
But facing major funding
issues, Translink, in its updated
plan that will be finalized in
November, has cancelled plans to
add more services to overcrowded
U-Pass routes.
"We had hoped to provide new
bus service, which really would
have benefited students in particular," said TransLink transportation planner Rex Hodgson.
"Now with our outlook being a bit
worse than what we had anticipated, we've had to scale back on
some of our investments."
The new plan no longer includes increasing bus service on
routes to and from universities
and colleges, a move which would
have added 79,000 more trips
along bus routes by 2013.
Hodgson said that the company
realized they didn't have the revenue and had to re-evaluate what
services could be provided in the
new plan. While students won't
see those additional services this
year, Hodgson said they are still
The #99 runs along the Broadway corridor, the busiest commuter bus route in North America.
STEPHANIEXUPHOTOfTHE UBYSSEY
looking to implement them in the
future, when money is available.
TransLink's financial situation
has recently come under fire from a
student group called Get on Board
B.C., which focuses on funding
issues and the need for rapid transit.
"We're thinking how funding is allocated to TransLink,"
said Tanner Bokor, Get on Board
spokesperson and AMS associate
vice-president external. "We're
certainly not addressing TransLink
as an organization. We think that
there are governance issues in
TransLink that play onto the funding issue."
One advance in rapid transit is
included in the plan: the Bur-
naby-to-Coquitlam Evergreen
Skytrain line.
Hodgson said the line, which
will add seven stops, is one of the
main benefits for students in the
new plan. Construction begins
this year and is to be completed in
2016.
Students at Douglas College's
Coquitlam campus will be gaining
a Skytrain stop, which is a big gain
for a campus where the majority of
students commute by car.
Dave Taylor, communications
director at Douglas College, said
the station will make a tremendous difference for students.
"Our students need to get out
there and transit would be the
biggest and easiest way to do
that," he said.
Taylor projects that at least
half of the campus's 4,000
students will make use of the
Evergreen Line, as they already
are part of a mandatory U-Pass
program.
SFU students could also see an
impact from the Evergreen Line
in the future, as bus services are
rerouted to account for a new
"Burquitlam" station.
Though the Evergreen Line
will certainly benefit students,
TransLink's plan made no mention
of a rapid transit system along the
Broadway corridor, a topic that
has incited action from thousands
of students over the years.
The Broadway corridor is the
main route students use to commute to UBC. It is not mentioned
in TransLink's 40-year plan either.
But Hodgson said that this
doesn't mean rapid transit along
Broadway is off the table.
"We've not progressed to the
point yet where we're able to include that yet in this plan," he said.
"We recognize there is a demand.
Even with the great service we're
providing, capacity is a problem."
TransLink is currently evaluating the route as part of a rapid
transit study called the Regional
Transportation Strategy. That
study will be undergoing consultations this spring and will be
completed by August 2013.
Looking back on the plan,
Hodgson said the company wasn't
able to target U-Pass routes this
year, but still recognizes the
need for transit for students in
the future.
"Given the financial situation
we find ourselves in and some of
the challenges we're facing with
funding, we've had to make some
hard decisions." Xi
—With files from Laura Rodgers Sports + Rec
)R C.J. PENTLAND
MONDAY, OCTOBER is, 2012
FOOTBALL»
Bye week a blessing for victorious Thunderbirds
C.J. Pentland
Sports + Rec Editor
Banged up, bruised and battered, the UBC
football team was hurting badly, and it was
showing on the scoreboard. After four straight
losses to start the year and their only victory
against the winless Alberta Golden Bears, the
season had the makings of a write-off. The
T-Birds had three more games left in the year,
but two of them were against teams ranked in
the top eight in Canada, which didn't provide
an optimistic outlook.
They needed something, anything, to turn
their 1-4 season around and perhaps back
into the final playoff spot. And wouldn't you
know it, they got exactly what they needed: a
bye week.
With Thanksgiving weekend scheduled
as a bye week for all the teams in the Canada
West conference, the T-Birds had a chance to
regroup and gain experience by playing next to
a set group of guys. And because of that, they
were able to come out with a strong performance and take down the CIS No. 6 ranked
Regina Rams 24-17 on Saturday afternoon at
Thunderbird Stadium.
"The bye week helped us to get healthy,
I but also to have some time to actually work
together again," said head coach Shawn Olson
after the game. "That's one of the things that is
overlooked on defence, your ability to work in
coordination with the guy next to you. When
there's always a revolving door of who's next to
you, it's really hard to get that coordination....
[Today] we finally had a version of what we
' kind of expected at the beginning of the year."
The Thunderbirds racked up an impressive 281 yards on the ground rushing against
the Rams. The Canada West's leading rusher
Brandon Deschamps accounted for 171 of them,
capped off by an 85-yard touchdown run on the
second play of the second half. But it was the
defence that kept the T-Birds in the game. They
held the Regina offence to well below their season average of 30.4 points per game, picking off
four passes — one each by Bryan Rideout and
Kofi Kuma-Mintah and two by Miguel Barker
— and recovering one fumble in the process.
The timing of the big plays made the difference. When UBC's offence completely stalled in
the second half and recorded six straight drives
without a first down, the defence limited the
damage by preventing any big plays by Regina
and always keeping UBC in the lead.
The interceptions all came at huge times as
well. Rideout's came after a mess of a play that
saw a field goal attempt turn into an interception by the Rams; he picked off a throw on
UBC's two-yard line. This action kept UBC's
slim 3-0 lead and was the catalyst for the ensuing drive that resulted in a 16-yard touchdown
pass from Billy Greene to Andrew Darcovich.
Kuma-Mintah's interception was perhaps
a game-saver. Regina was threatening to complete their comeback, only trailing by two with
3:44 left in the game, but the defensive back
picked off the opening pass of the drive. The
'Birds then turned it into some much-needed
insurance points, as Greene connected with
a diving Jordan Grieve in the back of the
endzone to make it a nine-point lead.
"That's the big thing that I was proud about
with these guys," said Olson in reference to
the big plays on defence. "The offence struggled the whole second half, we were missing
things, [but] defensively we played real good.
I wouldn't say [it was good] the whole game
— guys were tired - but guys stepped up and
made a play when we needed to make a play."
With only two more games left in the
I regular season, the T-Birds finally have some
momentum, and they will need to carry that
forward in order to have a shot at the playoffs.
To slide into the fourth and final playoff spot,
they must win their remaining contests and
hope for a little help from the other Canada
West teams.
Next week will see UBC travel to Winnipeg to take on Manitoba, and they close out
their season the following Saturday against
Saskatchewan in Saskatoon. They have lost
to both those teams already this season, but
as this season has shown, nothing is predictable. UBC had lost 49-20 to Regina the
last time they played, but they showed on
Saturday that they can compete with the top
teams in the west.
If the T-Birds can continue to gel and roll
with their momentum, what looked to be a lost
season may in fact be salvaged. Xi SPORTS + REC    I    MONDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2012
SOCCER»
Women's soccer crushes UNBC
Frazao sets Canada West scoring record
Brandon Chow
StaffWriter
The UBC women's soccer team's
torrid pace at Thunderbird Park on
Saturday led them to a convincing
13-0 win against their northern
neighbours, the University of Northern B.C. Timberwolves. Leading the
way was fourth-year striker Janine
Frazao, who earned the title of
Canada West all-time leading scorer
with her impressive five-goal effort.
From the start, the Thunderbirds
displayed a relentless first-to-the-
ball attitude. Strategic passing plays
allowed them to dominate ball control and zone possession throughout
the match.
UBC was quick to strike after Rachael Sawer's low, hard shot from 20
yards out found the back of the net
a minute after the opening whistle.
Two minutes later, an assertive run
down the right side followed by a
stretch pass to Sawer gave her space
to cross the ball to Frazao, who
neatly headed the ball in for her first
tally of the night.
The 21st minute saw another
Sawer-to-Frazao setup; their tight
passing play inside the 18-yardbox
led to UBC's fifth goal. Five minutes
later, UNBC decided to switch
goaltenders, substituting Kat Hart-
wig-Clay for Reagan McMillan.
The sub didn't change much for
UNBC, though, as UBC went on to
score four more goals in the first
half. Frazao's third goal of the night
came off a sharp pass across the 18-
yard box from Rachel Ramsden.
Meanwhile, at the back end, UBC
KAI JACOBSON PHOTWHE UBYSSEY
Janine Frazao scored five goals to become the Canada West's all-time leading scorer.
game ended with a standing ovation
for Frazao after the announcement
of her title as Canada West's all-time
leading scorer. In total, Frazao had
eight shots on goal and one assist to
add to her five goals in 71 minutes of
playing time.
"She's worked very hard for me
and I'm super proud of her," said
head coach Mark Rogers after the
game. "It's a big accomplishment
and she still has one more year to
go, so hopefully she can continue to
score like she has done and add to
that tally."
UBC moves to 7-1-2 on the year
and sits in third place in the Canada
West. They close out the regular
season next weekend on the road
when they take on Victoria and the
University of the Fraser Valley. Xi
defenders expertly deconstructed
any UNBC opportunities while providing reassuring offensive support.
Heading into the second half
with a commanding 9-0 lead,
UBC continued to dictate the play,
hemming UNBC in their half and
creating numerous chances off
crosses and nifty passing plays
outside the box.
The first goal of the second half
came at 63 minutes, with another
simple redirect off Frazao's head
from a cross by defencewoman
Meghan Pasternak. Eight minutes
later, Frazao received a penalty shot
after being fouled in the box; she
finished from the spot for her fifth
goal of the night.
After two more goals from Taylor
Shannik and Shayla Chorney, the
SOCCER»
Men's soccer
ties Alberta
Andrew Bates
Managing Editor, Web
The last time the UBC men's soccer
team failed to win a game, it gave
up a goal in the last minute of the
Canada West championship and fell
to the University of Alberta Golden
Bears. In this weekend's rematch,
Alberta frustrated them again.
The Thunderbirds gave up a
tying goal with ten minutes left in
the game to record a 2-2 draw with
the Golden Bears in Edmonton on
Saturday afternoon. UBC was in
the midst of closing out a promising
comeback until a looping header
by Alberta's Jonah Feil eluded the
defence and found its way into the
back of the net.
The game started out with
Alberta's Zenon Markevych scoring
a goal in the first seven minutes of
the game, making it only the second
time all year that UBC has been
behind. But goals by Thunderbird
midfielders Greg Smith and Reynold
Stewart on either side of halftime
gave UBC the lead and set the team
on track for a ninth consecutive win,
which was some measure of revenge
for last year's playoff encounter.
However, Feil was able to tie the
score when he snuck past an otherwise organized T-Birds back line to
put his head on a cross and knock it
home.
With the tie and a 2-0 victory
over Saskatchewan on Sunday, UBC
is now 9-0-1 and is in first in the
Pacific division of the Canada West.
They continue their regular season
at home next weekend against
Victoria. Xi
THUNDERBIRD
RESULTS
Friday, Oct. 12
Men's hockey
UBC 4
Calgary 2
Women's hockey
Calgary 5
UBC 2
Men's basketball
UBC 74
Wilfrid Laurier 69
Women's basketball
Women's volleyball
Saturday, Oct. 13
Women's rugby
UBC 10
UVic 5
(UBC grabs fourth and final
playoff spot with the win)
Men's hockey
I IRC 4
Women's hockey
Calgary 6
UBC5(OT)
Women's field hockey
(UBC has clinched a berth at
CIS nationals)
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THE SORROWS OF
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starring
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MONDAY, OCTOBER is, 201
THEATRE»
Actor and improv artist Ryan Beil stars as Werther, a young man who takes his life in the name of unrequited love.
TIM MATHESON/THE UBYSSEY
Goethe stage adaptation waxes tragic, traumatic
Kaavya Lakshmanan
Contributor
We've all heard of Beiber fever,
but what about Werther fever?
In its next production of the
2012-13 season, Theatre at UBC
presents The Sorrows of Young
Werther, a tragic love story about
a man who falls in love with a
married woman and eventually
takes his own life. Somewhat
autobiographical, this Romantic
novel by Johann Wolfgang von
Goethe set into motion what is
known as the "copycat suicide"
phenomenon.
"The church was really opposed to the novel when it was
first published in 1774," said
director and UBC theatre alumna
Fannina Waubert de Puiseau.
"There was a phenomenon called
'Werther fever,' where young
men started dressing in the
clothes that were described [as
being worn by Werther] in the
novel." Accordingto de Puiseau,
the church claimed that young
men were committing suicide in
order to copy Werther's actions
in the novel. "Whether that's actually true is unclear," she added.
This novel was revolutionary
at the time for its portrayal of a
commoner. De Puiseau admitted
that it hasn't always been her favourite read. "I first had to study
the novel when I was 15,16," she
recalled, "and I hated it! It was
actually quite traumatic."
In fact, it wasn't until she
came to UBC and took a course
on British Romantic literature
that she gained an appreciation
for unrequited and non-normative love stories, which prompted
her to re-read Goethe through a
different set of eyes.
Ryan Beil, Jessie Award winning actor and UBC BFA acting
alumnus, will be playing the part
of Werther. His love for the performing arts began in elementary
school when he participated in
pageants. "I've always been a
drama geek ... and starved for
attention," he said with a laugh.
"I generally get cast as funny
parts.... I'm a comic actor. I
usually play the clown or the
funny guy."
Ryan is a member of improv
team the Sunday Service, which
recently won the 2012 Canadian Comedy Award for best
improv troupe.
Falling for someone
you can't be with,...
the torrents of
emotion that
follow... absolutely.
Ryan Beil
Actor and improv artist
"You learn in theatre school
that acting is about making
specific choices," Beil said.
"Improv training helps you do
that instantaneously: be specific,
make a choice and commit to it.
I find it helps you stay on your
feet."
When asked if he identified
with the character of Werther,
he replied with an enthusiastic,
"Absolutely!"
"Falling for someone you can't
be with,... the torrents of emotion
that follow... absolutely."
Beil's words of wisdom to aspiring actors? "It's tough and it's
hard, you have to chase the jobs,
but it's also good to produce your
own work. It's not about necessarily just waiting for the phone
to ring. You have to ... get up and
do it as well." tJ
The Sorrows of Young Werther
runs Oct. 17-20 at the Freddy
Wood Theatre, with a matinee on
Oct. 20.
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«
whatyoumissed.ca 8    I    CULTURE    I    MONDAY, OCTOBER 15,2012
FRUIT »
■493 A DAY
KEEPS THE
CTOR AWAY
More than 25 years in the making, a new apple
variety gets its big reveal at the Apple Festival
NDIANAJOEL ILLUSTRATION/THE UBYSSEY
BY ANDREW BATES
What started 22 years ago
as a simple fruit sale has
now grown into 22 tons of
apples at UBC.
The annual Apple Festival hit
the UBC Botanical Garden on
Saturday and Sunday, featuring
44,000 pounds of apples in 77
different varieties.
"We started because there were
apples growing in the vegetable
garden, in the fruit area," said
Friends of the Garden (FoG)
member Margaret Butschler,
recalling the festival's humble
origins. "Some of the FoGs said,
'Hey, we can make some money if
we sell these to other Friends of
the Garden.'"
In addition to the regular apple
sales, the festival now includes
food carts, apple pies, candied
apples, crafts like apple earrings and apple necklaces, and
other apple-related memorabilia.
Running the festival requires 300
volunteers, and Butschler estimated 17,000 people are usually in
attendance.
One of the festival's main
attractions is the tasting booth,
where attendees can pay $5 to
taste over 60 varieties of apples.
Butschler compared the differences in apples to differences in
wine.
►
WOLF RIVER
"Up in Vernon and Summerland
this year, it's been hot and sunny;
they have lots of water from the
lake. Their apples are huge and
heavy and firm this year," she said.
"You can go to the Fraser Valley,
where they have very little water
and it didn't rain: they have smaller apples."
A new variety of apple joined
the mix on Saturday as well.
Code-named SPA-493, this apple
was developed by plant improvement scientists from the federal
government. The new apple will be
called Salish.
Below, Butschler has shared
some of her favourite types of
apples from the festival. Xi
"That's a huge apple," said Butschler,
who said some apples can weigh as
much as three pounds. "When you
buyyourthree-pound bag of apples,
you're maybe only going to get two
apples in that bag. It's an apple you
can cut up and share with all the
fine people in the family or in your
residence."
"That's for people who like that taste
of a Golden Delicious, but this actually keeps better," she said. "It's good
to stock. It won't go brown when it's
close to the air." Though some of
the apples become known as winter
varieties, most apples are picked by
November and store for up to five
months.
SPA-493/SALISH
The new variety of apple, which has been named Salish, is a bit of a mystery.
"It's yellow underneath and then it has that beautiful red glow on top of that,
this blush," said Butschler. "We know that it has a bit of a sharp, piguant flavour,
but we also know that it's very sweet."
Food scientists have compared the Salish apple to the Nicola, Delicious or
Golden Gala varieties. "But all the people who have done a blind tasting —just
ike wine again — those people have chosen SPA. Eighty-nine per cent of
them like SPA best for its taste," she said. "So you taste it, you think, 'Wow, is
that ever delicious and crunchy.' And when you cut it, you actually have juice
dripping down the knife."
►
LORDLAMBOURNE
"That's a beautiful, sweet dessert
apple," Butschlersaid. "It only keeps
for two months, so come over and
buy a bag, eat it in the next few weeks
and it'll be just a joy."
^   CALV]
D
CALVILLE BLANC
D'HIVER
This apple is great for baking, according to Butschler. "It's a beautiful
apple for people that make French
tarts or open pies or little tarts. It
keeps its shape," she said. "That one,
ifyou eat it, is so juicy that it just drips
downyourhand.'
►
BELLE DEBOSKOOP
"That's a Dutch apple that was developed in the Netherlands. That was
in the 1850s," she said. "Really juicy
and sharp-flavoured, and very, very
high in Vitamin C."
m
►
HONEY CRISP
■
According to Butschler, Honey Crisp
apples are constantly in demand. "It's
a lovely scent when you bite into it.
Very aromatic, juicy and very sweet,"
she said. "It's the one that's been in
the stores for three or fouryears, and
just about everybody you talk to says,
Do you have any Honey Crisp?'" MONDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2012    |    CULTURE
MUSIC »
Five playlists to tune you into midterms
From classical arias to boy band drivel, the right tracks make all the difference
Mia Steinberg
The Martlet
VICTORIA (CUP) - Ever find
yourself short on tunes during
those late-night midterm study
sessions? Below, find a list of the
best studying music, helpfully organized accordingto your
state of mind, whether you're
determined and alert or panicked
and caffeinated.
l.THEBAROQUE-N
RECORD
STUDY STATUS Fresh and eager.
This year will be different:
readings done on time, no last-
minute cramming and all As, baby.
DETAILS Classical music is fantastic
for studying: interesting, low-key,
and no lyrics. Plus, it's easy to find
online. Musopen.org has hundreds of recordings from different
composers available to stream
and download.
RECOMMENDED TUNES Bach's
"Goldberg Variations" are lengthy
and inobtrusive, providing hours
of lightly interesting background
noise. Any and all Romantic-era
piano pieces work, too; after that,
there's always Mozart.
POSSIBLE SIDE EFFECTS Remember
those horrendous piano lessons
as a child? Spine straight, chin up,
hands lightly floating above the
keys? Well, you do now.
2. THE FILM SCORE
STUDY STATUS In need of a little
motivation, but still on schedule.
DETAILS A film's soundtrack
is explicitly tied to the events
onscreen and plays a large part
in connecting you to the story.
The score alone can transport you
into a specific headspace, and you
can begin to feel like the star of
your own action movie. Suddenly,
finishing that biology assignment is a matter of life and death;
without it, the Avengers can't
win against the Cylons and Darth
Vader will crush the rebellion.
They're counting on you. You can
do this. Yes, Tony Stark wants a
fist bump — wait, no, you're still in
the library. Turn that imaginary
high-five into a muscle stretch.
RECOMMENDED TUNES The HOW W
Train Your Dragon soundtrack is
brilliantly energizing. For a real
fist-pumper, grab the score to the
first Pirates of the Caribbean film.
POSSIBLE SIDE EFFECTS Having
flashbacks to the films you love
leads to YouTube clips of your
favourite scenes, followed by, "I'll
just watch the first 20 minutes,"
followed by, "Does the library
have popcorn? Because this trilogy
needs popcorn."
3. THE AMBIENT POST-
ROCK INTELLI-RAVE
STUDY STATUS Your blood is now
52 per cent coffee, and your
economics textbook needs some
existential whimsy.
DETAILS This post-rock subgenre
takes its cues from progressive,
ambient, minimalist and experimental musicians. With sparse
lyrics and lots of slow build, post-
rock can put you in a relaxed yet
focused state of mind.
recommended tunes The Camp-
fire Headphase by Boards of Canada is exquisite electronica that
pulls double duty as study aid and
obscure music snob fodder. The
Earth is Not a Cold Dead Place by
Explosions in the Sky is fantastic
as well.
POSSIBLE SIDE EFFECTS Prolonged
exposure can cause depersonalization, staring contests with the
nearest wall, and long, strange
trips through Wikipedia articles.
Ifyou find yourself contemplating
the black dwarf fate of the sun,
abort mission. Harsh that mellow.
Do not walk towards the light.
4. THE FORBIDDEN FRUIT
STUDY STATUS Well, that five-
minute break lasted nearly an
hour, and there's no way you can
do the entire assignment tonight,
but you can finish most of it.
Probably.
DETAILS It's a fact: as soon as you
need to focus on schoolwork, you'll
discover a new TV show, musician
or other fun distraction. All you
want to do is immerse yourself in
this new love, but you can't — you
have midterms to study for. So
your new obsession sits just out
of reach, positively dripping with
all the fun you're not having right
now. And it knows you'll give in;
it's just a matter of time.
RECOMMENDED TUNES Open your
music player. Which album or
artist do you automatically select,
devoid of conscious thought?
That's the one.
POSSIBLE SIDE EFFECTS Complete
denial. You can still work while
listening to this album. For sure.
Except for this one part, because
it's amazing. And the next two
tracks really deserve your full
attention. After that, back to the
books — you promise. You can stop
any time you want to.
5. THE BUBBLEGUM POP
STUDY STATUS Brain-melting error.
Cannot compute. Just. Do. One.
More. Page.
DETAILS You're done. The barista
has cut you off, the overhead lights
seem to be buzzing in tune to "We
Didn't Start the Fire" and your
textbooks are suddenly scribbled
with gibberish. Your dignity
disappeared at roughly the same
time you somehow got ink all over
your face.
RECOMMENDED TUNES Listen to
the music you loved before you
had taste, right when puberty hit
and emotions ran high. The stuff
you publicly decry but privately
love. The dorkiest boy bands and
most autotuned pop drivel. Put
your drinks up, hit the dance floor
and let the beat drop. Indulging in
guilty pleasures can cause a surge
in energy, temporarily boosting your productivity over the
finish line.
POSSIBLE SIDE EFFECTS Those
mindless beats at full volume will
not foster poetry, kids. Proofread
that essay in the morning. While
your ideas will be out on paper,
they'll be so exquisitely nonsensical that you'll feel like they were
written by a stranger. But it's OK;
next time you'll do things differently. Maybe listen to some Bach
instead of Ke$ha, and avoid this
whole desperate last-minute mess.
Sounds like a plan.
Meet one of our people and they'll ask about you.
Not your resume. Because it's you, the person,
Redl indiVJdUdlity.     weYe interested in. After all, it's a big, diverse world
out there. Tackling global business challenges takes
different viewpoints and fresh thinking. Listening.
Sharing. Debating. It's all part of the job. All we're
missing is you. Visit ey.com/CA/Possibilities.
See More | Opportunities
Unreal togetherness.
=U Ernst &Young
Quality In Everything We Do Opinions
LAST WORDS
Two-tier uni plan
smacks of classism
PARTING SHOTS AND SNAP JUDGMENTS ON TODAY'S ISSUES
It's good to be back to the bargaining table!
Unfortunately, we can't do anything about
wages, but we can offer this tasteful Salish
apple gift basket.
FED UP WITH UBC'S
FLAGRANT APPLE
BOOSTERISM
We're fed up with UBC's flagrant apple boosterism.
For 22 years, the university
has more or less made the apple
its unofficial mascot. The Apple
Festival has been UBC's premier
farmer's market/agricultur-
al-themed fair. But what was
once a small provincial festival
celebrating the popular fruit has
become a decadent coming-out
party for some of the apple industry's most powerful illuminati.
Take the new Salish apple,
for example, unveiled at last
Sunday's festival. It's another in
a long line of hot-rod varietals
rolled out annually at apple
festivals around North America. This announcement is quite
a "get" for the UBC Botanical
Garden, and has cemented its
place in the stratosphere of
Appledom.
It's safe to say UBC's festival is
now the apple industry equivalent of Cannes, the Paris Air
Show or the Academy Awards.
Which is great for apples. But
then there's the nagging little
truth: there are a lot of other
fruits out there that deserve
celebrating.
Like the blueberry. UBC's
annual blueberry festival pales in
comparison: a few stands outside
the Bookstore, a box or two of
blueberries, and, if you're lucky, a
pancake. The double standard is
stark. UBC is willing to invest in
some fruits, but not others.
UBC's fruit policy is rotten to
the core.
AMS TONE-DEAF
ON CHANGES TO
HARASSMENT POLICY
It's no secret that the AMS has
been having a few labour issues
over the past year. Security
workers have unionized and
gone on strike, and one security worker has even filed a
complaint against the AMS for
allegedly discriminating against
him for his involvement in
a union.
It's certainly awkward that
during this time, the AMS has
decided to remove any references to union activities or union
membership from its harassment
and discrimination policy. At
best, this is a clumsy oversight.
At worst, it's a preemptive strike
against any other workers that
are considering organizing. And
this isn't even getting into the
exclusion of gender identity from
the new policy. Young people are
often the most at-risk for being
exploited by employers and it's in
the interest of students and the
AMS to fight against that.
WHAT LESSONS CAN
YOU LEARN FROM A13-0
WIN?
The conferences that UBC's soccer teams play in were thrown
out of balance with the addition
of three awful teams and no
extra games.
Universities that aren't
members of Canadian Interuni-
versity Sport — as opposed to the
second-tier Canadian Collegiate
Athletic Association — want in
for the increased quality of play
and attention offered by a major
athletic program. There has been
a rush of new applicants: Mount
Royal University, the University
of Winnipeg and the University
of Northern British Columbia
all fielded Canada West soccer
programs for the first time this
year, with UBC Okanagan set to
be added next year.
But adding all of those teams
is flooding the schedule, and
now UBC players have fewer
opportunities to test their skills
against the top-tier teams in the
conference. For the men, the
11-team conference has been split
into Prairie and Pacific divisions,
meaning that Pacific teams play
other Pacific teams twice and
teams from the Prairies only
once. For the women, all 13 teams
only meet once in the regular
season. When you have more
LLUSTRATION INDIANA JOEL/THE UBYSSEY
teams in a league than games in
the season, you don't really learn
a lot about your opponents.
All this would be simply annoying if the new teams weren't
so bad. UBC just destroyed
UNBC 13-0 in women's soccer.
In the men's game, UNBC have
lost every match this year, and
the three games Winnipeg didn't
lose were wiped off because
they fielded an ineligible player.
Some of UBC's lopsided wins:
8-0 (against the University of
Lethbridge), 5-1 (Winnipeg), 6-0
and 5-1 (UNBC).
Accordingto the UNBC student paper, the soccer program
was rushed up a level in the hope
that it would convince Canada
West to approve their application
to the conference. They're facing
challenges that would kneecap
any established program, and
maybe they can be competitive in
the future. But they aren't now.
UBC has talented players that
can compete at the highest level
of CIS competition, but they've
been having trouble reaching
the national tournament. Men's
coach Mike Mosher has spent
two years preaching the gospel
that everything comes down to
high-pressure knockout games.
Thrashing UNBC is not preparing them to face teams that are
actually hard to beat.
Despite their powerful
performance on Saturday, the
women's team got trounced
3-0 by Trinity Western University earlier this year, and
this past month both teams
came to a stalemate against
the team that beat them in last
month's playoffs.
UBC has pitched a proposal
to CIS to create an elite division
for schools that want to pour
resources into their top teams.
The proposal has strengths and
drawbacks, but one thing is
clear: there are too many teams
and not enough games in the
Canada West, and competitive
balance needs to be found to
avoid turning off casual fans
and halting player development.
Xi
' < \
KATICHISMS
by Gordon Katie
Nearly every week, the media tells
a distressing story of the financial
prospects of our graduating class:
overwhelming student debt, depressed wages for perhaps a decade,
want of basic cognitive capacity
(graduates lack the "critical skills,"
"problem-solving, writing skills,
social intelligence and adaptive
thinking" necessary for today's
workforce).
But don't fear: the Globe and Mail
has a plan to deliver us from this
Dickensian future of functional illiteracy and debt servitude. "REEDUCATION," a series launched Oct. 6,
proposes a "radical overhaul of the
system," including such innovative
suggestions as lifting the tuition cap
— which in B.C. forbids domestic
tuition from rising more than the
rate of inflation — and creating a
two-tiered system of education.
The first tier would be composed
of a small number of elite research
institutions (similar to the Ivy
League) for students who "value
their proximity to the top scholars
and researchers." The larger and
more varied second tier would
de-emphasize research and focus on
remedial teaching and "up-skilling"
through a vague balance of online
and offline courses.
But wait, there's more! These
schools would offer you a "deification of choice" through degree
customization, including add-ons
and bonus "degree badges," turning
your education into something like
buying World of Warcraft expansion
packs.
Why the overhaul? The "massifi-
cation" of education. We made the
silly mistake of making education
too accessible, creating a glut of
over-qualified and under-employed
riffraff. I think it would really be
best for everyone that you leave
these august halls of higher learning to us bluebloods, and set that
tattered copy of The Republic down
as you march back to the salt mines
from whence you came.
Returning to the world of reality,
I have good news for you: there is
no crisis in higher education, and
certainly not one that demands this
sort of transformation.
Despite the recession, completing
a post-secondary degree remains
the single most prudent financial
decision you can make. Next time
you see a melodramatic warning
of your impending poverty or read
a long treatise about how we have
to "fix" universities, I want you to
remember a few facts.
• The unemployment and underemployment rate of young university-educated workers is substantially lower than those without
university educations. During the
recession, unemployment rates for
the university-educated increased
only 0.6 per cent for men and 1.2 per
cent for women.
• The income gains from post-secondary education are as large
as they have ever been, and the
wage gap between those with and
without post-secondary degrees
is only increasing. Accordingto a
UBC co-authored study, those with
university educations can expect 40
to 50 per cent more lifetime income
on average.
• Youth unemployment is not some
peculiar consequence of a Canadian
policy of over-education, but a
phenomena across the Organization
for Economic Co-operation and
Development. However, Canada has
been praised for being well below
the OECD average.
• Young graduates are indeed
suffering, but the problem is not
over-education or the failure of the
academy, it is a sluggish economy.
Low aggregate demand coupled
with austerity policies threatens to
prolong this economic stagnation.
Instead of boosting spending
to stimulate the economy, the
2012 provincial budget has made
substantial cuts to post-secondary
education. This is the continuation
of a trend since the 1970s, when 90
per cent of post-secondary revenue
was covered by government (by
2000, just 57 per cent, according
to the Canadian Federation of
Students).
Anyone interested in the financial plight of Canadian students
should plead with the government
to reinvest in post-secondary education. We should not use the consequences of economic stagnation
as a pretence for thinly veiled calls
to segregate our universities across
class lines. Xi
T-Bird arena more than
just concerts, liquor
LETTER
Dear editor:
Your article "Arena Dreamin'"
(Oct. 11, 2012) incorrectly suggests that the Olympic legacy of
UBC's Thunderbird Arena rests
only in large-scale concerts with
a liquor licence.
The vision for the arena was
always far greater, and includes
providing a range of diverse community programs.
On this score, the facts
speak for themselves: the arena
receives more than 650,000
annual visits, including 1,200
participants in weekly drop-in
programs, over 190 hours of
programs per week, and more
than 100 weekly hockey games. It
is one of the most well-used sport
facilities in the province.
It is true that there were issues
with concert events prior to the
2010 Games. After the Games,
the event management team
underwent major changes. The
new vision includes concerts, but
also other events that have been
very popular.
The article ignored the recent
record, including successful
events like the 2011 Stanley Cup
Finals media and practice events,
a round of the 2012 Davis Cup,
UBC Rec's Annual Lace-Up for
Kids fundraiser, as well as many
family and community events.
Holding a permanent liquor
licence is not the most important
part of our operations. This modern university arena has made
possible a host of university,
community, national and international programming. And we
look forward to providing more.
Sincerely,
Kavie Toor
Associate Director, UBC
Athletics and Recreation Scene
ADVICE »
Going the distance with Dr. Bryce
H
WHAT YOU SHOULD DO
by Dr. Bryce Warnes
Hi Dr. Bryce,
I'm in a long-distance relationship
and my girlfriend and I are planning to see each other this summer.
Problem is, instead of coming here to
Vancouver like we originally planned,
she wants to go to Edmonton so we
can spend time with her a-little-too-
close best friend.
I've already saidyes, but the more
time she spends with Mr. Edmonton,
the less I'm looking forward to feeling
like the third wheel for two weeks. The
three of us spent last summer together,
and there's no indication that next
summer will be any different.
We've had fights about letting
jealousy get the best of me, so I need to
somehow back out of going to Edmonton without bringing that up again. I
can handle beingjealous, but I'm sure
as hell not paying money to watch
the two of them flirt with each other.
Again. Help me!
Sincerely,
Envious
Dear Envious,
You say you want to get her to come
to Vancouver, but you don't want to
bring up the jealousy thing. Bad idea.
You need to bring it up because it's
what's making you feel shitty right
now, and because suppressed jealousy has a corrosive effect over the
long term. Let your feelings see the
light of day, or else they'll compromise the stability of your relationship.
But if you're accusatory — "Last
time I came and visited, you wanted
to hang out with Mr. Edmonton all
the time!" — she'll go on the defence,
and neither of you will leave the
conversation happy.
<MULTIPLE INTERSECTING LINKS- PHOTOfTHE UBYSSEY
If you're honest and aren't afraid
to discuss your emotions openly — "It makes me uncomfortable
spending the summer with you and
Mr. E. I feel like a third wheel. I feel
I deserve some just-you time," — you
will hopefully get her to see the
matter from your perspective.
You'll both have to make compromises to maintain a long-distance
relationship. Ifyou can suppress
your jealousy enough to let your girlfriend keep Mr. Edmonton around as
a shoulder to cry on when you're out
of town, she needs to make compromises as well — like taking a two-
week break from her BF substitute.
At the end of the day, though,
you're a guy who gets jealous, and
she's a woman who likes having
close male friends. There is a fundamental incompatibility between you
two. You can make it work, but it will
take openness and compromise on
both ends, even if that means bringing up the J-word. tJ
HACKEDEX
YOUR UBC WORD OF THE WEEK
MOA, or the Museum of Anthropology, is easily the
best museum on campus. Located off Marine Drive,
it features world-renowned exhibits and doubles as a
hub for teaching and research. The building itself is an
architectural masterpiece. Believe us — it's stunning.
PIC OF THE WEEK
JOSH CURRAN PHOTOfTHE UBYSSEY
Jas Dhillon helped shut down the Regina offence on Saturday in UBC's 24-17 win.
ams
this is your ams
Eat. Shop. Study. The Old SUB is still open!
THE OLD SUB
Op
v *    sin
ett
UBC Library & the AMS Food Bank presents
FOOD
FOR FINE$
October 22 - November 4
$2.00 will be waived for every
non-perishable food item
(up to a max of $30)
UBC
W
a place of mind
THE   UNIVERSITYOF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA
Library
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ams
Fo&l
Batfk 12    I    GAMES    I    MONDAY, OCTOBER 15,2012
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40-In spite of
44-Bauxite, e.g.
45-Small batteries
46-Rum cocktail
47-Irritable
50-Isr. neighbour
52-Urns
53-Unit of corn
55-Rime
57-Principles of commerce
63-Coarse file
64-High times?
65-Smelting waste
67- do
68-Gold coin
69-Ike's ex
70- Siouan speaker
71-Closes
72-Adult male deer
30- China s Sun -sen
32- Gives off
33-Mother of Perseus
34- Protection
36-RR stop
38-Malesheep
41- Possesses
42-Maritime
43- Keepers of daily recorc
48-Place of worship
51-Nasal
54-Tears
56-Brewery kilns
57-Suffragist Carrie
58-Scandinavian c
59-Womanizer
60-Caesar's partne
61-Split
62-"Give that
63- Grande
66-Joke
14
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51             ■
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■ 53
54   1             ■:;
56
DOWN
1-Naught
2- Children's author BIyton
3-Son of Isaac
4- The day following today
5- Native American tent
6-Places of contest
7-Soft drink
8- Pulitzer-winning biographer Leon
9-Get ready to drive
10-Coined money
11-Archipelago part
12- Neet rival
13-LAX posting
21- Loincloth worn by Hindu men
22-Actor Chaney
25-North Dakota city
26-Worship
27- Quotes
29- Kitten
7
2
3
5
57
58
59
60
61
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"
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PUZ
ILE PROVIDED BYBESICROSSWORDSCOM. USED W
TH PERMISSION
ACROSS
1- Nair rival
19- East of Eden director K
20- Sore spot where the stc
joins the intestine
23- Perl man of Cheers
24-Hawaiian food
25-PC shortcut
28- Engage in espionage
31- lift?
35- Foolish persons
11     kh^nrVnm
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5
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5-Be silent, musically
10- Cosecant's reciprocal
14-Not many words
2
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15-Wear down
16-H.S. exam
17- Neeson of Rob Roy
8
2
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7
PUZZLE PROVIDED BY KRAZYDAD USED WITH PERMISSION.
SHAMELESS GIVEAWAY
NON OPT-OUT STUDENTS ONLY
WHILE SUPPLIES LAST!
THEUBYS
TICKETS TO
ADVANCED
SCREENING OF
PARANORMAL
ACTIVITY
ON THURSDAY,
OCT. 18 7:00PM
All the activity
has led to this.
Mi I m
PAQANORMAl/J, ivity
LOSER THAN YOU THINK
IN THEATRE
to see it first
ParanormalMovie.com
octAber
CLAIM YOUR TICKET BY COMING TO RM 23 IN THE SUB
The Master of Management of Innovation is an accelerated 12 month
(8 months course based & a k month experiential term in industry)
professional management degree. Leading researchers in direct contact
with students through a very small & selective class provide a focused
learning experience in economic analysis, technology management,
strategy, finance, accounting, marketing & policy.
MMI IS AN EXCELLENT COMPLEMENT TO
YOUR SCIENCE OR ENGINEERING DEGREE.
www.utm.utoronto.ca/mmi
THE UBYSSEY
4^ Management
tS3 UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO
j Institute of Health Policy, Management & Evaluation
J UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO

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