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The Ubyssey Sep 23, 1969

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Array THUNDERBIRD FULLBACK Paul Danyliu grinds out yardage in Saturday's game against College of Idaho. Birds lost 20-0. See story page 11.
-dick button photo
Courting
THE UBYSSEY
is for the Boyds
Vol. LI, No. 5
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1969
228-2305
Ruling today
on Boyd
by brian mcwatters
Student court decision on the legality of the
dismissal of SUB games area supervisor Dermot
Boyd was withheld until 12:30 p.m. today after a
four hour session Monday.
Chief justice Louis Romero, after a five minute
consultation with the other six judges said that a
ruling would be given today as it was getting late.
He said that court would not be re-convened
but that "interested parties" would be notified of
the decision at noon.
The charge laid by Kevin Crowe, arts 3 cited
Alma Mater Society treasurer Chuck Campbell as
acting in direct violation of the constitution by
reclassifying the position of games supervisor to a
part-time job which could be held by a student.
Defence counsel Ian Sisset, law 3, moved the
charges be dismissed against Campbell on the
grounds that the nature of the action was frivolous
and calculated only to embarass and harass the
treasurer.
To support this motion The Ubyssey was cited
as exhibit "A" for referring to the ears in the Sept.
12 issue "You can bet your Boyd . .. Chuck's in
trouble. Exhibit "B" was the edition of Sept. 16
with the story "Linde withdraws but charges
relaid".
Talk site
for BCUS
up in air
Personality conflicts
among student leaders led
to the cancellation of the
B.C. Union . of Students
conference this weekend.
"I wish student leaders
would recognize their
common responsibility,"
said Mike Doyle, Alma
Mater Society external
affairs officer, Monday.
Doyle was obviously
disgusted with the hostile
attitudes which the student
councillors of B.C.
universities have for one
another. *,
BCUS executive
secretary, Bob Hicke was
forced to cancel the
conference when councillors
of the smaller B.C.
universities refused to meet
at UBC, the proposed site.
Many student leaders of
Contined Page 2
See: BCUS
Strike looms after
SFU PSA dept. vote
BURNABY (Staff)-Students and
faculty members of Simon Fraser
University's political science, sociology
and anthropology (PSA) department
voted Monday to give the university
administration a 48-hour strike notice.
At a highly charged general meeting
almost 650 members of the PSA
department passed a five part motion
giving the university administration
until Wednesday noon to open
negotiations concerning the trusteeship
of the department and recent denial of
tenures to certain profs.
"If the administration refuses to
establish an administrative negotiating
committee and enter into open and
direct negotiation we will go on strike as
a department beginning at 12:30
Wednesday," the motion read. "A PSA
strike and teach-in on democratization
of the university will begin at that
time."
An estimated 22 people voted against
the motion and 12 abstained. The rest
ofthe votes were affirmative.
A second part of the motion
welcomed   the   proposal   of Canadian
Exhibit "C" was the edition of
Sept. 19 which included the
required notice of the court
session headed "Campbell
Charged".
Bob Callaghan, law 3 and Jim
Bennett, law grad student,
representing Crowe, argued that
any matter of construction and
finances are not frivolous and that
The Ubyssey is a normal
newspaper only reporting the
happenings and not representing
any specific side.
The court recessed for* 35
minutes while judges Louis
Romero, Greg Bowden, Arthur
Ewert, David Mossop, David
Robertson, David Donohoe, and
Gary Tindall deliberated on the
question of dismissal of the
charges.
Continued Page 2
See: Boyd
Recent legal charges forcing GS
into possible self-censorship
If the Georgia Straight survives
its current legal problems, future
policy will have to undergo drastic
changes.
"We have followed a policy of
civil disobedience but are now
faced with the prospect of strong
self-censorship," said Straight
editor Dan McLeod Monday.
The underground paper was
recently charged with counselling
another person to commit a
criminal offence and fined $ 1500
for printing an article giving
directions on the growing of
marijuana.
McLeod was fined $500 and
placed on three years probation.
As a result of his probabtion,
McLeod feels that "they'd lock
me up and throw the key away if
the paper was busted again."
Raising $2,000 for fines doen't
present too much of a problem
for the Straight but 15 obscenity
charges laid this week will tell the
story.
"If we were The Ubyssey we
would have a good chance, legally
speaking, on these obscenity
charges," said McLeod.
There are plans afoot for a
local benefit to raise funds for the
stricken newspaper. The Straight
is contacting local groups to
appear and Beattle John Lennon
has been approached to come to
the aid of McLeod and the paper.
Association of University Teacher's
president that the administration and
PSA department enter into direct
negotiation.
Martin Loney, president of the
Canadian Union of Students told
department members, "The actual
situation now looks like Paris in May; I
hope it will end like Madrid in
August.
"I guarantee that we'll win," said
PSA prof Louis Feldhammer. "We're
here and we're here to stay."
Feldhammer told the crowd that if
he is fired because of his actions he will
not accept another teaching position
but will remain at SFU.
Ofthe 16 faculty members present at
the meeting, nine supported the strike
motion.
The motion went on to elaborate
that if a strike is called it would be
different in concept from a strike in an
industrial plant.
"What we are trying to do is not to
grind the wheels of prodution to a halt,
but rather a collective expression of our
opposition to the administration's
efforts to destroy our
department," it said.
"The strike thus serves as a
demonstration of our collective
determination to stop the
administration and an expression
of our deep and collective
commitment to that goal..."
The last part ofthe meeting
was devoted mainly to the
election of two students and two
faculty members to form an
arbitration committee.
Under the Covers
Council endorses PSA    p. 2
Truth revealed p. 4
Music, theatre reviews p. 5
ZAP p. 7 Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 23, 1969
—dave evans photo
COWBOY GRAEME CAMPBELL (right) strikes threatening pose
in campus production of Boy Meets Girl, which continues until
Saturday at the Freddy Wood Theatre. Bewildered victim is Peter
Jaenicke.
AMS council backs
SFU's PSA dept
Council  Monday  night  voted   curriculum.
to support Simon Fraser
University's Political Science,
Sociology and Anthropology
department.
A motion was passed to
extend use of the secretarial
services of the Alma Mater
Society to the students and
faculty of the PSA department in
their bid to re-democratize the
faculty.
The move came about five
hours after the students and
faculty voted—in a mall meeting
at SFU-to set a 48-hour deadline
for strike action if the
administration does not meet
demands to negotiate its position
openly, (see story page one.)
The remainder of the
four-hour meeting was devoted to
the perusal of the president's
mid-year report.
The 45-page publication—entitled policies and priorities
etc."—was presented by president
Fraser Hodge. It included Hodge's
14-page brief to the liquor
commission and an eight-page
supplement   by   Stan   Persky  on
Included prominently in
Hodge's report was an evaluation
of Del Vallair's AMS-supported
election campaign in
Rossland-Trail
Hodge argued that—contrary to
criticism—students were not
forced to support a candidate, but
rather a policy.
He said in the report that "it
was never our (AMS) intention to
win very many votes" but rather
to promote education.
Vallair received 288 votes at a
total cost of $3,800 to UBC
students.
The report noted that a
committee has been struck to
evaluate the position of SUB
building manager (although it has
not yet met) and went on to list
the Hodge administration
priorities for the remainder of his
term.
They include a move to have
the vacancy on the board of
governors filled by a student;
executive demands that council
support  anti-calendars and other
Student BoG members
widespread reaction at
TORONTO (CUP)-Two
students sitting on the board of
governors of Ryerson
Polytechnical Institute have
kicked off widespread student
reaction by resigning from the
board, claiming they were
"ignored, deceived, and tolerated
like kids," by the board and the
institute's administration.
Richard Finlay and Gordon
Jackson, elected by students last
October and then appointed to
the board, said Wednesday they
resigned in a joint letter to
Ontario premier John Robarts a
week      ago.      The      provincial
governmental appoints Ryerson
board members.
Both Jackson and Finlay ran
for the positions as moderates,
"hoping to counter-act the
atmosphere of student
rebellion ... to demonstrate
responsible student participation.
Ryerson was the first
post-secondary institution in
Canada to get student
representation on its board.
But their proposals for reform
and attempts to get information
were thwarted by the
administration.
W. M. Kelly, chairman of the
Ryerson board and vice-president
BOYD
From Page One
The judges returned with a
verdict upholding Crowe's right to
call for student court action.
Sisset claimed Campbell had
not acted by himself in signing an
inter-department memo dated
Aug. 20 authorizing Boyd's
immediate dismissal.
He said Campbell acted within
his right as treasurer and signed
the memo after consultation with
AMS president Fraser Hodge and
co-ordinator Dave Grahame and
should not be charged as an
individual.
Sisset argued that the AMS
treasurer is responsible to the
More Boyd—page 8
BCUS
From Page One
. smaller   B.C.   colleges   feel
that UBC is trying to run
BCUS.
The resentment has come
from UBC's handling of the
provincial election. Many
representatives opposed Dell
Valair's candidacy in the
Rossland-Trail riding.
Other conflicts have been
created by various remarks
AMS President Fraser
Hodge made concerning
smaller B.C. colleges. Hodge
has caled them "little
league" as opposed to "big
league" U.B.C.
Perhaps the most bitter
conflict exists between
Hodge and University of
Victoria student president
Norman . Wright. The
46-year old Wright refuses
to attend any BCUS
conference held at U.B.C.
The conference has been
postponed indefinitely
pending the finding of a
"neutral site". Doyle will
represent UBC in future
conferences.
"I hope BCUS will
become a functional
reality," said Doyle.
"It would give B.C.
students a new solidarity
and would facilitate growth
of regional colleges in B.C.,"
he added.
means of course and faculty
evaluation; the establishment of a
commission to investigate the high
prices in the book store,
cafeterias, and parking; and the
publication of a weekly "council
newsletter" to promote council
policies apart from the
"constructive criticism" which is
expected from and delivered by
The Ubyssey."
resign:
Ryerson
of Consumers' Gas Company, has
denied the students' accusations.
"Not only were they given a
great deal of attention at board
meetings, but they also received
full co-operation in obtaining
information about the
operation—written and verbal," he
said.
UBC at present has no students
on its board of governors.
However, education minister
Donald Brothers has asked Alma
Mater Society president Fraser
Hodge to submit a list of four to
six people, including students, as
possible candidates for a vacant
seat on the board.
YOU ARE
We/come
TO BE OUR GUEST AT
A PREVIEW MEETING
of the
DALE CARNEGIE COURSE
SEC
• The amazing power of a trained memory
• How to quickly develop more poise and self-confidence
• How to get along even better with people
• How to communicate more effectively when speaking
to individuals, groups, using the telephone or writing
letters
BOTH MEN AND WOMEN INVITED
NO COST OR OBLIGATIONS
THURSDAY, SEPT. 25, 7:30 p.m.
HOLIDAY INN
1110 HOWE STREET
Presented by 'Thorfie' Thorfinnson
LEADERSHIP TRAINING INSTITUTE
535  W.   Georgia   St.
Phone   688-8277   (24   hours)
DALE  CARNEGIE
FOUNDER  (R)
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Alma  Mater Society
Committee Appointments
Students are needed for all types of committee work. The
Alma Mater Society is looking for any student interested
in contributing to his university—that should mean you.
Submit applications in writing to A.M.S. Secretary. Please
reply by Wednesday, September 24, 1969. The following
committees need members:
1. Men's Athletic Committee
2. Winter Sports Centre Committee
3. Traffic and Parking Committee
4. Bookstore Committee
5. Future Housing Committee
6. Elections Committee
7. Eligibility Committee
The position of Returning Officer is also open, and applications are being accepted in the same manner as for the
above committees.
Conference on Student Government
October 4, 5
SUB BALLROOM
All students are invited for the purpose of a serious,
thorough discussion on the nature and purpose of the student government at the University of B.C.
Presentations are invited on the following topics:
1. Voluntary unionism.
2. The role of students in negotiations with the
Senate, the Administration, various levels of government, and the general public.
3. The student government as a service organization.
4. The Students' Council as a federal government or
what?
5. The role and effect of Students' Council in academic reform.
Contact Tony Hodge or Mike Doyle, c/o A.M.S./Sub.
Secretarial assistance is available. Please reply by September 25.
Open House Committee Positions Vacant
The Open House Committee for 1970 requests applications
for the positions of:
Vice Chairman
Clubs Co-ordinator
Secretary
Special Events Co-ordinator
Guides Co-ordinator
Service Co-ordinator
High School Tour Co-ordinator
Written applications should be turned into the A.M.S.
General Office by Wednesday, September 24, at 4:30 p.m.
Please include interests in application in letter form. Tuesday, September 23, 1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Power transfer provided
by new GSA constitution
by fran mcgrath
The Graduate Student
Association has a new
constitution which greatly
decentralizes executive power.
"The main feature of the new
constitution is the transfer of
considerable power from the
graduate executive council to a
more representative graduate
representative assembly," said
exeutive member Peter Victor.
"The GRA will consist of
elected representatives from the
various graduate departments. The
GRA will be the policy
determining body while the GEC
will endeavor to execute this
policy after approving it."
The constitution was passed
Sept. 19 with 564 votes for, 36
against, with 10 ballots spoiled.
GSA vice president John
Dickenson, said the new
constitution was needed for two
reasons.
"Graduate students started
associations or unions in 25
departments last year," he said.
"A liason committee of all the
unions met four times last year to
discuss common problems. "This
was a very informal committee
and had no formal connection
with the GSA. Better definition of
the relationship between the
committee and the GSA was
necessary."
Dickensen said "The other
reason for the change came from
the GSA's desire for a permanent
bar in the planned $5,000,000
expansion of the grad students
centre.
This was possible if the GSA
conformed to the law by forming
a society under the societies act.
This was done, freeing the GEC
from the housekeeping and social
functions associated with running
the centre and turning them over
to a management committee.
"The new constitution frees
the GSA to follow more political
objectives," said Kickenson.
"These objectives are things such
as more involvement of graduate
students in departmental decision
making and upgrading teaching
assistant salaries to a common
cross campus standard."
"The changes will encourage
departmental unions and
coordinate them so they can
attack problems common to all
grad students," said GSA
president Art Smolensky.
as***
POTENTIAL RIOT in Buchanan was calmly avoided Monday when Mike Doyle
doused a voiolent, passionate mob with cold, cunning logic. The external-affairs officer
was called to active duty when the debate's topic—should the AMS be
voluntary?—caught the imagination of the campus. Realizing the importance of the
—david bowerman photos
debate, campus malcontents of every political hue turned out and chanted anti AMS
slogans. But Mike saved the day by reacting with reason instead of rhyme, mind in
place   of mace.
Voluntary AMS membership gets support
A crowd of 16 voted in favor
of voluntary Alma Mater Society
membership at the debating
society's first meeting of the year
Monday.
Debating society president
John Cherrington, proposed the
principle of freedom of
association.
"Students should be allowed to
decide on what they should or
should not support," he said.
"AMS membership should not be
compulsory."
AMS external affairs officer,
Mike Doyle, argued that voluntary
membership would not really
serve  the  students because of a
general lack of student awareness.
"Most American universities
are run by the administration with
voluntary student participation,
resulting in fraternities or other
small power groups in control"
said Doyle.
Debate chairman Greg Mason
as    he    looked   at    the    sparse
audience said: "The very fact
that there is standing room only
and the crowds outside are
waiting to get in indicates
something about voluntary
organizations."
Cherrington and members of
the audience criticized the AMS
for   running   a candidate  in  the
recent provincial election.
"Students should have the
right to suport the candidate of
their choice," said Cherrington.
"Why should the AMS have the
right to spend the student's
money on a political campaign?"
Cherrinton is also president of
the UBC Social Credit Club.
..a^^o-^^.0.*--****»»o***********-*-o-**************o************M>**a*****^^
PROF HAMMERS TREE CUTTIN G PRACTICES
by john twigg
Ubyssey Tree Reporter
B.C. should cut more trees and reject outmoded
forest practices, according to forestry prof. Dr. David
Haley.
"Forests in B.C. are too important to be managed
by outmoded policies," he said in an interview
Monday. "We shouldn't be looking just at the forest
land but at the total forest environment.
"The allowable annual cut should be set in
accordance with the future in mind."
Haley said the annual cut (amount of logged
timber) is governed by the outmoded Hanzlick
formula, used in B.C. for the past 40 years.
The formula says the allowable cut is equal to the
volume of the old growth divided by the rotation age
(time it takes for a forest to rejuvenate) plus the mean
annual increment of second growth stands.
The trouble with this formula, according to Haley,
is that the rotation age (on which the formula is
dependant) is 80 years on B.C.'s coast and 120 years in
the interior.
"It's nonsense to think in static terms. Who knows
what the demand for timber will be in 80 years?"
"The idea that a sustained yield should be
maintained is ridiculous, but it is ingrained dogma.
"The B.C. Forest Service operates on the premise
that every acre of land must be saved for lumber use in
perpetuity, but they appear reluctant to even consider
using forest land for recreation or other esthetic uses,"
he said.
Haley is uncertain of the future of wood products.
"I doubt if they will ever become dispensible, but
they are rapidly becoming less important/' he said.
"I don't think wood products will be used in
construction in the future, but I am almost sure there
will be extensive use of wood fibres, especially in pulp
and paper."
We should take advantage of the old growth that
stands now and sell our lumber while the market is
good, according to Haley. The second growth that
replaces the old growth will be useful in the near future
as pulp and paper.
"You can have continuous forestation without the
sustained yield formula," he said, "The main thing is
maintaining the land once the timber has been
harvested.
"Should we pass on a stand of wood or should we
sell that stand and pass on schools and such built with
the profits from the timber?
"The days of timber use are limited, the strength
of our forest industry lies in cellulose and reconstituted
wood. The size of the tree is not as important as the
bulk."
"Eighty years rotation is too long to wait, so much
could change in that time," he said.
"I have a feeling that changing the allowable cut
would lead to a more rapid growth of the forest
industry."
Haley also slammed what he called the "quantity
emphasis" in B.C. forestry.
"The province has a great deal of public control on
the   amount   of  timber   cut   each   year,   but it has
practically none over the quality of the cut, he said.
"We seem to subjugate esthetic values to the
physical volume, whether it be more or less than the
allowable cut designed to maintain the sustained yield.
"Timber companies are required by law to control
the amount of lumber they cut, but there are no
controls on the way they make the cut."
Haley admitted the recent case of the Squamish
Highway washout could be an example of this, but said
he wan't familiar with the situation.
"It looks like someone cut timber up in the
mountains and the runoff caused a flood. It is quite
possible the company stayed within the allowable cut,
but neglected quality."
The trouble with the forest management officials
now is they don't know enough of the other possible
used of forests, so they fall back on sustained yield,
Haley said.
"These other uses include wildlife reserves,
recreation and watersheds—esthetic uses in other
words."
Haley said an extensive cutting of B.C.'s forests,
provided it is done with the result in mind, would not
destroy the forest.
Haley specializes in Forest Economics and Forest
Environmental Management. The latter course, Haley's
own idea, will be offered this spring.
"The course is mainly traditional forestry versus
other forest uses. We study pulp mill pollution and
recreation uses in discussion groups," he said. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 23, 1969
THEUBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by the
Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university
administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey
subcribes to the press services of Pacific Student Press, of which it is a
founding member. Ubyssey News Service supports one foreign
correspondent in Pango-Pango. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. City editor, 228-2305; editor,
228-2301; Page Friday, 228-2309; sports 228-2308; advertising,
228-3977.
SEPTEMBER 23,1969
Suppression
"Brothers visits UBC, makes no promises, no
commitments," read the headline on Friday's story.
From there, we read on about how B.C. education
minister Donald Brothers went slumming last Thursday,
mixing with the bureaucrats, the politicos and the
sycophants who generally cluster around such worthies
wherever they go.
The absurd surreality of the visit intensified the
more we read. First Brothers told Ubyssey city editor
Nate Smith that during 90 minutes he and Alma Mater
Society president Fraser Hodge "discussed no particular
topics and reached no conculsions." If this was what in
fact took place, we can only assume that each of these
men has little else to do but pass the time of day with
the other, in which case they are probably both
overpaid.
Next, Brothers—obviously feeling unusually
magnanimous—invited Hodge to submit a list of
candidates for the vacancy on the board of governors.
Perhaps the good minister would have us believe one of
these will actually be chosen for the post. More likely,
we think, this exercise will fill the role of giving Hodge
something to do—which, judging by the record of
Hodge's council, he sorely needs.
But these inanities pale before the final arrogant
pontification from Brothers—the announcement that
the education department will do what it damn well
pleases with the Perry Commission report on
post-secondary education, and to hell with whether or
not the public is interested in its contents.
To add to all this, Dr. G. Neil Perry, head of the
commission and author of the report, accompanied
Brothers around campus and would only grin when
asked what was in it.
As in all situations where a government refuses to
release what should be public information, we can only
assume that the report contains information that would
be injurious to that government's image—in this case,
that of UBC as a tranquil place where bright young boys
and girls go to prepare themselves for life in the great
society outside.
We might assume that it says something about the
critical space shortage at UBC, or the suppression of
faculty and student freedom at Simon Fraser University,
or the widespread public dissatisfaction with the way
our universities are run, or the tenure systems that keep
incompetent profs on the payroll, or the research being
done at this campus for specifically private, imperialist
interests such as Kaiser Coal.
We might assume the report says something about
these things. Actually, we're not too sure it does.
We kind of suspect it contains only a few
mewlings about space and the paucity of Socred
education grants. Even this would be enough for
Brothers to keep the report suppressed—but it wouldn't
come to grips with the fundamental issues surrounding
UBC.
That's why we think the report should be made
public—all the more so if it includes the items listed
above.
If it doesn't include them, it should be released
anyway—and Perry, as deputy education minister,
should be held accountable for a job execrably done.—P.K.
the UAyssey
AS USELESS AS .
LETTERS TO THE  EDITOR
Pre verts
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I would like to express my
disapproval of your profanity in
the Sept. 19th issue of The
Ubyssey. Your use of symbolism
on the front page: "A sandwich
can be symbolic"—"Eight inches
of good Canadian meat is more
than any chick should eat" is, I
suppose, left to students with
dirty minds to appreciate in all its
subtleties. The indirectness gives
you the freedom to insult the
students' intellect.
However, the article on pf two
of Page Friday: "Bouncing Beaver
in Blaine "is a direct insult to UBC
students. Roon wrote, "The other
group consists of guys who want
to make their girl friends horny
and the girls they want to lay."
Not only does he make the general
subject "sex" an ugly thing, but
his English is that of an
uneducated pervert.
Your paper seems to have
started with the poorest grade of
journalism — as it left off with last
year as well. Either these pieces
are written by sexual perverts, or
people who thrive on synthetic
sexual experience.
I realize your reporters may
find it difficult to create news or
subjects of interest, but why not
find something other than sex to
drag into the muck
DANIEL E. MEAKES
Arts 2
We pride ourselves on being the
best      goddam      perverts      on
campus.—Ed.
AMS jollies
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
. Carey Linde is a law student
and he used to be on the AMS
council last year but quit. Here I
wish to comment on the article
"AMS Takes the Easy Way Out"
in last Friday's (September 19)
Ubyssey in which Linde concerns
himself with the present AMS. In
a nutshell he says it is
incompetent, dishonest,
composed of mental midgets and,
of course, bureaucratic-the pet
word of the social misfit. As a law
student he should be aware of the
consequence of making degrading
and unjustifiable statements about
individuals and count himself
lucky that he is within the
protective walls of the university.
If one were looking for a
corrupt AMS we need only cast
our minds back to last year and
remember the scandals such as the
library card fiasco, and later, the
resignation of many council
members who now harass the
present council, and in my
opinion "Took the Easy Way
Out".
BRYAN SANCTUARY, UC
grad studies
Science gripe
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
As organizers of the science
student-faculty coffee party held
on Thursday, September 18, we
must take strong objection to the
subsequent article in The
Ubyssey.
Despite the semtiments of your
reporter and considering several
conflicts with other activities
sponsored by the faculty, as well
as the very nature of the event, we
feel that a turnout of 30 students
is far from poor.
We measure success, not by
numbers, but rather by the
accomplishments of:
1) providing   an   oportunity
for students to meet informally
with faculty members in a greatly
reduced ratio.
2) providing an opportunity
for students to speak to members
of existing departmental clubs,
and to become involved.
3) establishing departmental
clubs in those fields where clubs
did not previously exist.
We feel that the
misrepresentation of the article is
a gross example of the negativism
of your newspaper.
DAVID J. KOOP,
Science UJS.
FRED BUCKWOLD,
AMS rep.,
Science UJS.
Editor: Michael Finlay
News Paul Knox
City  Nate Smith
Photo  Bruce Stout
Wire Irene Wasilewski
Sports  ....'.' Jim Maddin
Associate Peter Ladner
Senior    John Twigg
Ass't City     John Gibbs
Managing Bruce Curtis
Page Friday .. * .' Fred Cawsey
r   Norbert Ruebsaat
A skeleton crew staggered into the
office, having more or less recovered
from Saturday's bash.
The city editor slinked in and was
immediately reminded that he had
perpetrated the greatest animal act in
history. Jim Davies quoted his.
drunken ravings at length, while Brian
McWatters declared: "I helped you
down the stairs, I deserve a byline."
Ginny Gait said something about the
Boo Brothers
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
One of the most rewarding
aspects of a university education
can be the experience of coming
to know students of varying
cultural and national*
backgrounds. If foreign student
enrollment were restricted as you
quote education mininster Donald
Brothers as advocating (Sept. 19),
B.C. students would be those
most damaged by that restriction.
J. McREE ELROD
Chairman,
Social Action
Commission
North Shore
Unitarian Church
Bleah!
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
It has been said that the
optimist sees the glass as half-full
of water, and the pessimist sees it
as half-empty. Thusly, in order
not to offend either of these
illustrious positions, we will
describe the Buchanan lounge
glasses of coke as either half-full
of water or half-empty of coke.
For those who prefer something
more than simply fizzy water,
may we suggest to food services
that they fill the cups only
half-way with pure coke.
This would make it not only
more palatable for those who
prefer a stronger brew, but, I
think people, in general, would
rather pay 10 cents for a nickel's
worth of honest coke than to be
subtly cheated and drink murky
water. ■
JULIAN AND WANISSA
city ed attempting to drive home,
turning Larch Street into a stunt
driviing course.
John Andersen said he had never
seen anything as funny as Smith's rush
to the can. When asked for comment,
the city editor said: "For the first time
in living memory Gibbs stayed sober,
somebody had to uphold the tradition,
tradition.
Those who missed the debauch,
included Colleen Hammond, Robin
Burgess, Urve Torva, Fran McGrath,
Kathy Zahar, Dave Keillor, Leslie
Minot, and Christine Krawczyk and
Jennifer Jordan.
The sports types, of course, were In
training Saturday night, so Tony
Gallagher, Steve Mallard, Kelvin
Beckett and Bob Weidman also missed
the show.
Richard Sullivan, Dick Button, Dirk
Visser and Dave Inns couldnt
understand what all the fuss was about,
since worse horrors are a normal
occurrence in the darkroom.
Editors and senior staffers are asked
to report to the office today at noon
to pose for press card mug shots. Tuesday, September 23; 1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
BOY MEETS GIRL co-author Bella Spewack arrives at play opening
Friday night.
30's play smash hit
by pat moan
Boy meets girl, boy loses girl, boy gets girl.
"To    this   plot   add   a   little   satire,   a   lot   of   laughs,   a
salt-of-of-the-earth Cinderella and you have Sam and Bella Spewack's
1935 comedy now playing at the Freddy Wood.
Boy meets Girl opened Friday night in glittering, gaudy
Hollywood style. The "stars" and "who's who" arrived in vintage
limousines to screaming crowds. They paraded down the canopied
walkway in period garb.
The funny thing is, with long coats, rimless specs and high-heeled
shoes back in vogue, the legitimate theatre-goers were indistinguishable
from the planted 30s crowd.
However, there was one very real 1930s gal present in the form of
co-author Bella Spewack—a charming babe who's been through the
original thing, way back when.
She and hubby Sam (who didn't make the show) teamed up to
poke fun at Phoney Hollywood in Boy Meets Girl. But' "you can't give
people a straight satire, it dies Saturday night," says Bella. "But give
them a little syrup and they'll take anything."
So Sam lays the foundation and she adds the sugar. And it's the
sentiment (not overdone, and with humour) that makes the play good
34 years later.
The social comment is a present-day force, Hollywood sham is
irrelevant. But heroine Susie is vital flesh and blood. Pregnant,
pigeon-toed, unwed-and matter-of-fact. You laugh with her, not at her.
She is truly innocent and falls into the clutches of Hollywood
when she faints (from her "condition") in the office of a producer
while bringing in lunch.
Hack writers Benson and Law (John Sparks and Edward Stidder)
never miss an angle. They are looking for a variation of their
boy-meets-girl theme ... and it is dropped in their laps.
A new hero is born (literally and figuratively)-Susie's baby Happy.
He is Happy—the comedy, Happy—the tragedy, Happy—the emperor of
emotions. He is coming,flash the previews. (And he does.)
Susie becomes the "Mary Magdalene of the foreign legion," but
none of it goes to her head, because she doesn't really believe it.
She is not dumb. As she says, "Oh, I'm intelligent—I just don't
know anything." Actress Anni Scarfe does a swell job on Susie.
The rest of the group is on the satire side. C. Elliot Friday as the
boss is a Mr. Mooney type who knows everything about nothing. (Peter
Variety offered
at CBC festival
by michael quigley
The CBC has been recently presenting a Festival of Music at the
Queen Elizabeth Playhouse. Though all the free tickets for the seven
concerts were given out a week and a half ago, the chances are still good
that you can get in because some ticket holders tend not to show up. If
you arrive at the Playhouse by at least 7:30 and wait patiently, you
may be rewarded. The doors are opened to non-ticket holders at 7:50
each evening.
Remaining concerts in the festival are tonight (Vancouver
Chamber Singers and the CBC Vancouver Chamber Orchestra).
Thursday (Music for Wind Ensemble and the premiere of a
contemporary chamber work, The Pines of Emily Carr), Saturday (The
Victoria Trio and the Chamber Orchestra performing Canadian works)
and next Tuesday (The Collectors).
Last Saturday night a capacity crowd filled the Playhouse to hear
a two-part concert later to be broadcast on the CBC AM and FM
network like the other festival events.
The first half of the program was taken up by Ian McDougall's
Big Band, giving the premiere of McDougall's Vancouver Suite, a jazz
tone-poem about the city, interesting in both composition and
arrangement.
The section on English Bay had a Girl From Ipanema bossa nova
beat, Stanley Park had ducks (saxophones) honking, Fourth and
Arbutus was a combination of psychedelic Village Bistro rumblings and
Chicago big band rock, there was a sleazy trumpet solo in Carrall,
Cordova, and Hastings, and in Oak Street, Four-Thirty, the tempo kept
speeding up and slowing to a dead stop.
The second half of the concert was an hour-long performance by
French-Canadian chansonnier Gilles Vigneault, a truly phenomenal
entertainer.
Vigneault is a poet as well as composer, whose songs echo the
rural life of Quebec both past and present, songs filled with life and
soul, songs like those which say "mon pays, ce n'est pas un pays, c'est
l'hiver."
Backed by a five piece group in tasteful arrangements by his
pianist Gaston Rochon, Vignaeault warmed up the Vancouver audience
so that by the end of the concert they were singing along with him (in
French) and enthusiastically shouting for more and more.
There was no need for translations of Vigneault's songs aside
from the introductions in English which he gave. It was as Ihe said: "I
will sing in my language and you will understand in yours."
Jaenicke's voice was a little thin. Opening night tension?)
Peter Brockington plays the beautifully archetypal agent. He is
simpering, slick and probably has perfumed breath. ("He's a pale
anemic louse." says Law ... "He's a businessman.") He makes your
skin crawl.
The plot thickens as the weak-bladdered has-been cowboy star
decides to marry Susie for Happy (for money). "Ah'm mighty fond of
you and Happy" (he hates Happy-"a baby alius steals the show').
"Mighty fond,"  he declares.
"Ah'm gonna make you mah leadin' lady for life."
There are some complex plot contortions here, but all ends well.
(Bella's sentimentality here.)
And the dish ran away with the spoon-Susie runs off to Europe
with an actor who can't act, but turns out to be an English lord.
Boy meets girl, boy loses girl, boy gets girl. A surefire plot.
It is an old-fashioned play carried off with a lot of 1960s pizazz,
thanks to director Donald Soule.
The use of Laurel and Hardy type flicks makes a lively relief from
the static stage set and somewhat contrived action.
All in all it's a happy show-a nice change from modern theatre
which is so often black, black, black.
Seeds steal
first show
at Colonial
by mark Jacques
The Colonial Music Hall is
again alive and well. It re-opened
last Friday night to a good-sized
audience which included
prominent socialites such as
Vancouver City Licence Inspector
Milt Harrell.
Spring was on hand with their
usual high quality material, two
features of which were some
electronic generations and a good
solo by their new drummer, Cat
Hendrikse.
Also at the re-opening was
High Flying Bird, a local heavy
blues group. None of their
intrumentalists were exceptional,
but all together with their lead
singer's vibratoish voice, they had
a nice full sound. The patter
between songs wasn't very
interesting, however.
The Bird was best when they
weren't trying to be technically
impressive. In one number the
drummer was trying so hard to
keep the five-four beat that there
was very little variety in his
presentation.
The group which stole the
evening's show was The Seeds of
Time. Their first set was fairly
good, but the second found lead
singer Geoff Eddinton in a hostile
mood.
During their version of Back
Door Man he stripped off his
jacket and shirt and came down to
on the iloor where, like a
magician, he commanded the
crowd to stand up, dance, clap
their hands., and sit down. It was a
rare example of a band getting the
audience really involved instead of
having them sit placidly on the
floor.
The way the group held
together in this long number was
really incredible, as was
Eddington's vocal. Closing the set
was Muskrat Rumble, with John
Hall pounding away on the
out-of-tune barrelhouse piano.
Starting this Thursday night
for four days at the Music Hall are
the Deviants from England, who
were to play at Hyde Park gig in
London with The Airplane and
The Dead Sunday before they left
for Vancouver.
IS
ALMOST
AS SPICY AS
ONE OF
LINDY'S
CORNED
BEEF
SANDWICHES
3211  W.  BROADWAY Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 23, 1969
Ontario University presidents
release anti-violence paper
Administration policy towards
Ontario student unrest may
change drastically if a game plan
released Thursday is implemented.
The document, drafted by the
Committee of Presidents of
Universities of Ontario, was
suggested "as a working paper for
the development on each campus
of an appropriate statement of
policy regarding the handling of
incidents of violence or the
obstruction of the universities'
processes."
The document outlines two
forms of "illegitimate
disturbances" which effectively
cover almost all forms of protest
outside of verbal protestation and
orderly picketing—and it is
impossible to be certain even of
these.
Under the general headings of
disturbances "which obstruct the
normal processes by which the
university carries out its academic
functions     and     those    which,
whatever their other
characteristics, invoke violence or
the threat of violence," the paper
lists five categories of
"unacceptable" offences:
* violence against any
member or guest of the university
community;
* deliberate interference
with academic freedom and
freedom of speech (including not
only disruptions of a class but also
interference with the freedom of
any speaker properly invited by
any section of the university
community to express his views);
* theft or wilful destruction
of university property or of the
property of members of the
university;
* forcible interference with
the freedom of movement of any
member or guest of the university;
* and, in general,
obsturction of the normal
processes and activities essential
to the functions of the university
av OLD UBC PREZ
Disciplinary measures
start seen in report
TORONTO (CUP)-A
suggested containment policy for
campus unrest unveiled Thursday
will probably be used "as the
starting point for formulation of a
new disciplinary procedures,"
according to the vice-chairman of
the group which drafted it.
John B. MacDonald, former
president of UBC and now
vice-chairman of the Committee
of Presidents of Universities of
Ontario, said Friday that a
working paper released by his
organization "will be looked at on
each campus.
"Each university is free to
accept the report, implement it,
modify it or ignore it," he said.
The working paper, if adopted
wholesale, could provide harsh
punitive measures for nearly every
form of non-verbal dissent except
orderly picketing.
MacDonald said the members
of the committee who drafted the
working paper left some terms in
it indefined—crucial ones, such as
"obstruction of the normal
processes   and   activities   of  the
university," which leaves the
working paper extremely vague in
defining permissible and
non-permissible dissent.
"I imagine each presidential
commission will be free to arrive
at its own definition," he said,
"bearing in mind the particular
circumstances at each university."
University of Toronto
administration president Claude
Bissell termed the report "a
helpful document, one of several
statements that will be used to
determine  our Toronto policy."
"I am sure it will also be given
close scrutiny by students,
councils, and the graduate student
union."
But the working paper
reportedly contradicts the
recommendations of Bissell's own
committee on discipline, which
information leaks have revealed
will sugest a more tolerant
attitude toward most campus
disorders.
Bissell's committee was
appointed last summer."
Celebrating ...
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community.
Universities, the paper states,
are "not prepared to tolerate" any
dissent or demonstration judged
to be in these areas.
"The university therefore will
consider all of the activities listed
above as cause for immediate
suspension," it states.
The document, however, does
not attempt to define those
actions which could be considered
either "violent," or "an
interference with freedom of
speech or academic freedom."
Nor does it define the "normal
processes and activities essential
to the functions of a university
community."
The Committee of Presidents of
Universities of Ontario consists of
the presidents of the 14
provincially assisted universities in
the province, as well as an
academic colleague from each.
Opportunity for
WOMEN STUDENTS
with a minimum typing
speed of 35 wpm.
An Employment Counsellor
from
OFFICE ASSISTANCE
VANCOUVER LIMITED
will be in the University
STUDENT PLACEMENT OFFICE
Monday to Friday
9:00 a.m.   to 5:00 p.m.
September 22 to 26
to tell you about
FREE   TRAINING   COURSE   of   5
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PANGO PANGO (UNS)-The
island hospital was full Monday
after the annual mid-September
June juice festival Saturday.
SCROOGE
SAY:
HEAVEN IS
MONEY
ATTHE
COMMERCE
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but do you use
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* Wouldn't use
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THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
Shed a tear for dean of women
Helen McCrae.
Mrs. McCrae was quite
concerned about the
AMS-distributed birth control
handbook and wanted to organize
a seminar for impressionable
freshettes to explain that birth
control does not mean a chick has
to sleep with every guy that
comes along. (Why the hell not?)
She approached a campus
women's club to organize the
seminar. She received a polite
"no" and now denies ever
conceiving (sorry about that
Helen) the idea.
ZAP
Question of the week: what is
in the Perry Commission's report
on higher education that has
offended the Socred government?
The much-touted report was
finished months ago but education
minister Donald Brothers said last
week he hasn't decided when to
officially present it. Brothers said
the report may not be made
public when it is finally presented.
If Perry gave the Bennett boys
the expected pat on the back, the
report would probably have been
released by now.
Could there be a little editing
going on?
Last year's AMS president
Dave Zirnhelt may not have
received many votes as a
provincial Liberal candidate in
Cariboo, but he won over the 100
Mile House Free Press.
The front page of the paper's
July 23 edition referred to
Zirnhelt as a former UBC
president (take that Walter Gage),
and "an eager and capable young
man, but not one prone to be
carried away by the spirit of
radicalism".
"Mr. Zirnhelt succeeded in
controlling the radical faction and
retaining good order on the
campus," said the Free Press.
Meanwhile, the Province was
busily quoting Liberal leader Pat
McGeer's glowing praise for
Zirnhelt.
In a speech at Quesnel, McGeer
said Zirnhelt had been "crowned a
student leader.' Please Pat, some
AMS   types   already   believe   in
Clubs do their thing
at annual Clubs Day
The animal act is on again.
Thursday, every club from the
flat earth society to Aunt Sarah's
knitting circle will take part in the
annual clubs day.
Henry Ellis, organizer of clubs
day, said up to 50 clubs will
participate in displaying their
activities and enlisting new
members.
All of SUB will be taken up by
the event with displays set up on
both floors.
An attempt will be made this
year to ease the congestion by
introducing cross-aisles and having
displays set up on both floors,
including the ballroom.
The purpose of clubs day said
Ellis, is "to solve the
communications problem faced
by many clubs."
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ZAP
divine
them.
right,    don't    encourage
Has anyone noticed the
fourth-year home ec text "How to
Increase Profits with Portion
Control"? The bookstore is selling
it. Food services matron Ruth
Blair has probably memorized it.
Flattery department: The
Ubyssey last week received a copy
of a brief in which the Peace
Action League protested nuclear
testing in the Aleutians.
The brief was accompanied by
a letter askingfhe Ubyssey toUse
its "influence with the U.S.
government" to stop the testing.
When are CYVR UBC radio
deejays going to stop trying to be
junior league Terry David
Mulligans.The sounds in SUB
sound like the best of CHQM and
the worst of CKLG.
Where are they now dept? Les
Horswill, defeated in last year's
election for AMS president, is in
Ottawa working as a personal
assistant to Tory leader Robert
Stanfield.
Former arts dean Dennis Healy
is acting president of Toronto's
York University.
Where is AMS treasurer Chuck
Campbell's budget?
He said a week ago that the
budget would be presented within
the week, but a few things had
come up and it might be a little
late.
He didn't specify what those
"things" were, but is one of them
a case in student court
Incidentally, Campbell kept his
nose   out   of Monday's  student
court meeting.
ZAP
Recent visitor to The Ubyssey
office was millionaire socialist and
former Ubyssey staffer Pierre
Berton. When introduced to
editor Mike Finlay, Berton said:
"I see things haven't changed
much who are you fighting now?"
SAVE UP TO $125 FOR $1.75!
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BOOK STORE
HE & SHE CLOTHING
UBC STUDENT REP.-JOHN KEATING-Res. YU 8-5144
WANTED:
People and Ideas
All STUDENTS or FACULTY interested in participating
in a WORKING Committee, please come to:
ROOM 125 SUB
TUESDAY, SEPT. 23, 12:30
Help Organize . . .
TREK
WEEK
(October 19-25)
WHAT  IS IT:
(1) An  alternative  to  Homecoming
(2) A week of involvement in the University and Community
(3) fund   raising  events  for  charities
(4) a  promotion   of  the*  University  and   its   students
WHAT HAS TO BE DONE:
(1) Co-ordinate existing events (T-cup, Teach-ins, Alumni  Reunion  Days)
(2) Work  with   Faculty,  Clubs  and  Alumni  organizations  to   plan   new
events
(3) Organize  a  TREK  back to Vancouver
(4) Organize   seminars,   speakers,   etc.
(5) Finalize  a  complete   P.R.   program
THIS   IS   AN   INDEPENDENT   COMMITTEE   OF   AND   FOR   U.B.C. Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 23, 1969
v*» **•»*. «• -
'•C-'i-^ **' .•',*»
-£.!•■■>■■;. ■ *■*■-.
^*KiTrt **-**v*-* **" • -***■
. *-'V>\**»
^rZi?.--..^-*.**^.**,
ACADIA GRAD HUTS ... on way out, eventually.
—dave evans photo
Residence huts on way out
but not until towers built
UBC's army huts are slated for
destruction—but it will be several
years before the first tar paper is
peeled off the rotting planks.
The huts were puchased as;
"temporary accommodation" in
1944 and have been used for
residences under the names
Acadia, Westbrook and Fort
Camp ever since.
Since they are only temporary,
the shacks will be torn down as
soon as replacements" are built.
Which may take a while.
The        first of       three
complexes —the Wireless—is
already  at  least   a year  behind
schedule.
Construction on the three
17-story hi-rise towers was to
begin last June but has been
postponed until at least 1970,
because of the lack of federal
money.
The residence—expected to
take 18 months to be built—will
house 1,300 single students on the
land now occupied by the traffic
office.
Once the Wireless is completed,
work is scheduled to begin on
Acadia Park, an apartment
complex for 300 married
students.
The buildings will replace the
huts behind the recently
completed Acadia hi-rise in the
South-East reaches of the campus.
The huts now house male grad
students who walk a mile for theirl
meals    because    there    are    no;
cooking facilities in the shacks.
Fort Camp's replacement is
slated for construction sometime
after 1973. But it will probably be
quite a while after because it must
follow the other complexes that
are behind schedule.
The new Fort Camp will
accommodate some 1,500 single
students on a site behind the
present huts overlooking Burrard
Inlet.
Boyd cont from page 2
student council for his actions but
can create a "rule niesi" which,
although temporarily binding, has
to be put before council before a
permanent ruling is to be made.
Callaghan contended that
council could hire people but the
people would be subjected to the
power of the treasurer if this
continues.
"The power of the treasurer to
fire people hired by the students
council is much more than having
the power to look after day to
day business. This is too much
power for the treasurer to have,"
said Callaghan.
The counsel for the defense
closed his remarks by saying that
nowhere in the constitution is the
students council named as the
only authority able to fire staff.
Campbell did not appear at the
session.
SUB FILMS PRESENTS
THOMAS CROWN
AFFAIR
with STEVE McQUEEN
and BONNIE PARKER (nee Dunaway)
September 26 - 28
SUB 75c
Fri.: 12:30 - 3:30 - 7:00 - 9:30
Sat.: 7:00 - 9:30   -   Sun.: 6:30
CHINESE OVERSEAS STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING
Saturday, Sept. 27, 7969
8:00 p.m.
at INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
MOONCAKES AND MOVIES FOLLOW ELECTION
The University of British Columbia
READING AND STUDY
SKILLS PROGRAMS
READING IMPROVEMENT COURSE
The U.B C. Reading Improvement course offers individualized programs for
senior high school students, university and college students, and others
who wish to improve their reading and study skills for educational, business,  professional  and  personal  reasons.
Coursework emphasizes: increase in reading speed and comprehension —
previewing, skimming and scanning — study habits and skills — critical
reading skills — flexibility of reading rate — reading skills In subject
matter, professional,  academic and  special interest areas.
Classes begin the week of October 6 and meet for 3 hours once weiekly
for 7 weeks in  East Mall    Annex, Room No.  119.  (Next to Brock Hall.)
FEES:
Students $30.00    (Senion   high   school   students,   college  and   university
students taking  9 units or more.)
Others      $60.00    (Part   time   adult   students   and   non-student   adults.)
Fees include testing, materials, counselling, use of reading laboratory
during current and future sessions.
FALL SESSION SCHEDULE:
Section I — Mon.-Thurs.
Section 2 — Mondays
Section 3—Wednesdays
Section 4 — Thursdays
Section 5 — Mondays
Section 6 — Tuesdays
Section 7 -— Wednesdays
Section 8 — Thursdays
Section 9 — Saturdays
Section 10 —Saturdays
3:30- 5:00  pm.—begins  Oct. 6 (Students)
7:00-   10:00  p.m.—begins  Oct. 6  (Students)
7:00-10:00 p.m.—begins Oct. 8 (Others)
7:00-10:00 p.m.—begins Oct. 9 (Others)
7:00-10:00 p.m.—begins Oct. 6 (Others)
7:00-10:00 p.m.—begins Oct. 7 (Students)
7:00-10:00 p.m.—begins Oct. 8 (Students)
7.00-10:00 p.m.—begins  Oct. 9 (Students)
9:00  am.-12:00—begins Oct. 11 (Others)
9:00 a.m.—12:00 begins Oct. 11 (Others)
For further information please contact Reading and Study Skills Program
Education Extension, Extension Department, University of B.C. (1228-2181
local 16).
WRITING IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM
Improve your essay writing . .. This course is designed for those who
wish to improve the quality of their essay writing. The course consists of
brief lectures, seminar-discussions, writing exercises, practice in organizing
and writing essays on- both literary and non-literary topics, and counselling on problems with suggestions for technique changes. The instructor
discusses with groups and individuals the strength and weaknesses of
essays written by class members.
Classes begin the weeks of October 6 and meet for 3 hours once weekly
for 7 weeks in Room No. 3218, Buchanan Building, U.B.C. Campus. (Parking
in S.U.B* lot.)
FEES:
Students* $30.00    (Senior   high   school,   college   and   university   taking
9 units or more.)
Others     $60.00    (Part-time  Adult  students,   non-student  Adults.)
No other costs.
FALL SCHEDULE:
Section   1  — Mondays 7-10  p.m. —  begins October 6.
Section 2 — Wednesdays 7-10 p.m. — begins October 8.
(Possibility of additional sections being opened during the day and on
Saturday  morning,  depending  on  interest.)
Instructor:  Miss  Lolita   Rodman,  U.B.C.   English   Department   member.
REGISTRATION  FORM
Name of Course      Fee enclosed-.
Section (list two or three preferences)
Name (Miss, Mrs.  Mr.)  	
Address       Phone 	
Occupation  Employer  — Phone-—
Student..
. Institution  Year
Please make cheques payable to the University of B.C. and forward with
this form to Education Extension, Extension Department, Vancouver 8, BC.
(228-2181). Tuesday, September 23, 1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page
BCSSC undermines SUB caf
refreshment booth to open
by shane mccune
The Black Cross Student
Service Committee is trying to
undermine the high-priced SUB
cafeteria.
A spokesman for the
newly-formed committee said
Monday the administration uses
profits from the cafeteria to cover
other expenses.
The Black Cross advocates
replacing the present cafeteria
with a student co-op operating
five days a week. Proposed prices
would    include    15    cents    for
sandwiches, five cents for three
cookies, and possibly five-cent
coffee.
A staff of about 20 student
volunteers would be required to
prepare and sell the food. Once
the co-op became well-established,
the number of workers could
increase to 100. Profits would be
used to pay wages and assist the
Georgia Straight, the spokesman
said.
The committee will be
operating a refreshment booth in
the SUB courtyard on Clubs Day,
this Thursday.
The food service may be the
first of several student co-ops to
replace existing ancillary services,
said the spokesman, who wished
to remain unidentified.
Black Cross hopes to open
booths outside Buchanan building
and SUB within a week.
A leaflet describing the Black
Cross Student service committee
is to be published shortly.
A usually unreliable source said
"Anyone interested in helping
Black Cross should call
224-3035."
McGill principal Robertson
resigns in unexpected move
MONTREAL (CUP)-H. Rocke
Robertson, principal and
vice-chancellor of McGill
University for the past seven
years—the latest three stormy
ones—announced Thursday he
would retire from his positions
some time in 1970.
He gave no reason for his
decision, except to say: "It is very
bad to have someone in this type
of position for very long."
The 57-year-old surgeon's
announcement came as an
apparent surprise to the campus;
he had nine more years to go until
he reached official retirement age.
"The Rock" achieved a certain
degree of notoriety in some
student circles at McGill during
his tenure, beginning in 1966
when he called police onto the
campus. The police brutally
dislodged a group of students
occupying the principaal's office
protesting Robertson's
interference in the McGill Daily
after the Daily reprinted an
allegedly "obscene" article.
From that point on, Robertson
was frequently embroiled in
controversy as student unrest at
McGill increased, and as the
English language university more
and more came to resemble an
English island in an increasingly
restive French sea.
The tension reached a high
point at the end of the 1968-69
school term, when thousands of
demonstrators marched on the
university in Operation McGill,
demanding it become a
French-language institution.
At the same time, Robertson
was paired off in a struggle with
political science instructor Stan
Grey, who was fired by the
administration for his part in
disrupting a meeting of the McGill
board of governors.
The situation at McGill is
potentially no less tense this year,
and may have been a major factor
in Robertson's retirement.
However, other reasons, such as ill
health, have been cited as reasons
for his leavetaking.
A 10-man committee which
includes two students will begin
meeting in the immediate future
to begin discussions on
Robertson's successor, although
the final choice will be up to the
McGill board of governors.
There are no students on the
board.
AMS changes its mind, calls
for senate elections in Oct.
The Alma Mater Society has
changed its mind about the senate
elections.
Council decided at the Sept. 16
meeting that instead of having five
of the senators elected now and
six elected in the spring all of the
eleven senators will be elected this
October.
"Rather than going the year
with only half of the student
senators it would be worth the
extra hassle to elect the senators
now," vice-president Tony Hodge
told The Ubyssey.
"Too many important issues at
which  student  representation  is
required are coming up for the
elections to be postponed because
of bureaucratic difficulties,"
Hodge said.
Eleven senators are to be
elected, five by campus-wide
elections and one each by each of
the following constituencies:
applied science, arts, commerce
and law, grad studies, education
and science.
The senators elected by the
applied science, arts and grad
studies constituencies will hold
office for a one year term while
those elected by the commerce
and law, education, and science
constituencies will hold office
until spring of 1972.
Of the five senators elected by
campus-wide vote the two
receiving the highest number of
votes will hold office until the fall
of 1971. The remaining three will
hold office until the spring of
1971.
Senators-at-large will be
elected Oct. 15. Nominations will
be open from 9 a.m. Oct. 1 to
noon Oct. 9.
Constituency senators will be
elected Oct. 22. Nominations will
open Oct. 8 and close Oct. 16.
Nomination forms are available
at the AMS general office.
WIN!   WIN! WIN!
CYVR-UBC RADIO WILL PAY SOMEONE $457
JUST FOR JOINING THE BILLBOARD CLUB
Draw will be made at 4:00 p.m., Friday, Sept. 26
Membership in this Club also entitles you to reduced admission
to some Campus events.
TICKETS ARE 50c ACROSS FROM THE INFORMATION DESK
AND IN ROOM 235 IN SUB.
MUST VACATE
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• .DOUBLE your reading rate
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■Vexf class 7:00 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 14
in Buchanan 2225
INQUIRE ABOUT OUR SPECIAL STUDENT RATES!
Legend Reading
3/1678 WEST BROADWAY
738-9719 Page   10
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 23, 1969
 •***-
SPOR TS
Football Thunderbirds gain
experience, but nothing else
-     » *     H
"Vt \ i   *>i3l$M
HAPPINESS IS PASSING
YOUR GRADES . . .
Legend  Reading
3-1678 W. Broadway
738-9719
TUESDAY,   SEPTEMBER   23   —   35c
Aqua  Soc. presents:
• WORLD  WITHOUT  SUN
• OCTOPUS HUNT
• ON THE ROCKS
Continuous Showings  12:30-9:30
SUB THEATRE
FLOWERS
"Originality in Flowers
For All Occasions"
20% OFF CORSAGES
ORDER   EARLY
Phone 736-7344
2197 West Broadway
NEW YORK
COSTUME SALON
RENTALS
WHITE DINNER JACKETS
TUXEDOS,  DARK  SUITS,  TAILS
COLORED  JACKETS
SPECIAL   STUDENT  RATES
224-0034     4397 W. 10th
STUDENT COUNCIL COMMITTEES - EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
QonfyuanaL on,
STUDENT
GOVERNMENT
S.U.B. BALLROOM
Odabah. If - 5
All UBC students are invited to participate in a discussion on
student affairs at UBC. Presentations on the following topics
are solicited from all those interested in the direction of the
Alma Mater Society at UBC.
1. Voluntary unionism.
2. The role of students in negotiations with the
Senate, the Administration, various levels of
government, and the general public.
3. The student government as a service organization.
4. The Students' Council as a federal government
or what?
5. The role and effect of Students' Council in
academic reform.
Contact Tony Hodge or Mike Doyle, c/o A.M.S/Sub.
Secretarial assistance is available. Please reply by September 25.
STUDENT COUNCIL COMMITTEES - EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
—dick button photo
THUNDERBIRD DEFENSIVE
BACK      BOB     WHITEHEAD
really gets to the centre of
thjngs in downing College of
Idaho's fullback Rick Jensen
for a short gain. The Birds
dropped the game 20-0 but
didn't look too bad doing so.
Yardstick
UBC
College of Idaho
9
First Downs
17
96
Yards Rushing
113
87
Yards Passig
169
13
Passes Attempted
24
6
Passes Completed
16
2
Interceptions By
2
1
Fumbles
-
0
Fumbles lost
—
9/90 yds.
Penalties/yards
5/40 yds.
6/35 yds.
Punts/average
4/24 yds.
to
Summary
FIRST QUARTER
No Score.
SECOND QUARTER
2:54—College    of    Idaho—Pass—Len    Troxel
Limbago. Conversion attempt blocked. 0-6.
14:25—College of Idaho—Pass—Troxel to Limbago.
Conversion attempt good. 0-13.
THIRD QUARTER
No Score.
FOURTH QUARTER
14:18—College of Idaho—Troxel  run. Conversion
attempt good. 0-20.
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
Danlyiu— 20  carries  for  73  yards.  Longest, nine
yards.
Gregroy—16  carries  for 41  yards.  Longest, nine
yards.
COLLEGE OF IDAHO
carries  for   53   yards.
Longest,   10
Glasyier—20
yards.
PASSING
UBC
Larson—Attempted 12, completed six for 68 yards.
Two interceptions.
Gregory—Attempted   one,   completed   it   for   19
yards. No interceptions.
COLLEGE OF IDAHO
Troxel—Attempted   23,   completed   16   for   169
yards. Two intercepted.
RECEIVERS UBC
Peck—Three   receptions   for   three   attempts.   34
yards.
Gregory—Three receptions for three attempts. 25
yards.
Richie—One reception for one attempt. Nine yards.
Rice—One reception for one pass. 19 yards.
COLLEGE OF IDAHO
Limbago—Six receptions for six passes. 91 yards.
Two TD's.
English—Five receptions for five passes. 47 yards.
Waters—Two receptions for two passes. 19 yards.
By STEVE MALLARD
Thunderbird Stadium heard the sound of football
fans cheering last Saturday afternoon.
The Thunderbirds didn't win, but they did provide
some entertaining football to the surprise and delight of
long-suffering home team fans.
The Birds lost 20-0 to the College of Idaho Coyotes,
however they were in the game up until the last few
minutes.
The first half was mostly a defensive struggle. The
Birds' offense was stymied by the bigger, faster Coyotes
and the usual penalties.
A 25-yard screen pass to Roger Gregory was nullified
by a penalty, as was a 12-yard first down run by Paul
Danyliu.
No Corcoran
In the absence of Dave Corcoran, Danyliu was the
team's leading rusher with 20 carries for 73 yards.
The Coyotes' first touchdown came at 2:54 of the
2nd quarter on a pass from quarterback Len Troxel to end
Cisco Limbago. The convert was blocked, the 3rd convert
that the Birds have blocked in two games.
In the dying seconds of the first half, poor tackling
by the Birds secondary enabled Limbago to carry a short
pass from Troxel into the end zone for his second
touchdown of the quarter.
Halftime score-Idaho 0-13; UBC-0.
Rookie QB
Rookie UBC quarterback Al Larson had a rough first
half. At one point, the Idaho pass rush enabled defensive
tackle Dave Pearson to pick off a Larson pass that another
rushing lineman had batted into the air.
In the second half, the UBC offence shaped up better
but they couldn't cross the goal line.
The fans appreciated the sustained action rather than
UBC's usual three tries and the punt which they have
watched for the last few years.
One Larson drive, had the Birds marching from their
own eight to the Coyote 12 yard line before Larson was
thrown for loses attempting to pass. During this march
the Birds had seven straight first downs!
Coach Gnup
Coach Gnup's imagination went to work in the next
series of downs. Faced with a 4th down and long yardage
situation, Gnup sent in Roger Gregory to punt.
From punt formation, Gregory faked and passed to
end Dave Rice for a first down at the Idaho 33 yard line.
"We saw them laying back, so we sent in the fake punt,
said Gnup after the game.
With the ball now in the Idaho end it looked as if the
Birds might score; and then perhaps an on-side kick, and
then?—?
However, Idaho's Bill Bubak intercepted his second
pass of the game and returned it to the U.B.C. 17 yard
line.
Visions of a U.B.C. victory were shattered by Bubak's
interception.
The final Idaho touchdown with 40 seconds left in
the game served only to make the score look worse than
the Birds deserved.
Coach impressed
Idaho Coach E. A. Bonamino, was pleased with his
team's victory, and he was impressed with the Birds.
"U.B.C. has improved a great deal, especially at
quarterback. That No. 11 (Al Larson) can really throw."
Coach Gnup was not as pleased,
"We're still scrwing up assignments; and with our lack
of speed in the defensive backfield we had to lay back to
stay behind them.
The laying back enabled Idaho to connect on short
passes with alarming regularity.
Other problems that UBC coaches must face up to
are-to provide better pass protection for Larson and to
get pass receivers to run sharper patterns.
The Thunderbirds are not a bad football club-they
are a young club. Because of this inexperience, they make
costly mistakes.
Yet the fans who were present on Saturday afternoon
will agree that there is hope for better in the future. Tuesday, September 23, 1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  11
Intramural Notices
MEN
Attention Unit Managers and Participants.
Preliminary round schedules for soccer, touch-football, tennis,
badminton, and swimming, are now posted at the men's intramural
office. Consult the schedule to find out who you are playing, and when
and where. Any clashes must be reported to the Director as soon as
possible.
CO-REC
For all those interested in participating in co-rec. Badminton,
meet in the Memorial gym Tuesday, Sept. 23, at 12:30, meet for
Tennis in the Memorial gym Wednesday, Sept. 24 at 12:30.
Field Hockey Birds
Beat Pitt Meadows
By KELVIN BECKETT
The B.C. Field Hockey Association's winter season commenced
last Saturday and UBC split the two games it participated in.
In first division play the Thunderbirds matched long-time rival,
Hawk's 8-0 victory over India with a 3-1 win over Meadows. Hawks
have won the championship for the past two years.
Two goals by Paul McMillan and one by Antonie Schouten gave
the Birds their victory.
Not so fortunate were the second division Braves. They went
down 6-1 to the Hawks' second team. Though not an upset, the score
was surprising as the Braves ran second to Hawks last year.
If play on the first day of a season means anything, then it
appears once again the first division will be a two-team fight between
UBC and Hawks and that second division has been handed to Hawks B
on a platter.
Women's Practice Times
Swimming       Irene Sigismund   224-9979
(speed)
Swimming       Shirley Martin      738-3575
(synchronized)
Tennis
Susan Eager 987-0920
Track and       Helgi Westberger 731-2638
Field
Volleyball       Marilyn Turner    434-5377
M.W.F. 4:30 p.m.;
Empire Pool
Sun. 12-1:30 p.m.;
Crystal Pool; Tu. Th.
5:30-6:30 p.m.;
Empire Pool
Oct. 4, Sat. 11-
3 p.m.; M. 4:30-
7:15 p.m Th. 12-30-
1:30 p.m.;
Armories
T. W. Th4:30-
7 p.m.; Armories
Sept. 23 1-2:30
p.m.; Women's
Gym; 7-8:30 p.m.;
Memorial Gym
PANGO PANGO-(UNS)-
Great walking blorg Roberticus
Cecilius was arraigned late last
week on charges of slaying a
number of females of the species
with arrows through the heart. He
is being charged with bethrothal.
Gymnasts arise
All men interested in
competing in gymnastics for UBC
are asking to come to a meeting in
room 211, Thursday noon.
SKIN & SCUBA CLASSES
NAUI CERTIFICATION
1st Semester - $20.00
UBC WAR MEMORIAL GYM
Room 211
THURS., SEPT. 25
7:15 p.m.
Soccer lads
Drop game
By BOB WE1DMAN
This year's edition of the UBC
soccer Thunderbirds has only two
first string players back from last
year's team that finished high in
the Pacific Coast Soccer League
standings.
In Victoria Saturday, the side's
lack of veterans showed clearly as
the Birds dropped a 6—1
exhibition game to the Victoria
O'Keefes.
The O'Keefes, also of the
PCSL, were in UBC's end for the
great majority of the ifrst half and
had no trouble jumping to a 4-0
lead by the midpoint of the game.
Gary Thompson scored the
lone UBC goal at 32 minutes of
the second half on a well placed
20 yard line drive.
Coach Joe Johnson viewed the
game strictly as an experiment
and remains very optimistic about
repeating last year's playoff
performance.
Both Johnson and the players
felt that a lack of familiarity more
than anything else hurt the team.
Regardless of the talent on the
club, the Birds have not. reached
the level where they can
effectively communicate with
each other on the field and
anticipate each other's moves.
The Birds open their 16 game
PCSL schedule this Saturday
when they play the Firefighters at
Callister park at 2 p.m.
-richard sullivan photo
Exhibition win gives
rugby Birds head start
The UBC Thunderbird rugby
team beat the Kats for the first
time in five years, as they took a
16-5 decision Sunday at Wolfson
field.
It doesn't count for anything
as it was only an exhibition game,
but it gives coach Donn Spence
and his Birds a big mental start on
the season.
The UBC team now has a ten
game winning streak, counting
nine game wins on last years tour
of the east.
Eric Martin led the team with
seven points on two converts and
a drop goal.
"Credit has to go to the
forwards, though," said Spence,
"They worked hard to get the ball
and we controlled the game after
the first 20 minutes because of
it."
Gordie Mackenzie pulled his
hamstring muscle and will be out
for about two weeks, including
next Saturdays opening league
game against Ex-Brits, Saturday.
The Braves dominated their
game against Kats seconds
Saturday. Ross Mcintosh was the
director of the attack which just
humbled their opponents 19-0.
WING GORDIE MACKENZIE
WATCHES Thunderbird
teammate, and scrum half Mike
Hutchison launch his little
baby scoreward. The Birds
scored 16 unanswered points
to take a 16-5 win.
Team training
The Thunderbird swimming
team is looking good according to
head coach Jack Pomfret.
This year the Birds have a
number of frosh turning out to
three-a-week practises in the rain
at Empire pool, including Andy
Keir from Toronto and local star
Frank Nordquist.
A number of veterans have also
been at the practises according to
Pomfret.
ftaAA
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Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
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Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
UBC STUDENT REP.-JOHN KEATING-Res. YU 8-5144
UBC CURLING CLUB
GENERAL MEETING
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23rd, 12:30, BU. 100
Elections   -   Registration
Full Turnout Essential
BEGINNERS WELCOME — ESPECIALLY GIRLS
— Lessons Given —
MEN'S or MIXED TEAMS - BONSPIELS - PARTIES - COMPETITIVE or SOCIAL Page  12
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 23, 1969
'TWEEN CLAS&S
Why NDP lost
join a lit union
TODAY
GERMAN   CLUB
Meeting at  noon in I.H.
CURLING    CLUB
Elections and registration noon in
Bu.   100.
BOWLING    CLUB
General meeting noon in Bu.   102.
SAILING   TEAM
Signup for eliminations by 5 p.m.
Thurs. (where/). Races at Burrard
Civic   Marina   on   Sept.   27.
FOLK   SONG
Singelte come to SUB 113 at noon if
you   wish   to   perform   on  Clubs   Day.
VARSITY   OUTDOOR   CLUB
Inquire at noon in SW corner of
SUB   basement.
AQUA   SOC
Films in SUB auditorium 12:30 to
9:30 p.m.   Cost  35  cents.
SCIENCE  FICTION
Fan club meeting for clubs day noon
in   SUB   115.
WEDNESDAY
VARSITY   OUTDOOR   CLUB
General meet today noon, Angus 104.
VARSITY   DeMOLAY   CLUB
Meeting, elections 12:30, SUB 211.
New members  come.
UBC    GOLF   TEAM
Meeting, tryouts for golf teams, Wednesday   noon,   room   9   Law   building.
■WlE-LAW   SOCIETY
Orj-a-rrtzationar meeting 12:30, Angus
215.
IL   CAFFE
Conversation and music in Italian,
noon,  I.H.   room  402.
CANOE    CLUB
Meeting   noon,   SUB   215.
CHRISTIAN    SCIENCE
Meeting   noon,   I.H.   room   206.
EXPERIMENTAL     COLLEGE
Rod Dickinson and Karl Burau: Why
the New Democrats lost the B.C.
elections,   noon,   SUB  125.
SLAVONIC   CIRCLE
Meeting   noon,   Bu.   220.
BADM'NGTON    TEAM
Team organizational practice, 5:30-
7:30   p.m.,   Women's   gym.
YOUNG   SOCIALISTS
Meet today  noon,   SUB  clubs lounge.
ONTOLOGICAL   SOC
Discussion  at  noon   in  Bu.   232.
COMMUNITY   INFO
Meeting at noon SUB 211. B.C. Tour
B.C.
THURSDAY
FORESTRY   U.S.
General meet Thursday noon, McMillan   166.
CINEMA 16
Silent Classics start Sept. 29 at 6
p.m.  in  SUB theatre.
ATC
Folk mass practice at 10:30 a.m. and
6 p.m.  in ATC chapel.
ENG.   LIT.   UNION
Meeting at noon in Bu. 106 to form
union.
POLITICAL    SCIENCE
Dr. Miroslav Soukup will give a public lecture on "Theoretical Tools for
Understanding the Societal System in
Czechoslovakia*  at  noon  in  Ang 104.
Rev. Gary Davis
part of tradition
By Jerry Kallberg
The history of Negro music in
North America traces several
paths including spiritual music,
jazz, country and urban blues.
Spiritual music experienced its
greatest creative outbursts after
the Civil War and between the
years of 1910 and 1930. Rev.
Gary Davis, born in 1896 in
Lawrence County, South
Carolina, is a part of this
tradition.
"The music is already with the
religion; I just learned how to play
the guitar. I just trained myself to
play religious songs—play them!
the way people would like them.
They're not no blues; they're just
a kind of story .. . My style of
playing guitar is like a person
playing the piano. See, there's
three hands to the guitar, just two
to the piano."
Rev. Davis has recorded with
the Prestige, Perfect, and
Vanguard labels. His most recent
Vanguard release was recorded at
Newport in 1968. As well, there
are   a   number   of   anthologies
containing selections by Rev.
Davis.
He is appearing at the
Riverqueen until September 27.
Last Monday he performed to a
small audience; his reaction:
'They told me if I go to the
church ain't nobody there, go and
preach anyhow."
This is his second appearance
in Vancouver and it is an
opportunity to see a man who is,
both an important figure in the
history of American music, and an
excellent entertainer and
musician.
EAT IN • TAKE OUT • DELIVERY-
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
CLASSIFIED
Rate:s Students. Faculty & Club—3 lines, 1 day 75t* 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 25-*;
4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by  telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. of B.C.,
Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
WHO'S OCTOPUS? FIND OUT IN
.SUB Ballroom with the Winter's
Green, Friday, Sept. 26, 9-1, at
the Octopus Johnston Memorial
Dance.
Greetings
12
Lost & Found
14
LOST: BROWN WALLET. EUCH-
anan Lounge, Wed., Sept. 10th.
Need I.D. desperatelv. Ph. 266-
2736.	
LOST: NE . BUCH. 202 AT 2:30
on Wednesday, one pair brown
square frame glasses. Plea-se eon-
tact   Louise   Mooney,   Ph.   224-0063.
PERSON WHO 'BORROWED7
clarinets from Music Bldg. please
return to that vicinity. My only
source of income. Reward — call
988-5363	
FOUND: SEASON TICKET BOOK
for Freddy Wood Theatre See
Al at 4640 W. 9th, at 6 p.m.
LOST: PEARL RING: CHEMISTRY
Building washroom. Phone 434-9844
Rides & Car Pools
15
RIDE WANTED FROM EAST
Burnaby, 16th Ave. and 1st Street
for   8:30's.    Call   Joanne,   521-1730.
Special Notices
16
U.B.C. BEAUTY SALON (NEAR
campus). Complete hair care. 5736
University   Blvd.   Tel.   228-8942.
U.B.C. BARBER SHOP. 4 BAR-
bers to serve you. Open 6 days a
.week.   5736   University   Blvd.	
UNDERWATER FILMS AQUA
Soc. presents Tuesday, Sept. 23,
World Without Sun, Octopus
Hunt, On The Rocks. Continuous
showings, 12:30 - 9 30. 35c. S.U.B.
Theatre.	
JOIN THE BOWLING CLUB 12.30
Bu.    102.    Tues.,    Sept.   23rd.
SCIENCE UNDERGRAD SOCIETY
nominations open for 3 A.M.S.
Reps, and Academic Coordinator.
Pick up nomination forms at
S.U.S.   Common   Room,   Hut  Q-7.
PROVINCIAL BURSARY
cheques are now available at cashiers, 3rd floor, new Admin. Bldg.
All students receiving bursaries
must report to the cashiers.
FRIDAY AT 4:00. LISTEN TO
Listen to CYVR-UBC Radio and
hear someone win $457. Join the
Billboard Club for 50c and you
could win. Tickets on sale across
from Information Desk in  SUB.
FOLK MASS IN THE ANGLICAN
Theological College Chapel. Sunday, Sept. 28, at 9:00 a.m. Everyone  welcome.
Travel Opportunities
17
ANY STUDENTS INTERESTED IN
an inexpersive flight to Europe,
leaving Vancouver in January to
Amsterdam, returning in May,
please contact Raven Committee,
School   of   Architecture.
Wanted-Miscellaneous
18
URGENT! STUDENT WHO WIT-
nessed accident 7:45 a.m., Sept. 8,
Arbutus  and   25th,   phone  434-1076
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
MECHANICS—UNUSUAL SKODA
V8.   Fred   732-5867.	
1966 CORVAIR AUTOMATIC, 46,-
000 miles. Leaving for France
this month. Offers over $900.
876-4836.	
'60 SPRITE, REBORED ENGINE
competition, clutch, new top, snow
tires.   After    6:30,    926-3937.	
1962 FORD GALAXIE, AUTO,
trans., new brakes, tires, radio,
6-cyl. Excel, cond. (offers). 228-
9256.	
1960 PONTIAC CONVERT. EXCEL-
lent condition. New engine, radio,
$700 or nearest.  Tel.  922-7344.
FOR SALE 1964 V.W. CUSTOM.
New Paint, interior tires, clean.
Need $$.  Phone 732-5933  evenings.
'61 FALCON, BRAND NEW TRANS -
mission (std.) Low mileage, 6-cyl.
eng., radio. Reliable, comfortable,
good looking. Only $475.. Call Rob
327-5114.	
'65 TRIUMPH SPITFIRE, LOW
mil., new trans., brks., clutch,
tires, two tops. 261-7713. Rick.
'61 MONARCH 4-DR., 352 CU. IN.,
P.S., P.B., A.T., radio. 325-1444 or
874-6596.	
1962 CHEVY CONVERTIBLE —
immaculate. Floor shift, reconditioned engine, radio, new tires,
etc. Linda, 987-5605 after 6:15 p.m.
ENGLISH SALOON CAR (AUSTIN
style). Perfect running order —
receipts for recent overhaul. List-
price $300. Cash sale; serious
buyer only $225. Phone (mornings
and   evenings),   733-6656.        	
'61 AUSTIN HEALEY, 3000, VERY
good cond., $1200, or offers. Interested parties only. Phone 228-8069
between 5-8 p.m. View at 3926
W.  23rd  anytime.
Autos For Sale—Cont'd
21
1961 RILEY 1.5, ASKING S375.00.
City tested, engine trans, rebuilt;
twin S.U. „carbs tach.   266-6035	
'67 FIREBIRD CONV. 326 C.I. DE-
lux, 19,000—one owner—all power,
new W.T. Tires Looks and runs
like  new.   Phone   874-5082
Automobiles—Wanted
22
Automobiles—Parts
23
AUSHEAL    3000    WIRE    WHEELS.
Very good cond.,  $18 ea.  876-2748.
Automobiles—Repairs
24
Motorcycles
25
1967 YAMAHA 305, 4700 MI. $500.
261-7821.	
350 TWO STROKE TWIN JAWA
'66. $350. 2500 miles. Call George
after 5 p.m., 325-4502.	
BUSINESS SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
PAINTED SHIP BAND AVA1L-
able. Special rates for Campus
clubs. fraternities, sororities,
guaranteed.   Fuzk.   Call  278-G354.
'HIS INTRICATE MIND' AND
'Toad' available for dances or
parties. Info. 291-1748. Hoss, after
5 p.m.
Duplicating  &  Copying
32
Miscellaneous
33
Photography
34
CANON   FOR   SALE.   WITH   LOTS
of  extras.   Call  Ron  at  733-8791.
Repairing—All Kinds
35
Rentals—Miscellaneous
36
STROBES FOR RENT. OTHER
party lighting. Strobes $10.00 Per
day. Spectacular Productions.
434-2648.	
SOUND CAR RENTALS AVAIL-
able from UBC, radio, in Room
235 SUB. Book ahead for noon
hours.
Scandals
37
COME AND SEE WILLIE COY-
ote destroy the Roadrunner in
Buch 106 12:30 p.m. Sept. 16, 17,
23,   24.	
NAKED WALL? COVER UP
with silkcreen prints by local artist.   All   editions   limited.    $3.00   -
$10.00.    Phone   738-2963.
SCANDALOUS! YOU CAN WIN
$457 by joining the Billboard
Club. For 50c you are entitled to
all the privileges of membership
in  the  Club.  On  sale  in   SUB 235.
WHO'S THE SWINGING DEAN
that swung until 3 a.m. Saturday
morning? Anyone for Irish in
San   Francisco?
Sewing & Alterations
38
Typewriters & Repairs
39
Typing
40
EXPERIENCED ELECTRIC HOME
typing. Essays, theses, etc. Neat,
accurate work, reasonable rates.
321-2102.	
EXPERIENCED & RELIABLE
typist available for home typing.
Please   call   277-5640.	
TYPING WORK WANTED. 3589
West   10th   Ave.    733-5922	
TYPIST,    EXP.    ELECTRIC.
738-7881	
TYPING, NORTH SHORE STU-
dents. Reasonable rates for papers, essays, etc. Expertly done.
Phone 988-6798
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
Help Wanted—Male
52
WANTED: EXPERIENCED RADIO
announcer for part time work.
Phone Tom Peacock 684-5131
(9:00-noon).
Male or Female
53
WANT TO MAKE MONEY IN
spare minutes on Campus? Duca-
tive, legal, far from laborious.
Call Mrs. Duncan, 228-9597	
MUSICIAN NEEDED FOR WEST
Indian band. Call Archie at, 937-
3295.
Work Wanted
54
EXPERIENCED DRAUGHTSMAN
and artist available for all kinds
graphs, diagrams, artwork. Very
low rates. Call John Kula, 224-
4146.
INSTRUCTION
Language Instruction
61A
$67.50 FOR 60 LESSONS
Learn Conversational French, Spanish, German or English (New Canadians for as low as
$67.50 FOR 60 LESSONS
Take   advantage    of    this    amazing
offer:   only   six  students   maximum
per group.
For   the   best  tutoring   in   language
conversation,    call   us    today    (8:30
a.m. to 7:30 p.m.) at 736-5401.
CONVERSA- SCHOOL
OF LANGUAGES
(Recognized Educ. Institution)
1603 W.  4th   (at Fir)
Music
62
Special Classes
63
FALL CLASSES STARTING NOW
In HATHA and PRANAYAMA
Yoga.   For  inf.   and   student   rates
phone    434-1SS7.
SKI INSTRUCTORS' TRAINING
COURSE — Whistler Mtn. — 6
weekends — Oct. 4th and/or 5th
to Nov. 8th and/or 9th. 6 consecutive Sats. OR Sundays—$20.00; all
12 Saturdays and Sundays—$36.00.
For information phone or -write:
Jim McConkey, Alta Lake, B.C.
932-5422.
Tutoring
64
FRENCH LANGUAGE AND Tutoring by Frenchman. Eves and
Sat. All levels taught. Call 684-
6887 or see Raymond at Civil
Engineering,    Rm.    109.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
TEN       SPEED      RACING      BIKE.
Centre   pull   brakes,   Alpine   gear.
New.   Call   Gerry  327-2808  after  5
p.m. ,	
SONY       TC255       STEREO       TAPE
deck.   Forced   to   sell.   Ph.   Larry
224-9833.   Fort   Camp   Hut   4   Rm.
11.	
MATTRESS NEAR NEW 48" WIDE
$20.   Phone   266-4043.
BUY   PRE-SALE  TICKETS   FOR
BIRD CALLS
Your   Student   Telephone
Directory
NOW-Only 75c and SAVE
After   Publication   Price   Will   Be
$1.00
FUN SAILBOAT, 20' FLYING
Dutchman class boat, top shape.
1720.    922-3789.
STUDENTS' SPECIALS (THIS
Week Only). Single Hollywood
beds complete 49.50 and up. Ready
to finish chairs 6.95 and up.
Chests of drawers 14.95 and up.
6 drawer Mr. & Mrs. chest 18.95
each. 3 shelf bookcases 6.95 and
up. Klassen's, 3207 W. Broadway.
RE 6-0712. Beer bottle drive-in
at   rear  of  store.
SEALY POSTUREPEDIC DOUBLE
Bed. 6'6" long; I1,', yr. old. Somewhat spotted economy cover.
Otherwise good cond. $75 or offers,
Bob  Hunter,   224-3742.
FREE PASSES TO GUESTS OF
Invitation 69/70 Book holders to
movies, restaurants, night clubs,
etc. Don't miss yours, $1.75, at
SUB   information.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
MALE STUDENT HOUSING ON
Campus opening on Sept. 16 at
5760 Toronto Rd. Room i $50) or
room plus board ($110). Linen
changed weekly. Large studio
room. No transportation problems. Accommodation for 28.
Comfortable lounge. Enforced
quiet hours. Contact Ron Dick at
address   or   at   home   224-0327.
FURN. ROOM. MALE NON-
smoker. Light — washing — sandwiches. Breakf. arranged. Close to
UBC.   Phone   224-7141.
THREE SLEEPING ROOMS; MADE
only;   4178  W.   12th   Ave.     244-5163
GIRL TO SHARE HOUSEKEEP-
ing room near Gates. Private
bath, entrance, $45. See Helen,
back  basement,   4460 West  11th.
F U L. L Y FURNISHED LARGE
rooms for two males, priv. entrance, priv. bath, congenial student landpeople, 1% blocks from
gates, $40 person.   224-6389 after 5.
GIRL WANTED TO SHARE LGE.
apt. with three girls, first or
second   year   preferred.   733-0019.
Room & Board
82
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
WILL SHARE MY MOD. FURN.
home non-smoker. 490 E. 28th
Ave. Also furn. 2-bdrm. mod.
home, 7873 Wedgwood, Burnaby.
Leave name, phone, mail box or
address   above.	
FEMALE SENIOR STUDENT OR
grad to find and share apt. or
house with same. Call Rosalind,
266-8035.	
GIRL WANTED TO SHARE CAMPUS flat. Only 7 min. from classes!
$80, room and board. Telephone
228-9598	
THREE GIRLS WANTED FOR
co-op. immediately; two more
October 10th. Call Jon Bartlett,
733-6912
Unfurn. Houses & Apts.
84
FEMALE STUDENT TO SHARE
new apartment in Kits. 307—1805
Yew St. Phone 732-6961 after 6
p.m.

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