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The Ubyssey Oct 17, 1986

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Array "v5BC
5T
ELECTION SPECIAL X
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXIX, No. 12
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, October 17,1986
228-2301 J C^
V
I
►
•Hi*
'Only rich need ap
.     u^2 2 figs
By EVELYN JACOB
If you aren't rich, don't apply.
That's the message people who
want a university education in B.C.
are hearing at increasing volume.
They're hearing it from the Social
Credit government in its refusal to
reinstate the grant portion of the
provincial student loan system, and
in statements such as Post-
secondary Education Minister Russ
Fraser's recent remark that maybe
students should put off their education if they can't afford it.
Potential students are also being
deterred by evidence of rising debt
loads and soaring default rates on
loans taken out by students who are
on the brink of bankruptcy.
In a recent interview at the
University of B.C., Premier Bill
Vander Zalm said he is considering
bringing back a "version" of the
grant program, but refused to give
details. In the meantime, while tuition fees and unemployment are increasing, critics are branding B.C.'s
student aid program the worst in
the country.
Lome Nicolson, the New
Democratic Party's post-secondary
education critic, says he is aware of
students who have had to declare
personal bankruptcy because of the
student aid program. "The student
aid system is a major deterrent to
people who want an education," he
says.
The NDP has pledged to reinstate
the student grant program and
restore provincial funding to student aid to 1983 levels. It has also
promised to increase opportunities
for students living outside the
Lower Mainland to attend post-
secondary institutions by providing
grants.
And if recent statistics from the
Canadian Federation of Students
are any indication, changes in
B.C.'s student aid system are sorely
needed. The CFS figures show the
average debt load of students
graduating from UBC in 1986 was
$15,000 — up a whopping $12,000
from 1984 when the student grant
program was abolished.
Students graduating from professional programs are also racking up
bills as high as $40,000, according
to bank officials.
"The government will have to do
something about the student loan
program or it will collapse," warns
UBC's financial awards director
Byron Hender.
Hender says that students are finding themselves unable to keep up
monthly payments and are
defaulting on their loans instead.
He says the provincial default rate
on loans is close to 20 per cent, and
even higher in certain banks.
He cited the example of an
honors arts student from Ontario
who could not make monthly
payments on a $18,000 loan.
"A federal government collection
agency told her to declare
bankruptcy," says Hender. "This
suggests we've got an unfortunate
problem developing all over the
country, and B.C. is in the worst
position."
Stuart Clark, manager of the
Bank of Montreal's UBC branch,
says increasing numbers of students
are having difficulty paying back
their loans because of high
unemployment   and   because  they
are borrowing more money from the
government than originally planned.
"The idea of the loan program
was to help needy students get
through university," says Clark.
"Back in the '60s, the most a student could borrow was $1,000.
Now, we're finding that more and
more students are having a hard
time paying back their loans. The
government's original plan obviously hasn't worked."
Fraser said the default rates are
not   a   cause   of   concern.   "Not
everyone will default," says Fraser.
"I have more faith in Canadian
students than that."
But Hender disagrees. "I'm getting really worried about the loans
students are graduating with and
when the bankers get worried about
it, you know there's a real problem.
The student aid program in B.C.
deteriorated substantially during
restraint when provincial funding
dropped from $33 million in 1982 to
$12.5 million in 1986. At the same
time, the Alberta government in
creased funding for student aid by
35 per cent in 1985 to $106 million,
and will spend $116 million this
year.
When Socreds eliminated the
grant program, students in B.C.
became the only ones in Canada
who do not receive a portion of
their student assistance in the form
of a non-repayable bursary.
The maximum loan a B.C. student can borrow has climbed to
$5,560, $3,560 of which is a Federal
See page 2: DEBTS
s
ocreds still same party
By JEFF BUTTLE
British Columbians are not fundamentally conservative, but they
will likely vote for Bill Vander Zalm
and the Social Credit party anyway,
according to one of B.C.'s top
political scientists.
Because Vander Zalm senses victory, don't expect much policy
direction from him before the election, Simon Fraser University professor Martin Robin says. And if
the Socreds are re-elected, don't expect much of a change in political
direction either, he adds.
The trivialization of politics and
political debate in B.C. are much of
the reason for this.
"Opinion in B.C. on the big
issues is fairly liberal-progressive or
social democratic," Robin said in
an interview recently. "That much
hasn't changed over the years."
However, voters today seem
more concerned with electing someone who makes them feel good
about the future.
"It's very much personality versus issues. He has staked his campaign on a perceived ability to lead.
"He has not, for example, made
any anti-labour utterances so far.
His pollers have told him he's got
broad-based support."
The backpedaling ex-Premier Bill
Bennett did in the last year of his
administration, to distance himself
from restraint, will be continued
and extended by Vander Zalm, says
Robin.
"Bennett's restraint program was
a very difficult one politically —
B.C. cut back much greater than
other provinces.
"Bennett was never able to gain
his support back after this. In his
last years he stopped talking about
restraint and instead talked about
the supposed benefits of restraint.
"Vander Zalm has rejected
restraint — told people it was ill-
advised. He has attempted to
distance himself from the Bennett
government."
Robin is the author of a two-
volume political history of B.C.
from 1871 to 1972.
He says recent Socred strategy
had been to win back "soft" party
support alienated by Bennett but
now, under "Zalm-mania", the
party hopes to gain previous New
Democratic Party supporters.
"Therefore Vander Zalm is talking much about consensus, about
getting people back together — not
picking on labor leaders as ogres as
(the Socred party) has in past elections.
"Vander Zalm every once in a
while says he'd like market forces to
play a greater role in social life but
he hasn't taken overt conservative
views."
He'll gently mouth market views
at the same time that he's bailing
out Cominco, for example, Robin
says.
"The Socreds have not talked
about free enterprise versus
socialism, but competence versus
incompetence."
Vander Zalm did the smart thing
by calling an early election and
capitalizing on his leadership campaign momentun, Robin says.
"Vander Zalm hasn't had to prove himself in any way — in parliament or in policy.
Inside
FACULTY leave B.C. for
higher wages ... p. 3
MINIMUM wage:
Canada's lowest... p. 3
RESTRAINT has long
history ... p. 3
SKELLY talks at UBC .
.p. 5
UBC political debate
on CITR ... p. 5
YOUNG people who left
UBC for work comment
on election ... p. 5
CANDIDATES galore . .
. pg. 6 and 7
LOWEST participation
rate in Canada ... p. 8
"The NDP were hoping the
mania which had caught on would
have a chance to dissipate and
Vander Zalm's confrontational
style would come out."
Part of the reason this hasn't
happened is because of the shortened campaign period, Robin says.
"Campaigns are shorter now —
they used to be 38 days or so. If the
campaign was longer the growth of
NDP support we've seen in the last
week would be greater.
"With Expo in the background
there's a prediction to celebrate.
Vander Zalm is very much capitalizing on the mood that's been dizzying the province.
"It's much easier to get elected
See page 2: PRESS Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 17, 1986
Press downgrades debate
From page 1
on image, the excitement of novelty, and then get down to the
business of governing with an open
mandate.''
The downgrading of political
debate in this context can be attributed partly to the performance
of the press, Martin says.
"Overall, the press and television
did contribute to this phenomenon
called Vander? Zalmania. (The
coverage) didn't have to do with
policy, but novelty and trivializa-
tion of politics.
"In that sense, (the press
coverage) helped Vander Zalm.
He's charming and affable and he
was an upset winner at the leadership convention.
"It was the same with Skelly . . .
(the press) weren't out to defeat him
for ideological reasons, the process
of trivialization of politics hurt him.
It was mean and irrelevant."
One important shift Robin
detects in this campaign is the
renewal of support for a Socred
leader.
"A lot of Bennett's support was a
strategic vote — to keep the NDP
out of office. There is a strong
traditional fear of a socialist
government amongst Socreds.
"This time there's not only support to keep the NDP out, but to
get behind Vander Zalm.
"Vander Zalm hasn't been campaigning on the (government's)
record, or his own record. He's
been campaigning on trust.
"The NDP are trying to point to
his erratic performance in the past
— his conflicts with the education
establishment, for example.
"There are some parallels to the
election of W.A.C. Bennett in B.C.
and Ronald Reagan in the U.S.
There hasn't been a change over
issues like welfare, but people like
the leader.
"People in B.C. may hold New
Democrat views but vote for
Vander Zalm.
"Some people say it's-not a campaign but a coronation."
Debt of $35,000 owed
From page 1
Canada student loan. Clark savs
with a $20,000 debt-load — which is
not inconceivable for many
students to build up over a four-
year period — a student will pay a
yearly interest rate of about 12 per
cent. That works out to $300 a
month for 10 years, making the actual amount owed $35,000.
Many students want to pay their
loans, according to Hender, who
says the provincial government
should be more flexible on collection procedures. B.C. banks are
strictly governed over collection
rules because they face losing
government guarantees on loans.
"There is no reason to give
defaulted loans to collection agen
cies who will charge students 25 per
cent over the amount owed," says
Hender.
He says the provincial government is not much further ahead
financially without the grant system
in place. The cost of collecting
loans, interest on outstanding
loans, remission rates, and default
rates are as high as when grants
where part of the student aid program, he said.
Hender says the loan program
"bought the provincial government
time" to enable the economy to
recover. "The critical question we
should now be asking, is what level
of debt should students have to
carry? Are $20,000 debts acceptable
to the public?"
fiSOUTHEEraiNG
HSSNOPLRCEHEHL
lukon Jack never said much but,
when he did, he had something
to say. He was, in his way, very
particular on matters of taste.
"Southern things have their place"
he would say "and that place is
not here!'
I guess what he meant was that
light and airy and sweet things are fine
and good, if that's what you like,
but that here in the North a thing must
be more substantial. Finely crafted,
smooth and sturdy. It must be something you can put your hands around.
Yukon Jack did not believe in
comfort for comfort's sake, he saw no
point to it. But he did appreciate the
finer things. Another paradox.
!^m^Mi0mm
THE BLRCK SHEEP OF CfiJMSN LIQUORS.
For Yukon Jack recipes write: YUKON JACK RECIPES, Box 2710. Postal Station 'U!' Toronto, Ontario UU 5Pi
DO YOU ENJOY SPORTS?
If you are a sports oriented individual, then you will
want to become a member of Canada's largest intramural sports program. By applying for a staff
position you get a chance to meet new people and
learn new skills. The following positions are still
open:
* Graphic Artists
* Promotions Manager—Soccer
* Sports Editor—Soccer
* Promotions Manager—Squash
* Promotions Manager—Badminton
* Sports Writer—Racquet Sports
For more information on these positions,
contact,
The Intramural Sports Program
Room 66, Lower SUB Concourse
Phone 228-6688
UuC iWumaAxA...
{fa aoW sports!
3250 West Broadway at Blenheim
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
From 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.
(Holidays: 10:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.)
OCEAN'S
TUNA
Light flaked in broth or
chunk light tuna in
water	
PER
TIN
369 g. Drip & AA      PER
Regular  ■•   TiN
EFFECTIVE OCT. 17 UNTIL OCT. 25
THIS STORE ONLY
M.J.B. GROUND
COFFEE
*1.
$4.
39
3 /O Discount OFF Your Grocery Order
Ask at the cashiers for your
student discount card!
STUDENT/AMS CARD I.D. REQUIRED
MINIMUM PURCHASE $30,000 -
DETAILS AT STORE Friday, October 17, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
ELECTION SPECIAL X,
Minimum wage enters limelight
By NORA READY
B.C.'s minimum wage, the lowest
in Canada, is in the election
limelight.
Both the Social Credit and the
New Democratic parties have promised to raise the minimum wage if
they get elected, although as late as
September, Premier Bill Vander
Zalm talked of eliminating it
altogether in certain sectors.
NDP leader Bob Skelly led the
way, before the election call, by
saying his party would increase the
SKELLY . . . wage proposal
current minimum wage of $3.65 per
hour by $1 within six months of
taking office. Vander Zalm
responded by saying his party
would launch a review of the wage
that could include raising it in some
sectors, decreasing it in others, or
eliminating it in areas such as the
hospitality sector.
"Here we are in one of the
wealthiest provinces in this country
and yet many thousands are forced
to work at the lowest minimum
wage. It's absolutely shameful,"
says Skelly. He says that 60,000
people work for minimum wage in
B.C., two-thirds of whom are
women. He added that sometimes
people get even less because the
government refuses to enforce
employment standards legislation.
During the election campaign,
Vander Zalm promised to raise the
wage but his lack of specifics leaves
voters with no guarantee he has
abandoned his plan to eliminate it
in certain sectors.
B.C. Public Interest Group
researcher Boyd Pyper says a
decrease or elimination of the
minimum wage would be
"disastrous" for students. According to a survey Boyd recently completed, only a quarter of students
are able to save enough for tuition
and living costs. None of the survey
respondents were able to finance a
year's education through their summer jobs.
"An increase by $1 is a good
start," says Pyper, adding that a
more significant hike would be
needed before students could expect
to keep up with current tuition fees.
PIRG's study of student summer
employment was based on 1985
figures from the University of Victoria. The study found that of the
88 per cent of students who found
work, 18.5 per cent worked at or
below the minimum wage.
The report says over a third of
the women students work in the
hospitality and service sectors during the summer.
Overall, the majority of
minimum wage earners in the province are women according to the
Women's Economic Agenda, a
coalition of women's groups. WE A
is asking candidates in the election
to support an increase in the wage.
The coalition notes that the annual salary for a minimum wage
earner is $2,000 below the poverty
line.
Michael Cleig, a Social Planning
and Review Council official, feels
the minimum wage provides "an
assured standard against which
other wages should be measured."
"People should be able to have a
basic income to provide for food,
clothes and shelter," says Cleig
whose organization examines
poverty, the social impact of
unemployment, and related social
issues.
Restraint came
after 1983 vote
By GLENN McDONALD
The Social Credit government's
silence over its post-election plans
has an immediate precedent.
The party centered its last election campaign in 1983 on the theme
of economic recovery. The Socreds
stressed incentives to private enterprise and public works projects
(mega-projects) as the means to
achieving this goal.
The issue of balancing increasing
public expenditures with a growing
deficit was addressed in terms that
were vague at best.
According to Social Credit campaign literature of the time, "maintaining essential services for those
people who need them most is the
unfailing promise of this government."
In general, it was assumed the
Socreds would adopt a moderate
progrm of curtailed public spending. On the eve of the election, the
Vancouver Sun newspaper endorsed Social Credit, saying it was "not
likely to start taking reactionary
measures."
In fact the Social Credit restraint
program began slowly in early 1982.
Reacting to the worst recession the
province had suffered since the
Depression, the government made
sizeable cuts in funding for public
schools and universities. By the fall
of 1982, the province's three universities were grappling with deficits.
At the same time, the government
imposed controls over public sector
wages through the Compensation
Stabilization Program.
The large Social Credit majority,
won in the May 5, 1983 election,
provided the foundation for an intensification of restraint.
The 1983-84 restraint program
possessed several key elements.
First, the Social Credit government
sought to centralize power in its
own hands. Through such measures
as the Education (Interim) Finance
Amendment Act, limiting the
autonomy of local school boards, it
sought to bring all public expenditures under its direct control.
Reductions in public sector spending   were   accompanied   by   the
weakening or elimination or certain
groups. This included the labor
movement, often a source of opposition of Social Credit policy,
and many grass-roots organizations
such as tenants and human rights
groups considered superfluous in
the new right philosophy espoused
by Social Credit.
This last measure had, in the
government's eyes, the effect of
creating a more favorable climate
in the province for private enterprise and new investment.
One year after their re-election,
Social Credit had succeeded in
implementing the bulk of a restraint
program never suggested in the May
1983 campaign.
The Socreds deemed these
strict measures necessary in order to
See page 9: Restraint's
1
WE CAN'T
AFFORD IT
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AMD NEITHER
f
WE DID IT, RESTRAINT,WE DID IT i
WORDS  Aut>   Mos<c\    "BV   TATt^Oc      KlWSEUvA  > \ [\ \ .•
-pERTOfcMED BV    £>IU_   ©EJOk^E.IT   ^-\UE      3CCR.EC>   MA3&«JTy.
Top faculty, students leaving province
By SYLVIA ARNOLD
After four years of the Social
Credit government's restraint program, top faculty and graduate
students are leaving UBC and
Simon Fraser University in record
numbers, threatening both universities' competitiveness.
"We're losing good people . . .
it's very difficult to recruit because
our salaries are not competitive,"
says UBC faculty association president Barrie Morrison.
Faculty salaries at UBC have
declined by 12 per cent in ieal purchasing power over the last three
years, says Morrison, and SFU
faculty have only recently received a
salary increase that is two per cent
above 1982 levels.
The average salary at UBC and
SFU last year was approximately
$49,000 compared with $57,000 at
the University of Toronto, and
$55,000 at the University of Alberta.
SFU faculty association president
Doug Cole says during restraint
when salaries were frozen, the
university had "real problems
recruiting and retaining faculty,"
particularly  in  computer  sciences
and business administration which
he describes as "hard-pressed
areas."
Last year at UBC there was more
than double the usual number of
faculty resignations which increased
from 23 to ,48.
Figures at SFU have not yet been
compiled but president William
Saywell says there is "no question"
that SFU has lost faculty.
"It's partly a result of our
salaries not being competitive,"
Saywell says. "There's also a
general uncertainty about the
priority given to universities in
B.C."
Since the Socred restraint program was introduced in 1982, faculty salaries at UBC and SFU have
decreased significantly after accounting for inflation.
Claude LeBon, dean of business
administration at SFU, downplayed
the effect of restraint in his department: "We lost only two professors
last year," he says, but admits they
have been unable to fill one of those
positions.
"It is very difficult for us to
recruit," he says.
LeBon    says    recruitment    in
business administration is a problem in North America as universities must compete with private industry for qualified scholars.- He
says professors are able to be
choosy and pick universities where
they will be in the best position to
pursue their careers.
"We've had to compete with
other universities and have lost in at
least a couple of cases," he says.
The current wave of faculty
resignations has also affected
graduate students.
John Dafoe, UBC Graduate Student Society programs coordinator, said "if the professor
leaves, it certainly provides a
disincentive for students to go to
that university."
Faced with the highest tuition
fees in Canada and inadequate
financial assistance, students are
now reconsidering getting graduate
degrees.
Last year at UBC there was a
drop in graduate student enrolment
from 4,000 to 3,700, while this year
enrolment has stayed constant at
about 3,700 students.
Dafoe said it is getting increasingly  difficult  to  afford  a graduate
degree in B.C., as teaching assistant
salary increases fall far short of the
high cost of tuition.
In 1985, teaching assistant
salaries at UBC increased 6.4 per
cent, while tuition fees increased
118 per cent. "
Under the restraint program, the
number of full teaching assistant-
ships decreased, making it rare for
students to obtain full 12-hour per
week positions.
The Graduate Student Society at
UBC calculated that even with a full
teaching assistant position,
graduate students fall $300 per
month short in meeting tuition and
living costs.
"I've always had two jobs on the
side, I wouldn't have been able to
afford grad school otherwise,"
Dafoe said.
B.C. graduate programs face
tough competition from those in
Ontario and Alberta, as those
universities offer a tuition waiver
policy for their full time teaching
assistants.
If the situation doesn't improve
in B.C. soon, Dafoe warns, "a lot
of students will leave the province
for Ontario and Alberta." Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 17, 1986
Vote
On October 22, we must consider who we are, and what we are
voting for.
By entering university, we have made a commitment to education. We have bet our futures on its success in this province. So we
should endorse the party that will best serve the interests of
students and youth in general.
The NDP has a strong, well established policy of supporting
education and the long-term future of this province. They support
greater funding for student aid, and an institute for higher education in the interior of the province. They support a guaranteed
youth employment scheme, and an increase in the minimum wage.
They are conscious of the strains on our renewable resources, and
support their maintenance, the NDP is the party which best
understands the needs of the students of B.C.
The Social Credit party is oriented towards big business and
answers to its needs. Social Credit candidates will not discuss their
policies because they would not be acceptable to us.
Considering the Socred's well established record, there is no
reason to believe that they will not continue their destruction of
the education system.
As students, we must choose a representative that will bring us
the best reward for our investment of time, money and effort in
education.
X
#$~df. *"~ '   i.    \ .".*   if'.f'C   .'.',
Exactly what has Vander Zalm said so far?
I just want to make a comment to
P. Rafe Mooney's letter (Article
Misconstrues Facts). He mentions
that "positive response to Mr.
Vander Zalm's visit easily
outweighs the few 'jeering'
students." I'll have to take his word
for it because I wasn't there. I like
most other UBC students have
classes on Wednesdays between
9:30 and  11:30 when Mr. Vander
Zalm took his walk through campus.
What I did take exception to in
the letter were two remarks made by
Rafe Mooney. The first was in the
defense given to our • beloved
premier during the cat calling
episode. I certainly do not question
anybody coming to Mr. Vander
Zalm's defense. What I do dislike is
that the reasoning for the defense.
What is the point of "If someone
insulted your father what would
you say or do?". Of course I would
defend my father. He is a relative.
Surely Mr. Vander Zalm is not the
father to that vast majority of
students who received him so well.
The only other meaning of father
that I can think of is in the religious
sense such as "Our Father". God
help us all if that is your meaning.
Geer blasts avant garde NDP
As we approach the final days of
the election, New Democrats are
aghast and demoralized at their loss
of public support. Why don't the
people like them? Why is Bill
Vander Zalm so popular? What
about the issues?
It   is  precisely  because  of  the
Meet Brass
On Monday, October 20th, 1986,
from 7:00 to 10:00 p.m. in the Pit,
students have an opportunity to
meet the UBC Brass informally.
President Strangway, Chancellor
Wyman and members of the administration and Board of Governors will be on hand to answer
questions and drink beer. If you
have concerns about issues such as
B-lot parking, tuition fees, quality
of education etc., there will be no
better opportunity for you to get
answers from UBC's decision
makers. Hope to see you there.
Simon Seshadri
President
228-3972
issues that the people will vote
Socred. Premier Vander Zalm
stands for balanced, pragmatic
government and free enterprise in
the marketplace. Where does the
NDP stand?
The New Democratic Party is the
same old coalition of loud special
interest groups. The people do not
want government by the one who
drowns everyone else out. They do
not want government bureaucrats,
radical feminists, Native Indian activists, and radical left-wing poverty
groups controlling their lives.
The people do not want a govern
ment that holds cabinet meetings in
the back room of Odyssey Imports.
They do not want to be ruled by
people who sip Espresso at La
Quena while listening to
Nicaraguan folk songs. British Columbians do not want government
by people who stage anti-nuclear
'die-ins' at the U.S. consulate, people whose only knowledge of the
world comes from a Clash album.
In short, British Columbians do
not want a New Democratic Party
government.
Jeff Baturin
applied science 4
That point, however, is minor.
My real criticism is the line that instead of antagonizing the Socreds
we should be listening to "what Mr.
Vander Zalm has to say." Exactly
what has he said so far? He has
done a fair amount of Ottawa
bashing, saying we are not getting
our fair share from Ottawa. That is
old stuff in this province; I can
show examples from pre-World
War I of that.
The only policy that I have heard
Vander Zalm make is the one of
how the Socreds are going to create
500,000 new jobs. I saw it on
BCTV. They really did not say how
it would happen, although a lot of
party bigshots got up to assure us of
how great it will be.
The fact that we do not even have
anywhere close to 500,000
unemployed in this province means
nothing, it will happen according to
Vander Zalm. Otherwise, I have
heard him say nothing except his
campaign is to be run on style with
no substance, he will not debate
with anybody or tell what he will do
if he wins the election. Besides that,
all he has told us is to 'trust him'
(something I will not do).
I would like to finish my article
with two facts for Rafe that cannot
be misconstrued, and one speculation that is solely my own and for
which I have no basis in fact.
Anyway, here you go.
Fact: B.C. has the lowest participation rate in post secondary
education in the country. This process is considered irrelevant by our
present government.
Fact: The tuition rates at the
universities in B.C. are amongst the
highest in Canada.
Speculation: If the Social Credit
win this election, tuition fees will
skyrocket. The excuse will probably
be there is no money, whilst another
billion or so is being spent on the
newest mega-project (I say a Site C
Dam costing roughly three billion
dollars).
Enjoy those facts and speculation
Rafe. After all you must have at
least two years left in university if
you're in second year. Hopefully
you won't have to get a job while
going to school. Our jobless rate is
the highest in the country, and our
minimum wage is the lowest.
David Juliusson
international relations 4
Bill Vander Zalm's democracy scary
By CHRIS FRASER
Perhaps the most notable feature
of this election campaign is the
overwhelming feeling of incredulity
one gets while observing the various
manoeuvres of Socred party brass
and hacks alike. Distortion and
disinformation abound, and confused thinking manifests itself at
every opportunity.
THE UBYSSEY
October 17, 1986
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday
throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not necessarily those
of the administration or the AMS. Member Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB
241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
"Vote for me," pleaded John Ehinger to the assorted masses. "Why should we?" retorted Jeff Buttle.
"Yeah, what's so good about you?" echoed Svetozar Kontic. Evelyn Jacob and Jennifer Lyall didn't
know either so they asked party faithful Cassandra Freeman who retreated to a corner to eat chocolate
chip cookies. Peter Berlin woke up and wanted to know what he was missing. "Nothing, he won't
talk," volunteered Robert Beynon. "Just more pre-election politicking," added Patti Rather. "What,
another election?" shrieked Tony Roberts. And all the candidates began to be silly. Chris Fraser, Mark
Leiren Young, and Allison Felker ripped each other apart in front of an appreciative audience while
I Ronald Stewart applied his favourite smile and David Ferman reserved more radio spots. Michael
I Groberman refused to get involved, but Victor Wong obligingly smiled for the camera and Malcolm
I Pearson even kissed Janice Irving, Nora Reach, Peter McDougall, Javier X, Corinne, Glenn McDonald .
I   and Rory Allen. Stephen Wisenthal organized a party to take all our minds off it.
Wednesday's noon hour SUB
auditorium speech by NDP leader
Bob Skelly typifies this. As Skelly
commented on minister of post
secondary education Russ Fraser's
special advice for students not having enough money to attend a college or university, a Young Socred
in the crowd eagerly raised a sign
reading "Stop the Gutter Politics".
This was a ridiculous attempt to
stifle legitimate debate, on a key
election issue, but even more amazing was the fact that, simultaneously, another Young Socred self-
righteously held aloft another sign
saying "Bob Skelly B.S." (i.e. Bull
Shit)
But this is all in an honest
minimum wage day's work for the
Socreds and their freshly
"renovated" democracy-equals-
stage-presence leader, Mr. Vander
Zalm. Political debates with opposition parties, we are told, are
useless; they only provide a platform for these parties to outline
their policies (Isn't that what
democracy is about; presenting options to the electorate?); candidates
— especially those vulnerable first-
time virgins — are advised, if not
told, to avoid public debates.
Senior Socreds are quoted as saying
that, because they are in power,
they needn't bother with such
democratic trifles.
Socred policy and party positions
on issues of importance to the elec
torate remain veiled, Mr. Vander
Zalm commenting prophetically
during the Socred leadership campaign that "the smart candidate
avoids detailed policy statements,
for they rarely help and can do you
harm . . . your answers should concentrate on style." (Province July
27, '86)
This is democracy Socred-style.
"Why now?" asks a sincere-
looking Mr. Vander Zalm in
newspaper ads. "Because the people of British Columbia want a
fresh start". This is surprising
because it is admission that continued Socred rule as the "restraint
years" would impact negatively on
B.C. But still, a fresh start? From
who? A veteran of twenty years in
politics; twenty years of blatant
contradictions?
Most recently, Mr. Vander Zalm
has called for an end to confrontation, yet stated that "the (public)
mood isn't for avoiding confrontation. Once you do that, you're admitting that you are prepared to
capitulate" (Province July 27,
1986) and suggested a Royal Commission into education after having
said with regard to education cutbacks, "our education system has
not suffered at all". (Vancouver
Sun April 2, '83) Double-talk like
this is not a fresh start. It is merely
the continuation of a Socred tradition.
In the same newspaper ad, Mr.
Vander Zalm speaks of people wanting to become involved in our
democracy, saying that: "They
have valuable local knowledge and
fresh new ideas." How incredible!!
This from a man who claimed he
was "really the founder of
restraint" (Easy Living Dec-Jan
'84), the Socred policy which has
been a systematic assault on
grassroots democratic infrastructure.
Community college boards of
See page 10 Friday, October 17,1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
SPECIAL Xi
Skelly skins stylish Socreds
By DAVID FERMAN
Appearing confident and displaying none of the much publicized
nervousness, NDP leader Bob Skelly slammed the Social Credit
government and delivered key NDP
policy in a speech to an overflowing
crowd in SUB Auditorium Wednesday.
Skelly criticized the Socred
record on education, specifically
government cutbacks.
"B.C. has the lowest participa
tion rate in Canada — Why? I'll tell
you why. Social Credit mismanagement."
"Cuts have resulted in a denial of
access to education. The statistics
don't lie," he said.
Skelly briefly outlined the NDP
policy on post-secondary education.
"We want to reduce tuition fees
bv funding universities properly,"
he said.
Skelly said an NDP government
would make student
grants, eliminated by the Socreds in
1984, available again.
The NDP leader said the
minimum wage was "totally inadequate" and that provinces with the
highest minimum wages, Saskatchewan and Manitoba, have the
lowest unemployment rates in
Canada. He then repeated his promise to increase the minimum wage
by one dollar to $4.65 an hour.
Skelly made pointed attacks on
premier Bill Vander Zalm.
Massachusetts is an economic
success because it values education
and has innovative economic
policies, said Skelly.
"It is a state willing to trade on
its wits. Can you imagine Bill
Vander Zalm trading on his wits?"
asked Skelly.
Skelly's speech was interrupted a
number of times by hecklers but he
snapped back sharply each time. A
heckler asked Skelly why he didn't
Debate degenerates into debacle
By ALLISON FELKER
What started out as a long-
awaited political debate turned into
a shouting match when members of
UBC's Young Socreds and the
NDP went on the air Thursday on
CITR radio.
At the start of the debate NDP
member Robbie Fleming criticized
the Socred government's elimination of student grants, which have
resulted in average debt loads of
$15,000 for graduating students.
Young Socred president John
Landis accepted that post-
secondary students were going
through a "tough: time."
"I don't agree that student aid
has been underfunded".    Premier
Vander Zalm was open, and accepted the Young Socred's suggestion of loan remissions and more
student assistance," he said.
"How can you give more student
aid when there is no money?" asked
Fleming, who said education, social
services, and welfare rates have
been ignored by the Socreds.
Mega projects such as Northeast
Coal and Expo have been financed
at the expense of social programs,
said Fleming, "which even Socred
ministers don't think will work."
Fleming spoke about the NDP's
Youth policy for those under 25
years, which would guarantee two
years of either education, work or
job related training.
"That's just false promises and
generalities," said Landis. "What
kind of jobs will it get us? sweeping
streets?"
"Why do you think we're in bad
straits, John?" answered Fleming.
"It's because of your government.''
Fleming and Landis were also
asked to comment on the 15 per
cent tariff imposed by the U.S. on
Canadian lumber Thursday.
Landis said: "1 am disappointed,
but considering the magnitude of
the tariff, we're lucky. I don't see
what Bob Skelly would have done,
with his antagonistic attitude
towards dealing with the U.S."
Fleming said the tariff was higher
than industrial analysts predicted.
Job horizon to the east
By PATTI FLATHER
A group of young British Columbians who left the province to find
work took a half-page advertisement in Vancouver Province
newspaper Thursday to urge B.C.
voters to throw the Social Credit
government out of office on Oct.
22.
The ad, signed by 37 people, called the Social Credit government
"short-sighted", and said the
signatories are "among thousands
of British Columbians who have
been compelled to leave our homes
and seek livelihood outside the province."
According to Statistics Canada,
Socred skips concert
Rock for Brains, a benefit concert for post-secondary education in
B.C., was held at the Commodore
last night without a Social Credit
speaker present.
Although both NDP MLA Bob
Williams and Social Credit minister
of post secondary education Russ
Fraser originally agreed to appear at
the event, only Williams spoke.
Fraser cancelled out earlier in the
week.
"After his statements about the
poor not being able to afford
university I guess he reconsidered,"
said after his speech. "I'd
go into hiding too."
"B.C. is the worst province in the
country in terms of young people
getting to university," Williams
said. "We're at half the national
average and the northern and interior regions are at half that
again."
"It's nothing short of a scandal
in terms of discrimination," he
said.
Williams said the education crisis
is partly a result of the Social Credit
view that education is for the middle and upper classes.
"We should see it as a subsidized
system for anyone who has the
ability," he said.
Fraser's absence, despite his announced intentions to appear, was
not surprising to some ofthe people
in attendance. "He's a typical non-
debating Socred," said Aldridge, a
third year political science student
at SFU.
Joanne Miller, another SFU student, agreed, adding, "the man
cannot defend himself."
Alex Laverick, businessman from
New Westminster, also condemned
Socred education policies: "I
wanted to go to university but I
couldn't get the money," he said.
"The way they're making education
so elitist is not good."
"If the NDP gets into office," he
continued, "there may be some
changes made because they seem to
have a more serious attitude
towards education than the present
government does."
The concert featured Vancouver
band DOA, backed up by Key
Change and the Rocking Fools. All
of the bands exhibited an anti-
Socred, pro-education stance, DOA
altering the lyrics of Creedence
Clearwater Revival's "Willy and
the Poor Boys" to "Billy and the
Socreds" in order to make their
point.
there has been a net interprovincial
loss of 3,516 people from B.C.
from January to May this year —
the highest of any province.
Part of the advertisement reads:
"We were forced to leave in part
because of the disastrous economic
and social policies pursued by the
Social Credit government."
The people who financed the
$1,600 advertisement call
themselves Displaced British Columbians, and many are former
UBC students.
Bill Tieleman, now an administrator with OXFAM in Toronto, organized fundraising for the
message to B.C. voters. Tieleman
said in a telephone interview from
Toronto Thursday that he left B.C.
in December 1983, a few months
after he completed his masters
degree in political science at UBC.
"I was unemployed when I left,"
said Tieleman. "The economy was
nowhere and Social Credit was only
exacerbating the situation."
The initial idea for the advertisement came in April from former
UBC student Chris Gainor, who
was Ubyssey editor from 1977 to
1978. Tieleman said George Her-
manson, the United Church
chaplain at UBC until 1984, also attended the first planning meeting.
After,   said   Tieleman,   "we
just made up a list of everyone we
knew from B.C. who had left."
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"If you watched the news, John,
you'd know that," he said.
"Try doing homework, Robbie"
answered Landis.
Menger also asked Landis and
Fleming to comment on Skelly's
style throughout the campaign.
Fleming said it was "unfortunate" that the media focused on
his earlier "blunders". "The media
is a warping-force ip this election,"
he said.
"Skelly", Landis commented,
"is overshadowed by members of
his own party. He said that all Skelly said in his speech at UBC Wednesday was "Socred bash." Skelly
compared UBC to Harvard and
other "elitist" universities which
Landis said Fleming would "fit
right into." Asked to respond to
the Ubyssey opinion poll, which
showed 40.5 per cent of students
would vote N.D.P. and 27.2 per
cent Socred. Fleming said he didn't
think the poll was that different
from the rest of the province.
Landis said he could understand
why students would vote for the
NDP when Skelly promised student
grants. "It's a tooth fairy approach," said Landis.
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move to Massachusetts.
"Because we want to take those
ideas and move them up her;,"
Skelly replied.
Skelly attacked post-secondary
education minister Russ Fraser's
remarks that students who couldn't
afford to go to school pos'pone
their education.
"I believe Vander Zalm should
have absolutely repudiated the
statements of his minister Russ
Fraser. I would have fired him
outright," said Skelly.
He criticized Vander Zalm's .:am-
paign as negative and defeatist.
"His campaign means more
restraint and more
unemployment."
Skelly blasted the Socreds on
economic responsibility.
"The ultimate refuge for a
Socred is where is the money coming from? Where did the money
come from for Expo? asked Skelly.
Where did the money come from
for the Coqhuihalla and North east
Coal come from?" Skelly said: "I'll
tell you, it was borrowed, every
nickel of it. Bill Bennett and Bill
Vander Zalm have mortgaged our
future."
BOB SKELLY
criticizing
2j
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THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 17,1986
SPECIAL X
THEP
"If the Socreds attack
on the education system
continues then all our
universities are in danger
of becoming second-rate
institutions — Tom
Brown,
THE TOP CONTENDERS. . Dick
Gathercole (far left) and Darlene
Marzari (left) hope to be smiling,
New Democrat MLAs next Thursday
?**■•*
By SVETOZAR KONTIC
There is a restraint policy for
education and services but not for
the Social Credit government said
the two NDP candidates for Point
Grey.
In an interview with the Ubyssey,
Darlene Marzari and Dick Gathercole, said the Social Credit government has made a determined attack
on education in B.C.
"The demoralization of education has been so thoroughly intended — it's not a lack of priority, it's
#  DUO ATTACKS PREMIERS
BOGUS RESTRAINT POLICY
"Vander Zalm considers himself to be the father of
restraint. What we have to remember is that there is
no restraint for him or his friends" —Dick Gathercole, NDP.
a real attack, said Marzari.
Gathercole said: "Vander Zalm
considers himself to be the father of
restraint in B.C. What we have to
remember is that there is no
restraint for him or his friends."
While the provincial budget has
remained the same, education and
LIBERAL: BASHING
EDUCATION TO STOP
By PETER BERLIN
Education is the crucial issue in
the election, not just in the Point
Grey Riding but throughout the
province says Tom Brown, one of
the Liberal candidates running in
Point Grey.
"Education is the key priority,"
THE   TRUE   GRITS.    .    .Doreen
Braverman (above) and Tom Brown
election v
specialA
Brown told the Ubyssey on Thursday. He said if BC is to compete internationally, a higher proportion
of high school graduates must further their education.
"Sixteen per cent of high school
grads in BC go on to higher education, compared to about 20 per
cent in the USA and 33 per cent in
Japan," said Brown. "I am concerned about the students who have
the ability but not the finances to go
on."
Brown said his contact with
voters during the campaign confirms they see education as the big
issue in the Point Grey riding.
"They want the education
bashing to stop. If the Socred's attack on the education system continues, then all our universities are
in danger of becoming second-rate
institutions," he said.
"The most important thing is a
change in attitude and a committment to universities as the cornerstone of the future of the province," said Brown.
He is more cautious, however,
when it comes to committing
himself to large-scale changes in
university funding. He said the
Liberals would "make a start" at
bringing university funding up to
the levels across Canada, and "a
start" at bringing student aid back
to the previous levels of $35 million
in 1982.
Doreen Braverman the other
Liberal candidate in Point Grey and
a local businesswoman, told The
Ubyssey she would like to see tuition fees in B.C. eliminated eventually. She said funding would
come from increased provincial aid
and from the private sector. Almost
all of the Point Grey riding falls
within the federal constituency of
Vancouver Quadra which is held by
Liberal leader John Turner.
Brown said the most positive
aspect of the Quadra Liberal victory in the federal election was that
the people who worked on the
Turner campaign are working for
the provincial party in Point Grey.
social services have received continuous cutbacks, said Gathercole.
"It is a matter of priorities in
deciding where the money goes," he
said.
Marzari said there is no rationale
for government spending in B.C.
"With the Fund for Excellence,
universities are in the position of
grovelling for money at the priority
of some government official," she
said.
Marzari criticized then civil servant Norman Spector's appointment to a teaching post at UBC.
"The government said we'll
make it worth your while to hire
Norman Spector. What thev are
really saying, is, try not to hire Norman Spector and see what
happens," said Marzari.
She said the provincial government does not contribute any
money to post-secondary education.
"The Socreds are using only
federal equalization payments
rather than contributing their share
to post-secondary education, said
Marzari.
Marzari added that tuition fees,
significantly higher than those in
eastern provinces discourage
students from attending universities.
"We must remove barriers and
provide the best opportunities to
our students," she said.
Gathercole said the NDP's Youth
"The students have
been left adrift in a sea of
sharks. Steps must be
immediately taken."
— Douglas Dunn, Green
Party.
DOUGLAS  DUNN.   .    aiming at
the greening of Point Grey
Guarantee program, designed to
guarantee young people either a job
or training, will improve youth
unemployment.
The program tabled in the
legislature in the spring, promises
youth two years of either education,
or work, or job-related training. It
would cost about $150,000,000 and
employ approximately 60,000 people between the ages of 18 and 24.
The bill was ignored by the Socreds
and failed with the dissolution of
cabinet.
"We are not doing any favours.
We are looking at job intensive activities which benefit the province,"
said Gathercole.
Marzari added the cost of the student grant program is not significant compared with Socred
megaprojects.
"It is untrue that grants are not
beneficial because of the high interest payments the government
must make, which is what Socreds
argue said Marzari.
Gathercole said the universities in
B.C. must pay competitive salaries.
"It's up to the university administration to give raises," he said.
Provincial funding has to be
redirected to do this, said Gathercole, emphasizing there must be a
change in priorities. "Ask Pat
McGeer where the money for the
tunnel to Vancouver Island is going
to come from," he said.
Marzari said student housing
would be a top priority of the NDP.
"It would be nice to have student
accomodation in town. The university should set up Co-op houses for
students," said Marzari, adding the
scheme would not be free.
EXCELLENC
By CORINNE BJORGE
Douglas Dunn slammed current
education funding and called for
closer links between the community
and the educational system in an interview with the Ubyssey Tuesday.
Dunn, a 27 year old BCIT
business graduate, is the Green Party candidate for Point Grey in the
up-coming provincial election.
"It's totally unacceptable to expect a student to graduate with a
$15,000 debt," said Dunn. "No
business would be allowed to start
up with even a $10,000 debt load",
he said.
Dunn said the Green Party
favours a return to provincial levels
of funding to student aid, which
have dropped from $33 million in
1983 to $12.5 million today.
"The students have been left
adrift in a sea of sharks. Steps must
be immediately taken," said Dunn.
The Social Credit's Excellence
Fund was not the way to go, he
said. "I personally believe the Excellence Fund is an embarrassment,
and    I    find    the    term    itself Friday, October 17, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
ELECTION SPECIAL Xi
McGEER OFFERS
SMALLER PIE
ivf
THE INCUMBENT. . .Pat McGeer (right) defending his patch for the
Socreds
By EVELYN JACOB
"I said it publicly then and I'll
say it now — everyone should take
less," said Social Credit candidate
Pat McGeer, referring to the Bennett government's restraint program.
McGeer, 58, who is seeking reelection on the Socred ticket with
candidate Kim Campbell, compared restraint with the Depression
in an interview Wednesday.
"If the pie shrinks you have to
take away money from someone,"
said McGeer. He said B.C. faced
hard times in the early 80's, but he
is proud of the Social Credit
government's record regardless,
particularly in education.
"That (restraint) is the reality we
were faced with. If unions demand
more, you have to take away from
others," said McGeer.
Despite four years of government
cutbacks, McGeer said B.C. enjoyed its greatest growth in education.
"When people were saying we
were hit by restraint we never had
more students going to colleges and
universities, or institutions to serve
them," he said.
Although university enrolment
increased despite restraint, univer-
SCHOOL SYSTEM ANTIQUATED
By EVELYN JACOB
Kim Campbell is worried about
education in B.C.
Campbell, a professor of political
science at UBC from 1975-78,
former Vancouver Schoolboard
trustee and assistant to Bill Bennett,
said she is concerned grade 12
students are not prepared to enter
university.
"In the 60's and 70's an anti-
achievement attitude pervaded the
public school system," said Campbell who is seeking election in the
Point Grey riding with long-time
MLA Pat McGeer.
"Teachers thought if you pressed
students to work it was unfair. I
think we went too far the other way
and didn't encourage them
enough," she said.
Schools should be open to
everyone in B.C., said Campbell,
including those who cannot afford
it. She said remarks by post-
secondary education minister Russ
Fraser that students should put off
their education if they cannot afford it, is not the Social Credit's
policy.
"Anyone who
criticizes us must be
hostile —building good
educational institutions
has been our priority."
— Kim Campbell, Socred.
"I don't think Russ meant what
he said," Campbell said. She said
the Socreds did not do a good job
of dispelling the belief that restraint
was an attack on education.
"Anyone who criticizes us now
must be hostile," said Campbell.
"Building good educational institutions has been our priority."
Campbell said student debts are
no greater now in terms of purchasing power than they were when she
attended university in the 60's.
"Unemployment is the real problem," said Campbell who would
like to see more work-study related
jobs for students.
Asked if a ceiling should be placed on the amount of money
students borrow to go to university,
Campbell said she was not aware
E FUND EMBARRASSING
repugnant.
Instead of short-term solutions
such as the Excellence Fund, Dunn
said he envisions closer links between the educational system and
the community.
"The idea is that a student interacts with the community" he
said. "The boundaries between the
school and the community should
cease to exist."
Dunn suggested areas of community study to include resource
management, peace education, and
non-violent conflict resolution.
Dunn also saw the ties between
education and community as a
possible source of job creation.
"I don't believe any politician
can create jobs. Job creation is so
big and all encompassing," said
Dunn. He said the alternative is job
creation within the community.
"You get feedback and you're
aware of your choices. You are in
the work environment so you can
see how it relates to your degree"
said Dunn.
Green Party policy stresses the
productivity of the private business
sector. "Sixty to 70 per cent of jobs
are in small business," said Dunn.
Dunn said that big business could
also be encouraged to create more
jobs by a more efficient use of the
recycling system. 5,000 to 10,000
more jobs could be created by encouraging logging companies to do
better salvage and recovery jobs,"
he said.
"We need to move towards more
self-sufficiency in our basic commodities by encouraging the purchasing of locally produced products," said Dunn.
Dunn said the Green Party has
received increasing support and
have twice the number of candidates running in this election.
"We expect to surpass the Conservatives" he said.
"When people vote Green they
are making a statement," said
Dunn. "They want a non-nuclear,
non-violent future for their
children. The globe is a finite place
and we must learn to live on it," he
added.
there was no limit on loans, but is
interested in finding out more about
the problems of student aid.
"People who want to pay back
their loans need help," said Campbell, who favors better remission
programs over grants. She said she
would like to look at the grant program but added she has heard
negative criticism about it from her
colleagues.
The grant system in B.C. was
eliminated by the Socreds in 1984
and replaced with an all-loan
system. Students in B.C. became
the only ones in Canada who do not
receive non-repayable bursaries.
Asked why provincial funding to
universities has decreased over the
last four years, Campbell blamed
the federal government. She said
the Canadian government cut the
amount of money allocated for
health care, forcing provinces to
take more money out of education.
"Every province in Canada is objecting to it, but the feds know they
won't cut back on health care,"
said Campbell.
"If we got all the money we
should from the federal government, we wouldn't have a defecit,"
she added.
Faculty heads, presidents of
universities and education critics
meanwhile say the provinces have
ducked their share of fiscal responsibility by not contributing their fair
share of money for education.
"Tuition fees in BC are
the greatest bargain a
young person can have"
— Pat McGeer, Socred.
sities' operating budgets were slashed, the student grant system was
eliminated and faculty salaries were
frozen.
But McGeer defended Socred
policy. He said five new provincial
education institutes were opened
during this time, including the Open
Learning Institute and the
Knowledge network.
Critics have blamed B.C.'s low
post-secondary participation rate
on poor access to universities for
students living outside the Lower
Mainland, but McGeer says those
students may now obtain degrees by
satellite, and through the OLI.
Asked how a Social Credit
government would address the
default rate on loans which have
been increasing steadily and are
now approaching 20 per cent in
B.C., McGeer said: "When I last
looked into student aid the default
rates were very low, even during the
dark years of unemployment."
Bankers and student aid officers
all over the country, meanwhile
worry that skyrocketing student
debts are driving people into personal bankruptcy.
But McGeer insists provincial
funding to student aid is the highest
it has ever been.
"It's more than tripled this
year," he said.
McGeer's remarks contradict
statistics, however, which show
provincial funding to student aid
dropped from $33 million in 1982 to
$12.5 million in 1986.
Faced with paying the highest tuition fees in the country, McGeer
was asked how the Social Credit
party would alleviate high costs to
students.
"Students should be aware of the
real cost of education," said
McGeer. "Tuition fees in B.C. are
the greatest bargain a young person
can have," he said.
McGeer said the universities set
tuition fees, which should not be
dependent on the political process.
Although all three of B.C.'s
universities have warned they stand
to lose their competitiveness as
faculty leave for other institutions.
McGeer said he isn't sure of the exact relationship between faculty
salaries and the quality of education.
"The more productive people
were paid less in the labs I worked
in at UBC," said McGeer.
"It's always nice to pay professors more, but I believe the
universities should select the stars
and reward them accordingly. You
should pay the Wayne Gretzkys
what they're worth," he said.
Asked where the money would
come from to reward outstanding
faculty, McGeer said "it has
nothing to do with government
policy. It's how the universities
marshal their own resources."
McGeer served as provincial
education minister from 1975-1979,
and universities minister from
1979-85. A UBC graduate, McGeer
received a medical degree in 1958,
and has been head of UBC's
neurological department since 1964.
McGeer and Garde Gardom won
45,520 votes in the Point Grey
riding in the last provincial election,
compared with 32,461 NDP votes.
■»"VJ
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KIM    CAMPBELL.
newcomer
.Socred
election v
specialA Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 17, 1986
ELECTION SPECIAL X
111
s, no money, no school
By PETER MacDOUGALL
B.C. has the lowest post-
secondary education participation
rate in Canada due to a combination of high unemployment and expensive education, students and
government critics say.
Lome Nicholson, NDP post-
secondary education critic, said the
economic recession in B.C. which
was prolonged by government inaction, is preventing students from
earning enough to fund their education.
"Even if students take a year or
two out to work, they still lose
ground economically," said
Nicholson.
According to Statistics Canada,
the B.C. participation rate is 17 per
cent, while Quebec enjoys a 34 per
cent participation. The national
average is 25 per cent.
Russ Fraser, post-secondary
education minister, said the
Statistics Canada figures are not accurate for B.C.
"The Stats Can survey covers the
age group of 18-24, while the
average age of a college-university
student in this province is 26.
Therefore thousands of students are
excluded from this survey," said
Fraser.
Fraser said the number of grade
twelve graduates going into post
secondary programs has increased
from 18 to 31 per cent since 1978.
But Nicholson said he has no
faith in the statistics used by Fraser.
"Comparing 1978 to 1984 is like
comparing 1950 to 1920. There has
been as much change and development in 1978-1984 as there was in
those years. The Socreds are always
dreaming up new statistics to refute
statistical measures that have been
consistant for years."
Steven Scott, executive officer
for the Canadian Federation of
Students, said an important factor
in B.C.'s low participation rate is
high tuition fees.
"Tuition fees in Quebec are approximately half those of B.C.,"
said Scott.
John Waters, president of the
College Institute Educators
Association, said tuition fees have
increased  134 per cent in the last
five years at the college-institute
level.
Waters said the problems of access faced by students living in
B.C.'s interior also contributes to
the low participation rate! Government cutbacks to funding is the major reason for the problem, says
Waters.
"The Kwantlen College campus
in Langley, the BCIT campus in
Maple Ridge and the David Thompson University Centre in Nelson
have all been wiped out," said
Waters. The College of New
Caledonia, an institution for northern students has also faced
serious government cutbacks.
"The academic university
transfer program has been seriously
cut. Other courses like Fine Arts,
Theater, French and Spanish have
been eliminated," he said.
Nicholson said B.C. students are
at a disadvantage compared to
students in other provinces.
"In B.C., all the universities are
located in a small radius, while in
Alberta they are better located
geographically. In Ontario and
Quebec they (universities) are all
Economic oxilos make a point
From page 3
Letters were mailed out requesting donations and more contact names. More than half of those
contacted donated money, with $40
being the average contribution.
Tieleman said while he was surprised that the provincial election
was called so soon, the fact that Bill
Vander Zalm is leading the B.C.
Social Credit Party has been a boost
to fundraising.
He said people who have left
B.C. remember Vander Zalm's
record as one of confrontation.
Tieleman said Social Credit
policies have made the recession
worse because  the government  is
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not diversifying B.C.'s economy
away from natural resources and
social programs were cut when people needed them most.
"1 don't want B.C. to turn into
an Atlantic province where the
young people have to leave their
homes and never have the opportunity to come back to work and
live," he said.
Tieleman served on the Alma
Mater Society student council as a
graduate student representative in
1982, was active in UBC's Teachers
Assistant Union, and was Ubyssey
news editor from 1979 to 1980.
Other past UBC students who
helped finance the advertisement include Kate Andrew and Sheila
Howick, who both also served on
student council, and Kelley-Jo
Burke, Fraser Easton, Eric Eggertson, Brian Jones, Steve McClure,
Glen Sanford, Julie Wheelwright,
Geof Wheelwright, and Paisley
Woodward.
OFFICE FOR WOMEN STUDENTS
presents
THE
IMPOSTER SYNDROME
Do you feel like a fraud? Do you fear that others see you
as more intelligent than you really are, and that one day
you'll be "found out"? This workshop will explore
causes and consequences of the imposter syndrome and
offer suggestions for overcoming the problem.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 17
12:30-2:20 p.m. WSO Lounge, Brock 223
AMS
CONCERTS
presents
Homecoming "86
with
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OCT. 24th
SUB
Ballroom
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DOUG &
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Want to work on those muscles? Come to the
UBC Aquatic Centre. We are offering introductory weight training classes. Classes will be weekly Monday & Wednesday from 5:30-7:30 p.m.
Cost: $20 for 4 hours of instruction.
Registration: At front desk of UBC
Aquatic Centre.
Maximum class size: 6 people.
Classes will cover basic concepts, exercises and
techniques with emphasis on using weights effectively and safely. Starts Oct. 27, 1986.
REGISTER NOW!
over the place," he said.
The Socred's answer to students
who are unable to attend
metropolitan universities is the
Open Learning Institute, (OLI) said
Nicholson.
"But OLI students don't experience the social life, don't get
lectures, have almost no opportunity to talk with professors, and miss
out on the overall maturing experience that comes with attending
university," says Nicholson.
The prospect of a large debt load
has discouraged many people from
attending a post-secondary institution. B.C.'s student aid program
contains "a miniscule" amount of
money   compared   to   other   pro
vinces, and it no longer has a grant
program, said Waters.
Joyce Statten, Liberal candidate
for Vancouver Little Mountain,
said the Liberal party is committed
to restoring bursary funding to
1983-84 levels.
"It would be a first recourse
(before loans) rather than a last,
and would be based on need," she
said.
But Fraser said the 25 per cent
remission rate on B.C. student
loans is in effect, a grant program.
He also said he's been trying to encourage his provincial counterparts
to lobby the federal government to
engage in a remission program for
Canada student loans.
Steady jobs.
In Point Grey, vote
Darlene Marzari,
Dick Gathercole. mf
DmocrfB
y UBC OFFICE5
AUTOMATION
SHOW
October 22 & 23
SUB Partyroom & 207/209
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For zany wigs, masks,
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This year for October only:
A Whole Specialized Store at
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1023 W. BROADWAY
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733-6116
also as usual at -
The Red Caboose
Kids Only Market
Granville Island
682-1544
554 W. GEORGIA
(Georgia & Seymour)
681-8757 Friday, October 17, 1986
Tile    UBYSSEY
Page 9
ELECTION SPECIAL Xi
Restraint's a surprise
MttCEOfS       VW     »     VOLVO     SPECIALISTS
From page 3
bring government spending under
control and thereby reduce the
growing deficit. But the famous
July 7 budget contained an overall
spending increase of 12.3 per cent,
due primarily to public works spending and uncontrollable increases in
certain social programs, such as
health, care and welfare. The
welfare rolls had grown from
54,770 in June 1981 to 94,000 by
December 1982, leaving the
ministry of Human Resources with
a huge cost overrun.
Legislation included in the July
restraint package called for: the
restriction  of public-sector  union
bargaining rights, government control over school boards, and the
repeal of human rights and tenants'
rights. Many people who had voted
Socred said they felt betrayed and
regretted their vote.
Operation Solidarity, a broad-
based coalition of groups opposed
to the government's policies, was
formed immediately following the
presentation ofthe budget. Popular
protest and union walkouts
escalated and an agreement struck
between union leader Jack Munro
and Premier Bill Bennett, known as
the Kelowna Accord, prevented a
general strike.
While the accord allowed the
B.C.    Government    Employees
Union to negotiate for important
concessions in its contract, most of
the Social Credit's restraint plans
were left unaltered.
The next stage of Social Credit
restraint came with the new budget
of February, 1984.
The budget included even deeper
funding cuts to the public sector
and education. Transfer payments
from the federal government for
post-secondary education were
witheld and welfare payments cut.
Bills repealing the Human Right's
Code and rent controls, thwarted
the previous year, were reintroduced and eventuallv passed in May,
1984.
\h*Vooo0o0
The annual Ubyssey ghost story
contest is back. Prizes will be
awarded to the best ghost story
and best scary graphic (photo or
drawing). The stories must include:
the B-lot gates, the clocktower
pond, a headband, Gorgo the tasty
lime space treat, Pat McGeer's
spectacles and Bill Vander Zalm's
teeth.
The stories must begin:
Whatever it was, it was too thick
and too green to be fog that
rendered the headlights of Selma's
Valiant useless. And the smell . . .
First prize in each category will be
a dinner for two at The Eatery
Restaurant. Second prize will be a
hardcover copy of Stephen King's
new horror novel It, from Duthie
Books.
The winning entries will be
published in the Oct. 31 issue of
The Ubyssey. Entries will be accepted in SUB 241k until Oct. 24.
©o°©
OCTOBER SPECIAL
BOSCH FUEL INJECTION TUNE-UP
ONLY $55 plus parts
• Replace plugs, points, and all filters
• Clean injectors and fuel distributor
• Fine-tune engine
Call Now For An Appointment 731-8171
Complete repair service available
"Your BOSCH Specialists"
Open Monday to Saturday 8:00 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.
1503 W. 3rd Avenue at the entrance to Granville Island
TRUE CHROME AT THIS PRICE!
Larry's Not Kidding!!
EXTRA 10% OFF
WITH AMS CARD
I  Ii
COME and MEET
JOHN 11
Speaking in support of Prov. Liberal candidates in Vancouver Point Grey
DOREEN BRAVERMAN and Dr. TOM BROWN
where?
•  STUDENT UNION BUILDING AUDITORIUM
when?
•  NOON on FRIDAY, OCTOBER 17th
SUBJECT?
"WHY THE ISSUE IS
EDUCATION!
REMEMBER — YOU can VOTE, on ELECTION DAY,
WED., OCT. 22nd, in POINT GREY with only two pieces
of I.D. even if you are not on the Voter's List.
CASE OF 10
$25
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VANCOUVER
263-0878
EVERYONE WELCOME. . .
GREAT GOLF! BEAUTIFUL CLUBHOUSE! FABULOUS FOOD!
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An Outstanding Public Course and Clubhouse
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(Monday through Friday)
11:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
224-7513
reservations
suggested
The Thunderbird Lounge at the University
Golf Club is pleased to present it's Fall
Entertainment Schedule by presenting:
ANDY THOMA
Thurs., Fri. & Sat., Oct. 16 - 17 - 18
8:00 p.m.-12:00 a.m.
We can honestly say we have the best prices in town!
University Golf Club
^VmWWjMQ.     5185 UNIVERSITY BLVD., VANCOUVER, B.C.
?«|W7 Banquet & Office Phone: 224-7513
''^V^T Pro Shop Phone: 224-1818 Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 17, 1986
Zalm can't be trusted
From page 4
directors, once elected from the
communities in which the colleges
are located, are a case in point.
These boards, responsible for
financial decisions, were eliminated
by the Socreds as restraint was
brought to bear on the post secondary education system. They were
replaced by sham boards consisting
of prominent local Socred hacks appointed centrally from Victoria.
In my riding, the chair of this
sham board, after having helped to
generate a $300,000 dollar deficit
for the college over the past summer, is now the Socred candidate in
the upcoming election.
However, Mr. Vander Zalm's
true distaste for the grassroots was
revealed in his infamous Bill 72, the
Land Use Act. This would have
stripped all regional districts of
their planning power, and abolished
the Gulf Islands Trust had his
Socred colleagues been insane
enough to endorse it.
But why is it that Mr. Vander
Zalm will not address and debate
the issues honestly? A look at his
last political foray provides an obvious reason.
In that campaign for the
mayoralty of Vancouver, Mr.
Vander Zalm was very specific in
his stands on relevant issues. He
even issued a policy leaflet saying
that his plans for Vancouver included "free economic zone status for
(the) city, like Hong Kong and
Singapore".
The result of this campaign?
Vancouverites rejected Mr. Vander
Zalm. It was this failure of Mr.
Vander Zalm in 'the Vancouver
mayoralty campaign which
necessitated the current absurd attempt to present him to the public
as "changed" or "reformed". This
attempt, involving an incredible-
faith on the Socred's part in the
public's amnesia, has succeeded
with tacit media support. An
analysis of Mr. Vander Zalm's
political career when he "retired"
yielded the conclusion that: "there
is no middle road with Bill Vander
Zalm"    (Vancouver   Sun    April
Come On Kids - Write like us
TODAY
The Ubyssey Presents
NO FUN
SUB 241 k
Expo 86 official folk-rock duo
3:30 - 7:30 p.m.
Fri. Oct. 17
Amber liquids will be available
W& Studio sa
DREAMING and DUELLING
by John Lazarus and Joa Lazarus
OCTOBER 4-25
Tues. - Sat. 8 p.m.
Sun. 2:30 &8 p.m. (2 for 1)
RESERVATIONS
324-5227
Langara Campus, 100 W. 49th Ave.
^Artfiur&
FOR MEN
For smartly classic or
uniquely original clothes for
all occasions from casual to
formal wear.
The consignment shop with a difference.
5581 Dunbar St. at 40th Ave. Ph. 266-3393
Open Seven Days A Week
2-'84).
But his return to politics has been
greeted with no analysis, no comparison of what he is saying now
with what he said in the mayoralty
race, or in his controversial years as
a Socred cabinet minister.
To a first-time voter, it would
likely seem impossible that the man
smiling on their TV screen once
said, "If anybody is able to work,
but refuses to pick up the shovel, we
will find ways of dealing with him".
How should Mr. Vander Zalm's
statement that elections should be
held at a set time so the voting
public "knows when an election is
going to be held" be interpreted
when in reality he uses the shortest
campaign length possible and sets
his poll date for a week after the
end of Expo?
Obviously this cut out several
days of campaign coverage because
of the diversion of media attention,
and ensured that the post Expo
unemployment and deficit will not
impact on the electorate's con-
siousness.	
Chris Fraser stays up all night and
socializes with cadavers in his spare
time.
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Social Credit
Kim Campbell     Pat McGeer
Energy
Young and experienced, Kim Campbell has
the enthusiasm to tackle the issues. Kim has
taken the initiative in seeking solutions to
problems in her meetings with business,
native, and education leaders.
Ability
Kim knows what it means to be a responsible
decision maker. As a policy advisor to the
Premier's office (September 1985-June
1986), she worked on the most important
issues facing us - including education,
aboriginal matters and land use questions.
Service
Kim has been director of the University Nonprofit Building Society building non-profit
housing in Kerrisdale and False Creek. Kim
was director of the Dunbar Point Grey
Southlands Family and Youth Association
which established a rehabilitative program
for young offenders.
Leadership
Pat is minister responsible for B.C. Pavilion
at Expo and the highly productive Business
Visitor's Program. He has developed high
technology into B.C.'s fourth largest industry.
Pat has helped introduce Emily Carr College
of Art, Open Learning Institute, Advanced
Systems Institute and the Justice Institute.
Experience
Pat is currently Minister of International
Trade, Science and Investment. He has 24
years of working experience representing
Point Grey in the B.C. Legislature - 10 years
as a cabinet minister.
Commitment
Pat is committed to free enterprise, sound
economic policies, services for people, new
investment in B.C. and the preservation of all
suitable University Endowment Lands for
park purposes.
A New Team for Point Grey Friday, October 17, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
('4&0fl
TODAY
UBC STUDENT LIBERALS
John Turner speaks on Education issues, noon,
SUB Ballroom.
UBC NEW DEMOCRATS
Pre-election   victory   bzzr   garden,    everyone
welcome, 4:30-9 p.m., SUB 205.
MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Bzzr  garden  with   free  film   "Easy   Rider,"   4
p.m.-7:30 p.m., SUB 215.
AMS ROCKERS
General meeting re: Next year's booking/events,
noon, SUB 241A.
UBC FENCING CLUB
Fencing practice, new members welcome, drop-
in fee S3, 6:30 p.m., Osborne Gym B.
ST. MARK'S FAITH AND JUSTICE
Free Friday flick: "Dream of a Free Country — A
Message From Nicaraguan Women," 7:30 p.m..
Music room, St. Mark's College.
UBC MAIN LIBRARY
Tour of the Library, noon, meet at Main Library
entrance hall.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Practice session, noon. Ballroom or Party room.
UBC FENCING CLUB
Fending practices —  new members welcome,
6:30 p.m., Osborne Gym B, drop-in fee $3.00.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Practice Session, noon. Ballroom or Party room.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Sportnite-floor hockey, 5:30-8:30 p.m., Osborne
F, c'mon out and support your team! $1.00.
UBC STUDENTS FOR PEACE
AND DISARMAMENT
Rim:  Paul  Newman in  "A Step Away from
War", noon, SUB 205.
NATIVE INDIAN STUDENT UNION
Election,   8:30-4:30.   NISU/NITEP   Hut,   6375
Biological Sciences Rd., behind Scarfe.
PRE-MEDICAL SOCIETY
Badminton  and  pizza   night,  5:30-7:30 p.m.,
Osborne Gym A.
CHINESE VARISTY CLUB
Gym night, 9:30-11:30 p.m., Osborne Gym.
THE UBYSSEY
Recruitment bzzr event featuring No Fun, the official folk-rock duo of Expo '86 — Come on kids,
write like us, 3:30-7:30 p.m., SUB 241k.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversational   meeting,   noon,   International
House, Main Lounge.
SATURDAY
UBC JAPAN EXCHANGE CLUB
Broomball, 9:30 p.m.-10:30 p.m., UBC ice rink,
$1 members, $2 non-members.
SUNDAY
UBC DANCE CLUB
Practice session, noon-4:X p.m.. Ballroom or
Party room.
AMS ROCKERS
Sunday Services Jam, 12p.m.-4 p.m., SUB119.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Worship Service, 12:00 p.m., 2490 W. 2nd Ave..
bottom of Kits United Church.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Practice Session, noon. Ballroom or Party room.
MONDAY
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENT ASSOCIATION
Second general meeting, noon, SUB 207-209, or
212.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Practice session, noon. Ballroom or Party room.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Movie night, showing "Atlantic City" and "My
Favourite   Year,"   7:30   p.m..   Garden   Room
lounge. Graduate Student Centre.
WEST POINT GREY UNITED CHURCH
All candidates meeting (Point Grey Riding), 7:30
p.m.. West Point Grey United Church, 4595 W.
8th Ave.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
International Film night: "Asuirre, The Wrath of
God," 8 p.m.. Gate 4, International House.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Practice Session, noon, Ballroom or Party room.
TUESDAY
PREMEDICAL SOCIETY
Lecture on  Forensic  Pathology by Dr.   Ferris,
noon. Wood 1.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Practice session, noon, Ballroom or Party room.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Practice Session, noon. Ballroom or Party room.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS MINISTRY
Informal worship, everyone welcome regardless
of denomination, noon, Lutheran Campus Centre.
COMMITTEE AGAINST SEXUAL
HARASSMENT ON CAMPUS
Organizing meeting at 12:30 p.m. at the UBC
Women's Centre.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study and discussion at 12:30 p.m. in Brock
304.
GREENS OF UBC
Will be holding a general meeting, noon in SUB
237.
No Fun
SUB 241k
Today
On Monday, October 20th at 7:30
p.m. you may have your last
chance before the election to question candidates from the Point Grey
riding about their opinions on provincial concerns.
Candidates will meet at West
Point Grey United Church (8th Ave.
and Tolmie St.) at 7:30 p.m. on
Monday Oct. 20th at an All Candidates Meeting sponsored by the
Outreach Committee of the congregation.
Prof. Ken Carty of the UBC
Political Science Department will
chair the meeting. At this time, it is
understood that the following candidates will be present: Doreen
Braverman (Liberal), Tom Brown
(Liberal), Kim Campbell (Social
Credit), Dick Gathercole (NDP),
Darlene Marzari (NDP), Pat McGeer
(Social Credit) and Douglas Dunn
of the Green Party.
•
MOVE-A-THON FOR PEACE
End the Arms Race is sponsoring
a "Move-a-thon for Peace" to take
place October 25, 1986. Participants walk, run, jog, bicycle or
rollerskate around the Stanley Park
Seawall to make money for peace
groups in Vancouver. It starts at 12
noon, from the Art Gallery steps at
Robson Square, and ends at 2:30
p.m. with music and refreshments
at Christchurch Cathedral.
For more information, or to pick
up "Move-a-thon" pledge sheets,
call End the Arms Race at
736-2366.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.75; Additional lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines,
1 day $4.75; Additional lines, 70c. Additional days, $4.25 and 65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders Over $10.00 — Call 228-3977
5 - COMING EVENTS
35 - LOST
85 - TYPING
THE VANCOUVER
INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
Saturday, Oct. 18
ENGINEERING THE
FUTURE
Sir Alan Cottrell, Master,
JESUS COLLEGE,
Cambridge University
LECTURE HALL 2,
UBC WOODWARD
BUILDING
at 8:15 p.m.
LOST THURS.. OCT. 9. Pulsar watch with
brown strap. Sentimental value. Contact
Tom, 222-1178.
KID'S WATCH. "Don't be too late" at pool.
Sat., Oct. 11. Sentimental value. 222-3179,
2759 Melfa Court, Family Housing.
65 - SCANDALS
WELL PECKERHEAD, we didn't quite run
out of pins — maybe next year.
18 is MBA, though. ACE
70 - SERVICES
11 - FOR SALE - Private
BUTTON  MACHINE for sale.   Phone Jim
Wickens, 222-1680.
GREAT   STUDENT  WHEELS.   V6,   auto.
Valiant, $800. A-1 mech. shape. 731-0894.
20 - HOUSING
STUDENT
HOUSING
Available in Fairview Crescent, U.B.C.'s
newest single student residence. Occupancy from November 1st. Situated
just behind the University Village, all 4-,
5-, and 6-bedroom townhouses are completely furnished and rent includes all
utilities. Amenities include dishwashers,
deluxe furnishing and satellite television
reception capability. Prices start as low as
$250 per month and applicants must be at
least 21 years of age by December 31st,
1986 in order to qualify. Please apply at
the Student Housing Office, 2071 West
Mall (weekdays 8:30 a.m.-4:00 p.m.), or
call 228-2811.
UNIVERSITY HILL
UNITED AND
PRESBYTERIAN
CONGREGATIONS
invite you to join us in worship
Sunday mornings at 10:20 a.m.
in the Epiphany Chapel,
Vancouver School of Theology.
Young Adult Groups Sunday
or Monday evenings.
Pot Luck Harvest Supper
Friday, Oct. 17 — 6 p.m.
PHONE 224-6377
6050 Chancellor Boulevard
ROOM AND BOARD. West 19th Ave. &
Arbutus. Furnished rm. full bathroom,
available imm. Ph 731-8702.
ROOM & BOARD in exchange for childcare
& domestic duties. Close to UBC. Call
Shelley, 738-5123: hm., 688-4581: wk.
ATTRACTIVE furn. 1 BR suite near King Ed.
& Blenheim. N/S, no children, no pets.
$475/mo. 738-6459 after 6 p.m.
THE ANGLICAN STUDENT
MOVEMENT AT UBC
and
ST. ANSELM'S    '
ANGLICAN CHURCH
present
CHORAL EVENSONG
7:30 p.m.. Alternate Sundays
SUNDAY. OCT. 19th
following the service,
A Recital by
Fred Cory, flute
and
Paul MacDermot,
Classical Guitar
Everyone is Welcome
ST. ANSELM'S CHURCH
 University Blvd.	
MINIMUM  NOTICE REQUIRED-Essays,
term   papers,   resumes,   theses,   reports,
UBC location (Village) 224-2662.
ADINA WORD PROCESSING for resumes,
essays, theses. Discount for students. 10th
& Discovery. Phone 222-2122.
JUDITH FILTNESS, quality typist. 3206 West
38th Ave. 263-0351.
WORD   PROCESSING   SPECIALIST.    U
write,  we  type theses,   resumes,  letters,'
essays. Days, evenings, wknds., 736-1208.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 yrs. exp.
Wordprocessor & IBM typewriter. Student
rates. Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
WORD PROCESSING. Writing, editing:
resumes, theses, reports, essays, letters.
Professional quality. 324-9924.
TYPING, photocopying, phone FAX and
Telex services, reasonable rates. Please call
946-0723 (24 hours).
ACCENT    WORD    PROCESSING     -
278-0764.    Francais - English - Italian.
Delivery on campus — letter quality.
W/P & TYPING: Term papers, theses,
mscpts., essays, tech. equations, letters,
resumes. Bilingual. Clemy, 266-6641.
TYPING. Quality work at reasonable rates.
Fraser-Kingsway area. Paula, 873-2227
24 hours.
24 CARROT VALUE - Lettuce save your
celery with prices that can't be beet.
AGORA FOOD CO-OP, Dunbar & 17th.
CRISIS PREGNANCY? Birthright offers
alternatives to abortion. Call 687-7223 (free
pregnancy tests).
TYPING? YOU BET! Theses, term papers,
essays, whatever. Experienced, reasonable.
Kits. area. June, 738-1378.
TYPING. Fast and accurate. $1.50/pg.
Rachel, 224-0866 or 228-3881. Satisfaction
guaranteed.
TYPING/WORDPROCESSING. Seventh &
Vine, 731-9955.
YEAR-ROUND. Expert essay, theses, typing
from legible work; spelling/grammar corrected. 738-6829, 10 a.m.-9 p.m.. King Ed.
bus route.
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
1 FREE DINNER
DAILY
SPECIAL
Jb
This is a terrific deal! Bring a friend or a sweetie, purchase 2 of
the daily specials and receive the least expensive one FREE.
This coupon applies to daily specials only, isn't valid for takeout or with any other coupon. HAVE A GREAT DAY!
3431 WEST BROADWAY
738-5298
margarita monday
every monday
earl's place
10th ave/trimble
tel: 222-1342
Min-thurs 11:30-11:00 p.m.  Iri \ Mil 11:30-12:00
Vancouver's Priority Ticket Club in Association with
Perryscope Concert Productions.
MEANS
-&>
fe
■cW^j
FIRST
CHOICE
■EVERYTIME-
)0
YOU WANT THE BEST SEATS FOR
THIS YEAR'S HOTTEST SHOWS?
JOIN THE HOT SEATS CLUB!
An exclusive club that offers the best seats
without the hassle of waiting in line.
This year our members will have the best
seats in the house for —
BILLY JOEL, HUEY LEWIS,
THE PRETENDERS, ERIC CLAPTION,
GENESIS, BILLY IDOL, CYNDI LAUPER,
IRON MAIDEN — BROADWAY SHOWS
AND MORE! AND THEY'LL NEVER
WAIT IN LINE!
HOT SEATS MEMBERS FIND OUT ABOUT
SHOWS BEORE ANYONE ELSE ON OUR
SPECIAL  PHONE LINE.
They have the option to purchase a pair of
priority seats for most concerts that come
to Vancouver.
A YEAR'S MEMBERSHIP COSTS ONLY
$90.00 and can be purchased at all
VTC/CBO outlets. There is a limited
number available.
Call 731-2882 for more info.
rams
&k
The new home of the Copy Centre is
\
WITH
DOWNSTAIRS
MORE Coin Operated Machines
MORE Full Service Machines
MORE Services—Binding, Reductions
MORE Card Readers
MORE Operating Hours
BUT Same Great Prices
STUDENT UNION BUILDING
LOWER LEVEL
VISA AND MASTERCHARGE ACCEPTED
228-4388 Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 17, 1986
No Fun seeking office: SUB 241k
By STEPHEN WISENTHAL
Paul Leahy is running for Premier of
British Columbia with an unbeatable platform of All Style, No Substance.
The campaign press release says all
Leahy's   public  appearances   will   feature
No Fun
Ubyssey Office
SUB 241k
today, 3:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
popular local music act No Fun.
But what is No Fun?
It was founded back in the seventies, the
decade of pet rocks and Airport movies, by
David M., a slightly cynical rock icon with
long, gelled-back black hair. Recently this
crazy folk-rock-on-a-drug-as-yet-
undiscovered style has gained an increased
following among the university and Big
Hair crowds in Vancouver.
Their current big hit, Be Like Us, which
has yet to get heavy AM airplay, was
originally written in 1975.
They have been calling themselves the official folk-rock duo of Expo '86 for a couple of years.
David M. talked to the Ubyssey last Friday night at No Fun's Major Record Company Contract Signing Party at the Arts
Club Lounge. He was disappointed Bruce
Allen hadn't shown up.
M. said the group had broken several
records for shortest trips to Expo, including
some stellar three minute visits.
He was particularly touched by the
message from the president at the Romanian pavilion which said he wants to improve our intercourse.
Paul Leahy is the other half of No Fun.
He plays the electric guitar (M. plays an ac-
coustic with pickups) and sings the occasional song. His candidacy for the premiership has recently been promoted by his supportive band.
The campaign press release says Leahy
has an "insurmountable" lead over Vander
Zalm and Skelly. But there will be some
personal appearances including one today
in the Ubyssey office.
M. says Leahy has got all the votes in
every poll they have conducted. "It will be
a coronation rather than an election."
The cover of 1894, their latest release
(cassette,' 1985), features a stylized picture
of M. and Leahy driving their band car, a
Torino.
"I like to think of it as the car Elvis
would have driven if he had been me," says
M.
He has recently come to the realization a
lot of the bands songs have to do with
death. "All our bit show-stopper songs are
about death," says M., adding "Death is
the ultimate show-stopper."
They have two upcoming cassette
releases, The New Switcheroo, 60 minutes
with nine songs per side, and The Night
Smells Like a Dog.
Their set Friday featured Be Like Us and
closed with a final special version, Die Like
Us, including the well received lyric
"microwave your head." They also played
Me and Warren Beatty and Mick Jagger
Have This Problem with a catchy rhythm
while David M. held up covers of Rolling
Stone. They played I'm Not Taking Susie to
the Be-In and some numbers from their upcoming tapes.
M. said if he had previous lives, he would
have been a compulsive truth teller. "I probably had a few abruptly terminated
previous lives."
He said No Fun's lyrics and statements
"try to tell the truth by lying so
profoundly."
He cautioned people, particularly university students, not to get too smart. "The
smarter you get, the less happy you are."
Slow performs fully clothed
By TONY ROBERTS
Amid a mass of gob, snot, and
broken glass Slow proved, once
again, that trash is a gas.
No, mini-howler Tom did not
"let it hang". Nor did he spit,
bleed, or puke on the crowd. On
Slow
The Town Pump
October 13
Monday night, Thanksgiving, as
the mighty Expo groaned and finally expired under the weight of taxpayers dollars, Slow exercised its
purpose: to make a mess.
Typically, these guys had to deal
with the technical hazards that have
become a Slow trademark. Mikes
cut out, guitar strings snapped, and
beer bottles painted parabolic arches in the putrid air.
Tom "let's fuckin' paardy"
Anselmi had his hands full. Over
zealous fans swarmed the stage and
dogpiled just for the hell of it.
It appeared some fans wanted a
re-run of Slow's Expo exposure. At
one point, during "Out of the
Cold", tiny Tom was torn offstage
by an excited throng who tried to
peel his trousers off. After a struggle Anselmi managed to crawl back
on, his boxer shorts secure above
his shrivelled knickers.
Sterling performances of the excellent "Have Not Been the Same",
"I Broke the Circle" and a sizzling
remake of Hendrix's "Foxey
Lady" proved Slow worthy of the
fast lane. With mondo-monolith
Stevies Hamm on Bass, and the
dichotomy twins, Ziggy and Christian, scraping away on grunge
guitars, this unit has personality to
spare. Terry, despite a bad haircut,
played drums.
Surprise, Surprise. Slow has
matured from a bunch of sloppy,
beer-headed morons to a bunch of
sloppy,   beer-headed   musicians.
Their shows are still uneven,
distorted, and dumb as hell, but
over the course of a year they've
progressed immensely.
Seattle screamers Green River
were similarily noisy and idiotic.
The band is fronted by a helium-
lunged singer whose stage antics are
a combination of styles: kind of like
gumby meets the melting pretzel.
yes, this man was born without
kneecaps.
The group as a whole is surprisingly tight, in spite of their appearance. Fun to watch and laugh
at, but they lack the character of
Slow.
Openers The Hip Type, a young
band with little stage experience,
were fine. They're unisex (male
Drummer and Guitarist, female
Bassist and Singer) which is interesting, and the vocalist has a
likeable presence and appearance.
Their songs however, lack the artistic flair which would warrant
critical attention.
MR. PLASTICINE
— mark pelletier photo
.demonstrating remarkable flexibility as he explodes in musical agony
All Entertainment Writers:
Please attend a special
meeting Wednesday, Oct,
22 at 3:30p.m. to discuss
the  possible  future   of
Ubyssey entertainment.
Big changes are about
to be made. Be a part of
them.
TOM ANSELMI
— mark pelletier photo
. alluding to a former flesh indulgence
Take a walk with a critic
By RONALD STEWART
Art Gallery reviews are difficult
to write.
Since I'm too lazy to describe all
those paintings as well as analyze
them, I've decided on a novel approach. Pick up your books and
your Ubyssey and walk over to the
AMS Gallery in the south-west corner of SUB. I know you walk by it
every day, but don't enter because
you're afraid of confirming your
sneaking suspicion that you're an
uncultured boor.
Canadian Expressions
AMS Gallery
SUB
Well you're not, and this show
from the AMS collection, called
Canadian Expressions, has
something for everyone. Besides, if
you've got time to read the vilest
rag west of Bianca, you've got time
to look at some nifty pictures.
We'll start on the right wall and
work around. Of course, you're
free to disagree with my opinions;
just keep your voice down.
The first two works are collages
by A. Neil: Dark Ages #2 and To
the Finland Station — and I don't
like either of them. Both intrigue
you initially, but Dark Ages is more
of an esoteric puzzle than art, and
Finland Station looks like the
artist's private joke. Don't worry, it
gets better.
Marianna Schmidt's The Pregnant Bride is great (keep your voice
down — let me explain). The style is
unusual and arresting; the painting
looks horrific, but the position of
the bride and the word "bop"
above her suggest a sense of
humour at work as well. Pretty intriguing, don't you think?
Tom Burrows' Dollarton #2 probably caught your eye as you walked in the door. Not only is it large,
but its manipulation of geometric
shapes fascinates, and once you get
close, the texture and subtle colour
variations interest you even more.
What does it mean? You got me,
but I like it.
Ghitta Caiserman's First Steps
also uses compelling geometric patterns plus a wild two-changing-to-
three dimensions trick. The content
— like that face in the mirror — is
also interesting, but the whole thing
seems contrived and gimmicky;
there's no emotional payoff.
Skipping along, Peter Aspel's
Night ever Falling is one of the best
works in here. The wild, beautiful
colours suggest a condition of
melancholy and serenity peacefully
co-existing. Take your time with
this one.
Lawren Harris has two works in
this show: Mountain Spirit, and
Northern Image on the next wall.
Both have a dynamic, native feel,
and a strong Group of Seven/Emily
Carr influence. (If you don't know
who they are, you'll just have to go
to the Vancouver Art Gallery too.)
Harris uses colour effectively, but
has to develop her own style.
Well, that's our tour of the AMS
Art Gallery. I hope you had fun.
Enjoy the gallery while you can,
'cause the AMS is thinking of turning it into its third video arcade.

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