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The Ubyssey Jan 20, 1966

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Array PROBE SLATED FOR LOWER MALL BOOKS
Lower Mall Residence Association (LMRA)
council Tuesday night exposed and squashed a
secret bank account involving $181.
The account, with the Imperial Bank of
Commerce Campus Branch in the name ol the
LMRA was in direct contradiction to the AMS
constitution.
As an AMS affiliated organization the LMRA
must bank through the AMS treasury.
In a two hour meeting the LMRA council
together with AMS executives, Byron Hender
and Mike Sommers:
• Called for an audit of LMRA's financial
records;
• Transferred the money to the AMS
treasury;
• Formed a committee to investigate AMS-
LMRA financial arrangements.
The   account Wednesday contained   $181.
When  it was opened Nov.  22, it contained
$390.
The account's existence was brought to the
attention of AMS officials by a letter from the
LMRA ex-secretary Ina Petersen, in which she
said she regarded the forms filled out to open
the account as fraudulent.
—norm  betts  photo
STENSTROM AND WOODS checking the cash . . .
At Tuesday night's regular LMRA council
meeting Mackenzie House representative Carol
Purdy asked why councillors hadn't been asked
about the acount.
"The application form to open the account
says we okayed the account at a Nov. 22 meet
ing," she said, "I'd like to see the minutes of
this meeting."
LMRA president John Woods said there were
no minutes because there had been no meeting.
Woods said a meeting could not have been
held to discuss the bank account as it was unconstitutional and would have been found out
if it showed up in the LMRA minutes.
Council members acknowledged they had
received checks for LMRA expenses from the
Imperial Bank of Commerce.
Goodwin made a motion to form a committee
to look into AMS-LMRA financial arrangements.
Council passed it and appointed Stenstrom,
Goodwin and councillor Bobbi Earle.
AMS treasurer Sommers said.AMS president
Hender, AMS business manager Ron Pearson
and himself would sit on the AMS side of the
investigation committee.
Stenstrom said his books have been open
all year and asked for an audit.
Council then voted to curtail the unconstitutional bank account and put the money into
the AMS  treasury.
Motions were passed okaying the audit Stenstrom requested and voting confidence in Stenstrom and  Woods  in  their positions.
Vol. XLVIII, No. 38  VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 1966
48 CA 4-3916
Promises'
welcomed
by our Mac
UBC President John Macdonald welcomes the promises
of increased federal support
for education in Tuesday's
throne speech, opening Parli-
ment.
"Everyone associated with
the universities will welcome
the urgently needed assistance," he said.
He hoped federal and provincial governments would cooperate so that the increased
federal aid would supplement
increased grants from the province.
The speech proposed to
"assist the expansion of institutions of higher education"
and to "provide greater and
more equitable opportunities
for young Canadians to attend
such institutions.''
Parliament "will be asked to
approve a substantial increase
in the financial assistance to
universities for the academic
year 1966-67."
"Amendments will be proposed to the Student Loan
Act."
"A program of Canada
scholarships and bursaries will
be submitted for your approval."
The government also plans
further action on the financial
problems of universities, taking into account differences between the provinces educational systems.
Macdonald summed up the
speech.
"In view of the Bladen Commission's report and the recent
report of the Economic Council, it was to be expected that
the throne speech would have
strong reference to providing
increased support for universities.
"More scholarships and bursaries to complement the Canada Student loan program will
make it easier for qualified
students throughout Canada to
attend university," Macdonald
concluded.
—■ powell hargrave photo
DR. JOHN MACDONALD is congratulated by the Science
Queen Fran Nason moments after he was made an honorary scienceman.
Science smoker hit,
police bust stripper
A 24-year-old exotic dancer who police charge performed nude before 600 UBC science students Tuesday night
appeared in Vancouver magistrate's court Wednesday
Betty Yvonne Jones, of 1522
East Third, was charged with
committing an indecent act.
The case was adjourned
until Jan. 26 with bail set at
$150.
Ten morality squad detectives raided Clinton Hall, 2605
East Pender, just as Miss Jones
allegedly became wholly exposed.
Police also seized a projector
but found no film.
The hall had been hired by
Science Undergraduate Society
as part of science week festivities.
The 600 students left the
hall after the raid.
SUS president David Williams refused to comment on
the affair.
Williams was questioned at
police headquarters Wednesday.
Staff, space
shortage hit
by Okulitch
By ANNE BALF
Lack of money and space for the science faculty has
meant failure for many students, Dean V. J. Okulitch
claimed Tuesday.
Almost 50 per cent of his
faculty's students failed some
courses at Christmas, he told
a science student-faculty coffee party
He blamed the high failure
rates on staff shortages and
high   student-professor   ratios.
"In mathematics, for instance, the ratio of students
to instructors is 209 to one,"
said Okulitch.
"The failure rate in many
courses is much too high. Possibly the students should work
harder and the professor teach
better."
Okulitch blamed many of the
faculty's troubles on lack of
space and funds.
"Our budget is only one
third of what we should be
spending on equipment and
buildings," he told The Ubyssey Wednesday.
He said, "even if he were
authorized to hire all the staff
he needed, we wouldn't have
room to house them.
"The most important thing is
space. We need that urgently."
Okulitch said the only addition to the science faculty's
facilities in the near future is
an addition to the biological
sciences building.
The departments of chemistry and geophysics are so
cramped they must turn away
graduate  students.
Okulitch warned UBC is
slipping behind in some of its
departments.
"We are starting to slip
badly in comjputer science and
we are behind in geology and
geophysics," he said.
The dean also criticized the
Science Undergraduate
Society's Black and Blue Review.
"The pass rate in certain
courses does not always correspond to the Black and Blue's
evaluation of the professor,"
said Okulitch.
Mac raps feds
for education
short-change
UBC president John Macdonald said Tuesday the Canadian government is spending
too little on scientific research
and education.
"The average grant of the
National Research Council (of
Canada) for a research project is $6,400," he said. "In the
United States, the average is
$16,000."
Macdonald was speaking a
science student-faculty coffee
party  in Brock  Hall.
But he said one atomic submarine costs more to build
than the agricultural research
in North America for one year.
"We have the skill to transform half the world during our
lifetime."
He said scientific expenditures have increased four times
since  1962.
"And the quality of teaching
has been improving in spite
of all the difficulties."
Macdonald said the faculty
of science budget has'risen 60
per cent in the last four years.
He accompanied his comments with a warning to
science students.
"Don't get mesmerized by
the prospects of accomplishment or a tour de force without any real significance," he
said.
Macdonald addressed the
students and faculty dressed
in a science sweater given to
him by the Science Undergraduate Society when he was
made an "honorary science-
man." Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 20, 1966
WHEN CHIPS ARE DOWN
Ubyssey stands
by its readers
— powell hargrave photo        [
NEW SCIENCEMAN,  UBC  president Dr. John   Macdonald   addresses  Tuesday's   science
undergraduate  society-faculty   coffee  party  in Brock at noon. He outlined the present
state of scientific research for a crowd of about 500.
New residence building
called  a wisp of smoke'
By STUART GRAY
UBC's architect planner
John Porter Wednesday described the possibility of a
new student residence near
the planned Student Union
Building as "a wisp of smoke."
But, said Porter, there undoubtedly will be some definite plans for new housing on
campus, possibly within a
month or two.
"The present plans consist
only of an indefinite general
area alloted for tentative
housing," he said.
The first hint of possible
new residences came in a SUB
progress report submitted to
council Monday by SUB chairman   Roger McAfee.
In the report, McAfee designated the new residence area
as in vicinity of UBC's traffic
czar Sir Ouvry Roberts' present headquarters.
Porter said a portion of this
area has been set aside for
housing in part of a campus
master plan being prepared
for UBC's Board of Governors
by a San Francisco architectural firm.
The residence area allot-
men gained approval of the
board in a progress meeting
with the architects last month,
he said.
Extensions to Lower Mall or
Totem Park are also a possibility, he said.
But UBC's president John
Macdonald is not stressing the
need for undergraduate housing.
He maintains UBC has already got more student residences on campus than any
other Canadian university, said
Porter.
This may be true statistically, but not necessarily in a
practical sense, he said.
Meanwhile there is consider
able pressure on the planning
office for the space now labeled
residences by many faculties,
said Porter.
He said all pleas are eventually rejected or accepted by
the  board of governors.
While internal rivalries for
more space are never vicious,
they often lead to confusion,-
he added.
"The administrative set-up at
UBC is first class when it
comes to getting people mixed-
up."
CORSAGES
.   .   .   REASONABLY   PRICED
STRATHCONA FLORAL CO.
5555  West   Blvd.
AM  1-7271
Competition opened
for photo addicts
The annual Ben Hill-Tout photography contest will open
to students, faculty and staff this spring.
The   competition  is   divided
into four categories: black and
white, senior; black and white,
novice; color, general; and
scientific and technical, black
and white and color.
Entries must be submitted
to room 201, Lasserre building
by Feb. 14.
The competition commemorates post-war UBC photographer Ben Hill-Tout who was
a leader in new forms of
photography.
JOIN
KITSILANO
CREDIT UNION
Low Cost Loans
to Members - Insured
Phone or Call:
2821 W. Bdwy.    RE 1-4531
PHYSICISTS *  ENGINEERS
for
PROTON  ACCELERATOR
STUDY
Atomic Energy of Canada Limited
is studying the design of an untra-
high current proton accelerator to
produce an intense neutron source
by spallation reactions. A beam
power of 65 Megawatts, 65 milli-
amperes   at   1000 MeV  is  required.
The study is basic and wide
ranging.   Problems   include:
production  of   high-efficiency
radio frequency power,
accelerator  orbit  dynamics,
space charge effects,
beam   transport   systems,
electromagnet design,
heat   transfer from   liquid
metal  targets,
control   system   studies.
Accelerator   experince   is   not   essential.    Enquiries,    including    academic qualification  and  experience,
should be addressed to:
FILE 1  E
ATOMIC   ENERGY   OF   CANADA
LIMITED
Chalk  River,  Ontario
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DIAMOND      RINGS
SYMMETRY     .    .   FROM $100
FIRBANKS
599   Seymour  •   Brentwood
and Park Royal
Ask about your student
Discount
By   CRAIG
The Ubyssey stands by its
down.
Since Monday, Brock cafeteria has been serving chips on
cardboard trays, not in the usual paper bags.
Wednesday noon, Ubyssey
managing editor Ian Cameron,
compared the number of chips
obtained in the bag.
Noted researcher Cameron
explained his methods.
"I bought a cruddy little
plate of chips and came down
here. Then I tried them out in
one of the old bags."
Two platefuls later, Cameron
had filled the bag.
He estimated the tray contained 50 per cent fewer chips
than the bag.
Brock dietician, Olga Rumen,
said the tray contained as many
chips.
"There never was a bigger
bag," she said. "Everyone gets
the ■ same five ounces."
Besides, she pointed out, the
chips now taste better.
The bagged chips were
"mashed, steamed, and much
worse than those on the new
air exposed plates", Miss Ru-
man said.
Miss Rumen also stressed the
cost of the chip is standardized across campus.
Price of chips at UBC is 15
cents although Brock is the
only cafeteria serving them on
paper trays.
TAPPING
readers when the chips are
Elementary   &   Secondary
FUTURE
TEACHERS
KE*EP
YOUR
EYES
on
VANCOUVER
•
Every year the
Vancouver School
Board
HIRES
many teachers
directly from
university
•
When the time comes
APPLY
to the
Vancouver
School Board
1595  West  10th Avenue
For an  interview
call RE 1-1131
TRAFFIC
& CUSTOMS
RESEARCH
SALES &
MARKETING
AGRICULTURAL
SERVICES
AUDIT &
ACCOUNTING
TRADING &
PURCHASING
CHEMISTRY
& ENGINEERING
PERSONNEL &
INDUSTRIAL
RELATIONS
TECHNOLOGY
& PRODUCTION
*-
CANADA PACKERS INVITE GRADUATING STUDENTS
in Arts, Commerce, Business, Engineering, Chemistry
and Agriculture to discuss plans for an interesting career in a leading Canadian industry.
STUDENT INTERVIEWS
with Canada Packers' Representatives will be held on
January  25 - January  27
at times arranged by the University Placement Office.
For further information, Canada Packers' Annual Report
and brochure are available at the Placement Office.
CANADA
@
PACKERS
CANADA'S LARGEST FOOD PROCESSOR Thursday, January 20,  1966
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
MO I K
jSjpfWgi^^
'   jf  *iiiii     nimi
marJijrar&s
&
PRINCE OF THE PAMPAS
KING OF THE CAMPUS
Zeta Psi Fraternity
i —norm  betts photo
IT'S NOT FAIR said the Citizens for Carlos committee when
their sign at Burrard bridge was repainted after this
picture was taken. Fraternities can't advertise their Mardi
Gras king candidates before Monday.
VICTORIA FIGHT
Warning letters
sent to students
Victoria College entered another phase of its fee fight
Tuesday with administration warning letters to students who
have failed to pay their full fees.
Victoria   College's   adminis-
Education boss opposes
free university education
Mac will face
Berkeleyites
Saturday
"Education and Beyond" is
the theme of a conference to
be sponsored by the Academic
Activities Committee of UBC
in Brock Saturday and Sunday.
The conference will be opened at 9:30 a.m. Saturday by
President John Macdonald,
speaking on the role of the university today.
Guest speakers include Dr.
Joseph Tussman of the Philosophy Dept. at Berkeley, and
head of Berkeley Experimental
College; Dr. C. W. Gonick, professor of Economics at the University of Manitoba and editor
of Canadian Dimensions, and
Berkeley student radical Steve
Weissman, a leader of the
Berkeley free speech movement and member of the San
Francisco-Viet Nam Day Committee.
Patrick Kenniff, Canadian
Union of Students president
may also speak on the structure of Canadian education.
One of the additional UBC
speakers will be Dr. A. D.
Scott of the Dept. of Economics, speaking on the economics of a university.
tration sent out 689 letters
Monday to warn students of
possible expulsion in their fee
fight.
The students are the remainder of the original 1,500 who
withheld $56 of their second
term fees to protest the 1965
fee increase.
The students intend to pay
the money Jan. 27, opening
day of the provincial legislature.
They now face a late fee fine
of $10 a student.
Sue Pelland, editor of the
Victoria College paper, The
Martlett, complained about
council action regarding the
fee fight situation in a phone
interview Wednesday.
"We won't know anything
definite from the council until Thursday morning," Miss
Pelland said. "And we're mad."
When the letters were sent
out Monday, many students
were irate.
"Some of them," explained
Miss Pelland, "are afraid and
disturbed — they don't know
what to do."
"We're mad at council because it didn't hold a meeting
today," Miss Pelland said.
Even though the AMS went
on record as promising to pay
the late fee fines, the issue is
now a legal problem.
"Clause six of the Societies
Act says the AMS cannot give
out property—so they've taken
the question to a lawyer."
"Government
could control
enrolment"
VICTORIA (UNS) — Education minister Les Peterson says
he opposes free university education because it could allow
governments the power of dictating enrolment.
"He who pays the piper calls
the tune," Peterson told 1,000
Victoria College students Tuesday.
If governments paid the full
cost of university education,
Peterson said, they would almost automatically gain greater
control over the institutions.
• •      •
"What would toe the restrictions placed on enrolment to
protect the taxpayers?
"Governments might even
dictate quotas on, say, the number of engineers to train," he
said.
Peterson said such a situation was "far-fetched, but it's
something that should be
guarded against."
The minister said he values
universities' autonomy and
does not favor government control.
• • •
"Everything to do with universities is outside of the government. Government's role is
to provide financial assistance."
Peterson said he believes all
financial barriers to higher-
education should be removed.
"Every student who has the
necessary ability to pursue
higher education should have
that privilege, regardless of
financial circumstances.
• •      *
Asked about fees, Peterson
said he "personally hopes" they
have reached a plateau.
"Universities are autonomous and set their own fee structures, but I would hope there
will be no increase."
In answer to another question, Peterson hinted the government is considering extra
financial assistance to out-of-
town students.
. . . they want you to do it now
Don't just stand there —
get out and do something
Don't just stand there, do something.
The practical aspects of this Student Volunteer Service slogan will be discussed noon today in Brock Lounge.
Students who have worked with prisoners at Oakalla will
describe their experiences.
Others, who have worked with high-school dropouts
and handicapped children, will also speak.
SVS is a Red Feather affiliate which tries to interest
students in community service projects.
It has recently launched a campaign to enlist the support of students for services that are required in Vancouver, but are not provided for by the usual agencies.
The meeting today is the first step in this campaign.
Conservatives want
plaque of gratitude
Nobody ever thanked the
Members of the Canadian
Officers Training Corps donated their pay to build the
armory for UBC, at the beginning  of  World  War II.
But there is no commemorative plaque of gratitude on
the building.
The UBC Conservative Club
decided at a meeting Wednes-
d a y to recommend such a
plaque be presented as a token
of appreciation of the university  and the student  body.
The UBC contingent of the
COTC, started in 1928, waived
COTC for the armory.
their pay to build the armory.
The whole operation was organized by Lt. Col. G. M.
Shrum, now chancellor of
Simon Fraser, and financed by
members of COTC students
at UBC.
The building was presented
to the university in 1941 by
Shrum and the contingent.
But the Conservative club
pointed out, there is no recognition of the donation anywhere  on  campus.
It also suggested a presentation ceremony.
—norm betta photo
SINGING UP A STORM in South Brock, Wednesday, were campus folk groups, singing in
aid of this year's Mardi Gras. Here Ann Mort if ee, Arts I, strums and sings along with
crowds attending so-called folk fiesta. mmrsssr
Published Tuesday, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
J_oc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Pounding member, Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa,  and  for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 1966
"It is not the contexture of words, but the
effects of Action, that gives glory to the times"
—Samuel Daniel, 1603
svw:~
,<x; "ms»fck>»~ sytsKf v
Slime
The Lower Mall Residence Association has a fine
record of service to the 700-odd students they represent.
Last year they blazed the trail the other residence
areas would do well to follow, in affiliating with the
AMS.
Theoretically, this was to have increased their
ability to serve their students, by providing them with
a 'big brother' for their dealings with Housing, and —
eventually — some sort for formal representation on
student council for the special problems of residence
students.
Tuesday night, however, the Lower Mall Residence
Association emerged as a kind of arch-type of these
AMS organizations with a basic distrust of the AMS
system.
It came out in the wash that frustrated, according
to their executive, by the AMS monetary procedures,
they had set up that particularly questionable form of
financing arrangement known as a "slush fund".
The AMS — and the Lower Mall — constitution
forbids any banking system other than the established
AMS system. So the slush fund — an unconstitutional
bank account — is out on one count.
The Lower Mall executive had to claim a meeting
was held approving the bank account, before the account could be established. Everybody admits there
was no such meeting, so the slush fund is out on two
counts.
But it's the third count that makes the whole thing
slimy.
It's the attitude that if the established procedures
don't work, then people can go to any lengths to circumvent those procedures, rather than use the same
energy to work to adapt things so everybody can benefit.
Lower Mall was not the first AMS organization to
regret the lack of immediately available petty cash.
But the actions the executive took—with or without
the tacit or clear understanding of the rest of their
council—set up a potentially dangerous position whereby
a few people had control of student funds which were
being administered — as far as the average student
knew — secretly.
The audit that has been ordered will probably find
nothing amiss financially.
But there is something amiss in the attitude that
when the AMS doesn't work to an organization's benefit,
then something should be done under the table.
So those people who worked to bring the slush
fund into the light of day must be heartily commended.
Because of their actions, one organization now will work
out a less questionable means of insuring a smoothly-
running operation.
But one more — and AMS candidates take note —
a real lesson for student government on every level
comes out of the Lower Mall mess:
Such activities are harmful both to the AMS (the
student body at large), and eventually to the subsidiary organization, (the very people the subsidiary
student leadership is trying to serve).
Whether or not this particular instance of a questionable activity is a case for the student court remains to
be seen.
But in it is a warning to everyone in student government — whether on the executive and council of
. (say) the Science Undergraduate Society or (say) the
Sports Car Club — to fly by the rules.
Or change the rules in a constitutional manner,
and then fly by them.
The alternative is usually an impressive leap and
then one hell of a fall.
$Zn>M
"Something tells me ifs going to be another one of those
seasons."
LETTERS
'Don't need any man7
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I'm nauseated, yea, sick to
my stomach with repetitious
blurbs dealing with the topic
of the female bust.
Latest to inspire my ire is
the. recent article discussing,
as the writer so cutely terms
them, "the mammary glands."
It may or may not interest
some of those clever males,
but many women are getting
rather impatient with this
idea of free discussion of women's physical properties.
Further, it may or may not
interest them to learn that
most women are not greatly
impressed with the pubic
lumpiness achieved by the too-
tight jeans worn by many
young men. Yet no articles
discussing this topic at length
appear.
Give it a rest fellows!
Grow up!
Realize the day has dawned
when it doesn't matter a tinker's damn what you guys
think of of the female body.
We really don't have to
worry about pleasing you or
care about what you think
re the mammary glands, for
our happiness and well-being are no longer dependant
on any man. A FROSH
•      *      •
NO MONASTARIES'
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
A great deal of to do is
made about the high cost of
higher education, but does the
cost really need to be so high?
If all the money wasted in
building monuments and cutting   grass were directed to
scholarships and fellowships
and periodicals and professorial salaries, and research
grants probably a great deal
more education could take
place at lower cost.
As for residences of monasteries a couple of thousand
second-hand trailers would do,
while quonset huts make
quite adequate labs and lecture halls.
The only high cost is the
high cost of sophistry and
monumentality.
GARY BOYD
Science IX
SCAPEGOAT
Editor, The Ubyssey. Sir:
Western civilization is done
for, you say, and all because
of a.d. 1921, the year of universal suffrage. Since then the
arts, education and business
have been subtley invaded by
inadequate women — adequately utilizing their wicked
female charms on the helpless, victimized male.
This is really too much!
You're using women as the
scapegoat for all the shortcomings of western democracy
since 1921.
Can't you think of anything
else that went wrong? W.W.
II was entirely the fault of the
emancipee, I suppose; aggressive, tyrannical office girl,
her!
As for your statement that
"education is controlled by,
and laced with the asinine frivolities of inadequate women", its pure bosh.
Your cynical wit is exceeded only by your idle exaggeration.
Spit all you like.
E. B.
IN
THE
EUR
By IAN CAMERON
My last column mentioned
the guy who turned up at the
festerers ball with a tie on.
Yesterday I learned why.
It's camp.
Camp, in case you don't
know, is something that's so
far out it's in.
Like, the Union Jack is
camp. Old
hot rods,
with the
front higher
than the rear,
are camp.
Old comics,
like Super-
m a n , Black
Hawks, and
Plastic Man
are camp. CAMERON
Batman, of course, is camp
par excellenct. Jitterbug-
ging (remember that) is camp.
Making your own car is camp,
but only because it's so ridiculous.
Dixieland is camp. Gainsborough is camp. The Hardy
Boys are camp, and Tom
Swift is the campest of all.
So now you know about
camp. However, no one has
brought this to the university
yet. So here it is.
Cameron's camp list. Cut it
out and take it wherever you
go, and you'll always be
camp.
Going to classes is camp.
Telling people we don't need
a SUB because we've got
Brock Hall is camp. Fort
Camp is camp. Acadia Camp
is just out.
Petitions for anything are
camp. Going to the Mardi
Gras bazaar but not to Mardi
Gras is camp.
Going to Faculty Formals
is camp, but not if you wear
a suit.
Malcolm McGregor is
camp.
Getting first class marks in
engineering and then going
into elementary education is
camp.
"We're concerned" buttons
are camp. Flunking is camp.
Ordinary shoes with laces are
camp.
Being a jock is camp, but
rowing isn't. The Bad Boys
Bagge Shoppe isn't camp, because it's commercial, but Ye
Olde War Surplus Shoppe
in Victoria is camp.
Finally, bugging The Ubyssey is not now, never was,
and never will be camp.
V
EDITOR:  Tom  Wayman
News  ..   Ron   Riter
Associate   George Reamsbottom
City        ....    Al    Donald
Photo         Norm   Betts
Sports        Ed Clark
Ass't  News   Dan  Mullen
       Richard   Blair,   Robbi  West
Ass't City    Danny Stoffman
Page    Friday         John    Kelsey
Managing       Ian   Cameron
Features             Mike    Bolton
CUP       Don    Hull
Anne Balf and Pat Hrushowy
sat on the desk Wednesday as
people milled about. Among the
millers were Craig Tapping, Joan
Fogarty, Doug (scandall Halver-
son, Jim Good, Stuart Gray, Tefri
Brown, Bert Hill, Marilyn Hill,
Hank Poulus, Carol Wilson, Anne
Slipper, Derrick Blackie, Sheila
Dobson, Valerie Zuker, and Sue
Gransby. Come again today people.
— In photo — Matt B. was back *—
Powell, Kurt, Joe and Dennis
busted their a — s and got the
art out  on  time.
Robert Duncan reads Friday noon Bu. 102
VV'/v*.*, *>.'.AMA\l<*A*.',> >,.*■ '..' Thursday, January 20,  1966
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
FOREGROUND
Here's UMs SUB
SUB construction costs jumped
$.7million since inception
JJaw.'W
The following is SUB committee chairman Roger McAfee's report io council Monday night on the slate of the
building.
Though the sod for the SUB
was turned late in October by
Prime Minister Lester Pearson, all the details of the project are by no means settled,
as McAfee explains below.
Progress on the student
union building to date can be
described as satisfactory although I personally would
like to see things progressing
more  rapidly.
Unfortunately, the nature of
the project, and the complications and complexities brought
about by having to deal with
several departments of the
university, makes this impossible. This is in no way a
criticism of these departments, rather a recognition of
an existing fact.
LESTER PEARSON
. . . sod turned
The architect informs me
that the schemes are developing and he has obtained almost all the necessary approval to continue with further
development.
I would also suggest that
council might further investigate the possibility of the inclusion of the bureaucratic
function of International
House within the structure of
the new building. We should
also look into the possibility
of the inclusion of organizations such as Canadian University Service Overseas within the new building.
Some action should be
taken to proceed with the
senior student lounge.
I would like to suggest that
a council committee be formed to pursue these questions
as soon as possible as the time
for any change is rapidly
drawing to a close.
FINANCES
When the building was first
planned, it was estimated to
cost somewhere between $3.8
million and $4.2 million depending on the floor area ultimately drawn.
As it now stands, the floor
area is about at the preferred
area listed in the initial program that is, approximately
164;000 square feet, plus an
additional 14,632 square feet
for future basement expansion. The addition of this last
amount pushes the area over
the programed footage.
* •      *
As it now stands, the building is estimated to cost approximately $4.5 million of
which it is expected that the
Alma Mater Society will contribute $3.3 million, with the
university making up the difference for food services.
The university will also
have to expend up to an additional $750,000 on off-site services.
In the original program it
was estimated that the society
would have to pay approximately $3,175 million for the
preferred area. As it now
stands they will be paying
only a slight bit more than
this.
The increase in cost reflects the increase in construction costs since this building
was     originally     programed.
As you are all aware, there
will be several commercial
spaces available in the building and it is estimated that
these will yield in the neighbourhood of $35,000 per year
in rental. These spaces are the
barbershop, the beauty salon,
the college shop, the bank and
the games room area.
• •     •
It is estimated that the barbershop will yield approximately $2,500 per year; the
beauty salon, approximately
the same; the college shop,
approximately $8,000 per
year; the bank, aproximately
$10,000 per year; and revenue
from the games room area is
estimated to be approximately
$12,000 per year.
We are currently investigating other sources of finances and it is hoped that a
more detailed report on these
might be available when some
Jt-
FORMAL AND
SEMI-FORMAL
Rental  and  Sales
TUXEDOS - WHITE DINNER
JACKETS - TAILS - MORNING
COATS        -        ACCESSORIES
Complete Size Range
STUDENT   RATES
McCUISH
FORMAL WEAR
LTD.
2046 W. 41st
MON.-SAT.-9:30 to 5:30
PH. 263-3610
PdAivi g lot
£n+r<wcc
C;\;a c»\Wd Tldrn
crtipr
4] Holt ir\
WAII
door-i!
UBYSSEY cartoonist Arnold Saba takes a whimsical look at the floor plans for the $4.5
million extravaganza scheduled to cover the area of a football field on the old stadium
site. Here's the basement, the rest of the floor area — incidentally, equal to that of the
B.C. Hydro tower — will be depicted in later installments.
of these investigations have
been concluded.
As you are also aware, it
was originally planned that
the building would be financed within a period of 15
years and it is possible that
this estimate will still stand
up.
However, this greatly depends on student enrollment
as the estimate was based on
the assumption that there
would be an average of 17,500
full winter session students
on the campus during the next
fifteen years.
•      *      •
If the actual number is lower than this it may take longer
to pay off the loan. If the
number is higher than this,
the loan will be retired at an
earlier date. We will not, of
course, know the exact position until the tenders are
opened.
The student union building
account after the inclusion of
this year's fee will be approximately $420,000 and we have
paid $43,000 so far in architect fees.
SCHEDULE
It is expected that construction on this project will begin
during this summer vacation
or in the fall and construction
time should be approximately
18 months, thereby opening
the building in the 1967-68
academic term.
These   dates   are   tentative
and are subject to revision de
pending upon the construction picture in British Columbia at the time, any further
problems which may develop
in negotiations with the university, and the ultimate price
which will be known only
when the tenders are opened.
SHAKEY'S
Pizza Parlour
1026 Granville
Commencing Tonight
for  10 days only
The HOWE SOUND
BARBER SHOP
QUARTET
Fun With Horses
in the 400 ft. LIVESTOCK Bldg. on the P.N.E.
Grounds, daily till 10 p.m. — Music too. — Horseback Riding, Western
and English and the unique opportunity of having Riding lessons for
Beginners and Intermediate.
All friends of Horses should come to the Indoor Riding in the livestock
Bldg. - P.N.E.
Telephone 255-6045
PARADISE VALLEY HORSE RANCH
JACQUES
de TONNANCOUR
RETROSPECTIVE • through Jan. 30
THE VANCOUVER ART GALLERY
STUDENTS PLEASE NOTE
CLOSING   DATE
for receipt of applications for
SUMMER   EMPLOYMENT
for graduates and undergraduates in the
CIVIL  SERVICE  OF  CANADA
has been extended  to
FEBRUARY   11,   1966
See your Placement Officer for details of
positions available and application forms. Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 20, 1966
—kurt   hilger photo
VICTIM OF MARDI GRAS stunt is Dave Race, Science II, who was grabbed Wednesday
noon by his fraternity brothers, hauled out of bed, trussed up with ropes and chains and
deposited in South Brock, in a coffin.
Campbell fumbles IH ball
Monday at council meet
By CAROL-ANNE BAKER
Ubyssey Council Reporter
Arts president Chuck
Campbell fumbled the ball
Monday night.
Council turned down a request that the AMS underwrite $300 worth of Interna
tional  House's  International
Ball.
Chuck Campbell, arts undergraduate society president, made a motion making
the AMS co-sponsors of the
ball to be held at the Commodore   this   spring   and
Simon Fraser keeps Shrum
but he wont run again, maybe
Simon Fraser chancellor, Dr. Gordon Shrum, said
Wednesday that he will probably not run for chancellor
in 1969.
Shrum, who was acclaimed chancellor for another
term on Monday, said, "I doubt that I will run again^ after
this present term is finished."
Under the constitution of the university the chancellor
is allowed to hold office for no more than two three-year
terms. '
Shrum said, "For the first term I was appointed, but
I would interpret that as being elected, therefore this is my
second term. '
Shrum has been chancellor of SFU since its inception
in 1963 when he was appointed to form the institute.
Shrum, who was nominated by 57 members of the
faculty, said there was no other candidates for the position.
Student leaders
meet in Victoria
AMS councillors Graeme Vance,  Mike  Sommers  and
Rick McGraw will be treated to a weekend at Victoria.
AMS  council Monday  night
granted a sum not to exceed
$105 to AMS co-ordinator
Vance, AMS treasurer Sommers and commerce undergrad
society president McGraw to
attend the joint meeting of
B.C. student leaders in Victoria Friday to Sunday.
The conference will include
30 student representatives
from all B.C.'s higher education institutions.
"They've been trying for
years to get all the student
representatives together," said
Sommers.
"The original purpose of the
conference was to discuss ways
to stimulate interest in higher
education in B.C., but we may
also be able to talk to education
minister Peterson and come
up with some proposals for
the provincial government
concerning higher education."
Paul Williamson, president
of Victoria College's AMS,
said the convention will also
discuss student government
and campus-community relations.
The convention is the first
of its kind held in the province.        ...... .        .  ........
marked them providers of a
grant not to exceed $300 to
underwrite the ball in case
not enough people showed
up.
- "If we pass this," said Neal
Wells, education undergraduate vote society president,
"every faculty will want
their dances underwritten
. by the AMS in case they
lose money."
"No ' they won't," said
Campbell, "because this
dance is for a different purpose. It's not just entertainment."
Campbell did not explain
how the dance was not just
for entertainment.
"Anyway," said Campbell,
"you undergraduate societies
can balance your dance
losses with other money-
making activities and International House can't."
campbell, "because this
dance losses with other
money-making activities and '
International   House   can't."
"I get it," said Byron Hender, AMS president," we get
to underwrite the loss but
International House will get
the profits — oh no."
"All our budgets have to
balance," said Art Stevenson,
engineering undergraduate
society president.
"Why don't they hold a
stag to raise money or something?"
"Why did they rent the
biggest and most expensive
ballroom?" asked Rick McGraw, comerce undergraduate society president.
"Don't they know whether
they'll get 100 or 5 0 0
couples?"  McGraw asked.
"No," Campbell replied.
"Will the seconder please
withdraw the motion," Hender  said.
"The seconder's left," said
Campbell.
Hender ruled the motion
withdrawn.    ..
COSTUMES (or MARDI GRAS
WE HAVE A GOOD SUPPLY OF MEXICAN, SPANISH AND
WESTERN   OUTFITS  -  APPROPRIATE   FOR THIS  YEAR'S
THEME - Reserve Early I !
DELUXE RENTALS       -        874-6116
1294 Kingsway at Clarke
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Homecoming Chairman:
Applications are now being received for the position
of Homecoming Chairman for 1966-67. ApppUcations
should be addressed to the Secretary AMS (Box 54)
stating qualifications. Applications close Thursday,
January 20th.
Education and Beyond   ...   2
Brockhall - Jan. 22-34
FREE
President Macdonald speaks
as does
Dr. Joheps Tussman
Stephen Weissman
Sol Stern
JilnL Socisdi^
(ph&Mnhu
Otto Preminger's
Saint Joan
with
' Jean Seberg
TODAY      JANUARY 20     AUDITORIUM
50c
12:30 - 3:30 - 6:00 - 8:30
GSA NEWS
G.S.A. ELECTIONS: An open meeting of the G.S.A. Executive will be held from 7:30 p.m. on the evening
of Monday, January 24, 1966. If you are interested in
running as a candidate in the forthcoming elections
it would be worth your time to attend this meeting
and find out what is required of the executive. All
Graduate student potential nominees are invited.
GUEST SPEAKER: Dr. H.L. Keenleyside will speak on the
subject of his 1965 trip to China and will also show a
16 mnl motion picture of his trip on Friday, February 4, at International House at 8:00 p.m. Admission
is free and coffee will be served after the talk. Free
tickets are available at the Graduate Student Center,
Faculty Club, and International House. A limited
number of these tickets are available so pick up yours
early.
THIS FRIDAY: This Friday, January 21, the Lower
Lounge of the G.S.C. will be transformed into a Beer
Garden from 3:00-6:00 p.m. Beer and wine will be
served. Come and bring along a fellow student.
REMEMBER: membership cards will be required before entry to the GSC. Thursday, January 20, 1966
THE     UBYSSEY
Pag* 7 Page  8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 20,  1966
IN ANTARCTIC
Explorer Wright
ends excursions
By HOWIE WHITE
Sir Charles Wright, UBC's own Antarctic explorer, has
completed what will probably be his last excursion.
Wright, a lecturer in geophysics, returned in December
from a month-long stay at
Byrd, an American research
station which, with a population of about 30, is the largest
settlement on the polar continent.
His purpose there was to install equipment for measuring
disturbances in the earth's magnetic  field.
The project was carried out
jointly by UBC and Stanford
University, San Francisco.
Wright first visited Antar-
tica in 1910, when he spent
three years with the famed
Scott expedition.
When Robert Scott perished
in 1912 on his return from the
South Pole, it was Wright, a
member of the expedition's
scientific corps, who lead the
search party to the explorer's
last camp.
During World War 1, Wright
developed the "trench wireless", which was used extensively by the British army in
France.
Later he was made director
of scientific research for the
British admiralty.
This last trip, his fourth to
Antarctica since 1960, was
made by air.
Wright, 78, said he will probably not go to Antarctica
again.
He hopes to go into semi-
retirement  later  this year.
Wright is currently working
at the Pacific Naval Laboratory
Victoria.
SIR CHARLES WRIGHT
. . . last outing
Aid  for  athletes
okayed by Council
AMS council decided Monday night it wants athletic
scholarships at UBC.
Council approved, with
only one abstention, a motion
the AMS "strongly urge" the
university to accept administration of athletic scholarships.
The motion stated recipir
ents of the scholarships
must conform to UBC entrance requirements and that
money for the scohlarships
should come from donations,
not UBC's general operating
revenues.
AMS ELECTION
INFORMATION
Nominations Open Wed., Jan. 19, 1966
for the following positions:
Slate H
First Vice-President
Treasurer
Coordinator
Slate I
President
Second Vice-President
Secretary
Nominations must be received by the A.M.S. Secretary
before:
Slate 1—4:00 p.m. Thursday, January 27, 1966
Slate 11—4:00 p.m. Thursday, February 3, 1966
Nominations will be posted only by the A.M.S. Secretary and will not be posted until such time as an eligibility form has been received by the Secretary.
The open candidates meeting will be held on Monday,
January 31, 1966, in Brock Lounge for the first slate,
and on Monday, February 7, 1966, in Brock Lounge.
ELECTION DATES ARE:
1st Slate-Wednesday, February 2, 1966
2nd Slate-Wednesday, February 9,1966
Nomination forms, elegibility forms and election rules
may be obtained either in the A.M.S. Office or from
the A.M.S. Secretary.
BAY
STARTS   TOMORROW
MURDER AT THE GALLOP
M.    Rutherford,    Robt.    Morley,
Flora  Robson
Plus
THE V.I.P.'s
E.   Taylor   and   Richard   Burton
STUDENTS  75c
DELTA
STARTS  TOMORROW
THE BIG GAMBLE
Stephen Boyd, Juliette Greco
PLUS
FIVE WEEKS IN A BALLOON
Red   Buttons,   B.  Ede,   Fabian
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATIMG SCHEDULE - 1965-66
Effective September 24th 1965 to April 15th 1966
TUESDAYS
WEDNESDAYS
FRIDAYS
SATURDAYS
SUNDAYS
12:45—2:45 p.m.*
2:00—3:30 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.
3:00—5:00 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.»*
3:00—5:00 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.**
12:45—2:45 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.
(Beginners & Preschool Children)
*    Special student admission:  15 cents.
** Except when hockey games scheduled — Nov. 19 & 20,
Jan. 28 & 29, Feb. 11 & 12 and two more dates not scheduled.
ADMISSION:
— Students 35* Adults .60*
Students .50' Adults .75c
Skate Sharpening .35* per pair
NOTE: The -Centre will be closed all day Christmas Day
and Good Friday.
For further information:  Call 224-3205  or 228-3197
Afternoons
Evenings
Skate Rental .35* per pair
FRATERNITY
SPRING
RUSH
Sign up at A.M.S. Office
Jan. 17th through Jan. 28th
You Only
GRADUATE
ONCE
If 1966 is your year don't be one of
those who will look back and wish
they had bought a copy of
TOTEM
Order Yours Today
at AMS or Totem office
in Brock Hall
Pre-Sale rate of $5.00 pays fer the enlarged Grad
edition (which will include the Campus Life pages),
and a Graduation Supplement of the 1966 Graduation ceremonies to be supplied in June.
LIMITED NUMBER TO BE PRINTED
The memento you'll cherish for years? Thursday, January 20, 1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
—don kydd photo
DARK AND .DINGY Armory has  caused scores of exam-writing UBC students to suffer
sore eyes for days after writing. Andras Horvat,  Arts   II,  has found the  best way to
supplement the poor lighting is with a cheap candle and is now ready for final exams
which start in another three months.
Books collected by CUS
for Nelson institution
The Canadian Union of Students is looking for books.
The books will go to Notre Dame at Nelson to supplement its library.
The drive started Jan. 17. Twelve bins have been
placed at central points in the main UBC buildings.
If you cannot find a bin, leave the books in the CUS
office, room 358, Brock Extension, during the two weeks
of the drive.
Student Committee on Cuban Affairs
PRESENTS
3 FILMS FROM CUBA
- CYCLONE, 1963
- CUBAN TRAVEL FILM - 1964
- MAY DAY - HAVANA - 1965
THURSDAY NOON ANGUS 110 25c
Young Canadians
jump parliament
OTTAWA (CUP) — The Company of Young Canadians
plans to put 250 volunteers into the field beginning this
summer to carry out a pilot project before the CYC is
actually established by Parliament.
William McWhinney, 27, the
recently appointed interim director of the company, told a
press conference Jan. 13 that
the form of this summer's projects has not yet been finalized.
He said the company will
take a "wait and see attitude"
until it is known what projects
are feasible and the availability of suitable personnel to
man those  projects.
He said the company plans
to undertake community development work in tooth rural
and urban settings upon request of the community involved.
Stewart Goodings, formerly
Acting  Director of the CYC's
organizing committee, committee, commented that the
company has received many
requests from across Canada
for volunteers.
McWhinney, who was national director of the Canadian
University Service Overseas
for four years, said the company plans to work closely
with CUSO.
ATTENTION
Moslem Students
Eid-ul-Fitr   Prayers
will be held at
9 A.M., JAN. 23, 1966
at
The   International  House
The House of Seagram
Interviews will be conducted February 7
for students graduating  in
CHEMICAL    ENGINEERING
MECHANICAL   ENGINEERING
BACTERIOLOGY
BIOCHEMISTRY
CHEMISTRY
FOOD TECHNOLOGY
See The University Placement Service for Information
and Interview Appointment
'Stay-Prest' casuals
just can't crease...
Leave it to Harris to happen upon a unique process
that gives their pants a perma-crease . . . right where
you want it, and it's always therel Tailored of rugged
textured synthetic hopsack with a Koratron* treatment . . . your assurance of casual good looks, with
a permanent crease. Tailored with belt loops, 1%"
cuffs . . . traditional cut in olive, sand or mint. Sizes
28-36. Each 10.95
The  Bay Career and  Campus  Shop,  second floor
the
$&»y
GEORGIA AT GRANVILLE
>   t   *   t   *  *t /.<   t,  >tKK*lK*.*i*> *   *'-*> *> ***r
/V*4*^Vv,;>,^\v^ * * *■* *■*.* * * * * *.'* *■/.'*-> <■ <W ■■ Page  10
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 20,  1966
tM/>*tME
K/e>e   to take A
EDUCATION
and fet?0H<{
tossettifc
-Adv»rti»em«nt Thursday, January 20, 1966
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 11
NEXT MONTH
Far out Farr
leaves campus
Special events chairman Murray Farr is leaving his post
in February to become manager of a dance group he sponsored here in November.
Farr has accepted the post
of manager of the Eric Hawkins Dance Company.
When the group was at UBC
last fall, Hawkins offered Farr
the job.
During his Christmas holidays in New York City Farr
accepted the position.
"It was the limitless horizon of the Hawkins' job that
appealed. New York City is the
cultural and booking centre of
of North America."
The job begins Feb. 15 and
Farr said he plans to work on
it for "two or three years".
The dance company has
planned U.S. campus tours as
well as trips to Berlin, Warsaw and Asia.
Farr plans to apply for a
Canada Council Grant in artistic administration after he
leaves the Hawkins post.
"I hope to eventually work
for the Canada Council as a
cultural  affairs  manager."
Farr said he would like to
see a full time business manager  in  Special  Events.
"The ideas, control, policy
must always remain with the
students," he said.
"However the administrative load involves a great deal
of work. Last summer it took
a couple of hours a day, now
it sometimes takes sixteen
hours a day."
"I am satisfied that Special
Events is doing the fullest job
possible and it has received cooperation from every campus
group.
"Our job is essentially that
of entertainment co-ordinators
with the exception of dances."
Farr said his motto for his
new job will be as it has been
in the past, "The old have no
monopoly on wisdom."
Student council will appoint
Farr's successor.
CUS sponsors
European tour
If you are proficient in French or German and moderately rich, you can tour Europe this summer as the guest of
the Canadian Union of Students.
"CUS aims to help Canadian
university students get to Europe," said CUS member Brian
Warriner Wednesday.
"We assist them in finding
jolbs; we arrange tours and accommodation and give information concerning study groups
and tours."
The CUS flight leave Winnipeg June 3 and returns Sept.
4 at a cost of $322.
The AMS charter flight
leaves Vancouver in May and
costs $400.
"We hope the AMS flight
will fill quickly, so that more
students will consider the CUS
flight," said Warriner.
As an added attraction CUS
is providing employment services.
Students with a good command of French or German
have the best chances for jobs,
although monolingual students
may get low pay as camp counsellors.
Other CUS services include
railway passes (Eurailpass),
student tour guidebooks and
identity cards, and information
about Renault purchases.
Further information may be
obtained at the CUS office in
Brock extension.
Program  offers
living  expenses
Jobs Abroad is the ideal setup for the poverty-stricken
student.
The program is organized by
the International Student Information Service in Brussels
and the International Student
Travel Center in the U.S.
In the program, students are
assured of a job and earn more
than enough to pay living expenses.
However, each student must
pay his own fare to Europe.
Applications Should be sent to
the ISTC in New York.
ESTATE  PLANNERS
for Head Office in Toronto
Business and Personal Estate Anaylsts
Opportunities for Arts & Commerce
Graduates
Contact Student Placement Service
Regarding Interviews — Feb. 3
^ EXCELSIOR LIFE JUt^O*?*?
the Player's Jacket fashioned by BANTAMAC in Terylone», a Cel-Cil fibre.
Come on over to smoothness
with no letdown in taste
'Rrgd. Can. T;M.
Come on over to
New!
Player's
Kings
Tuition Fully Paid
Book Allowance
Living Allowance
$78 MONTHLY SALARY
12 months per year while attending
university
MONTH PAID HOLIDAY
every year
FREE MEDICAL and
DENTAL CARE
ALL THESE BENEFITS
FOR UP TO 5 YEARS
WITH THE REGULAR OFFICER
TRAINING PLAN.
STUDENTS ATTENDING UBC CAN
STILL QUALIFY FOR 65-66
SPONSORSHIP
Can you afford to miss this opportunity?
JOfrtt
Young men attending the Canadian Services College and Canadian Universities
under the Regular Officer Training Plan
(ROTP) train for challenging and rewarding careers as commissioned officers in
the Canadian Forces. University students
can qualify for entrance on a competitive
basis. These young men are selected and
will advance on one basis alone — On
Their Merit.
For particulars see your Canadian Forces Career Counsellor
on the
UBC CAMPUS
Jem. 25, 26 & 27
Arrange   interview  appointments with the UBC placement
officer.
*"M**>*»;te*,- Page 12
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 20, 1966
'TWEEN CLASSES
SUS sponsors pep meet
Pep meet with Tom North-
cott,   skits,   girls   and   poetry
noon Hebb Theatre. 25 cents.
VIETNAM
General meeting in Bu 205
Friday noon to discuss M-26-D.
BRIDGE AND CHESS CLUB
General meeting today noon
in Bu 2225.
RELIGIOUS   COUNCIL
Today noon Pastor L. Reyelts
will speak on Unity Within
the Lutheran Church in Bu 102.
MUSSOC
Student musicians wanted
for Take Me Along. Call D.
Lui at Mussoc 224-3242 local
50.
UBC takes part
in honors program
UBC will participate in an international honors program with 19 other North American universities.
Twenty   students,   including
Lady loses cat
once again
By DAN MULLEN
Ubyssey Cat Reporter
Mrs. Ziska Schwimmer has
lost her cat for the second
time.
The first time her pet died
in New Zealand while she was
in Canada for a visit.
Over the weekend, a cement
model of the animal Mrs.
Schwimmer had been constructing disappeared from the
Laserre Building sculpture
room.
Mrs. Schwimmer said she is
enrolled in a fine arts department extension course in sculpture, and was modelling a replica of her pet for sentimental
reasons.
"I suppose someone took it
as a joke," she said, "but it
isn't terribly funny to me."
Mrs. Schwimmer said the
theft would have had to be
carefully organized.
"I had put the cat in water
to keep it ready for later work,
so it would have been very
heavy," she said.
She said the model, two feet
long and a foot high, mounted
on a stand, was only half finished.
Mrs. Schwimmer said she
last saw the sculpture Thursday.
It was gone when she returned to work on it Tuesday
evening, she said.
New frosh  rag
cries  for  help
The Frosh Paper, a Fresh
Point of View, has uttered a
panic-stricken cry for contributors.
Interested students should
see Chris Brockhurst or Doug
Bruce via the Frosh office
Brock Extension 157.
"If you write, sing, dance,
draw, tell funny stories, or
just plain look intelligent—we
need you,"  said Bruce.
God, of course
Religious study courses will
be offered by the UBC extension department for adults
starting Jan.  24.
New and radical ideas in
theology will be explored as
well as historical traditions.
one from UBC, and three pro-
fesors will spend a year studying in three to six countries
beginning this fall.
In each country, reading and
discussion will be supplemented by field trips, interviewing
local persons and independent
study.
Dr. Daniel Dorotich, senior
faculty member of World University Service at UBC, is arranging the program here.
He said candidates may be
majoring in any arts field and
the selection will be made on
the basis of academic promise
and social maturity.
"The candidate must now be
a second-year student, or an
obviously promising first-year
student."
"There are no language requirements, but knowledge of
another language would be
helpful."
Dorotich said this is the first
year of a three-year pilot project which has its headquarters
at Princeton University.
"There will be an evolution
after two years and it is hoped
the experiment will be expanded to include more students and more universities,"
he said.
Applications, including fac-
u 11 y recommendations, one
character reference, a transcript of marks and a page-
long statement on the candidate's suitability, should be
submitted to Dr. Dortich in
Bu. 1258 by Jan. 26.
Dorotich said the total tost
will be around $4,800 a student. The program will give
$1,000, UBC will grant $2,000
and the remainder will be paid
by the student.
"However, no student will
be rejected on financial
grounds," he said.
Credit for the year's study
will be reviewed by the arts
department and registrar when
the student returns to UBC
=;» id Dorotich.
SPECIAL  EVENTS
LMT's available for Major
Barbara and Mary Costa R.M.
255 B.E.
• •      •
CURLING CLUB
Meeting for all curlers Friday noon in Bu 203.
• •      •
SPORTS  CAR  CLUB
John Hall will speak in Bu
225 at 8 p.m.
• •      •
FINE ARTS
Profesor Rosenberg will
speak on Rome at noon in Lass.
104.
• •      •
JR. A.I.C.
Dr. J. C. Berry shows slides
on India noon today in Ag. 100.
• •      •
VCF
Fred Wagner will speak Friday in Ang. 110.
• *      *
FILM  SOC
Otto Preminger's Saint Joan
today at 12:30, 3:30, 6:00, and
8:30 in the Aud. 501 cents.
• •      •
CHRISTIAN   SCIENCE
Lecture at noon in Bu 100.
• •      •
SPORTS CAR CLUBS
*
Noon hour rally today starting at the south end of C-lot.
• •      •
AQUA SOC
Mid-erm break dive organizational meeting Bu 214 noon.
• •      •
CUSO
Two films at noon in Bu. 203.
• *      *
CUBAN  SOC
Three films from Cuba today
noon in Ang. 110.
Risque photo
causes fight
WOLFVILLE, N.S. (UNS) —
The Acadian University newspaper Athenaeium was distributed ^o campus subscribers
on hour late Saturday after a
dispute arose over the paper's
content.
The issue contained .photos,
an editorial and a headline
story about the confiscation of
allegedly obscene calendars by
Dr. E. S. Hanson, the campus
provost.
Hanson said the calendars,
containing photographic studies of female students of
Acadia University, were "in
poor taste" and resembled tear-
outs from girlie magazines.
A spokesman for the weekly publication said distribution
of the issue had been held up
only about an hour until the
printer, Kentville Publishing
Company, was satisfied of its
legal position concerning one
uhoto in the issue.
Pearson will announce
'crash program of aid
OTTAWA (UNS) — Prime Minister Pearson said Wednesday night he will soon announce a "crash program" of
increased federal aid to universities.
In a television interview, Pearson said the "very important increases" would be announced within the next
day or two.
He said they would be effective for this year only,
giving the federal government time to work out a long-
range program with the provinces.
Student Musicians Wanted
to play Cello, Violin, Flute, Viola, Clarinet and Horn
for Mussoc's Musical Production of
'Take Me Along"
call Dave Lui at CA 4-3242 (local 50) or RE 3-0187 after
6 p.m. on Thursday or Friday or appear (with instruments) at 1 p.m. Feb. 22 in U.B.C. Auditorium.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines. 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall, Ext. 26. 224-3242
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost 8c Found
11
FOUND APS inserted free. Publications office, Brock Hall. Local 26,
224-3242.
EXCHANGE ONE DARK BROWN
topcoat taken by mistake from
Sedgewick Library last week for
my own with car keys in pocket.
Phone Pete at 733-3419.
POUND IN BI SCIENCE BUILD-
ing week before exams — Ladies
Black   Diamond   Ring.   YU   5-2671.
ARE YOU SURE THE COAT you're
wearing is yours? On Jan. 12 someone took my new Aquascutum
raincoat from the Ponderosa and
left their old one. I would like to
arrange an exchange, if he would
contact Doug Sheepwash at 224-
3121.
BLACK WALLET WITH I.D. AND
my security symbol — namely
money. Lost in College Library
washroom; if found, contact Allah,
922-2251. (Janitor: please check
septic tank)
LOST — PAIR BLACK RIMMED
glasses i n Armouries Saturday
night.   Phone  John  224-9774.
LOST—PAIR OF GIRLS GLASSES.
Dark frame in the Buchanan Extension. Would finder please phone
278-0591.
POUND GIRL'S GLASSES IN GREY
case on Monday in East Mall
Annex. Apply Ubyssey Advertising
office.
Special Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance   rates?   If   you   are   over   20
and have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rales.
Phone   Ted   Elliott,   224-6707.
DEAR T.M.:   Someone in  the crowd
is    yelling    "HURRAH'    for    F.'G.
 Thanks,   K.L.
THURSDAY — 3:00-6:00, after the
Band Stand Show, mixer at the
Kappa Sigma house, 2280 West-
brook Crescent. Band! Refrelsh-
ments!   Women  Free.   Men   50c
IT'S ANOTHER MIXER! DANCE
to the Shantelles along with
A-Go-Go Girls at Totem Park
Saturday, January 22, 9 p.m. to
1   a.m.   A.M.S.   Cards   please!
BATMAN
IS
K
O
2nd ANNUAL ZETA BETA TAU
Charity Lunch: Tues. Jan. 25th.
B'is-stop coffee shop 11:30-1:15
(Give Generously for research in
mental  illness)
Transportation
14
1IDE WANTED FROM BROAD-
way and Nanaimo vicinity for
8:30's Monday thru Friday. Larry
AL 3- 8554.
DRIVER WANTED FOR CARPOOL
in North Lonsdale or Upper Levels
Highway vicinity. Phone Jim. YU
8-7643.
AUTOMOTIVE 8c MARINE
\utomobiles For Sale
21
•961 VW DELUXE, RADIO, Excellent condition, must sell 683-0040
evenings.
I960 RAPIER 88 h.p. 4 spd. Sport
Good cond. 64 engine. $750. RE
6-0606.    New   muffler.
'TOST SELL—55 CHEVROLET 4-
dr. Automatic, New Transmission,
good condition — Phone 263-7175
after 6 p.m.
Accessories 8c Repairs
22
WANTED: TR 3 BODY PARTS,
phone 224-0467 evenings ask for
Dave.
Motorcycles
27
1965 YAMAHA 250cc. 60 Miles on
new motor. Phone Fred, 738-7.988
in evenings.
Scandals
39
EXTRAVAGANZA: SCIENCE PEP
Meet! Tom Northcott, famous
actors, beautiful girls, noted poet:
E. Koster. All for 25c. 12:30 Thursday,   January   20.   Hebb   Theatre.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Typewriters 8t Repairs
42
GOOD CLEAN TYPEWRITERS. 120
up.    Also    Typewriter   repairs    at
SO percent savings. Poison Typewriters, 2140 W. 4th. Phone RE
1-8322.
Typing
43
TYPING OF TERM PAPERS, ES-
says, Thesis and Letters. Reasonable  rates.   CR  8-9480.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING, ARDALE
Griffiths Limited, 70th and Granville,   263-4530.
FAST   ACCURATE   TYPING   THE-
sis,   Essays,   Etc.,   on  new  IBM   Executive typewriter. Phone 263-4023.
Help Wanted
51
PIZZA PATIO IS CONTINUING
with Its policy of making employment available to students for part
time evening work—one or two
evenings a week. Students considering applying must have clean
driving record for use of Company
cars and be 21 years of age' or
older. Contact Manager at .the
Pizza Patio most convenient to
you after 5 p.m. Locations in Kerrisdale, South Van., Downtown
and  West   Van.
PS:   New   outlet   now   open   close
to  U.B.C.
BREAKFAST DISHES AND TIDY-
ing for Wheelchair Housewif.?. 2
hours daily or 3 days a week l>e-
tween 9:00 a.m. and 2 p.m. o minutes walk from UBC gates. $1.00
an hour.  CA 4-7574.
ROOM AND BOARD FOR  UBC  CO-
ed in exchange for baby sitting,
located on campus. Details to be
negotiated.   Phone   CA   4-3B22.
A 2nd or 3rd YEAR STUDENT TO.
sell advertising for The Ubyssey.
This is an excellent opportunity
for someone with drive to gain
sales experience and to earn
worthwhile commission.
Successful applicant must be
ready to work 6 to 8 hours a week
and desire to work next term as
well as the balance of this term.
If interested apply to A. Viiice,
Manager of Student Publications,
Brock   Hall.
Work Wanted
83
DAY  CARE  AT  MY  HOME,
way and Larch,  736-0697.
Broad -
INSTRUCTION
Music
63
GUITAR—SPECIALIZED INSTRUC-
tion by experts in every type of
Guitar and Banjo playing at "The
Mediterranean Shop", Vancouver's
Guitar Centre. 4347 West 10th Ave.
Phone CA 8-8412.
Special Classes
65
THE KN.ACK — IF YOU CAN'T
charm 'em with looks — try words,
an 8 week $8.00 evening course, in
EFFECTIVE SPEAKING starts
next week (Wednesdays), Alma
YMCA,  CA 4-3282.
THE KNACK — THE ART OF
electrifying MAKE-UP doesn't iust
happen. Learn under professional
instruction, 8 evening lessons, $8,00.
Call YMCA, CA 4-3282. Starts next
week.   (Thursdays).
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
KLASSEN'S
... USED FURNITURE MART ....
Where You Shop at Auction Prices
5207 West  Broadway RE 6-0712
(Beer Bottle Depot at Rear of Store)
FOR SALE — PAIR OF MEN'S
Buckle Ski Boots (including shop
tree.) Very good condition. Size 8.
$30.00. Enquire at Angus 456' or
Phone 228-3848.
Rooms
81
STUDENT (MALE), FURNISHED
single room, kitchen privileges, one
sharing frig., washroom, and .entrance. 1 block from shops and
buses. Non-smoker. Phone RE 3-
8778.
FOR RENT, KERRISDALE, WARM
comfortable sleeping room, could
be shared by two student, Non-
drinker or smoker. Phone 266-4755.
WANTED: MALE STUDENT TO
share house with three others
(graduate preferred) 733-2138 after
6:30 p.m.
Room 8c Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD FOR QUIET
male student. 4595 West 6th. Phone
224-4866.
s

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