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The Ubyssey Jan 25, 1966

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Array eeX, j THE UBYSSEY IMedn,d
Vol. XLVIII, No. 40
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, JANUARY 25,   1966
48
CA 4-3916
— powell hargrave photo
CHOKED COUNCIL CHAMBERS Monday reflected student concern over SUB sell-out and
constitutional revision. Largest crowd of year provided comments and suggestions on stu-
detn government operation in Brock Hall du ring year's longest meeting.
COUNCIL KILLS
RE-EVALUATION
SUB question denied
By CAROL-ANNE BAKER
Ubyssey Council Reporter
Council Monday night voted
down a motion to hold a referendum on the future of the
student union building.
More than 30 interested students packed the council chambers as AMS second vice president Peter Braund introduced
the motion.
Braund said students had
been asking councillors about
SUB since the SUB story
appeared in The Ubyssey last
Friday.
"Students should have a
right to question SUB,"
Braund said, "and I think they
should be allowed to vote yes
or no on whether they are in
favor of continuing SUB as
presently proposed and financed.**
"The facts must be presented
to the students by speakers and
the press, then let them decide whether SUB is good or
bad," said Braund. "The students  should have  a choice."
"If enough students voted
no on the referendum would
this mean an end to SUB ?,"
asked commerce undergraduate society president Rick McGraw.
"No, but it would mean a re-
evaluation of the project,"
said Braund.
"Students, especially freshmen, have a right to Ibe informed," said John Wheaton, frosh
president.
"There are many methods of
informing the students," said
SUB committee chairman
Roger McAfee.
"We could use The Ubyssey,
soapboxes in front of the library and we could make the
SUB committee members available to answer student's questions," he said.
"If 48 per cent of AMS fees
are   going   to    SUB   through
council I think students have a
right to know what next year's
executive council will want to j
do with the money," EUS president Art Stevenson said.
"What if the students decide
to stop the project," asked law
undergraduate society president Peter Hyndman, "what
will be done with the money
already collected ?"
"We've collected about $420,-
000 now," said McAfee. "I
would guess it would cost
about $500,000 to stop the project now, if we legally could."
"Just how many referen-
dums do we have to go
through before we decide
which one will be valid?" asked medicine undergraduate
society president Con Michas.
"If the students vote against
paying for it once it's complete
what are they going to do,
tear it down ?" Mitchell asked.
"I think students should be
able to vote on it each year
until the final contract is signed!," said Wheaton.
Question was called and the
motion was defeated.
RADICAL  REVISION'
Lawyer to scan
council shake-up
Student council Monday night submitted to the AMS
lawyer a radical constitutional revision which if passed
woud replace the student undergrad presidents with 15
members at large.
The revision, drawn up toy
Garth Brown, would:
• Replace the undergraduate presidents with 15 members at large elected by proportional  representation.
• Dispense with the AMS
coordinator and create a new
post of ombudsman.
• Allocate funds to the
Men's and Women's Athletic
committees at the discretion of
the AMS treasurer rather than
on the fixed rate basis used
now.
The revision brief was submitted to the lawyer as a precautionary measure before the
revision is brought before the
general meeting this spring.
According to the AMS constitution, constituional revisions must be passed in a general meeting of the students.
In proposing the revision,
Brown said the present system
of undergraduate society representation does not adequately represent students in
large faculties.
Brown also pointed out that
student councillors now have
two responsibilities.
"At present student councillors are elected to perform two
functions, to act as chief executive of their undergraduate
society, and to act as councillors."
The fifteen-member council
proposed by Brown would be
elected by proportional representation.
Under this system students
would vote by numbering
candidates in order of preference.
Mac offers
individual
'dialogues
By AL DONALD
Ubyssey City Editor
UBC president John Macdonald will face student ques
tions Monday, Feb. 8
But he will do it at a coffee
party, not at an open forum.
This mean Macdonald will
speak to students on a purely
individual basis.
Macdonald's announcement
of the meeting came Monday-
afternoon after a series of
events touched off his walkout
at the Education and Beyond
conference Saturday.
Students who attended the
conference listened to a half-
hour speech by Macdonald.
Conference chairman Ray
Larsen then announced the
president had another appointment and would not be able to
answer questions.
The announcement was
greeted by hissing and booing
from the 300 students in Brock
lounge.
"How come he never has any
time to answer questions?"
challenged Peter Cameron.
"That is simply not true,"
said Macdonald.
He said he had volunteered
to answer written questions
from students at his opening
r.ddress in fall 1965.
Cameron said this method
left no opportunity for personal dialogue.
"I'm sorry, I can't stay this
morning," said Macdonald.
Monday, Cameron and Gabor
Mate sent a letter to Macdonald asking to answer student   questions in public.
The letter gave Macdonald
the opportunity to designate
the time and place.
The letter said Cameron and
Mate did not consider the written question and reply a perfect form of dialogue.
"It is possible in a written
reply to evade a question completely, without the questioner
having the opportunity to challenge the evasion.
"It could go on interminably with little or no result.
"We are hoping now that
something truly productive
could come out of a public
exchange of questions and
answers."
Cameron and Mate received
a letter later Monday in which
Macdonald promised to answer
student questions at a coffee
party Feb. 8.
"I will also invite a few
members of the faculty and
administration to be present
and prepared to answer questions. There will be no
speeches," the letter said.
In a press release Monday,
Macdonald said he was given
only 24 hours notice to provide
time for questions.
JOHN MACDONALD
. . . 'previous date'
"I had other commitments, and told those sponsoring the meeting that for this
reason I would be unable to
undertake questions at that
time.
"I am surprised that some
students feel I am not available to answer questions," said
Macdonald.
"Last fall I invited any student with a question to send
it to me in writing.
"I undertook to submit questions and my replies to The
Ubyssey for publication for
general student information.
"I have not received a single
question through this invitation."
Canadian Union of Students
president Patrick Kenniff said
at the conference Sunday,
"President Macdonald's refusal
to answer questions was the
ultimate in rejection of dialogue with students."
Larsen, chairman of
Academic Activities Committee
which sponsored the conference, said Macdonald had the
program well in advance of
the conference.
According to the program
the president had from 10:30 to
11:30 a.m. for his speech.
The speech lasted half an
hour.
But when Larsen asked Macdonald's   secretary   earlier   in
the week if he would have a
question     period     after     the
(Continued on Page 3)
SEE: WALK-OUT
WHAT MAC
MISSED
SEE PAGE 5 Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  January  25,  1966
HAS  HITCHING
DOWN PAT
REPORTER EMMOTT
. . . gotta lift?
PEPSI SET,  TOO
SFA-CUS host
integrated meet
The first session of a B.C. Assembly of Students will be
held September at Simon Fraser Academy.
Delegates    from    all    B.C.
secondary and post-secondary
institutions will attend the
assembly, believed to be the
first of its kind in Canada.
It was voted into existence
Jan. 23 by 35 post-secondary
student leaders at Victory College after being planned at the
Canadian Union of Students
meeting in Banff at Christmas.
The assembly will meet once
or twice yearly to discuss student issues, provide for exchange of information among
member institutions and implement the recommendations of
the n&mbers.
It will also fight for the accessibility of higher education
to students of merit.
Each B.C. institution will
have one vote in the assembly.
CUS western regional chairman, Eduard Laval, said Monday," They'll go from sock-
hops to social action."
He said he hopes secondary
student representatives will be
able to take over the reigns
of organization when they
reach their post-secondary in-
stitiuttion.
Laval said SFA would host
the founding session.
At the Victoria conference,
education minister Leslie
Peterson said he would look
into the  complaint  about  the
application of B.C. governmen
scholarships to tuition fees at
the six nursing schools in the
province.
He also said equalization
grants for out-of-town students
boarding costs post secondary
institutions are being seriously
considered by the government.
Peterson added UBC president
John B. Macdonald's plea for
more provincial grants will be
answered in the governments
new budget next month.
He called for national co
ordination of higher education
and said standards should be
set so vocational and technical
certificates in one province
will be valid in the others.
Dean Ronald Jeffels of Victoria College said Canada
needs more education planning
at the federal level.
"It's   just   not   economic   to
planning" he said,
have    anything   but   national
Our quick chick clicks
By KRIS EMMOTT
I'm the fastest girl on The
Ubyssey.
That is, if the task is hitchhiking out to the gates and
back.
That's the result of the
hitch-hiking contest between
me and male Uibyssey reporter Pat Hrushowy which proved that the way to get a ride
fast is to wear a skirt.
At 1:50 p.m. Thursday,
your speedy reporter stood at
the corner of University
Blvd. and East Mall, thumb
out.
Three minutes went by.
Finally a Volkswagen bus
stopped and the driver signalled; for me to get in.
"You better get in the
front,"  yelled the driver.
I pushed the rear door shut.
It wouldn't shut. I gave up
and opened the front door.
"Get in the back," snapped
the driver, an Englishman
wearing a tweed cap.
"That was a stupid thing to
do," he added sweetly.
•-you're to close the doov
not bang it shut."
"I'm sorry," I muttered,
I'm not familiar with that
kind of door."
We rode the rest of the way
in frozen silence.
I clambered but on the corner of Blanca Street as fast
as I could. "Thank you ever
so much," I lied.
"You're quite welcome,"
said the driver, with a charming smile.
I crossed University and as
I rounded the corner a little
white MG stopped and picked
me up.
"What a sloppy day to be
walking."
"Yep," said the boy.
"Oh God," I thought.
Fortunately, this driver
turned out to be more communicative than the first. He
asked if I had a 2:30 class and
I said "yes," not wishing to
go into details.
At 2:01 p.m. I returned to
The Ubyssey office. The
round trip had taken eleven
minutes.
Some time later my opponent, Hrushowy, got back.
"How long did you wait
before you got a ride?" I
snickered.
He was forced to admit that
someone had taken pity on
him after seven minutes.
"And on the way back?"
Hrushowy hemmed and
hawed, but at last the truth
came out—somebody stopped
to pick up a little old lady
who happened to be walking
along, and: the felt that giving
him a lift was the only humane thing to do.
"So I waited three minutes
in all and you waited about
ten, Huh?"
I sneered at my cringing
opponent.
"When it comes to standing on a corner looking adorably helpless, a guy doesn't
have a hope."
McGoun debate team
wants  winners  cup
UBC's McGoun Cup champion debating team wants its
McGoun Cup.
The cup, presented to the
winners of the Western Inter-
Collegiate Debating Championships, has been lost for
three years.
Manitoba won it in 1961 and
was responsible for passing it
on to Alberta.
But both the University of
Alberta and the University of
Manitoba say they don't know
where it is.
Jacob Walker, a member of
the Manitoba team in 1961,
says they had it for five
months. He believes it was
given to Alberta in 1962.
Jack Khoury, public relations officer for the UBC
team which won the cup for
the last two years says UBC
has never received the cup.
The missing cup is up for
grabs again Friday when
Manitoba challenges Western
and Canadian champions,
UBC.
The debate is in Brock Hall
at 8 p.m.
Art course offered
An eight-session course on
art and aesthetics will begin at
UBC Feb. 1 at 8:00 p.m. in
Bu 102.
BAY
MURDER AT THE GALLOP
M.   Rutherford,    Robt.    Morley,
Flora Robson
Plui
THE V.I.P/S
Taylor   and   Richard   Burton
DELTA
JAIN. 28 & 29
YOUNG FURY
Rory Calhoun
Virginia Mayo
plus
HOOTENANNY HOOT
Br .Fours - Sheb Wooley
Johnny Cash
Striking
students
stomp back
MONTREAL (UNS) — The
week long student strike in
Quebec is over.
The strike of 27,000 students who walked out of trade
and technical schools in Quebec ended Monday.
It began Jan. 17 when students walked out protesting
the lengthening of the school
year by four weeks,
At a weekend meeting, the
executive of the Federation of
Technical and Trade Schools
voted to end the strike.
A four man committee from
students and the Quebec de-
part-ment of education will report its findings on March 31.
Student leaders said, however, they will resume the
strike if they are not satisfied
with government action.
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Qwumju^ 26,27,28 Tuesday, January  25,   1966
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
PAY OR BE EXPELLED'
— powell hargrave photo
TAKING OFF with Jefferson Airplane in arm ory Saturday, frugging frosh jerk up a storm.
About 600 turned up to writhe along with m op-haired pop group.
Mac says multiversity
inevitable despite unrest
The "multiversity" is inevitable in modern society despite
•'a rising tide of student unrest," UBC president John
Macdonald told an education
conference Saturday in Brock
Hall.
Universities have become
more important "as instruments of a booming economy,"
he said.
• •     •
"They have fewer and fewer
of the attributes of the ivory
tower and more and more of
the characteristics of corporate
know-how."
Macdonald said arguments
about priorities of research
over teaching and professsional
schools versus basic disciplines
are "meaningless."
'The major university, if it
is to meet society's needs,
must fill a panorama of obligations."
• *      •
The president said today's
generation is different from
the generation of "cool, conservative, dispassionate intellectuals" represented by U.S.
President J. F. Kennedy.
The current generation is
"much more willing to take
risks, to test itself and its ideas
against the world," he said.
These students do not want
their education "geared solely
to technical, scientific and economic strengths," he said.
"They don't believe education
is examinations or prescribed
texts or a series of grades,
and so they complain."
• •     •
But, said Macdonald, "in
many ways what they complain about is unreal."
He said students have great
freedom; they can choose their
own courses, and come and go
as they please.
Because of this freedom, he
said, their rebellion and the
rebellion of faculty members
who sometimes join them is a
great paradox.
The rebels protest the "establishment, but the establishment is organized society."
• •      •
He said some students place
an "over-emphasis on the
alleged rights and civil liberties of individual."
"There is always a small
group that chooses to oppose
authority, ignore the law, and
confuse freedom with licence.
The president said student
lawlessness has beein encouraged by society condoning illegal activities because it is in
a just cause.
"For society to tolerate an
unlawful sitdown in support of
Seaforths sally forth
for new reserve platoon
Recruitment starts Feb. 1 for a UBC reserve platoon
of Seaforth Highlanders.
Parades will be held every Tuesday at UBC Armories.
The program will include instruction in shooting, driving heavy vehicles and radio operation.
Allowance will be made for exams, term papers and
other university pressures, says platoon organizer John
Appleby.
Information is available at the COTC offices in the
armory.
a good cause will lead to far
worse violations of the law,"
said Macdonald.
Inquiry  delayed
in  auto  deaths
An inquest into the deaths
of Susan Bates and Charles
Turner has been postponed
until Feb. 1.
The two first year UBC
students, both 18 years old,
were killed when their car
went off University Boulevard and slammed into a
tree late Thursday night.
The inquest was originally
scheduled for today, but
Vancouver city coroner Glen
MacDonald postponed it because of difficulty in obtaining information.
Ultimatum set
for fee fighters
VICTORIA (UNS) — The handful of Victoria College
students still withholding second term fees will be expelled
Wednesday if they don't pay up.
Administration notices went  	
up Monday on campus announcing the automatic expulsions.
The registrar's office was
swamped Friday when the
deadline for payment of fees,
including a $10 late fine, was
reached.
Before Friday, 697 students
had refused to pay.
"Now only a small core of
withholders remain," Victoria
student newspaper editor Sue
Pelland said Monday.
"These students are in jeopardy."
She said an ad hoc committee formed last week to continue the fight and raise money
to pay the $10 fines for students is "still going forward."
Miss Pelland said notices
were circulated announcing a
general meeting of the AMS
Thursday.
She said a vote of non-confidence in the student council
will be called for.
"If this vote is passed it will
mean automatic dissolution of
council," she said.
WALK-OUT
(Continued from Page 1)
speech he received a flat refusal.
"He told me about five minutes before he spoke on Saturday he had an engagement,"
said Larsen.
Larsen told student council
in a report on the conference
Monday night that when students booed Macdonald, "they
were just expressing their reaction to his not having time
to answer questions."
He said the conference was
one Of the most successful
conferences of the year.
The conference was attended
by more than 400 persons on
Saturday and more than 255 on
Sunday.
Arts boycotts
'manipulating
UBC debates
Faculty debaters will fight
it out in the interfaculty debate Feb. 1 to March 15.
But the arts undergraduate
society will not be represented.
The arts executive passed a
motion Monday to boycott the
debate on the grounds that it
is immoral.
Consensus editor Peter Cameron, who made the motion,
said the debate would not be
judged on the issues discussed,
but on the speaker's ability to
manipulate people.
"Debating a point is fine but
developing skills in manipulating an audience is not a very
worthwhile activity," said
Cameron.
"It's  immoral."
Arts president Chuck Campbell said he was not at the executive meeting because he had
another appointment.
He said if he had been present he would have opposed the
motion.
The vote on the motion was
4-3 in favor.
The motion read, "The arts
faculty should boycott the interfaculty debating contest on
the grounds that it is immoral
to debate without regard to
content."
Sigma Tau calls
Sigma Tau Chi—UBC's honorary society—is calling for
membership nominations.
Male students who have
made outstanding contributions to University life through
academics, athletic or other
notaible extracurricular concerns will be considered after
nomination by a club or organization.
— powell hargrave photo
SPEAKERS SPEAK during weekend speak-in Education and Beyond. Panel members were
(left to right) UCLA prof Dr. Paul Ivory, CUS president Patrick Kennif, Berkeley J*ee speech
leader Stephen Weisman, Manitoba econom ics professor Dr. C. Y. Gonick. mnrssn
Published Tuesday, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-324!!,
L,oc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Founding member, Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa,  and for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
TUESDAY, JANUARY 25, 1966
"It is not the contexture ot words, but the
effects of Action, that gives glory to the times"
-Samuel Daniel, 1603
Walkout!
President John Macdonald's walkout from last weekend's teach-in on the university makes us nervous.
The business about "prior cornmittments" is very
strange. No-one seems willing or able to spell out exactly
where ot why the president was going.
Now it has been suggested that the president was
afraid he was facing a hostile crowd. He was perhaps
afraid some segment of that crowd — perhaps the
"irresponsible and lawless elment" his speech referred to
— might attempt to bait him.
But the facts are the crowd contained considerable
sympathizers with the presidential viewpoints, as the
dialogue following his walkout showed.
And the crowd was there only because they were
concerned with the future of universities. They wanted
to test their ideas against his practical experiences in the
truly academic manner of free discussion.
To deny them the opportunity to participate in such
a discussion is surely a violation of the purpose of a
university.
The president has suggested two alternatives to the
academic manner of discussing issues.
He has suggested students petition him with
questions, to which he will provide set replies.
The flaws here are obvious: The kind of intellectual
give and take as a discussion procedes through the
resolution of the inevitable misunderstandings, misinterpretations and downright wafflings are all absent
in the petition system of argument.
The president has also suggested students meet him
individually for a coffee-party discussion.
Now this is very nice.
But it doesn't answer the questions as to why, at a
teach-in, when people were there to discuss issues, there
was no public forum allowed.
In individual discussion, as the president knows, at
most four or five people at a time have access to him.
Often his time is monopolized by a few, without numbers
anywhere near equal to last weekend's group being able
to hear his answers.
Surely the president must realize there is no more
effective way of reaching large numbers than in open
debate — attempting to convince the listening unconvinced, rather than merely arguing with the already
committed.
To us, the refusal to debate issues publicly is the
end of the academic environment. It is the way of the
factory and the military, not of the classroom and the
university.
It is the way of the fanatic, and not the scholar.
And on another plane, the petition and the private
audience system can be construed as the way of the
king and not the mayor.
And kings these days are subject to strange diseases
— revolution and abdication and God knows what.
Which is why we are nervous.
EDITOR: Tom Wayman
News        Ron   Riter
Associate   George Reamsbottom
City   ....       ....    Al    Donald
Photo       Norm   Betts
Sports       Ed  Clark
A«s't News    Dan  Mullen
-    Richard   Blair,   Robbi  West
Ass't City    Danny  Stoffman
Page   Friday       John    Kelsey
Managing       lan   Cameron
Features       Mike   Bolton
CUP       Don    Hull
Ann Bishop got a story Wednesday. So did some other people
like Bert Hill, Marilyn Hill, Sue
Gransby who called Victoria Carol
Wilson, Jim Good, Terri Brown,
Andras Horvat, Pat Flushaway,
and our great and untiring type
council reporters Doug Halverspn
and Carol-Anne |(got |lt Iright!)
Baker. I got letters from the left
and a headache.
"Well. I have to go now BUT since I haven't had time to answer your questions publicly,
feel free to use my Ralph Dandy suggestion  box which I will leave in front of my office."
'Financial  aid  not enough'
Editor, The  Ubyssey,  Sir:
There is much talk nowadays about the need for financial incentives to attract good
faculty members to UBC, and
counteract the attractions of
working in the USA and other
parts of Canada.
I wish to question this point
of view as being one which,
in its emphasis of one factor
and neglect of certain others,
will not necessarily attract
the right sort of person.
I think that a stimulating
environment is at least as
important as money for high
academic achievement, and I
feel that in this respect Vancouver lags far behind many
other places.
From experiences in my
own field of meteorology, I
have found that most Vancouver workers show a distinct lack of interest in discussion and coordination of
research projects, or have a
very narrow range of interest.
Moreover, the university
itself does not seem to know
what it wants.
Not very encouraging when
one has to "publish or perish."
In contrast to this, I have
found colleagues in the USA
to be very enthusiastic and
cooperative.
If Vancouver does not
awake from their torpor or
throw off their blinkers, I feel
that purely financial bait will
merely result in attracting
professors who are more interested in money than their
work, not to mention a further increase in student fees
and another step in the
spiral of inflation.
Meanwhile, good teachers
will go to smaller institutions
which appreciate their efforts
and regard teaching as an art
worthy of perfection, not as
an unpleasant chore.
And the most ambitious researchers will continue to migrate southwards across the
border.
NORMAN THYER
Assistant Professor
Physics  Department
tie **h&ibir*s
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AN5WER TO  LAST  u)ES*'5    RlDOLE.-OrJLV THE  MpThER   (VJutrV   KMouJs  FOR  SURE. MARDI ERAS EDITION
Tuesday, January 25,   1966
MARDI
GRAS
EDITION
Page 1
DOWN MARDI GRAS WAY
Go south of the border
26th charity ball
best social event
Vancouver's largest charity ball is in its 26th year and
continues to be the biggest social event on campus.
Growing along with the so-
- powell  hargrave photo
CASTANETS CHATTERING, hat dancers Andy Danilui, Susan Hendrickson, and Carol Drake
rally round sombrero while rehearsing their Mardi Gras floorshow number.
FROM FIESTA
TO SIESTA
Floor show goes OLE
The floor show for Mardi
Gras "66 goes "south of the
border" to exciting Mexico.
The musical score incorporates adaptations of traditional,
well-known melodies such as
La Cucaracha, Granada and La
Bamba.
Less well-known, and subsequently appealing to those of
more ethnic tastes, numbers
will be presented to comprise
the total of 12 songs.
The sequences of scenes represents the four key Mexican
institutions; the market, the
siesta, the bull-fight, and the
fiesta.
Dal Richards will provide
the   orchestration  with   a   12-
AT ALPHA DELT
Tea is today
The Mardi Gras Committee
will hold its Annual Mardi
Gras Tea at the Alpha Delta
Phi fraternity house today
from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.
There, Queen candidates
will be evaluated on poise, personality, ease of conversation
and general appearance.
The guest list includes the
committee members, the candidates, patron and patron's
wives.
Pourers will be Dean Helen
McRae; Miss Fredrickson, faculty advisor to panhellinic;
Mrs. Beverley Leckie, alumnae
board of management; Sandra
Sutherland, panhellenic president; Judy Fainstein, incumb
ent panhellenic president, and
Lynne Iwasaki, last year's
Mardi Gras Queen.
'Mexican rally
set Thursday
A pep rally will be held
Jan. 27 at noon in War
Memorial Gym.
MC will be Russ Patrick.
Each candidate will be presented in a skit following the
theme South of the border.
Cheer leaders have worked out a new dance routine
for the rally.
piece band. Musical arrangements have been done by
Ralph Dyck—a familiar name
to jazz listeners of CBC.
Choreographic routines are
under the direction of Miss
Sharon Priestley who has
studied under the Winnipeg
Royal Ballet.
A new form of 3-dimensional
dancing is being used to develop the potential of a cast
of 50 on an enlarged floor of
the PNE  Showmart  Building.
In past years, music has provided purely a background for
the dancing numbers.
However this year, the musical score will command an
equal role with the dancing so
that the 2 facets of the show
will coalesce to form a unified
whole.
A stationary chorus will ex-
cempt the dancers from distracting their attention to their
dance routines.
From the opening fanfare of
3 trumpets to the color and
excitement of the fiesta score,
the floorshow of Mardi Gras
'66 will be an event to remember long after the 3 performances on January 27, 28
and 29.
cial aspect has been the contribution Mardi Gras has made
to worthwhile charities
throughout the province.
Last year's donation to Muscular Dystrophy totalled thirteen thousand dollars.
This year all proceeds will
go toward Research into the
Mental Illnesss of children and
will aid in equiping a laboratory presently being built on
the UBC campus.
The activities begin with a
Pep Rally to be held in the
War Memorial Gym on January 27 to 12:30 with the presentation of king and queen
skits.
Following in the evening will
be the charity bazaar at the
PNE Show Mart at 6:00 p.m.
featuring the premiere performance of the fabulous Mardi Gras floorshow.
Also featured will be"' the
king and queen fashion show-
the king cake autcion and the
contest prize draw.
Games and authentic Mexican food add to the fun and
excitement to be had by all.
The two big costume dances
will be held on Friday and
Saturday nights at the PNE
Show Mart at 9:00 p.m.
Once again the floorshow
will be presented as well as
the crowning of the King and
Queen of Mardi Gras '66.
The floorshow features the
gaiety of a day in Mexico.
Beginning with a market
scene it moves to the excitement of a bull fight and is
climaxed by a gala Mexican
fiesta.
The dances climax many
months of arduous work by the
Mardi Gras committee and
hours of rehearsals by the
floorshow cast.
It is due to the efforts of
all those involved that once
again this annual event is held
in the traditional Mardi Gras
spirit.
Bazaar big
on tamales,
baseball
Mardi Gras '66 goes South
of the Border this year as does
the Bazaar. The Bazaar will be
centered around a Mexican
Fiesta featuring authentic
Mexican dishes such as tacos
and tamales. Available also
for the more timid culinary
connoisseurs are such foods as
hot dogs, popcorn, ice cream,
and various beverages.
For the fun-loving crowd
games will be numerous—such
favorites as egg throwing, pie
throwing and dunking. Several toss games such as baseball,
bowling and darts are also being set up.
The Bazaar starts at 6:00
p.m. and runs through till
11:00 p.m. The program will
include a fashion show for
both King and Queen candidates, a cake auction (the cakes
supposedly being made toy the
Kings and their fraternities)
and an entertaining floor show.
The draw for the raffle ticket prizes will also take place
on the evening of the Bazaar.
All the proceeds from the
Bazaar—fraternity and sorority booths, and the cake auction—will go toward the Mardi
Gras charity which will equip
a research laboratory in the
UBC Medical Complex. The
laboratory is to be used for research into mental illnesses in
children.
Hope to see you all at the
Mexican Fiesta Bazaar—
Greeks break from past
and set a cube design
The sets for the South of the Border theme of Mardi
Gras this year are a complete break from past sets.
The design for the backdrop is a cubistic mosaic
employing hard-edge geometrical shapes which form a
stunning background of sun bursts and forms. The set is
20 feet high and 40 feet wide.
The designers are Mary Brock, Blanca Kister, and
Judy Schwartz from the UBC Theatre Department.
They deserve much thanks from the Mardi Gras committee and from all the Greeks on campus for making the
decorations a success. Page 2
MARDI        GRAS        EDITION
Tuesday, January 25, 1966
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MARILYN BRICKER
. . . Delta Phi Epsilon
PENNY DWYER
Alpha Gamma Delta
JOANNE HENNESY
. . . Delta Gamma
HEATHER HORNER
. Kappa Alpha Theta
URSULA HUPFAU
. . Alpha Delta Phi
SUSAN LeFOHN
. . . Alpha Phi
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MARDI        GRAS        EDITION
Page 3
... AND 13 HOMBRES WHO WOULD BE KING
GEORGE BALDWIN
. . . Phi Delta Theta
HOWARD FAULKNER
. . . Alpha Delta Phi
GRANT SPITZ
. . Kappa Sigma
JOHN WARK
Phi Gamma Delta
CRAIG BASSETT
. . . Sigma Chi
FRED BERMAN
. . . Zeta Beta Tau
CARLOS DILIGENTI
. . . Zeta Psi
KEIMEI DOI
. Delta Upsilon
HENRY JOHN
. . . Psi Upsilon
LARRY KENSIT
. Phi Kappa Sigma
OLE!
BLAKE LYONS
. . . Alpha Tau Omega
ROB PEEBLES
. . Beta Theta Pi
MIKE WARDLOW
... Phi Kappa Pi
Best  Wishes
Mardi  Gras
Compliments
of
J. E. Bulferlield
Ltd.
Compliments
from
Bowell McLean
Motors
615 Burrard
Pontiac
Buick
Cadillac
Acadian
Vauxhall
MU 2-3333
Best wishes to
Mardi Gras
H. E. ADDINGTON
5559 W. BOULEVARD
266-2616
Compliments
from
B. C. SUGAR
REFINING
CO. LTD. Page 4
MARDI
GRAB
EDITION
Tuesday, January 25,  1966
WHOOPING IT UP Mexican-style are folk dancers John
Cluff and Lindy Jordan-Knox, practising for Mardi Gras
floorshow.
Attorney-general
heads patron list
The 1966 Mardi Gras charity
Ball is honored th's year with
many well known Patrons and
Special Guests.
Patrons include the Hon. R.
W. Bonner, and Mrs. Bonner,
UBC Chancellor Mrs. Phyllis
Ross, President John B. Macdonald and Mrs. Macdonald,
former President Norman A.
M. MacKenzie and Mrs. MacKenzie, Dr. Gordon M. Shrum
and Mrs. Shrum, and His Worship Mayor William A. Rathie
and Mrs. Rathie.
Among special guests, Dean
D. M. Healy and Mrs. Healy,
Dean B. Eagles and Mrs.
Eagles, Dean Ian McTaggart
Cowan and Mrs. McTaggart
Cowan, Dean N. Scarfe and
Mrs. Scarfe, Dean A. W. Matthews and Mrs. Matthews, Dean
J. A. F. Gardiner and Mrs.
Gardiner, Mr.P. A. Lutszt'g,
and Mrs. Lusztig.
Dr. W. C. Gibson and Mrs.
Gibson. Dr. P. L. McGeer and
Mrs. McGeer,Mr. H. Lowe and
Mrs. Lowe, Mr. A. Swenson
and Mrs. Swenson, Mr. T.S.
Hughes and Mrs. Hughes, Mr.
Selman and Mrs. Selman, Miss
Sandy Sutherland, Mr.Michael
Hughes, Mr. Byron Hender,
Mr. Tony Buzan, Mr. Robin
Lecky, Mr. Graham Vance, Mr.
Harry K. Atterton and Mrs.
Atterton, Miss Lynne Iwasaki
and Mr. Gerry Nakatsuka.
The Mardi Gras Committee
will be looking forward to
meeting these Patrons and
guests at the banquet preceding the dance on January
28.
Head names
in committee
Heading the Mardi Gras
Committee are co-ordinators
Steve Hunter, and Trudy Hanson.
Committee members are:
Steve Merrit, treasurer; Barb
Doherty, Doug Hunter, and
Bruce Thompson, publicity;
Meredith Bain, and Gary Stevenson, raffle tickets; Dave
Graham and Allison Bryant,
activities; Judy McCury and
Brian Dorward, Commodore
arrangements; Sandy Donaldson and Don Cormack, bazaar;
Lesley Loree and Jason Leask,
programs; Norma Scott and
Sharon Stidson, secretaries;
Murray Spracklin, dance tickets; Stan Weber, sponsors and
donations; Keith Dunn, IFC
rep.; Judy Fainstein, panhellenic Rep.; Joanne Nerheim;
Eileen Evans; John Foote, musical director; Sharon Priestley,
choreographer; Shirley Zitko,
sets and decorations; Meg
Thompson, costumes.
UNTIL SATURDAY!
Comedy Star
DICK
GREGORY
also Stanley Kramer's
"Les Jolies Poupettes"
Raffle prize
trip for two
to Mexico
This year our goal is $15,000.
This money will be matched
dollar for dollar by the provincial government and doubled by the federal government,
yielding $60,000.
First prize this year is two
free round trip tickets to Mexico via CPA.
Second prize !s a fur stole,
donated by R. J. Pop, and third
prize is a wrist watch donated
by Henry Birks & Sons.
Other prizes include gift
certificates for clothing, hair
styling, appliances, and other
valuable items.
The draw will be held at
the Bazaar, Thursday, January 27, at the Showmart.
If you aren't fortunate to
win first prize, there is a charter flight leaving May 6 for
Mexico.
The trip includes 2 days in
Mexico City, 7 days in Aca-
pulco plus hotel and meals all
for only $295.
Details can be obtained from
the Mardi Gras office in South
Brock basement.
Compliments
from
DUTHIE BOOKS
LTD.
901   Robson
MU 4-4496
•      •      *
4560 W. 10th Ave.
CA 4-7012
BEST
WISHES
MARDI
GRAS
Compliments
from
GEORGIA
HOTEL
DUECK
ON BROADWAY
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TO PICK UP AUTHENTIC
ONE OWNER LOCAL 1965
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1305 W. Broadway
Phone 733-4111
UN I VERSITY
POST EXAM TOUR TO
and
ACAPULCO
DAYS
ONLY
$295.00
Canadian
10% Down. Balance
Over  12  Month*.
Leaving May 6
INCLUDING -
Jet Air Fare to Mexico City and Return
2 nights in Mexico City.
7 nights in Acapulco. Breakfast and luncheon.
Dinner in Acapulco.
Not Included:
Meals in Mexico City. Bus fair, Mexico City to
Acapulco, tips, personal items such as laundry,
tobacco, etc.
VIA
LM/tadu
xm
A/RUNES
For Reservations or Information call: Mr. S.  D.  Hunter
AM 1-8656 or Write Box 89, AMS Mardi Gras.
PLEASE RESERVE (Number)  SEATS.
NAME PHONE—	
ADDRESS	 Tuesday,  January 25,   1966
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 5
FOREGROUND
No Berkeley at UBC well, maybe
By GEORGE REAMSBOTTOM
Ubyssey  Associate  Editor
The Bladen report on financing higher education in
Canada was blasted. The concept of a university in North
American society was defined
as a conflict between the interests of corporate—capitalists and students who do not
believe a university's first interest is to serve public or
outside interests:
These and other areas reportedly within a student's
area of concern were discussed at a sparsely attended
but hotly pursued dialogue
presented at UBC's Brock
Hall on the weekend.
It was part of "Education
and Beyond" a seminar attended by Berkeley's Dr. Joseph Tussman and Stephan
Weissman (a leader in the
Free Speech Movement), Dr.
C. W. Gonick from the U.
of Manitoba, Dr. Paul Ivory
of UOLA, Dr. A. D. Scott,
UBC economic's head and
UBC economics' professors
Dr. John Young and David
Donaldson.
Another speaker was Canadian Union of Students president Patrick Kenniff. He had
this to say about the Bladen
report.
Mysterious four year
gap of paying
"It was an apology for the
university administration in
Canada. Deans, chancellors
and board of governors members made it up elem and
essence.''
Kenniff stressed that high
school is free, and the Bladen
report stresses that graduate
studies should be free but
there is a "mysterious four
year gap of paying while taking undergraduate studies."
He said this means in short
"Let the few who are able to
struggle out of their environment go for an undergrad
education — then train the
elite."
The report "showed economically why there was a need
to invest in higher education.
But there was a missing chapter — what they thought was
right. What they asked for
was expedient.
"This is the attitude now of
almost every university president in Canada — they could
set down what's right as far
as their university is concerned, yet they always set down
what they think will be expedient.
Janitorial role
for administration
"For example most presidents say they are responsible to their board of governors (unstated that board is
responsible to the provincial
government) — so let students fight the provincial government.
"University presidents in
this country are the only individuals whom are capable of
defending academic freedom
and they're not doing it. It
was never student's responsibility   to   fight   provincial
governments     but     students
may eventually have to take
that struggle over."
Kenniff concluded: "I see a
university composed of faculty and students. I see administration in a janitorial
function. This is the only
hope for destroying the corporation concept of a university. But students shouldn't
seek seats on senates or
boards as they are now constituted and don't favor student unionism either.
"A complete reconstitution
of boards is needed. It is a
matter of the university community accepting incompetence rather than governments
appointing competence. If
students and faculty are not
supposed to have time for
boards then neither do businessmen, particularly if
they're not part of the university community."
About the restlessness displayed at UBC Kenniff said:
"There is talk about another
Berkeley occuring here but I
don't believe it. Canadian
students are basically apathetic compared to Americans,
the same issues just aren't
present. Maybe President
Macdonald is doing his best
to create another Berkeley
but he just doesn't have the
material to work with."
Still concluding he stated:
"Communication with senate
and boards doesn't mean
seats. Joint committees of faculty and students can bring
out exciting recommendations then both groups are in
a position to hammer away at
the administration for these
points. Students shouldn't
set the curriculum, but should
evaluate it — seriously."
Dr. Tussman speaking on
"Education and the University" made these points:
Faculty support
soon will end
"Faculties will be increasingly nervous as students proceed to claim some sort of
role in ruling of universities.
Basically faculty does run the
university because it has control over students and curriculum."
"Many students and faculty
members are generally satisfied. The current student generation is highly tolerated by
even people who are offended
by actions such as occurred
at Berkeley. Many faculty
members have felt somewhat
guilty because they have ignored the new self-awareness
of today's students. At Berkeley, student action had benign
support of faculty more because of this feeling of guilt
than an agreement with student's reasoning.
"But the propriety or right
of students to act doubtful
because of their lack of
knowledge and experience
which does not qualify them
to take part in running university. And as soon as students move in direction of
running the university faculty
sympathy will end," he predicted.
Tussman stressed that "a
university in principal is not
a democratic institution —
students are apprentices in
training — they should be
understood and recognized
but must understand their
role."
Weissman spoke on "the
political role of an academic"
and these were some of his
points:
"A student is justified in
wanting to change his environment because he must work
within a system set up and
controlled by others — he
produces for reward of grades
leading to higher income
when he leaves university. It
is not a creative role."
"At present we are moving from a very competitive
ethic type of society into a
bureaucratic, systemized order of society rewarding specialization.
Changing concept
most important
"But together students and
faculty should be concerned
in the problems and directions of society.
"If society continues to
force people to do unnecessary work then it must be
judged as repressive.
"Apart from structural
changes most important is
changing    concept    students
and others have accepted towards a university."
"Tussman's assumption is
that ideological attitudes interfere with one's work. But
how can social action be kept
alive within the multiversity
concept of training individuals so that they fit into the
establishment."
"Students rewarded for
learning what society wants
them, to — other research irrelevant to establishment's
needs."
Dr. Gonick added: "Today's administrators accept
university as means of serving public or outside interests
which should support goals
of society regardless of what
they are.
"This is demonstrated in
other trends such as setting
up adult education courses in
gardening and how to make
the most of holidaying. Such
tendencies are drawing universities away from their
proper functions.
"Student syndicalists
(unionists) see university as
training school and demand
more respect and influence
in governing university because they will be future
managers of society, but
would likely add little to efficiency of school.
"Self government would
be  meaningful  to  university
with abilty to determine what
its aims and goals are but
not to a degree mill.
"Multiversity is like a
m u 11 i - purpose corporation
which is based on acceptance
of gradual homogenization of
society. Conflicts among
regional, ethnic and economic
groupings are being replaced
by large corporate powers
which are hotly competitive
technologically and very bureaucratic.
Political ideas
being exhausted
"Political ideas are being
exhausted with an end for
ideology in sight. Basic critiques and social organizations
are no longer significant.
"A faculty member, under
the multiversity concept, can
identify himself with his
specialization — operates
within a well structured mobility lab — which completely
exploits his special talents.
"But a multiversity concept is unrealistic because
there is still social conflict—
Berkeley's revolutionary insurrection was based on local
grievances which had! accumulated in face of the multiversity concept."
•Reed. Can. 7.M.
The Player's Jacket fashioned by BANTAMAC in Terylene*, a Cel-Cil fibre.
Come on over to smoothness
with no letdown in taste      |
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New!
Player's
Kings Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  January  25,   1966
ROYALS,  VICTORIA
Puck Birds take
two on weekend
By ED CLARK
Ubyssey Sports Editor
Bob Hindmarch's hockey Thunderbirds increased their
unbeaten streak to six games during the weekend.
Thunderbirds' Ron Morris
collected a goal and four assists to lead UBC to an 8-6
victory over New Westminster
Royals Friday night at the
Winter Sports Centre before
752 fans.
Saturday afternoon, Wayne
Desharnais and Mickey McDowell scored two goals each
as UBC clipped the University
of Victoria Vikings 6-4.
Royals, who play in the Pacific Coast Junior League, gave
UBC a battle but the Birds
took command in the final period, putting four goals past
Royals' goalie Don Wallis.
Saturday, Victoria goalie
Ted Hurd kept the  Thunder-
The little netminder kicked
West  invades
Japanese  music
The East - West conflict
moves into new fields tonight.
Elliot Weisgarber, a composer and associate professor
of music at UBC, discusses
the conflict between traditional anrl western musical
cultures in modern Japan at
the Unitarian Church of
Vancouver, 949 West Forty-
ninth,  at  8  p.m.
Bad Boys
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Hard to get large and odd sizes too
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"THE"  PLACE
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[Do-Nut Dineri
4556 W. 10th Ave.
Try our delicious T-bone
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Student Meal Tickets
Available
Dirds from doubling the score,
out 37 shots, of which over a
dozen were labelled.
UBC's Brian Wallace handled 23.
Desharnais' two goals gave
UBC a comfortable first period
lead, but Victoria's Terry
Foreman and Jim Wilson scored within 57 seconds of the
second period to tie the score.
Goals by Foreman and McDowell sent the teams to the
dressing room tied 3-3 after
two periods.
Len Bousquet's 30 foot shot
from the point on a power play
goal put UBC in front to stay,
in the final period.
Thunderbirds host University of Saskatchewan Huskies
this weekend.
Hat trick     | T-Birds shot down
by Oregon teams
by Diederik
beats India
Diederik Wolsak paced the
unbeaten UBC Thunderbirds to
another victory in Vancouver
Field Hockey League play Saturday.
Wolsak scored three goals as
UBC shut out India A 7-0 at
Wolfson field.
Wolsak is the top scorer in
the VFHL.
The win put the 'Birds in
sole possession of first place
in the A Division with two
games in hand.
By HAL ARMSTRONG
UBC rugby teams enjoyed
mixed success and failure during a two game tour in Oregon.
The Birds managed to draw
with Oregon State 3-3Thursday
at Corvallis and lost to the
University of Oregon 9-6 Saturday in Eugene.
The UBC forwards had it
all over the Oregon pack, but
the backs were unable to penetrate as effectively as they
have in past games.
The    Brave's    two    games
against the second fifteen's of
the two Oregon universities
were more successful. They
won the first game 21-0 and
the second 31-0 against Oregon
State and U. of Oregon respectively.
Meanwhile at Wolfson Field
Saturday the Totems stunned
second d i v i sion champions
Kats II 14-0.
At no point in the game did
the Kats mount a scoring
threat, so excellent was the
Totems' cover defense.
Sport Shorts
INTRAMURALS
Manager's meeting Wednesday noon, room 211, War Memorial Gym. All out.
VOLLEYBALL
T'Birds play Bellingham
YMCA in Bellingham Wednesday. Team will meet at 6:45
p.m. in Gym.
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Lafayette — 4 track stereo
rec./play. deck. One only^ A
real  buy	
Transistorized
Minifon Wire Recorder—Pocket size. Up to 4 hours rec.
time. Complete with remote
control mic.  3  only _	
Miny 601 — 4 tracks, all controls in mic. Excellent for
student or office use   	
Par os 56—2 tracks, 2 speeds
remote mic. Up to 6 hours
play time. 2 only. Fantastic
value!  	
Electra DA-301 — Most amazing AC or DC recorder. "Tape
it anywhere." 4 speeds, 3
heads, remote mic, up to 12
hours play time. Beautiful
upright design. One only. Case
marked	
Reg.
Sale
199.50
289.50
199.50
179.50
295.00
299.95
699.50
213.50
78.00
158.00
108.00
118.00
198.00
188.00
558.00
158.00
Models
295.00  128.00
69.95
159.95
199.95
36.88
88.00
Reg.
Sale
Nytone 50 Watt  Amplifier —
One only 	
139.00
68.00
Lafayette   —   44   watt   solid
state   amplifier   ..	
199.95
138.00
Heathkit—44  watt  solid  state
229.95
148.00
Electra   FM   Mult.   Tuner   —
Terrific    value	
119.50
78.00
AM-FM — FM Mult. Tuner —
Solid    state.    Very    sensitive.
Beautiful styling !.'_...
199.50
138.00
Harman   Kardon  A-700 —  70
watt  stereo  amp	
315.00
228.00
Lafayette  LR-800 — AM-FM-
multi   tuner with  powerful 70
watt   amplifier.    New   stereo
searcher feature. If you want
th finest at a real low price
One only	
379.50
288.00
Eico   ST-40—Powrful   40   watt
257.00
125.00
Garrard  —  Type  A  Mark  11
turn   table.   Can   be   used   as
99.95
79.88
BSR — Auto, turn taible com-
49.95
27.95
B  &  O —
Magnetic cartridge 	
29.95
16.00
Shure — M-44 magnetic cart
ridge   _ -	
34.50
24.88
Jerlsen—12"    co-ax.    speakers
Full frequency  _       ..
23.00
14.88
Calrad   —   8"   3-way   speaker
system  — 	
24.50
16.88
Deluxe    6x9   —    Heavy    duty
magnet,    co-ax.    speaker   for
hi fl   systems   or   as   replace-
12.95
6.58
Richard   Allen   —   Twin   cone
full frequency 8'  speaker.
29.50
22.00
Electra  — Magnificent 3-way
system. 12" woofer, 6%" mid-
range,      compression     horn
tweeter      ._	
94.50
68.00
158.00
A brilliantly engineered tape recorder,
the ELECTRA PC-104 is a must for the
busy executive or professional man. Automatically records your ideas, reports,
memos . . . repeats them on demand.
Check these outstanding features:
* 80 minutes recording or play-back time
* Capstan   driven,   precision   15/16   IPS
* Weighs  only  V/a   lbs.
* Operates on four inexpensive pen-light
batteries.
UNCONDITIONALLY
GUARANTEED
as  illustrated:
Complete with dynamic microphone, batteries, earphone, reel tape, empty reels.
Introductory offer:
You get absolutely free with each recorder three long playing tapes. Plus
telephone adaptor to record from any
phone, your important conversations.
Reg. $69.95
STUDENT'S SPECIAL
INTRODUCTORY OFFER
only $54.88
PERSONAL - PORTABLE
MEMORY
DRUM
that fits
pocket or purse
TRUE   FIDELITY
Dimensions
7%" x 3 3/8" x 17/8"
FULLY   TRANSISTORIZED Tuesday,  January 25,   1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
— dennis gans photo
INTENT Steve Spencer gets off shot above University of
Hawaii defender Steve Brixen as the Rainbows' Dick
Treglown looks on. Spencer's clutch foul shotting provided
UBC's winning margin Monday before record crowd.
Thunderbirds soar
over Rainbows
Steve Spencer's two free throws with 12 seconds to play
gave the UBC Thunderbirds a 63-61 victory over the University of Hawaii Rainbows Monday night.
A joyous throng of 3,361—
largest crowd in recent memory to see UBC basketball
game in Memorial gym —
watched as the Thunderbirds
fought back from a 35-29 half-
time deficit.
From the opening tipoff,
UBC raced to a 15-8 advantage.
But the aptly-named Rainbows
found the range and began
potting long shots midway
through the first half.
But Peter Mullins' boys
thundered out of the dressing
room to score nine unanswered
points.
Bob Barazzoul, who led UBC
scorers with 17 points, kept
the 'Birds close with sharp
shooting and aggressive defensive play.
In   the   preliminary   game,
Simon Fraser's Clansmen took
a 76-65 verdict from Norm
Watt's confused Jayvees.
UBC   and  Hawaii  go   at   it
again tonight at 8:30.
THUNDERETTE HOOP  TOURNEY
Molsons cop third win
By ED CLARK
Ubyssey Sports Editor
Vancouver Molsons topped
all teams in the seventh annual
Thunderette basketball tournament over the weekend.
Molsons captured their third
straight Thunderette trophy
and their fourth in seven years
by trouncing Mt. Pleasant Legion 55-37 in the tournament
finals Saturday at the Women's
Gym.
UBC Thunderettes, who
were defeated 31-22 by Mt.
Pleasant in the semi-finals, finished in third place after edging University of Alberta Din-
nies 33-30.
University of Victoria Vik-
ettes won the consolation final,
defeating Vancouver Orphans
38-30.
Molsons led 12-2 after seven
minutes of play and increased
the lead to 26-11 at halftime.
Molsons, Canadian senior
women's champions, swept the
eight-team tournament in unladylike fashion.
They rocketed to a 57-10 victory in their opening game Friday against Vancouver Orphans, then swamped the Dinnies
35-18 in the semi-finals Saturday.
The tournament was sponsored by UBC's Women's Ath-
Tyro track types
tear to triumphs
By DOUG  MOSER
Freshman Dave Aune scored
a convincing victory in the
660 yards in UBC track team's
debut of the season at the
Stadium Saturday.
Running strongly throughout, Aune took the lead at the
quarter-mile mark and held
off a strong challenge by Vancouver Olympic's Terry Dooley
to finish in 1:22.8.
His showing makes him
UBC's top middle-distance
hope in upcoming intercollegiate battles at Vancouver and
Winnipeg.
UBC demonstrated impressive depth in middle distance
performers at the meet, and
promises to field a strong mile-
relay team at Winnipeg Feb.
26.
UBC sprinters Chip Barrett
and Bob Morgan both made
the 60 yd. final, which Barrett
letic Association and the Department of Physical Education and Recreation.
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES FOR
1966 Graduates in Mathematics
with the
Department of Insurance
OTTAWA, TORONTO and MONTREAL
as
ACTUARIAL ASSISTANTS
$5790 - $7300
and
ACTURIAL SUPERVISORS
$5050 - $5800
Details and application forms available at your University
Placement Office. Competition Number 66-6400 and 66-
6401 refer.
FRATERNITY
SPRING
RUSH
Sign up at A.M.S. Office
Jan. 17th through Jan. 28th
won on a sticky track in 6.6
sees.
Sean Duffey was the winner
in the three-quarter mile event.
In the two paarlauf's both
UBC's relay teams registered
victories.
PHYSICISTS   &  ENGINEERS
for
PROTON   ACCELERATOR
STUDY
Atomic Energy of Canada Limited
is studying the design of an untra-
high current proton accelerator to
produce an intense neutron source
by spallation reactions. A beam
power of 65 Megawatts, 65 milli-
amperes   at   1000  MeV   is   required.
The study is basic and wide
ranging.    Problems   include:
production   of   high-efficiency
radio frequency power,
accelerator  orbit  dynamics,
space charge effects,
beam   transport   systems,
electromagnet design,
heat   transfer  from   liquid
metal   targets,
control   system   studies.
Accelerator   experince   is   not   essential.     Enquiries,    including    academic  qualification  and  experience,
should be addressed to:
FILE 1  E
ATOMIC   ENERGY   OF   CANADA
LIMITED
Chalk   River,   Ontario
PAPERBACK
NEW ARRIVALS
List No. 76 - Jan. 14, 1966
American  Railroads.  Stover.  (U. of Chicago.)   -            _    -    - 1.95
American    Revolution:    two    centuries    of    interpretation.    Morgan
(Spectrum.)    _     _ .   _     -     _... _          ....           _   - 2.25
Architectural & Perspective Designs.  Bibiena. (Dover.)     _. ...   _.   _   _ 2.45
Betrothed (I promessi sposi.) Manzoni. (Dutton.)                 - 2.30
Bird Display & Behaviour. Armstrong. (Dover.)                   2.70
Black Elk Speaks. Neihardt. (Bison   Bks.)        1.60
Chinese   Characters:   their   origin,   etymology,   history,   classification
& signification. Wieger. (Dover.)      __   -          4.00
Courts, the Public, & the Law Explosion. Jones. (Spectrum.)    2.25
Economics of Poverty: An American paradox.  Weisbrad. (Spectrum.) 2.25
England in the Age of the American Revolution. Namier. (Macmillian.) 5.00
Fremantle Diary (the south at war.) Lord. (Capricorn.)       _       1.45
Greek Drama.  Hadas.  (Bantam.)       _     __     .95
Guns of the Early Frontiers. Russell. (U. of California.)  .   _.   . _    _ 2.65
History of Orchestration. Carse.   (Dover.)             _  .__   _.._ 2.15
History  of Pathology. Long. (Dover.)      2.15
History of the Southern Confederacy. Eaton. (Free  Press.)   . ..   -   - _ 2.75
How Children Fail. (Holt. (Delta.)             _...        .    -    _. —  1.90
India: A Short Cultural History. Rawlinson. (Praeger.)      4.25
It's Fun to Make Things from  Scrap Materials. Hershoff. (Dover.) .._ 1.60
Johnson, Andrew &  Reconstruction.  McKitrick.   (Phoenix.)  2.95
Judgment & Reasoning in the Child. Piaget. (littlefield.)       -         _   - 1.60
Landscape Gardening in Japan. Conder. (Dover.)      -     2.95
Law   West  of   Fort   Smith:   frontier   justice   in   the   indian   territory.
Shirley. (Collier Bk"s.)  .95
Letters of a Woman Homesteader. Stewart. (Bison Books.)  1.35
Man for Himself. Fromm. (Premier.)    _          1.00
Massachusetts, Colony to Commonwealth. Taylor. (U. of N. Carolina.) 3.25
New Theatre of Europe. Corrigan. (Delta.) Vol. I        2.45
New Theatre of Europe. Corrigan. (Delta.) Vol. II  2.45
Nineteenth-Century Thought: the discovery of change.  Schoenwald.
(Spectrum.)    _..._.    2.25
One Hundred   Great Problems of Elementary Mathematics. Dorries.
(Dover.)          2.15
Ordeal by Hunger. The story of the donner party Stewart. (Ace.)  .50
Outbreak of the Second World War: design or blunder? Snell.
(Heath.)        2.00
Plenty-Coups: Chief of the Crows. Linderman.   (Bison Bks.)  1.60
Populist Revolt. Hicks. (Bison  Bks.) -  1.90
Principles of Vector Analysis. Marion. (Academic.)  2.65
Prologue to Revolution: sources & documents on the stamp act crisis,
Morgan.  (U.   of N.  Carolina.)       ■-_..     ___    3.25
Proverbs & Common Sayings from the Chinese. Smith. (Dover.)        - 2.45
Rebel War Clerk's Diary. Jones. (Perpetua.)    __    ._  __     2.65
Reconstruction & the Freedmen. McWhiney. (Rand McNally.)  _    .80
Record of Buddhistic Kingdoms. Legge. (Dover.)              _.   ...   . _  1.90
Reminiscences of a Ranchman. Bronson.  (Bison Bks.)             -     _ 1.60
Roughing  It. Twain.  (Signet.)          .75
Sane Society.  Fromm.  (Premier.)       ...            _     . .       1.00
Serpent's  Coil.  Mowat.  (Ballantine.)                .60
Shakespearean Tragedy. Bradley. (Premier.)  1.00
Soviety Literature in the Sixties.  Hay ward. (Praeger.)       _  2.10
Spanish Conquistadores. Kirkpatrick. (Meridian.) - _._..._ 1.95
Story of the Little Big  Horn: Custer's last fight. Graham.
(Collier Bks.)  _     .    _.               .95
Teaching in the Slum School. Strom.  (C. Merrill.)       ..        ._  2.25
Them Was the Days: an American saga of the 70's. McKeown.
(Bison  Bks.)         .            ..._______.     __ 1.35
Three Years  Among the Indians & Mexicans. James. (Lippincott.)     _ 1.50
Unconquered Siminole  Indians.  Peithmann. (Great Outdoors.)     ._._ 1.25
Universal  Encyclopedia of  Mathematics.  (Mentor.)              _       1.60
Use of Explosive Ideas in Education: Brameld. (U. of Pitts.)  2.45
Villains & Vigilantes. Cbblentz.  (Perpetua.)                         _       2.10
Why the North Won the Civil War. Donald. (Collier.)  .95
Wild Animals in Captivity. Hediger. (Dover.)  1.90
Winning of the West.  Roosevelt.  (Premier.)        _ .75
UBC BOOKSTORE Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  January  25,  1966
'TWEEN CLASSES
Tory Guest speaks
Gowan Guest—Diefenbaker
executive assistant   —   speaks
his  mind Wednesday noon in
Brock.
• •      •
SPECIAL EVENTS AND
FILM  SOC
Camp Week: Tarzan the ape-
man — Weismuller's first Tarzan film, and Alfred Hitchcock's 1923 silent movie Pleasure Garden Aud. noon.
• •      •
VCF
Dr. Fernando Vangeoni discusses Evangelism in South
America, Bu.  205 today.
• •      •
BRIDGE AND CHESS CLUB
Game session Brock T.V.
room Wed. 7:30-11:00 p.m.
General meeting Thur. noon
Bu. 2223 to discuss club policy.
• •      •
PRE-DENTAL SOC
Meeting noon in Bu 204 with
Dr. I. Johnson speaking.
• •      •
WEDNESDAY NOON HOUR
CONCERTS
Wed. noon in Bu. 106. Judy
Forst sings in German, Japanese and English.
• •      •
ACE
Import ant organizational
meeting for Little Mountain
Area Project Wed. noon in Ed.
204.
The   modern   way  to  see   is  with
Contact  Lenses
Have them expertly fitted at a
reasonable price by
LAWRENCE CALVERll
MU 3-1816 705 Dirks Bldg.
Elementary   &   Secondary
FUTURE
TEACHERS
K E*E P
YOUR
EYES
on
VANCOUVER
•
Every year the
Vancouver School
Board
HIRES
many   teachers
directly from
university
•
When the time comes
APPLY
to the
Vancouver
School Board
1595  West   10th  Avenue
For an  interview
call RE 1-1131
UBC LIBERALS
Ray Perrault speaks at noon
in Brock with Dr. Pat McGeer
and Allan Macfarlane.
• •      •
ONTOLOGICAL  SOC
The Art of Love by Michael
Cecil Wed. noon in Bu. 221.
• •      •
IL CAFFE
Italian day Wed. 11:30-3:00.
Films at noon. All invited.
• •      *
UBC PIPE BAND COTC
Important parade tonight
7:00 p.m. All members and
those interested.
• •      •
ENGLISH DEPT.
Wayne Burns, U. of Wash.
English professor speaks in Bu.
106 at noon on D. H. Lawrence.
• •      •
VARSITY DEMOLAY
Special meeting noon in Bu.
216. All please attend.
BADMINTON CLUB
No badminton Jan. 25 and
27.
• •      •
NDP
Final meeting of policy committee Wed. noon in Bu. 1221.
• •      •
PRE-LAW  SOC
Important general meeting
noon in Bu. 221.
• •      •
PRE-MED
Lecture and slides by Dr.
Gerein on the cardiac surgery
group at St. Paul's.
• •      •
CHRISTIAN UNITY WEEK
Professor Chas. Anderson,
Rel. St. Dept. speaks at noon
in Bu. 104 as the final event
of the week.
• •      •
MATH CLUB
Dr. Berry speaks on closed
curves Wed. noon in Math. 229.
CLASSIFIED
Rales: 3 lines. 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall. Ext. 26. 224-3242
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost 8c Found
11
FOUND ADS inserted free. Publications office, Brock Hall. Local 26,
224-3242.
LOST TAN PURSE IN FREDDY
Wood Theatre, Jan. 18. Need student card and visa desparately.
Reward.   Call Evy  733-3025.
POUND: PAIR OP BLACK LEA-
ther gloves looking for owner! Call
Susanne  261-8603.
A WOMAN'S GOLD WATCH EN-
graved with H. C. M. 1965. If
found phone^RE 3-4925 after 6 p.m.
TAKEN BT MISTAKE PROM
Sherry's Banquet Hall on Jan. 15
a black overcoat with red lining.
Owner write Dan Gerwing, 1*260
Walnut,   Victoria.
Special Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSTjR-
ance   rates?   If   you   are   over   20
and have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Phone   Ted   Elliott,   224-6707.
2nd ANNUAL ZETA BETA TAU
Charity Lunch: Tues. Jan. 25th.
Bus-stop coffee shop 11:30-1:15
(Give 'Generously for research in
menial   illness)
ANYONE INTERESTED IN MAN-
agerial duties for T-Birds Volleyball teams please contact J. P.
Daem O.K. 205 Lower Mall. Ph.
224-9049.
ROBIN. WHAT THE HELL IS THE
Cognoscenti? Batman.
Transportation
14
RIDE WANTED FROM 5th AND
Sasamat for 8:30 classes, mornings
only.   Phone   Sharry  224-3375.
ATTENTION ALTERNATE DRI-
ver urgently needed for Lynn-
Valley-Delbrook carpool. Phone
985-1804   for  Jim   Jr.
CARPOOL NEEDED IN THE Vicinity  of  25th  and  Granville.   Call
_Barb, 731-3556. '__
ADDITIONAL DRIVER WANTED
for carpool new Westminster area.
Cam,   522-4414.	
RIDERS WANTED FROM. 16 th
Ave. and Main. Willing to go
slightly off 16th. Approx. 10
blocks. Phone 876-4706 and ask for
Bob.
Wanted
15
Scandals
39
BIG RALLY THURS., JAN. 27
noon. Gym. Revolt Against Beau-
rocracy.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Typewriters 8c Repairs
42
GOOD CLEAN TYPEWRITERS, 120
up. Also Typewriter repairs at
50 percent savings. Poison Typewriters, 2140 W. 4th. Phone RE
1-8322.
Typing
43
L'ROKESSIONAL TYPING, ARDALE
Griffiths  Limited,   70th   and Gcan-
ville,   263-4530.	
FAST   ACCURATE   TYPING   THE-
sls,   Essays,   Etc.,   on   new  IBM   Executive typewriter. Phone 263-4023.
Help Wanted
51
PIZZA PATIO IS CONTINUING
with its policy of making employment available to students for part
time evening' work—one or two
evenings a week. Students considering applying must have clean
driving record for use of Company
cars and be 21 years of age or
older. Contact Manager at the
Pizza Patio most convenient to
you after 5 p.m. Locations in Kerrisdale, South Van., Downtown
and  West   Van.
PS:    New   outlet   now   open   close
to   U.B.C.
Work Wanted
52
INSTRUCTION
Music
63
Gl'ITAR—SPECIALIZED INSTRUC-
tion by experts in every type of
Guitar and Banjo playing at "The
Mediterranean Shop", Vancouver's
Guitar Centre. 4347 West 10th Ave.
Phone   CA   8-8412.
DRUMMER LOOKING FOR WORK.
Phone RE 8-8265. Ask for Bernie
Young.
Instruction Wanted
66
HONORS OR GRADUATE CHEMI-
stry student to tutor high school
Chemistry  II — Phone  CA  4-6820.
MICROSCOPE    WANTED.    PHONE
Geo.   Smith  LA  2-0209.
WANTED! LIVE DRUMMER WITH
own   skins.    Exp.    necessary    call
Jeff   AM   1-4192.
AUTOMOTIVE 8c MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
58 V.W. DELUXE SUNROOF UN-
dercoated radio excellent $650.
Phone   922-4350.
1962   VW.   DELUXE   RADIO   $1,050?
224-9925   Evenings   —   Stan.
Motorcycles
27
1965 YAMAHA 250cc. 60 Miles on
new motor. Phone Fred, 738-79S8
in evenings.	
FOR SALE: 1965 350c.c. B.S..A.
sport. Excellent condition. Low
mileage. Phone Doug at 224-9794
7-9 p.m.
WANTED TUTOR FOR PHYSICS
12. Someone who has hat least
Physics 200. Phone 988-0884 after
6  p.m.  Ask for Mrs.   Burgis.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
KLASSEN'S
... USED. FURNITURE MART ....
Where You Shop at Auction Prices
5207 West  Broadway RE 6-0712
(Beer Bottle Depot at Rear of Storei
Room  & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD FOR QUIET
male student. 4595 West 6th. Phone
224-4866.
WANTED FELLOW TO SHARE
Suite.  224-3102 after 6.
Unfurn. Houses 8c Apts.
84
FEMALE STUDENT TO SHARE
furnished apartment. $30. l'hone
Judy after 6.  736-5271  near Alma.
COSTUMES £or MARDI GRAS
WE HAVE A GOOD SUPPLY OF MEXICAN, SPANISH AND
WESTERN   OUTFITS   -   APPROPRIATE   FOR  THIS   YEAR'S
THEME - Reserve Early ! !
DELUXE RENTALS       -        874-6116
1294 Kingsway at Clarke
AMS ELECTION
INFORMATION
Nominations Open Wed., Jan. 19, 1966
for the following positions:
Slate 1
President
Second Vice-President
Secretary
Nominations must be received by the A.M.S. Secretary
before:
Slate I—4:00 p.m. Thursday, January 27, 1966
Slate II—4:00 p.m. Thursday, February 3, 1966
Slate n
First Vice-President
Treasurer
Coordinator
Nominations will be posted only by-the A.MS. Secretary and will not be posted until such time as an eligibility form has been received by the Secretary.
The open candidates meeting will be held on Monday,
January 31, 1966, in Brock Lounge for the first slate,
and on Monday, February 7, 1966, in Brock Lounge.
ELECTION DATES ARE:
1st Slate-Wednesday, February 2, 1966
2nd Slate-Wednesday, February 9,1966
Nomination forms, elegibility forms and election rules
may be obtained either in the A.M.S. Office or from
the A.M.S. Secretary.
CAMP WEEK OPENER
TARZAN & THE APES
Johnny Weismuller's first Talkie Tarzan
phis
THE PLEASURE GARDEN
A 1923 Silent Melodrama directed by
Alfred Hitchcock
A Special Events & Film Society presentation
Today - Auditorium 12:30 - 25c
Wednesday's Program
will be chosen from the following
King Kong
Rose Marie
The Sign of The Cross
Bride of Frankenstein
Dumbo
Hercules Unchained
The Ten Commandments
The Bolshoi Tractor
Keahoruya Varsity
Perils of Pauline
Flash Gordon
Crooked Teeth

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