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The Ubyssey Feb 9, 1971

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Array Dean rules
in English
coup
By JOSEPHINE MARGOLIS
The English department is
virtually under the control of Doug
Kenny, dean of the arts faculty.
In a letter issued Thursday to the members
of the English department Kenny said, "I am
convinced that the present unrest can no longer
be ignored by the university or be solved by the
department.
"I therefore consider it necessary to concern myself actively in
the department's problem and to take steps for dealing with both the
present tensions and their sources."
Kenny has recently received a letter demanding the resignation of
Robert Jordan, head of the English department.
Of the 38 tenured faculty members in the English department, 17
signed the letter.
The present state of affairs is not new. The English department
has a history of internal conflict and faculty differences centering
around academic and administrative issues.
The issue for some people is teaching versus research and
publication or prestigious publications versus sincere scholarship, an
English prof said Monday.
These are also the principles that determine which faculty
members are granted tenure (permanent teaching contract) after five
years at UBC.
However, others feel arbitrary and authoritarian decisions made
by Jordan in the last few months have culminated in the present state
of unrest.
When asked how he feels about the expressed opposition and
criticism of his position Jordan said, "My position by its nature is
subject to criticism.
People are entitled to opinion, even if it is not in my
self-interest. If their criticisms can be substantiated then let the
administration fire me."
Jordan cancelled a department meeting scheduled for Thursday
to discuss elective headship and said in an inter-departmental memo
issue Feb. 2, "The dean has received a letter from 17 members of the
department requesting my resignation.
"Under these circumstances I do not wish to address this
meeting."
In the same memo Jordan quoted, "I should remind you
(Jordan) and the members of your department that questions
concerning forms of government within the university are not matters
which can be resolved at the department level."
Jordan said Monday he doesn't really know what the issues are.
When asked by The Ubyssey to elaborate on the problems and
proposed solutions Kenny said: "Problems are not unique to thee
English department and to that extent it is not news.
Academic problems have always been solved internally, not
within the public arena and we intend to solve these problems in a quiet
academic way." to page 8: xc KENNY
Parks board cops out
MICROPHONES AT THE READY, presidential candidates Steve Garrod (left) and Hanson Lau square
off during Monday's AMS all-candidates' meeting. See story page 3.
Human government slate
challenges AMS hierarchy
By OSCAR ANDERSEN
For the first time in three years
an alternative slate is running in
the Alma Mater Society election.
Those of you attending this
university in 1968 will remember
a phenomenon called rising
Persky ism.
By MIKE SASGES and
SANDY KASS
Vancouver park board commissioners played a
very cute game of "hanky-panky" at Monday
night's board meeting.
With a style that only politicians possess the
commissioners left the fate of the proposed Jericho
road hanging in the air until March 8.
The motion concerning the road, which was
proposed under the heading of correspondence
between the park sites committee and the city
supervisor of property and insurance, was the main
attraction of the night.
George Puil, sites commission chairman, was
unfortunately not in attendance.
Board chairman Sandy Robertson was quick to
point out that since Puil was not at the meeting
there was no point in going on.
A motion from commissioner Helen Boyce to
defer any decision on Locarno park extension to the
March 8 meeting was carried unanimously.
At   the   March   8   meeting,   the   board   will
entertain the City engineer and planner to feel out
their ideas.
The crowd of 50 Point Grey residents were
most disappointed, but commissioner George
Wainborn was quick to rectify the situation by
passing out mints and cigarettes.
The city of Vancouver plans to regain
jurisdiction of Locarno Park extension, enabling
them to proceed with plans to develop the Jericho
road.
The parks board motion to release the Locarno
park extension and part of the Jericho beach
parking area follow Friday's recommendations by
city engineer Ran Martin.
Martin strongly favors developing the area as
stipulated in the purchase agreement between the
city of Vancouver and the federal department of
national defense.
to page 8: see NO DECISION
It seems a group of students
pissed off at a do-nothing AMS
banded together under the
leadership of 1967 arts president
Stan Persky.
Under the banner of "human
government" and with a platform
of feelie politics (flower, love,
dogs and free dances) combined
with a good social analysis of the
university and society, they
contested the AMS executive
elections that year.
And won.
Although Persky was later
disqualified by the AMS on
grounds he was ineligible.
Now the phenomenon appears
to be repeating itself.
A group of students Thursday
decided to have another go at
changing the AMS.
The latter-day Perskyists
elected student senator Steve
Garrod their presidential
candidate and went to it.
In what is admittedly a last
minute campaign, they are
attempting to recreate the
excitement of what is known to
old-timers as "Persky's year."
Garrod, a former Persky
campaign organizer and a grad
student in anthropology, said
Monday:    "Then,   as   now,   we
believed in what I like to
characterize as joyous politics."
Garrod said the "human
government" slate decided to run
when it became apparent no
candidates for the AMS executive
were going to change the boredom
created by the present AMS.
Included in the slate are:
English grad student Evert
Hoogers, who was elected
secretary by acclamation;
ombudswomen candidate Joan
Campana, a socialist in arts 3, and
co-ordinator candidate Susan
Kennedy, a former Thunderbird
cheerleader and current internal
affairs officer who decided to run
again from sheer frustration with
this year's AMS.
Garrod said the success of the
slate depends largely on the
turn-out at the polls of students
who ordinarily don't bother to
vote in AMS elections.
"Our only hope in this
election, as in the previous human
government, is to appeal to the
needs of students who are at the
present time apathetic," he said.
"Their apathy is entirely
justified considering the
alternatives they had to deal with
up to now," said Garrod.
"We feel this time there is an
alternative." Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 9, 1971
Lionel Tiger's fan club turns out in force
A man had been speaking from the floor for several
minutes at the People gathering in SUB ballroom Monday
night.
"Let's see some effective social control," said Lionel
Tiger, author of Men In Groups, and the person whose
speech had been interrupted.
A number of men rose in response to his plea and
moved towards the man who was trying to speak from the
floor. Members of a women's group raced toward the
group. Pandemonium reigned.
One yell was: "Social control, armed men and prisons
behind your social control, Tiger."
But public opinion was clearly with Tiger. The man
who tried to speak from the floor was bundled out of the
room. Tiger said the he hadn't wanted that to happen.
The man came back.
Tiger had begun by speaking dispassionately.
Tiger's general approach was "Where it's at is what we
are as animals." He contended that we are interdependent,
perhaps in "what used to be called The Great Chain of
Being."
He went on to claim that the heart of every sexual
difference is in the reproductive pattern. "We were an old
animal 40,000 years ago," said Tiger. Sexuality was
ingrained deep in the nervous system before we had
brains, he said.
Reasonable or sapient procedures don't apply to
human behviour, said Tiger.
He then went on to dissuss the two critical bonds
among primates and among human beings, that of mother
to infant, and that of adult males. In the human case, said
Tiger, the adult males are dominant, and usually form
political control g;oups.
Tiger explained that it is
socially necessary for mothers
to look after children,
because the "father doesn't
know if it is his."
It was during a discussion
of the aggressive properties of
the male that he was first
interrupted.
A group of women rose,
chanting and hooting, to the
stage, and formed a kickline,
shouting, "Hold that Tiger". Tiger. . .'control'
They made a number of allusions to Tiger's contention
that women don't form power groups, then disappeared,
only to come back and heckle.
The tone of Tiger's talk changed after the guerilla
theatre. He began to discuss the problem of what female
groups do, and why men have positions of power.
Tiger contends that the answer to male dominance in
politics can be found in the central nervous system. He
said that there is a relationship between sex and aggressive
behaviour. For instance, men can't function sexually if
they are not provided with clues from females. They then
take out their aggressive behaviour in non-productive
ways.
Tiger also said that men are more fragile than women.
He said the Royal Commission on Women treats
women in a discriminatory way, by advocating special
treatment, and that a "self-conscious human device" isn't
as satisfactory as an unconscious biological one.
The guerilla theatre and heckling completely ruffled
him. "I don't know how to proceed," Tiger said.
He rushed to a conclusion that men are inherently
more aggressive than women, and therefore control
society.
One questioner asked if Tiger saw any political
relationship between the revolutionary movements of
women, working people, and blacks, and the growth of
doctrines which advocate biological determinism and
hopelessness of change.
Tiger didn't see any relationship.
Vietnamese ask Canadian help
in protesting new escalation
The Paris delegation of the
South Vietnamese Provisional
Revolutionary government has
telegrammed former SFU prof
Kathleen Aberle to ask for
Vancouver demonstrations against
the U.S. invasion of Laos.
For the first time, the
delegation has also appealed
directly to the American people
(via another telegram) to help
stop the Nixon government's war
machine.
And   information   received   in
Ann   Arbor,  Michigan,  indicates
that     China     may     enter     the.
Indo-China     war    if    American
escalation continues.
The two telegrams to the U.S.
and Canada were sent by Madame
Binh, a member of the
Vietnamese delegation at the Paris
talks. She was a member of a
three-woman Vietnamese group
which toured Canada in 1969, and
visited Vancouver during the tour.
In the telegram, Binh also
called on Vancouverites to
demonstrate against the latest
American escalation of the
Indo-China war. The telegram
appealing to the American people
was sent to an anti-war conference
currently taking place in Ann
Arbor.
News of the telegrams came
during a recent Portland meeting
attended by Ellen Woodsworth, a
Vancouver woman.
Woodsworth was at the
meeting to arrange a tour of
Indo-Chinese women to Canada.
She said the Ann Arbor group has
also received information that
indicates Chinese will enter the
war if U.S. forces escalate their
attacks north of the 17th parallel.
The 17th parallel, which serves
as a border between North and
South Vietnam, was established as
a temporary demarcation line in
1954 by the Geneva Convention
to facilitate the withdrawal of the
defeated French army.
Woodsworth said a
demonstration will be held in
Vancouver Friday to protest
American escalation of the
Indo-China   war.
Local poets read today
Two Vancouver poets will'
give   a   free  poetry  reading
tonight at 8 p.m. in Ang. 104.
Michael Finlay, former
editor of The Ubyssey, will
read from his recently
published The Harpo Scrolls
and W. D. Ulrich will read
from his The Tree in the
Room.
truckiv my Buufcs fswtyt
Man vs. machines lectures
Conflict between man and a mechanized society is the topic of an
eight-session lecture series that began Monday night.
The series' subjects include: the machine and its critics; concepts
and philosophies in writings on western techological development;uses
and abuses of current concern for ecology and their feedback to the
technological system; the technological revolution; and survival in the
machine crisis.
Persons may register at the door Mondays at 8 p.m. in Buch. 221.
WRITE IN AND TELL US
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SAT. FEB. 13 1:00-HOCKEY UBC vs VICTORIA
SAT. FEB. 13 7:30-BASKETBALL UBC vs SFU Tuesday,  February 9,   1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
AMS GAA Pearson on the way out?
By MIKE SASGES
Alma Mater Society general
manager Ron Pearson may be on
the way out.
Pearson,     the     veteran
behind-the-scenes-professional
who administers AMS business, has
had a controversial 15-year stay.
A motion passed by council on
Wednesday reads in part:
"LIFE IS LIKE walking off into one long sunset," well-known
UBC poet Elvira Finch was heard to remark Monday on the SUB
plaza. Noted for her frequent outbursts of profundity and tirades
against materialism. Finch is selling her latest book at $50 a copy.
Threat of strike averted
The threat of a strike by campus operating engineers has been
averted.
A settlement was reached between local 882 of the International
Union of Operating Engineers and the university administration on
Wednesday, said Don Ankerson, union business agent.
The 30 month contract includes a 21 per cent increase.
If the strike had taken place, heating would have been cut off in
UBC buildings.
International week continues
International week is being held at International House this week.
The theme of international week is the international scene:
development and change.
The purpose of the week is to foster better understanding and
knowledge about the various countries from which UBC students
originate.
For the remainder of this week lectures are being held at the
following times: today noon, Israel today; Wednesday noon, Canadian
involvement in the West Indies and at 7:30 p.m., trends of economic
development in Pakistan;Thursday noon, neo-colonialism in Iran and at
7:30 p.m., student involvement in Mexico and Friday noon, Afro-Asian
movement.
An international fair is being held on Friday from 4 to 10 p.m.
with displays and slide shows. Saturday 10 a.m. to 4 pjn. it will have a
beer garden. Admission for the international fair is 50 cents for
students, one dollar for others and two dollars for a family.
A dance is being held Saturday from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. with the
Ngoma Ya Africa band and an admission of $ 1.25.
For further information phone 224-4535 or 228-3264.
"That the president and
treasurer are hereby authorized to
discuss with the general manager
the terms of the severance of the
association between the society
and the general manager . . ."
The motion, which was moved
by AMS vice-president John Scott
Mitchell and seconded by
co-ordinator Hanson Lau, was
carried with 18-4-6 vote.
Both Mitchell and Lau feel that
Pearson is not suitable for the job.
"It was a majority
recommendation from the
executive," Lau said Monday.
The only dissenting vote on the
executive was AMS treasurer
Stuart Bruce.
"Ron Pearson's business
activity   could   save   the  AMS  a
minimum of $50,000 over the
next five years," Bruce told The
Ubyssey Monday.
"He's been giving his best for
the last 15 years and I think he
has been and can continue to be a
value to the society."
Bruce would "not, however,
discuss the reasons for the
council's motion.
AMS president Tony Hodge
also would not discuss the reasons
behind the motion.
"I don't want to say anything
now because it might screw the
man up and if that happened I
would have to defend him down
the line," Hodge said Monday.
"I don't really want to defend
Pearson if he is attacked."
Since 1968, it's been an annual
event for AMS executives to ask
for Pearson's leavetaking. In 1968,
council executive voted six to one
to ask for Pearson's resignation.
The treasurer saved the day for
Pearson and council reversed the
executive's decision.
In September of 1969, another
move to get Pearson to leave
failed.
People behind the move at that
time charged that Pearson was
"personally arrogant and
objectionable."
He was also accused of exerting
illegimate controls over AMS
operations.
When asked Monday to discuss
the motion Pearson smiled and
said "no comment."
Grad fee hike announced
Students and faculty are opposing the $100
graduate student fee increase recently approved by
the Board of Governors.
A student-faculty committee was established
earlier this year to study graduate students' fees.
The committee submitted a majority report
recommending the increase, from a basic fee of
$300 to a basic fee of $400 per year.
The committee also recommended that the
teaching assistantships be increased from $2400 to
$3200.
It said that a system of dissertation fellowships,
worth $4000 each, should be established and that
the Senate and the BoG should pressure the federal
government into increasing the maximum size of
Canada student loans and the maximum number
of years that the loans can be repaid in.
The three graduate students on the committee
submitted a minority report which was supported
by committee chairman and associate dean of Grad
Studies, B. N. Moyls. They disagreed with the
recommendation to increase the fees.
"The BoG passed only half the
recommendations," Graduate Student Association
president David Mole said.
"It's imperative that the teaching assistanthips
are increased," Mole said.
"They haven't kept pace with inflation,"he
said, "and they are going to be subject to income
tax next year.
"We are going to make strenuous efforts to
make sure that the other half of the
recommendations are implemented without delay,"
he said.
Collectivism and humility
reign at candidate meet
About 300 people in the SUB conversation pit
had their peaceful lunch hour disturbed Monday by
an Alma Mater Society all-candidates meeting.
The show started with the introduction of
Evert Hoogers who has been elected AMS secretary
by acclamation.
Hoogers said that he had run as part of a slate
and would like to end the traditional passive role of
the secretary.
"We're running as a slate because we feel that
the AMS has reached its lowest point in the last few
years.
"Human government on campus is a necessity.
We intend to act as a collective."
Bill Bey, running for ombudsman said that
there were many problems that had been left
unsolved by this year's council.
Joan Campana, the second candidate on the
human government slate was then introduced.
"I'm running for ombudswoman," she stressed.
"We're going to heal the problems within the
AMS, not the symptoms.-
"I see the university as*a part of society, not an
ivory tower.
"We would like to see the democratization of
the   university.* Our   slate   would  use   the   AMS
resources   to  establish  student  employment.  We
would also like to take off the restrictions on women
in the university.
Hamish Earle, the present AMS ombudsman
and candidate for a second term said he had tried to
get results.
"If you want a live executive who can do
things, then I suggest you vote for one of the
others," he said.
Sue Kennedy, the third member of the human
government slate was then introduced as running for
AMS co-ordinator of activities.
"I'm interested in the Canadianization of
course content. There is also a need for course
unions on this campus.
"Like Joan I'm concerned about the
discrimination against women in the university."
Kennedy, who is AMS external affairs officer
this year said she was thoroughly disillusioned with
this year's executive and believed fully in a
collective slate.
Clayton Vogler, a traditional candidate for an
AMS position, is also running for activities
co-ordinator.
"I don't really believe that the ideas of a person
are important as getting the ideas into some
concrete action," he said.
Finally, the heavies were introduced.
The first to speak was Steve Garrod of the
human government slate, who is running for
president.
"We've already seen the inability of the AMS to
work on campus with the real interests of the
students," Garrod said.
"The students through their apathy have shown
a vote of non-confidence in the AMS.
Garrod feels that the AMS should be abolished
if it does nothing.
"But the AMS can do something, especially for
summer employment and the long term situation of
jobs after graduation," he said.
"Your apathy has been justified in the past
The human government slate wants to justify your
interest," he said.
Hanson Lau, the second candidate for
president admitted with great humility that he was
not God.
"I can't make any promises," he said. "I'm not
God."
"The revolution is not in the AMS. If anyone
on the council has tried to make the executive more
human, it is I," Lau said.
John Scott Mitchell said that he wasn't going to
talk. He just wanted the people to remember that
he, Mitchell was more than willing to work.
When asked what would happen if all the
candidates on the human government slate were not
elected, Sue Kennedy said that those elected on the
slate would resign.
Garrod promised a general meeting in October
to seek the student's vote of confidence if the slate
won the election.
"If you feel we can do something vote us in
now and if you're disillusioned by October vote us
out," he said. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 9,  1971
THEWSSIY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C.
Editorial opinions are those of the writer ind not of the AMS or
the'university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
Founding member. Pacific Student Press. The Ubyssey publishes
Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's
editorial offices are located in room 241K pf the Student Union
Building. Editor, 228-2301; city editor, 228-2305; news editor,
228-2307; Page Friday, 228-2309; sports, 228-2308; advertising,
228-3977.
FEBRUARY 9, 1971
Election time
The campus is covered with banners and slogans
that would turn the stomach of the most unscrupulous
Liberal party organizer.
Bright-faced political hopefuls are putting classes
to sleep before the poor profs get a chance.
Lunches are ruined by all-candidates meetings that
resemble grade seven Red Cross club elections.
Yes folks, the circus has come to town — it's AMS
election time again, that fun-filled time of year when
students (or at least the 25 per cent of them who bother
to vote) decide what they want from their so-called
student government.
Since we're now hearing all kinds of promises
(some of them sincere, some of them bullshit) to change
the AMS and make it more relevant, it is perhaps as
good a time as any to perform what we hope is a final
autopsy, lay the corpse of this year's council to rest and
dispatch its soul to the great carpeted boardroom in the
sky.
To put it briefly, this year's version of the AMS has
been a failure even more dismal than its recent
predecessors.
The year's big project was the late, unlamented
new constitution, which fell flat on its legalistic face.
The famous and ever-popular "let's pretend we're
politicians" game continued, despite the increasing
unemployment crisis facing students. At no time during
its term of office has council done anything to come to
grips with the employment situation.
The lack of student housing and a number of vital
off-campus issues have been ignored in a similar manner
and (despite the claims of certain candidates who are
trying to run on their records) nothing has been done
about situations in the classroom.
The AMS has directed its energies to keeping SUB
in operation (not quite the gargantuan task some would
have us believe) and running a more-or-less efficient
business.
Council has carefully shied away from any action
that might offend the administration or anyone else,
even when it might have meant doing something
constructive for the students.
Some people like the AMS that way, others think
it can and should do something more meaningful.
What next year will be like is (as the posters say)
up to us tomorrow.
A glorified plug
It has come to our attention that a nebulous
organization known as the creative writing department
is sponsoring a free poetry reading tonight in Angus
104.
We would normally ignore such trivia were it not
for the fact that the struggling poets involved are W. D.
Ulrich and D. Michael Finlay.
The latter is the same well-known man about
campus who ranks right up there in the local color
category with Malcolm McGregor and Karl Burau.
Whether or not Mr. Finlay is the next Earle Birney
is a matter open to debate, but tonight you will have
your chance to give the kid a break. Just beware of the
book peddlars.
Editor: Nate Smith
News Maurice Bridge
City     Ginny Gait
Jan O'Brien
Wire    John Andersen
Managing     Bruce Curtis
Sports Keith Dunbar
Ass't News    ........ Jennifer Jordan
Leslie Plommer
Photo    David Enns
David Bowerman
Page Friday Tim Wilson
Room for names only today. Mike
Sasges worked, as did Liz Briemberg,
Nathalie Apouchtine, Ken Lassasen
and Sharon Boylan.
Mike Sasges worked some more,
along with Josephine Margolis, Sandy
Kass and David Schmidt. Mike Sasges
did   another   story,   while   David  Lee,
"Don't you get it, kid? They build six-lane highways so people who get tired of moving through the
city at a snail's pace all week can really move while they're enjoying Vancouver's scenic beauty on the
weekend."
Confessions of a politico
Chris   Gallagher,   Kathy   Stewart
Charlie Boylan made appearances.
and
•       •       •
By ART SMOLENSKY
Too often, political commentaries are written
by non-politicians. It is too risky for the
' 'professional'' politicos.
Art Smolensky, student senator and past
president of the graduate student association, lays
on the line two years of experience in both running
for office himself and running other people's
campaigns.
In this article he comments on why people run
and how they get elected to student office. He also
analyses the current contest and crop of candidates
for Alma Mater Society president.
Probably 50 per cent of the students who vote
in an election vote because they are near a ballot
box.
I suspect that the other 50 per cent vote
because they've heard a candidate's name along with
a few catchy words. Here are a few inside comments
on campus electioneering and the people now
running for office.
Most students (and others) run for office
because they are on an ego trip and because it'll
look good on their job application. Few, however,
will admit this either publicly or even to themselves.
A distinct minority are truly sincere and take
the job and its burdens to heart. AMS President
Tony Hodge is probably an example of someone
who has become too attached. Infighting between
presidential hopefuls Hanson Lau and John Scott
Mitchell has personally affected Hodge and his
actions.
This may be Steve Garrod's only trap; he, like
Hodge, will care too much about people rather than
organization for the sake of it.
Prerequisite to any campaign is money.
Election rules vary from year to year but the
maximum allowed expenditure is $50. Most
candidates go ov§r by $20 but hide it from the
elections committee.
Money, of course, isn't everything. Speaking to
classes seems to be a must in every campaign and all
three candidates are doing it. I've never really done
this and I don't know how effective "Hi, I'm Art
Smolensky and running for ..." can be. My own
feeling is that there is really no time to say anything
worthwhile.
Running on your record is a fallacy. Unless
you've done something god awful, you really run on
your name. If your name is familiar people will vote
for you. Walter Gage could be elected to AMS
President 9 times in 10.
Lau is tops in this respect. He has been running
for two years, ever since he lost an election for
Co-ordinator. Mitchell is relatively new on the AMS
scene but has an advantage in that he has been
Vice-President for four months, after an essentially
no-contest by-election.
Garrod is perhaps least known among the three,
having but recently taken over the graduate student
senate seat from Stan Persky. Interestingly enough,
he has been the one most politically involved for the
longest time. The trouble is that he was working in
the back rooms rather than standing up and talking.
Everyone who expects to win has to do some
sloganeering.
Garrod has borrowed from the "human
government" movement, of which he has been a
part for four years. Lau has decided that "time" (he
says that it is nebulous and fuzzy on purpose) is
appropriate. Communications, service, leadership
and representation are Mitchell's well worn slogans.
Another device is to use catchy words or
phrases having good connotations as a part of your
platform. Usually the words mean nothing and if
critically read sound very cliche. Lau's poster stating
"time for love and understanding" is a classic
example.
Mitchell seems well aware of the fact that few
people really read these strings of words. Along with
groovy "in" words like "pollution and
conservation", a bottom line on his poster reads
simply: "Pacific Great Eastern Railway".
Some AMS types figure that Mitchell's backers
accidentally put that name on the poster, while
others think he put it on as a joke since nobody
reads campaign literature anyway.
Of course the safest way to get elected is to
have no platform at all. Just a name and a face are
best. It is a risk to say what you stand for.
Lau intelligently has followed this maxim and
written essentially nothing. Mitchell had student
senator Ed O'Brien write a little blurb with lines like
"with your assistance he will. .."
Perhaps riskiest of all, Garrod and his friends
have drawn up a seven point stand which they call a
bit of motherhood and apple pie with teeth in it.
Incidentally, Garrod is the only one who in
writings backs Canadianization. Definitely a risky
proposition.
A candidate's personality can mean a lot if he
speaks to classes or even writes his own campaign
literature. I have known all three for some time,
have seen them in different situations, and now
offer this subjective and personal view.
Mitchell stikes me as stoic, aloof and arrogant.
This fits in with his handsome and striking face (one
which he rents out to various photographers to earn
extra money).
Unlike the other candidates, he does not have a
good grasp of the UBC scene. Even his best friends
will admit that he is not really in touch. They,
however, consider this to be a virtue for an AMS
President. Their rationale is that by completely
knowing what's going on you'll step in and throw
yourself in to a particular situation, thus losing
control over other phases of the job.
Mitchell is more comfortable as an information
co-ordinator    as    opposed    to    an    information
to page 9: see LAU Tuesday,  February 9,   1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Candidates' statements
Following are statements by
the candidates in Wednesday's
first slate Alma Mater Society
election.
Grad student Evert Hoogers
has been elected AMS secretary
. by acclamation and no statement
is printed for him.
President
KELVIN BECKETT
Only 30 years after Pearl
Harbour. . . men speak of
politics . . . Do we want a fag
president?
And furthermore, the halls of
SUB reak with fanaticism. Out
with the Jesus freaks and Conrad
Schwartz is 98 per cent
psychological.
But then, John Mictchell —
cops on campus. We know
mothers turning and burning.
Smash Freddy Wood.
Spit on Smallensky.
Smash Hanson's ego.
He won't have Kelvin Beckett
to kick around anymore.
Really? Is this all there is?
STEVE GARROD
I think we have all seen the
inability and the unwillingness of
the AMS to deal with the real
issues of our lives. The AMS is at
present irrelevant. It must be
reformed, or abolished.
We have the imagination,
ability and organization to work
to make concrete changes in your
lives.
The AMS must deal with the
real issues that face students:
unemployment,   democratization
PIMPLES
Ugly skin blemishes on face or body.
Eczema. Pimples, Red Scaly Itching
Skin and Athlete's Foot are quickly
relieved by NIXODERM. Antiseptic
action heals, helps make skin softer,
smoother, clearer. Ask your druggist
for NIXODERM ointment and soap.
Help clean, clear and revitalize your
skin. Look better fast.
of the university, Canadianization,
housing and the discrimination
against women.
Many of you were not going to
vote because there was no choice.
Now there is a choice, and it is up
to you to vote for the HUMAN
GOVERNMENT for a real change.
HANSON LAU
I have no promises to make but
I have people to serve and projects
to complete.
For the September lost souls,
we can provide a more
informative orientation program.
Discussions on what a university is
all about can be organized can be
organized on a small group basis.
For the displaced SUB souls we
can develop the 5,000 square feet
basement area for a student
lounge. We need a general meeting
for that and I think you will come
out.
For the undergraduate societies
we can give a guaranteed income
and build a relationship of
co-operation.
One thing is for sure: Love and
Understanding will transcend all
the bureaucratic trappings that
belie the AMS.
JOHN MITCHELL
In four short months as Vice
President (Academics), I have
shown my committment to action
in the AMS.
You want to evaluate teaching
and determine course content. I
have initiated the campus wide
course evaluation and the tenure
inquiry.
You demand to make
decisions. I want students on
every university committee:
President's, Hiring & Firing,
Selection & Promotion.
Ph D's
They don't give degrees to
automobile mechanics but:
you become an expert after
studying them for 9 years
(should get a PH.D.)
Take advantage of a FREE
consulting service. Bring your
car in to Henneken Auto
today for analysis of the
problem and a free estimate
for solving the problem. VW,
Mercedes, Volvo, Porsche
Specialists. Fully guaranteed
reasonable rates.
You ask "why are we here?" I
want seminars to answer these
questions.
You wonder what happens to
your $24? "Will SUB cost more
money?
I am not running a popularity
contest, nor do I preach
colloquialisms and cliches.
I may not have all the answers
to all the problems. It is
impossible to please all the
people. But, I am willing to listen
to you, to your suggestions and
complaints, and then make
decisions.
I will work, hard, for YOU.
Make the AMS relevant to you.
Vote John Sott Mitchell, AMS
President.
Co-ordinator
SUE KENNEDY
There is only one issue in this
election: is it possible for the
AMS to be effective and relevant
to students?
We have seen that a desire to
serve students and to improve the
AMS (a characteristic of almost
every AMS executive member) is
not enough. As long as the same
basic conception about the AMS
exists, it will continue in the same
track that it has run in the past.
The Human Government slate
has a program for action on the
issues facing us, as students and
members of the community:
• employment,
• equality for women,
• Canadianization,
• democratization of the
university via course unions and
more important, the knowledge to
carry out this program with a
different approach to AMS
politics.
Vote:     Susan     Kennedy,
Co-ordinator; Joan Campana,
Ombudswoman, Steve Garrod,
President.
CLAYTON VOGLER
(i) Set about creating an
abortion, venereal disease, drug
and birth control information
centre, staffed by medical and
other interested students.
(ii) Study the possibility of
an AMS sponsored food outlet to
compete with food services with
food at lower prices.
(iii) Hire students for any
jobs in the university, where
possible.
(iv) Clubs - finances
(guaranteed incomes, petty cash)
However, in my opinion, the
ideas of a candidate are not as
important as, for this position, are
his or her capabilities for getting
things done.
Ombudsman
BILL BEY
It's my view that an
ombudsman is an intermediary,
getting students with problems
together with those who can help,
and to ensure that the results are
as satifactory as possible. An
ombudsman must deal with
individual and group problems,
especially those concerning
student alienation, calendars and
course relevency, financial aid and
adequate housing. He must also
use his time efficiently, to most
effectively handle singular
personal problems and the major
issues affecting us all. I have the
ability, the experience and the
attitude to effectively manage the
office of ombudsman. Help get it
all together, vote Bill Bey for
Ombudsman on Wednesday.
JOAN CAMPANA
I want to tackle problems, not
symptoms — meaning a university
run by and for students and
faculty, not for business and
foreign interests. It means dealing
with unemployment — summer
and after graduation;
discrimination against women and
the true history of Quebec; labor
and the native population; an end
to irrelevant "research" and
beginning Vietman war research.
It means all students organizing
and mobilizing to use the
university as a base for social
change.
HAMISH EARLE
People come to the
Ombudsman with seemingly
unsolvable problems, when all else
has failed.
As the list in SUB proves I,
Hamish Earle, have with trust and
without fuss obtained facts,
diplomatically analyzed situations
and obtained effective solutions
which are acceptable to the
complainant.
Facing the same challenges as
all students, my proven
experience permits me to get
results on your behalf from
administration, faculty and
executive.
For continued effective results,
vote EARLE for OMBUDSMAN.
DAVID MacKENZIE
If you've read this far, you've
probably realized that seventy-five
free words in The Ubyssey is a
great chance to brag, boast, and
bullshit. It's not much of a chance
to enlighten. The job of
Ombudsman is to hear students'
problems and take action to solve
them. Elect me, and I'll do it.
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rami Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 9, 1971
PRINCE GEORGE
(SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 57)
Teachers Wanted
for September, 1971
Meet the Prince George Recruiting Team
FEB. 10, 11,12
at
THE HOLIDAY INN
1110 HOWE ST., VANCOUVER
•
Telephone for an appointment after 9 a.m. — Feb. 10
684-2151
Or apply to D. P. Todd, Dist. Supt. of Schools
1891 Sixth Avenue, Prince George, B.C.
OFFICIAL NOTICE
Alma Mater Society
AMS EXECUTIVE ELECTIONS
2ND SLATE: The following positions are open:
Vice-President—must have completed 2 years or its equivalent
Treasurer - must have completed 2 years or its equivalent
External Affairs Officer - must have completed 1 year or
its equivalent
Internal Affairs Officer — must have completed 1 year or its
equivalent
Nominations for these positions close Thursday, Feb. 11 at noon,
after which time campaigning may begin.
The Election will take place Wednesday, Feb. 17th.
Nomination forms may be picked up from the AMS General
Office, AMS Executive Office or from AMS Secretary Anne
Clarkson, SUB 248.
GRAD CLASS GENERAL MEETING
Thurs. Feb. 11,1971
SUB Auditorium
(see ad this issue)
Page Tuesday
UBC's Musical Theatre
Society's presentation of West
Side Story has managed to
capture the best of two worlds.
It is a production which
maintains a standard of acting,
singing and dancing verging on
professionalism and yet retaining
the verve and vigour an amateur
cast can give.
Despite its popularity, West
Side Story is an extremely'
difficult musical to produce
successfully due to the heavy
demands on the actor, who must
be a capable actor, and a strong
singer and dancer as well.
One moment, characters are
immersed in a highly dramatic
scene, the next they are required
to break into song, often
requiring a voice of near operatic
proportions. Since Leonard
Bernstein's musical score is
extremely difficult both for
singers and musicians, it often
requires the cast to sing in a
variety of keys, as a result,
Mussoc's production was a
mixture of acting and singing
prowess.
Jennifer Paterson as the
Puerto Rican heroine, Maria, was
by far the best vocalist,
possessing a rich, full, soprano.
However, in the acting end of
the role, which at the best of
times verges on mushy
sentimentality, she proved to be
something less than perfect.
While her voice strengthened the
overall sound of the musical
numbers where the entire cast in
involved, such as "Tonight", her
portrait of Maria in scenes
testing her dramatic skills was
weak.
Playing opposite Paterson was
Victor A. Young in the role of
Tony, Maria's lover. Of all the
roles in the musical, that of
Tony is the most difficult, as it
has little the actor can grasp
onto characterwise and requires
an extremely high voice range.
Unfortunately Young u a past
president of MUSSOC, was not a
strong enough actor or singer to
carry the role and was
frequently overshadowed by the
stronger characters.
The£
West Side Story
mmmWmmmmmmmWmmmmmmUWSmmmmtWkWmWmtk^-'fTefT~-**J^*-*'9mmmmWUBBm* «B
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FRIDAY 12 & SATURDAY 13
7:00 & 9:30
SUNDAY 14 - 7:00
SUB THEATRE
VALENTINES SPMI,
Bring in your Sweetheart
AMS Students-50c
General Public—75c
it
Ruth    Nicol   and   Jennifer   Paterson   in   scene   from   Mussoc
production of West Side Story. -george lenko photo
Ruth Nichol as Anita was the best all around character with a
strong voice and personality that suited the woman-of-the-world
image she created. Her timing was a bright spot in both the dramatic
and comic scenes as she played the character to its full advantage.
Brent Carver, a second year theatre student plays Riff, the
leader of his gang the Jets, and best friend of Tony. The part, along
with that of Anita, offers perhaps the most for an actor, however
Carver tended to overplay his role. His best asset was his enormous
vitality and adeptness as a dancer which helped the show in the early
stages of the first act to get off its rather shaky feet and move on to
bigger and much better things.
A fourth year Arts student, Ken Irwin, played Bernardo. While
the part was small, his performance was extremely good, displaying
the merits of a more than capable actor. Ed Astley, who incidentally
is also president of MUSSOC, adequately played the part of Action,
physically suiting the role of the tough hood.
While the quieter scenes may not have been as strong as they
could have been, the big musical numbers were a source of skill and
creativity. It is during these scenes that one sees why this story of
two street gangs, one American, one Puerto Rican, has achieved such
high acclaim.
Using an . entirely student chorus, choreographer Grace
Macdonald set a fast pace which the students more than kept up
with in spite of the fact that they were practically dancing on top of
each other due to the minute size of the old auditorium stage.
"America", a song in which the Puerto Ricans
contemplate the pros and cons of living in the U.S. and "We're
Disturbed" where the effects of social injustices suffered in the
slums are humorously examined, prove to be musical and comical
highlights. And of course the rumble scenes complete with snapping
fingers and near aassaults on the audience were a success.
In an especially effective dream sequence the stage crew has
experimented with the use of a fogmaking machine that more than
does its job. In fact they are so successful, anyone sitting in the first
five rows is nearly smoked out.
However, through thick and thin, fog, and extremely poor
audience attendance, MUSSOC will be continuing to put on this
excellent production in the Old Auditorium until Saturday.
NETTIE WIL
„ AND THIS COUPON
and have 2
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768 MARINE DR., WEST VANCOUVER Tuesday, February 9,  1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
Plaza
Suite
Neil Simon's play Plaza Suite
now on at the Playhouse under
the direction of UBC's theatre
head John Brockington, is a
dialogue on stage. The three one
act plays take place in a hotel
room, hence the name Plaza
Suite. The playlets are really not
plays at all, they are dialogues.
They would have been much
better suited to a radio play,
since the importance of a visual
presentation to their success, is
nonexistent.
The first playlet, The Visitors
from Mamaronek is fairly good,
even though it is obviously
limited by its worn out theme,
Sam Nash, a wealthy
businessman, played by Tod
Andrews, and his wife Karen
played by Vera Lockwood, find
their marriage disintegrating.
Sam hates the idea of growing
old, so he diets and exercises to
maintain a youthful image, he
also fools around with his
secretary played by Linda
Sorenson. Sam uses his youthful
and attractive secretary to
assuage his fears of old age. At
fifty-one, he is still fit, although
his wife, through her dumpy
appearance and her
conversation, won't let him
forget his age. She is willing to
forget about the affair and go on
from there, but Sam isn't, so he
leaves her.
The other two playlets are
, awful. In the second one, The
Visitor from Hollywood., Tod
Andrews and Vera Lockwood
play a seduction scene in which
Andrews, as famous Hollywood
producer Jesse Kiplinger,
succeeds in seducing his former
and now grown up girlfriend,
Muriel. Everybody knows that
dazzled by his fame, she will give
in, and she does. From the
beginning, the playlet is silly but
by the end, it deteriorates into
inanity.
The third playlet, The
Visitors from Forest Hills is
about a wedding that almost
doesn't happen. The ^suspense in
this   one,   is provided  by   the
Vera Lockwood, Linda Sorenson and Tod Andrews in  Neil
Simon's Plaza Sweet. -vlad photo
ludicrous situation of the bride,
played by Linda Sorenson,
having locked herself in the
bathroom ten minutes before
the wedding. The remainder of
the play involves the efforts of
her very tritely Jewish parents
played by Tod Andrews and
Vera Lockwood, to get her out
of the bathroom. At best, the
bride could have killed herself,
but unfortunately she decides to
come out when her fiance
played by Glenn Macdonald tells
her to cool it.
The best that could be said
for these plays was voiced by an
older patron of the arts who
walked behind me in the aisle on
the way to the lobby during the
second intermission. He
remarked to a woman who I
suppose was his wife: "At least
you can understand it." The
comment is really quite apt since
the thoughts and the humor in
the playlets are so obvious that
they have all been used before.
SIDELIGHTS
There was an interesting
handout being distributed at the
Playhouse door on Saturday
night. It was obviously not
prepared by the Playhouse staff.
The pink sheet had a list of odd
facts concerning the dispute over
the Playhouse Theatre
Company's decision to drop
their option on George Ryga's
play, Captives of The Faceless
Drummer.
The sheet pointed out that
Plaza Suite cost fifty thousand
dollars to put on, while The
Faceless Drummer would have
cost one third of that, and that
Brockington used high priced
New York actors for the
production. This last is not
completely true, because both
Linda Sorenson and Glenn
Macdonald are local aactors.
However, some of the other
statements are interesting. The
Ryga play is an original play,
written by a Canadian. It could
have employed local actors, and
the play was concerned with one
of the most important issues
that Canada the nation has ever
faced, The War Measures Act.
The Playhouse gave as its
reason for not picking up its
option on the play that the
Playhouse was financially
wobbly, and that they needed a
safe play like Plaza Suite, a sure
fire type of thing that would
guarantee their solvency. The
logic fails me, since Ryga's Grass
and Wild Strawberries as well as
his Ectasy of Rita Joe were
both big moneymakers for the
Playhouse. Unfortunately, this is
the type of attitude that fosters
inane theatre like Plaza Suite. It
is a kind of artistic inbreeding
that results in weaker and more
diluted theatre. It's sad for all
concerned in the controversy,
since it is obvious that the
Playhouse Company would have
been better off financially, and
purer in its aestheticism, if it had
produced Ryga's play.
-TIM WILSON
PREGNANCY
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February 9 & 10-8:30 P.M.
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* Air Canada flight has been arranged in connection with several
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Continent, Summer, 1971.
Apply Before February 19, 1971 Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 9, 1971
Ed US Drug Week talks pack em in
By NATHALIE APOUCHTINE
Representatives of the medical
profession, the law, and services
directed at youth with drug
problems, were among the
speakers who kept Educ. 100 full
every noon last week's Drug
Education Week sponsored by the
Education Undergraduate Society
On Wednesday, students were
presented with two views of the
law governing the non-medical use
of drugs in Canada.
"The court must prove beyond
a doubt that a person has
possession of an illegal drug; that
the person charged has knowledge
of possession; and that he knows
the substance is a narcotic," said
P. W. Halprin, special prosecutor
for the department of justice.
He outlined the law as it now
stands and said, "the rate of
prosecution on possession charges
is very high."
Bill Deverell, a Vancouver
lawyer who has dealt with many
drug cases in court, spoke with
open contempt of our drug laws.
"There should not be a big
brother government that tells
people how to run their lives," he
said.
"Laws such as grass possession
are   legislated   as   a   result   of
Kenny moves in
on English dept.
from page One
When asked if students should not be aware of the problems
Kenny said, "They are not at a stage where the students are directly
affected."
Kenny said he intends to follow the advice which he gave to all
faculty members in the letter issued Thursday. "I request all members
of the department to refrain during the period of review from any
actions that might exacerbate the present difficulties."
Last year, the English department experienced similar disputes.
The issue was the denial of tenure to two professors, David Powell and
Brian Mayne, who had fulfilled the criteria for receiving tenure.
The primary criterion is that a faculty member write and publish
research and secondly that he is a good teacher.
Both Powell and Mayne had published work and were known for
their teaching merit.
The ultimate decision, reached by administration president Walter
Gage in conjunction with a special committee, was that Mayne be
allowed to teach for two more years and then be reconsidered for
tenure. Powell was given a terminal contract and is presently unable to
find another university teaching position.
An Arts I professor is organizing other English professors to donate
as well as collect money in order to hire Powell independently.
The three professors being Considered for tenure this year are
Peter Taylor, Bill Messenger, and Mike Goldberg.
Taylor and Messenger are both, completing their PhDs and are
getting ready to publish. Goldberg has already published.
No decision yet
from city council
from page One
As stipulated, the road will link Point Grey road to the east, and
N.W. Marine Drive to the west, dividing the proposed park land fronting
the beach and residential development.
The houses along the 4400 block Marine Drive will be
expropriated so that recreation land for residents of proposed
townhouses can be provided.
The townhouses will be built in two areas of the total scheme.
Private developers such as Clarke and Clarke Real Estate have been
quietly purchasing land by Trimble Street and Marine Drive for many
years, waiting for Jericho Road to be approved before applying to
rezone the area for townhouses.
The federal government has retained part of the old national
defense site adjoining Fourth Avenue and has received city rezoning
approval to develop townhouses on that site.
Officials say the Jericho road will provide access to the
federally-built townhouses.
The road will be financed jointly by the city of Vancouver and the
federal government.
In his Friday presentation to the town planning commission,
Martin said the road built this year would have two traffic lanes and
one for parking. He said long range plans call for another three lanes to
be built on the other side of a proposed divider, but it is unknown how
long it will take before the total project can be completed.
The board formerly released plans for a "Coney Island"
development of the site including an amusement park with rides and
games, tennis courts, and ice arena, a marina and an offshore island to
be built as a wildlife conservatory and miniature railroad.
Last week, Robertson indicated former board plans were being
revised, and said the board is mainly concerned with the development
of a marina on the present site of Jericho Beach.
Aldermen Art Phillips, Walter Hardwick, and Brian Calder last
week released a report they had prepared recommending the Jericho
Road be restricted to two lanes.
Alderman Harry Rankin said Monday he feels there is no need for
a six-lane roadway now or in the future and added that city council has
not yet made any final decisions concerning the proposal.
ignorance," said Deverell.
"Marijuana was placed under the
Narcotic Control Act, when it is
not a narcotic, medically
speaking."
He said that most of the people
arrested in "great sweeps" of
pushers are usually from
16-years-old to the 20's, who just
happen to have a large quantity of
marijuana for the purpose of
giving or selling to friends. i
And yet, those who really
make a lot of money on the drug
market, "are hidden behind many
walls of protection."
On Thursday, a young
Vancouver girl, who was busted in
California for cocaine possession,
and who consequently spent 18
months in prison lashed out
against the law as well, telling
what she learned about it, the
hard way.
"The courts change the law to
fit circumstances," said Lancelet.
"There are no set laws —
'different strokes for different
folks' is how the law works."
She said that in prison there is
no help - and that she got off
drugs due to the help of a
volunteer psychiatrist.
"I just happened to be lucky —'
there are more drugs in prison
than out of it You can get caught
in a web — when you leave prison
you're given one dress and five
dollars, so right away you start
thinking of how to get some
money fast, just to live," said
Lancelet.
"Besides, when you're in
prison you have nothing to do, so
everyone sits around all day
talking about how to rob banks
and so on — when you get out
you know more about crime than
when you get in," said Lancelet.
Lancelet was one of the
representatives of The House, a
relatively new service run by the
Narcotics Addiction Foundation.
The House, at 1040 West
Seventh Avenue (732-3301), is a
24-hour centre for youth to
receive free, confidential help on
drup trips, and is also a drop-in
centre where youth can meet and
just "rap.'"
Also speaking to students on
Thursday were representatives
from the Now Bus and the
Inner-City Hostel, and Peter
Stein from the LeDain Drug
Commission.
Stein outlined the general
recommendations of the interim
report of the commission, and
indicated impatience but have
neglected to read the report.
He explained that all drugs
have a "potential for harm,"
depending on the quantity used,
but said that the commission
recommended that no jail
sentences be given for possession
of mood-changing drugs, from
marijuana to heroin.
He said the use of the drug
possession law the way it stands is
useless because it does not deter
drug use and costs too much.
"We're against prohibition of
drug use, but we are for social
control of drug distribution," said
Stein.
YOU. . .
have probably read in this paper
the campaign speeches of the
candidates   for AMS EXECUTIVE
YOU probably have reached some sort of an
opinion.
How about putting that opinion on paper!
VOTING HAPPENS
TODAY — (Tuesday) (advance polling)
S.U.B. (by cafeteria) 11 30 - 330
EDUCATION BUILDING
RESIDENCES (Ft. Camp, Place Vanier, Totem Park), 5:00 - 7:00
TOMORROW — Wednesday, Feb.  10th
BARN
BUCHANAN
ANGUS
EDUCATION
CIVIL ENGINEERING
MAIN LIBRARY
SEDGEWICK LIBRARY
S.U.B.
WOODWARD LIBRARY
N.B. This election will       PRESIDENT
fill the positions of      COORDINATOR OF ACTIVITIES
OMBUDSMAN
Nominations close at
12:30 Thurs. Feb.   I 1
for the positions of
VICE-PRESIDENT
TREASURER
EXTERNAL AFFAIRS OFFICER
INTERNAL AFFAIRS OFFICER
If you are apathetic, hassled by the establishment, irrate, ticked off, a hopeless radical or
a bureaucratic hack, maybe this is your chance to do something about it. See the Official
Notice in this paper for more information. Tuesday,  February 9,   1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 9
Vancouver Jews take to streets
By BRUCE CURTIS
For the first time in living
memory the Vancouver Jewish
community gathered together to
protest in public.
Over 1,500 people gathered in
the courthouse square Monday
noon for a rally to protest the
denial of human rights to Jews in
the Soviet Union.
The rally was part of a
continuing protest stemming from
the arrest and conviction of 11
Soviet Jews who attempted to
highjack a bi-plane in Leningrad in
December.
Signs reading: "Cultural
Genocide in Russia, "Freedomyes!
Russian ,ImperialismNyet!, and "Let
my people go," were carried by
both young and old.
Lau attracts liberals
but Garrod a challenge
from page 4
contributor. His solutions to problems tend to lean on past and parallel
situations rather than original ideas.
Lau is Chinese and is in some part running on his ethnicicity.
Posters like "Hanson Rau for Plesident" are designed to attract liberal
sympathy. ("I'll vote for him just to show that someone who isn't
WASP can get in too.")
He is brash, loud, and often outwardly good-natured. He is
politically smart and is constantly changing faces for different
audiences. He likes to portray himself as the friend of Joe Student and
as a sort of father figure to rely on when the bureaucracy is screwing
you. He'd make a good ombudsman.
Lau considers himself to be an excellent organizer, which on the
surface appears to be accurate. Lau's problem, however, is that he
organizes solely around "better" student services. He fails to see that
this is only a part of a larger role that one must play as President.
Garrod admits he has a few hang-ups and that's why he is running
on a human government slate. He's human and flawed like the rest of
us.
Garrod is reasonably principled (a contrast to the other two
candidates) and has a number of firm ideas on what the AMS should be
doing. If it's true, his offer to resign half-way through the term if the
students aren't satisfied constitutes a money-back guarantee.
He is personally pleasing and likeable with an excellent sense of
humor. He is a good speaker and if he can ever get over the intimidating
atmosphere of the senate he will probably set a few old deans back in
their seats.
Garrod took a considerable political risk in this election when he
refused to cut or tie his shoulder length for the usual photographs. He
feels that if he can't be honest about himself,- how can he ever be
honest in office?
Both Mitchell and Lau are traditional, pre-Fraser Hodge AMS
types and as such have a real command of, the Society's human
resources. So far, Lau is the front runner but Garrod presents a serious
challenge.
A complete political turnaround with Garrod in front would set
me and the back room odds-takers busy rewriting our AMS Election
Manuals.
The protest opened with young
people dancing the hora and
singing Hebrew folk songs led by
Pinkus Bak, principal of
Vancouver's Jewish elementary
school.
The three hundred school
children who had been bussed to
the demonstration were wearing
homemade Star of David
armbands.
Vancouver's leading religious
leaders were there as part of the
platform party and were decked
out in silver chains symbolizing
what they termed "spiritual
genocide" and "religious
persecution."
"1967 saw a sharp turn in the
attitude of the Soviet Jew." Lub
Bershadskja, (a Russian emigrant)
told the demostrators. "Since the
six day war, all Jewish boys and
girls carry a picture of the Israeli
army and dream to be a soldier in
it."
Bersgadskaja was the main
speaker   at   the   rally.   She  was
til
In the village
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GRAD CLASS MEETING
-thurs., feb. 11, 1971 - 12:30 - SUB Aud.
Proposed Agenda:
1)   approve budget & social activities
2)   elect honorary positions - nominations from floor;
3)   allocate   class gift — bring  ideas with all pertinent
information
This will be your last chance to have
your say in your grad activities!
mm
mmmmm
LEON BIBB
'The Poet's Thing''
—poems and songs of the times
Part I - Today 12:30-SUB Ballroom-50c
Part II - Friday 12:30-SUB Ballroom -50c
Leon Bibb is a Black artist who has recorded a large repetoire on Vanguard and RCA
records.
The program will begin with early American work songs and chain gang songs, and will
develop into anti-war ballads and the powerful sound of Negro blues. The poems of
Malcolm-X and contemporary American poets will blend into the music of Neil Diamond,
Paul Simon, and others.
mmm^mmmmmnmmm^mmmmm^mkmwmmmmmm%mmmmkmmmmmmmmmmmmt00mmm
granted permission to emigrate to
Israel in 1970 and has since spent
all. her time touring North
America to "tell the true story of
life in Russia."
Another spokesman of the
Jewish community told the rally,
"The silence you heard from 1939
to 1945 you will never hear
again."
He was referring to the Jewish
idea that change is normally
accomplished through "proper
channels" and by not using public
demonstrations as a means of
individual expression.
"We believe the time has come
to tell the Soviet government and
the world that there is little
difference between physical
genocide, which crushes the body,
and spiritual genocide, which
crushes the soul," he said.
The originators of the Jewish
public protest were a group of
young Vancouver Jews who
organized loosely late last year in
a group called Magshimim. They
held a vigil at the courthouse in
December and gathered support
from the Jewish community for
the larger protest Monday.
"By getting the Jewish
community out into the streets to
this type of demonstration, we
hope they will be less hostile to
other demonstrations," said Marc
Triebwasser a spokesman for
Magshimim.
Triebwasser had helped to
organize the Monday's rally and
was pleased that they "managed
to exclude the right wingers."
Rallies of the type have
gathered many Jews who are only
anti-communist, Triebwasser said.
Monday's rally talked solely about
the alleged anti-Semitism in the
Soviet Union.
"Jews are beginning to
organize around the struggle for
liberation in much the same way
as Jhe Third World people," said
one demonstrator as he raised his
fist and joined the dancing which
ended the rally.
YOUR STUDENT CARD
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WEEKDAYS-9 A.M.-9 P.M. SAT. 9 A.M.-5 P.M.-327-0461
NO APPOINTMENTS NECESSAR Y Page  10
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 9, 1971
TUESDAY
FINE   ARTS  GALLERY
Discussion by Dr. G. Knox and Mr.
R. Hunt of Fine Arts Dept. "Richard
Hamilton: How We Hate", noon, Fine
Arts Gallery.
Dr. George Knox is the Head of Fine
Arts Dept. Mr. Ronald Hunt is Assistant Professor in Fine Arts Dept.
PRE MED SOC
Speaker    from    Narcotics    Addiction
Foundation, Wesb. 201, noon.
FINE  ARTS  GALLERY
Film   in   Richard   Hamilton.   Feb.   9,
10, 12,  16, 17, 23, 24. Richard Hamilton is  considered  the  father  of  pop
art movement in Britain.
FINE  ARTS GALLERY
Showing   of   prints   by   such   contemporary  artists  as   Andy Warhol,  Roy
Lichtenstein.      Robert     Rauschenber,
Jim   Dine,   E.   Paolozzi,   Frank  Stella.
INTERNATIONAL   WEEK
Israel   Today,   noon.   India    Students
Association discussion, 7:30 p.m., I.H.
NEWMAN CLUB
General  meeting,  St.   Mark's   College
music room, noon.
'tween
classes
WOMEN'S   LIBERATION   ALLIANCE
General meeting, all women welcome,
1776 Alberni St., 7:30 p.m.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Leon Bibb is a black artist who will
be doing a program of work songs,
chain-gang songs, blues and contemporary music as well as poems by
Malcom-X and others. SUB ballroom,
Part I. Tuesday, noon: Part II, Friday,
noon.
LAY  SCHOOL  OF  THEOLOGY
Union College  7:30.   First  of  8   week
lecture   seminar   series—$5   students,
$10  others.
SAILING  CLUB
General   meeting,   new  members  welcome, Bu.  104, noon.
WEDNESDAY
ANGLICAN-UNITED   CAMPUS
MINISTRY
Joe     McLellond     of     McGill,     Clubs
Lounge, noon,
PRE-MED SOC
Surgery    tour    at    VGH.    Details    at
Tuesday meeting.
ONTOLOGICAL   SOC
"Knowing   your   Transcendent   self,"
Bu.  232,  noon.
INTERNATIONAL   WEEK
Canadian involvement in West Indies,
3 p.m. Arab Students Association discussion,    7:30   p.m.    Four    topics    on
Pakistan. I.H.
T-BIRD   MOTORCYCLE   CLUB
SUB   105A.  noon.
ARCHEOLOGY  SOC
Revitalization meetin: Imperative that
you come. SUB 213, noon.
CIRAP
Free   seminar-lecture   on   "Organizing
the    Unemployed,    1930's    &    1970's",
SUB ballroom,n oon.
ANGLICAN-UNITED   CAMPUS
MINISTRY
"Civic     Politics",     Lutheran     Canvp
Center, 5:30 p.m.
0 BLACK CROSS
Black   Cross   Secret   headquarters   —
Brock   Hall   extension   basement,   un-
organization meeting,  1:30 p.m.
CAMPUS  CAVALIERS
207-209  SUB.
SKYDIVING  CLUB
General meeting, Rm. 215, SUB.
UBC   ABORTION   COMMITTEE
Abortion teach-in, Dr. Marakoff, guest
speaker.   SUB   ballroom,   noon.
WOMEN'S   LIBERATION   ALLIANCE
Workshop for Feb. 13 abortion march.
All women welcome. 1776 Alberni St.,
8 p.m.
CAMPUS CRUSADE  FOR CHRIST
"The Second Coming of Christ." Discussion, SUB 213, 12:33 p.m.
PRE   MED   SOC
Tour of Narcotics Addiction Foundation. Meet at Wesb.  100, with cars if
possible, noon.
T-BIRD   WARGAMES
Meeting, SUB 119, noon.
CVSO
Jim Ward, recently returned from
world trip, will speak on available
CVSO positions in Agriculture and
Forestry, Macmillan Bldg. Rm. 160.
noon.
EDUCATION STAGE BAND
Rehearsal, Educ. Bldg.  1317, noon.
CLASSICS   CLUB
John   Humphrey   will  show  slides   of
excavations  in  Anamur,   Turkey.   Bu.
penthouse, 8 p.m.
VARSITY   CHRISTIAN   FELLOWSHIP
Dr. Ian Rennie  on I. John, SUB  207-
209,   noon.
PRE  SOCIAL  WORK CLUB
Dr. Glen Hamilton of the B.C. association of social workers, to speak
and answer questions. All welcome,
SUB  105B,  noon.
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FEB. 25th
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COSTUME SALON
RENTALS
Single and Double-Breasted
Tuxedos and Dinner Jackets
Black and Colored
Flare  or  Straight  Pants
Up-to-Date Accessories
SPECIAL  STUDENT RATES
224-0034    4397 W. 10th
HOW FAR AWAY IS
EUROPE?
As Far Away as Your
W.S.S. TRAVEL OFFICE
EXCLUSIVE STUDENT RATES ON:
CHARTER FLIGHTS RAILPASSES
INTRA-EUROPEAN CHARTER FLIGHT
PLUS OTHER TRAVEL AIDS:
AIR CANADA SWING-AIR CLUB CARDS |
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT I.D. CARD
TOURS
Drop In At Your
Campus Travel Office Soon!
Room 237B SUB. ~[rn"
Hours: 12:30-4:30 M-F
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Club-3 lines, 1 day $1.00; 2 days $1.75.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.25; additional lines 30c; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance.
Publications Office, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. of B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
Closing Deadline is 11:30, the day before publication.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
LOVE PULSATES, PEAKING IN
Feb. Dance to Beyond Nemesis.
SUB Ballroom, Fri. 12, 8 p.m.
Valentinos $1.25. Others $1.00. Under 5 free.  AMS   cards  req.
Greetings
12
ARE YOU ARE SORCERER'S Apprentice. SUB Club's lounge Wed.,
Feb. 10, 12:30. Joe McLelland Mc-
gill.	
NEED    RIDE    TO    PR.    GEORGE,
. Chetwynd, 17th? Call John, eves..
224-7016. Annie Darling: Valentine
greetings,  love.	
HAPPINESS — IS — CLAYTON —
Vogler as Activities — Co-ordinator.
Lost & Found
13
LOST ANTIQUE SILVER RING
Feb. 1 in ladies washroom, Fine
Art Building. If found contact
SUB Lost and Found or Pat 922-
0684.
Rides & Car Pools
14
BLIND STUDENT WANTS RIDE
to and from Kerrisdale area. 5338
Cypress St. $20.00 per mo. Phone
Jeannie   Wright,   266-9023.	
DRIVERS NEEDED FOR BRITISH
Properties-Glenmore area. Call Liz
926-5771 or Cindy 922-3581.
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Scandal*
37
ARE YOU ARE SOCERER'S Apprentice. SUB Club's lounge, Wed.
Feb. 10, 12:30. Joe McLelland McGill.
HOMO SEXUAL COUNSELLING
Service: most of you have 60
years left, how long will you wait?
Consider your feelings, not how
others will think. Homosexuals
make good and understanding
friends. You are not alone. For
details write Graduate Student, 23,
Box 6572,   Station G,  Vancouver 8.
— VOTE
—and —
ON  —  WEDNESDAY
-   Vote   —   Vogler!
HOMO SEXUALITY ON TELEVI-
sion, CBUT, Channel 2, Hourglass,
Wednesday,  Feb.   10,   6:30-7:30.
PISSED-OFF WITH YOUR LAND-
lord's policies? Rent too high?
We're organized, are you? Vancouver Tennant's Council meeting
today, SUB Art Gallery, 12:30-1:30
Free> Band,  Come.	
IF YOU   ARE   TIRED
of authority, see IF ...!!!! !
SUB Auditorium, Friday and Saturday, 7:00 & 9:30; Sunday, 7:00.
AMS  card holders,  50c.
Typewriters &  Repairs
39
Typing
40
Special Notices
15
CANADIAN   PARTY   OF
LABOUR   presents
EISENSTEIN'S
"10    DAYS
THAT   SHOOK   THE   WORLD"
WED.,  FEB.   10  —  8   P.M.
50c HEBB  THEATRE
TIRED — OF — JUST IDEAS? —
Get — action with Clayton —
Vogler.	
ACTION — SPEAKS LOUDER —
than — words. — Vote — Vogler.
IF ... IS A STUDENT'S DREAM
come true. See how in the SUB
Auditorium, Friday and Saturday,
7:00 & 9:30; Sunday, 7:00. AMS
card holders 50c.	
16
Travel Opportunities
INTERNATIONAL   CHARTERS
687-2855 224-0087 687-1244
List of 1971 return 1-way & relative flights U.K., Continent, India,
Africa,  Hong Kong.
106—709 Dunsmuir St.,  Van.   1,   B.C.
TRAVELLING OVERSEAS ON A
BUDGET? Then visit your Youth
Hostels information desk which is
open every Wednesday from 12:30-
1:30 p.m. opposite the information
desk in the Students Union Building. Canadian Youth Hostels Association, 1406 West Broadway,
Vancouver  9,   B.C.   Tel.   738-3128.
ALL TYPES OF OFFICE WORK
can be done by Senior Secretary
now housebound. 732-6081.	
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST
—experienced in all types of technical thesis. Reasonable rates.
Call Mrs.  Ellis,   321-3838.	
NEAT ACCURATE ELECTRIC
typing. Theses, essays, etc. Reasonable rates.. Call Mrs. Duncan,
228-9597.	
ESSAYS AND THESIS TYPED
my home. Phone—Mrs. Murdoch,
261-3607.	
ANY TYPE OF TYPING DONE-,
essays, theses, notes, or anything
else. 186 W. 18th Ave., or 872-
1129.	
EXPERIENCED ESSAY AND
thesis typist. Electric typewriter.
Mrs.   Ann  Treacy.   738-8794.	
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING
my home. Essays, thesis, etc.
Neat Accurate Work. Reasonable
Rates.  Phone  263-5317.	
ESSAY & THESIS TYPING, IBM
Electric — 35c/page. Call after
noon,   733-4708.	
ESSAYS AND THESES TYPED
Experienced Typist, Electri Typewriter.  731-8096.
Wanted—Information
17
NOW'S — THE — TIME FOR
Clayton — Vogler as — Activitits
Co-ordinator.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'66 INT. TRAVELALL, V8, P.S.,
4 speed, radio, rebuilt R.E. and
brakes.   298-1996.	
'57 CHEVROLET. GOOD RUNNING
condition. $100 or so. 224-9869. Ask
for  Bob  in  room  209.
Motorcycles
25
1970 YAMAHA 75 EXCEL. CONDI-
tion. $250. Write or see Andrea
Grieve,  3164  West  6th.
YEAR-ROUND ACCURATE TVP-
ing from legible work; 738-6829
10 a.m. to 9 p.m.; reasonable rates.
TEDIOUS TASKS—PROFESSION-
al and Technical Typing. IBM
Selectric—Days. Evenings, Weekends.  Phone:   228-9304—30c per.
Help Wanted (Cont.)
51
UBC TUTORING CENTRE NEEDS
tutors for Geology 320, Psychology
308 & 31(>, and modern Icelandic.
$3.00 an hour, register at SUB
100B,   228-4583,   12-2  p.m.   daily.
RESEARCH ASSISTANT NEEDED
immediately to monitor Sleep EEG
between 11:00 p.m. and 8:00 a.m.
Background in Neurophysioloby,
Psychology or Biological Sciences
or in Nursing desirable- $400.00/
month. Contach Dr. G. Reith, De-
partment   of   Psychiatry,   228-2027.
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Instruction Wanted
61
Music Instruction
62
Special Classes
63
Tutoring
64
WILL TUTOR MATH 100 * 101,
day, evening, or Sat. Reasonable
rates. Phone 733-3644—10 a.m. to
3   p.m.	
FRENCH TUTORING, TRANSLA-
tion into French, experienced
Parisian teacher. 687-6494. ^Alain
Neumand   (804),   1949  Barctay  St.
IS ONE OF YOUR COURSES A
drag? Need help? Come to the
UBC Tutoring Centre. Almost all
subjects, SUB 100B, 228-4583, 12-
2   p.m.,   daily. 	
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
NIKON F 1.4 F50 mm, $250. HEAD
Competition Giant Slalom 195 cm,
$75^ Ken 224-0881. 4651 W. 16th
Ave.	
FOR SALE: KONICA C35 CAMERA
and flash attachment. Used only
once, $60. Complete. Phone 732-
0676.	
NIKKO STEREO AM/FM TUNER
Amp PE2018 turntable changer,
Shure cartridge, 2 Pioneer speak-
ers,   $250.   Jack,   228-9871.	
ONE PAIR WHITEl STARS 205CM;
Two studded winter tires on
Volkswagen wheels; one Beetle-
type ski rack; one 6-V Beetle
radio; Enquire at No. 2, 1607 Yew
Street.
BIRD CALLS
Your Student Telephone Directory
NOW HALF PRICE - 50c
at the Bookstore, Thunderbird Shop
and AMS Publications Office
RENTALS 8c REAL ESTATE
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
CO-ORDINATOR REQUIRED FULL
time for Nanaimo Crisis Centre.
Qualifications: Ability to relate
easily with young people, leadership potential, Knowledge of drug
scene helpful, but not essential.
Duties: Co-ordination of voluntary
personnel and activities of a youth
oriented Crisis Centre established
to provide intervention in Crisis
situations, drug information, referral services and to discourage
use of drugs by young people.
Salary: Commensurate with experience. Send Resume describing
education and experience to Jean-
nette Matson, Malaspina College,
Nanaimo, B.C., by February 18,
1971.
Rooms
81
TWO ATTRACTIVE SLEEPING
rooms for rent in young household. Kitchen privileges, phone,
washer. 10 mins. UBC, $60' and
$65 per month. Call Mrs. Duncan
228-95'97.	
FOR RENT: ROOM IN HOUSE.
Share cooking facilities. Mature
student preferred. 16th & Dunbar,
phone  738-5408  after  5:00  p.m.
Room &  Board
82
Furnished Apts.
83
EXCHANGE OR SUBLET; APRIL
to Septembtr, modern 2% (Faculty), everything included, downtown Montreal, close to McGill;
write Daniel LaTouche, Dept. of
Political Science, McGill Univer-
sity.	
WANTED—ONE GIRL TO SHARE
suite at 44th and Fraser. Cost
cheap. Phone Judy 321-1373 after
6:00 p.m. Tuesday, February 9,   1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11
—chris gallagher photo
THERE WERE LOTS OF DARK Thunderbird jerseys around but very little support for UBC's goalie
Ian Wilkie on Friday night at Thunderbird Arena. Here he is hidden by Laurie Vanzella (2), Rob
Trenaman  (18), and Norm Park (15) but still comes up with a good save. (see story below).
Birds blow first place chance
The University of B.C. Thunderbirds missed a
chance to grab a share of first place in Western
Collegiate hockey this weekend.
The Thunderbirds started the weekend trailing
the University of Manitoba Bisons by one game. The
Bisons split their two weekend games.
Unfortunately so did the 'Birds.
Friday UBC lost 54 to the University of
Alberta Golden Bears, but they rebounded to
whomp the same club 8-3 Saturday. Both games
were at Thunderbird Arena.
The Bisons bombed Brandon University 14-1
Friday, but were upset by the University of
Saskatchewan Saturday.
In Friday's game, the 'Birds couldn't clear the
puck out of their own end and Alberta made the
most of it. Four Golden Bear goals came after UBC
goalie Ian Wilkie had made at least one initial save.
Bob MacAneely scored twice for UBC. Barry
Wilcox and Norm Park added singles.
Jack Gibson was the big gun for Alberta with
two goals and two assists.
Alberta's starting goalie Bob Galloway was
injured in the second minute of play when he
stopped a MacAneely slap-shot with his facemask.
The cut required 14 stitches to close.
Galloway returned to the nets Saturday, but
Wilcox made his return miserable.
The UBC winger was the workhorse with three
goals and two assists. His second goal, early in the
second period; changed the complexion of the
game. Until then the game looked like a repeat of
Friday as Alberta was slowly taking over the play.
The 190-pound Wilcox skated over the Bear
blue-line on a collision course with Alberta's
economy size defenceman Dan Bouwmeester.
Wilcox skated right through Bouwmeester and
scored to break a 1-1 tie.
Thunderbirds never looked back. Three more
goals, including another by Wilcox, gave UBC a 5-2
lead at the end of the period.
'Bird coach Bob Hindmarch was more than
pleased that his big winger has started to flash the
form that earned him an offer to turn pro with the
Vancouver Canucks organization this fall.
Despite ranking among the league's top scorers,
Wilcox has been pressing too hard and missing too
may good scoring opportunities.
"Barry's been trying to pick the corner all
season," said Hindmarch. "Tonight he just fired."
MacAneely continued to lead the league in
goals (28) and points (47) as he picked up two goals
and two assists.
The Golden Bears made the ex-Edmonton
junior star a special target. But MacAneely is one of
the few 'Birds that can dish it out with anybody and
not get caught.
Rich Longpre, Rob Trenaman and Doug
Buchanan added singles for the winners.
Wilkie was outstanding in the UBC nets
Saturday. He included several outstanding stops in
his 33 saves. But he showed more than being able to
stop the puck. "He (Wilkie) plays the angles so well,
Alberta had nothing to shoot at," said Hindmarch.
The win was especially sweet for Wilkie since he
attended the University of Alberta, but played his
hockey for the Edmonton Oil Kings junior club.
Naturally this didn't endear him to Alberta coach
Clare Drake.
UBC's season record is now 12^. The
University of Calgary is also 124 after dumping
Victoria 5-2 and 13-2 over the weekend. Manitoba is
13-3.
mm
EAT IN • TAKE OUT* DELIVERY.
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
g UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY
lusiu
UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY 3
GRADUATE SCHOOLS
»  BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
»  HUMAN BEHAVIOR
SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA
An Admissions Representative
will be on campus
FEBRUARY 11, 2-5 P.M.
FOR AN APPOINTMENT
SEE YOUR
PLACEMENT OFFICE
WHERE ALL
THE ACTION IS
3
Sensational
Clubs in
1
HARRY'S
ENTERTAINMENT
COMPLEX
* OIL CAN'S
DANCE to the sounds of
NIGHT TRAIN
* THE BACK ROOM
The atmosphere of the
Roaring 20's
From   Los  Angeles
MAC TRUQUE
* DIRTY SAL'S
Listen to the unique voices
of JUDY & JIM GINN
— OPEN
MON. THRU SAT.
752 THURLOW ST. 683-7306
REMINDER
APPLICATION FOR BRADMT10N
All students who expect to graduate this spring are requested to
submit "Application for Graduation" cards (two) to the
Registrar's Office (Mrs. Kent) immediately. This includes students
who are registered in a year not normally considered to be a
graduating year (e.g. one-year teacher-training programme for
graduates) but who are expecting to complete a degree
programme this spring.
PLEASE NOTE: It is the responsibility of the student to make
application for his degree. If the student does not make
application, his name will not be put forward to his Faculty or
the Senate for approval.
NO APPLICATION - NO DEGREE
SPORTS
Wierd bounce in
Bird's basketball
It was a rather strange weekend
for the University of British
Columbia Thunderbird basketball
team as they swept two easy
victories on Friday and Saturday
nights, but lost last night to the
team they must beat in the
semi-finals.
On Friday night against the
University of Calgary
"Dinosaurs", the Birds were led
by Ron Thorsen's 20 points to
coast to an easy 74-59 victory
over the Alberta team. Terry
MacKay and Derek Sankey added
16 points each as Calgary was
never closer than 10 points to the
Bird's lead.
On Saturday night against the
University of Lethbridge, the
team went on to an impressive
122-89 victory. In doing so they
established a school record for the
most number of points in a single
game. The previous record was set
two years ago against Portland
State when UBC ran up a point
total of 117.
Arts- 20 — The sign up deadline for
of annual Art's 20 Relay road race Is
FeL 11. This race started in 1919 as a
means of aiding the development of the
spirit of the student of UBC as they
built their dreams and aspirations in
the building of their new campus here
on Point Grey.
Previously the campus was located
at the present site of Vancouver General Hospital. It attempting to bring
their new campus closer to them they
started the Art's 20 race. Teams of
eight men ran in relay manner from the
new campus to VGH. Challenges were
sent out between faculties and the rivalry grew and flourished until 1980
when the race was stopped. Last year
the  race was reinstituted with PE tak-
In Lethbridge, #ie Birds
poured in 63 second half points in
establishing their new record. Led
again by Ron Thorsen, with 32
points, they were never  behind.
Rookie guard Bob Dickson also
established a personal record as he
scored 18 points for a career high.
The real story, however, is the
continued good play of forward
Derek Sankey. In scoring 22
points he continues his late season
improvement after a relatively
poor   start.
Last night, however, the Birds
showed a complete reversal of
form. Leading 38-32 at the half,
the University of Alberta "Golden
Bears" edged the UBC team
67-65. Again Sankey looked
strong as he led all scorers with 23
points. Poor shooting worked
against the Birds, however, as the
Calgary team deserved to win.
These same two teams will meet
in two weeks time in the
^emi-finals. Hopefully by then,
the Thunderbirds will have
learned how to win the crucial
game.
ing the Arts 20 Cup.
AU teams of eight men are encouraged as it provides one of the last times
a team has of picking up points in the
standings. If you are interested come
to the intramural office, room 308 War
Memorial Gym.
Track and Field — The sign up deadline is Feb. 11
Bowling, Volleyball and Rugby — The
schedules for these events are now out.
Check outside the intramural office to
seo when you play.
Co-Recreation Volleyball — Unfortunately is cancelled for today only. It
will resume as usual next week. Everyone is welcome to play on Tuesdays at
12:30.
Tansar Crafts
we sell
handmade things
by local craftsmen.
2002 w. 4m. avenue Page 12
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 9, 1971
Day care
at UBC
" ... opportunity to provide
really fine child care."
Nationwide demand
for day care centres
By ELIZABETH BRIEMBERG
The Royal Commission on the Status of
Women found that there is a nationwide demand for
child-care services and recommended that day care
services be set up for the use of all — women at
home as well as working women.
Since the demand is so high and day care is
really  basic   to   the   rights   of both women  and
children, it deserved much more consideration. The
present day care centres in Vancouver are not full to
capacity despite the enormous need. Why is this
so?
There are at least three reasons. One is that day
care  centres and the subsidies available are not
advertised by the provincial government so many
women do not know of the possibilities.
A second reason is that women think of day
care   as  custodial rather than as a life-enriching
experience for their children. This view is often
justified and would be even more so if day care
became  part   of the education system extended
downward, as would be the effect of the Royal
Commission recommendations.
By JAN O'BRIEN
The need for day care on campus is obvious.
There are 65 to 70 three to five-year-olds in.
university housing alone and many more under three
who need day care now.
One year ago the University Day Care Council
was established by a group of students, faculty and
staff to initiate and co-ordinate day care for
members of the university.
At present there are three day care centres on
campus; Acadia Day Care Centre, University
Kindercare and the Campus Nursery Co-op. All are
run independently by parents on a non-profit basis.
The UDCC consists of equal representation
from the three day care centres and volunteer
advisors from the faculty of education, school of
social work and the department of health care and
epidemiology.
Acadian and Kindercare together accommodate
55 children, three to five-years-old.
The Campus Nursery Co-op which has 12
children, is the first in B.C. permitted by the
province to care for the pre-three age group.
he philosophy behind day care is changing. It
is no longer being considered a necessary evil or
second best.
"Day care is now seen as an opportunity to
provide really fine child care," said Emily Campbell
of the health care and epidemiology department.
Monica Mitchell, supervisor at the under three
co-op which started in September said group
experience is good for children given that they have
to be away from home.
"A lot of women handle licensed family day
care (babysitting, in a home) well, but the
environment here is for children," she said.
"There is very little they can't get into."
The situation at the co-op is special. Parents
must be students because working families could
not spend at least one-half day a week at the-centre.
"In other situations the children wouldn't have
their parents around. It's also changing some of the
parent's concepts about child rearing and is relieving
the anxiety about "am I doing it right?," she said.
The centre is not licensed but is running on an
interim permit which is renewed every three months.
he UDCC is undertaking a study of the needs
for pre-three care under the guidance of Campbell.
"The needs of the younger child are different.
They need more evidence of home continuity and
more care," said Campbell.
This is reflected in the parent involvement at
the under three co-op.
A group of parents in the Acadia high-rise are
planning another under three centre for the fall
under the auspices of the UDCC.
Parents handle administrative details and carry
out needed cleaning and maintenance work at all
three centres.
The provincial department of rehabilitation and
social improvement subsidizes the centres and has a
sliding scale of fees ranging from the full cost to no
fee in instances of a completely subsidized child.
All centres operate at an approximate cost of
$75 per child per month.
"The subsidy for each family varies not only
according to income but circumstances as well,"
said Campbell.
Acadia supervisor Ruth McLellan said while
the government does help the individual families, it
could do more in the area of pre-school teacher
wages.
"All pre-school wages in the province are
minimal," said McLellan.
Acadia, which has been in operation for two
years offers a free program The children are free to
move from one area to another to participate in
different activities.
"The more modern theory of child care is they
are free to do what they want to within reason. It is
not as structural," said McLellan.
The Acadia program consists of art, music,
television for Sesame Street and outdoor play.
Kindercare is structured and yet unstructured
said head teacher Myra Haraldsen.
The children choose what they would like to do
but don't move from one area to another, she said.
Kindercare is unique in that one of the
assistants is a man.
"A lot of the parents are single mothers. With
"Uncle Jim' the children have a male to identify
with," said Haraldsen.
Mitchell said kids need both men and women
involved in their upbringing. Some of the male
parents were reluctant about spending half a day at
the centre but now they enjoy it.
Everyone agreed that the university should be'
more involved in day care centres on cafnpus.
oth Acadia and Kindercare are using
university facilities, old huts, but the co-op is
renting part of an old fraternity house.
"Space is the biggest problem," said UDCC
chairman Corrine McAdam.
"The government helps with the operating cost
but each centre has to be set up and equipped," she
said.
The main source of funds in the past has been
small grants, said McAdam.
The council has applied for a $4,000 gift from
the graduating class of 1971.
They propose to spend the money on the under
three program, clearing the nursery co-op's initial
debt of $600, using $1200 to guarantee one year's
rent in the present facility or in getting more
permanent accommodation and $1,000 for the
purchase of outdoor equipment which is required
by provincial regulation.
The remaining $ 1,200 would be set in trust to
the council to found the second unit of the
pre-three centre being organized by the high-rise
group.
The ideal situation would be to find a place
large enough to house the two pre-three centres, said
Mitchell.
"The centres would run separately except in
the late afternoon when only a few children are left.
They could then be combined," she said.
Mitchell summed up the new feeling about
community child rearing saying, "It can be an
advantage, it can strengthen the family - especially
when the parents are very involved."
Thirdly, women do not use the present day care
centres because a means test is required to obtain a
subsidy and the centres are usually inconvenient for
transportation.
These reasons point to the kind of solutions
necessary. Free day care centres should be provided
on a neighborhood basis with the parents in control
of what goes on in them.
The government would finance them and
provide as much assistance in the way of "expert"
advice as the parents want. These centres would be
structured according to the needs of those who use
them. They would provide nurseries for infants, day
care facilities for two to six-year-olds and drop-in
centres for older children.
Older people in the neighborhood could help in
them and each centre could become the focus for a
greater sense of community in the neighborhood.
Some centres would 'be completely co-operative in
the sense that the parents would work in rotation in
the centre.
A small group has been started with the
purpose of doing research into the specific needs
people have. With this information we hope to begin
educational and agitational activities with the aim of
creating the day care services that we all need. If
you are interested please phone Isobel at 732-7059.
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus
in the Village
WE SlBRVE AUTHENTIC
CHINESE FOOD
AT REASONABLE PRICES
Eat In - Take Out
Open Every Day
4:30-11:00 p.m.
5732 University Blvd.       224-6121
In the Village
'V?**
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
Public Service of Canada
GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS,
ALL DISCIPLINES, SEEKING SUMMER
EMPLOYMENT WITH FEDERAL GOVERNMENT
DEPARTMENTS SHOULD REGISTER NOW AT THE
CAMPUS STUDENT PLACEMENT CENTRE.
|— FEB. 10-	
JOE McLELLAND - McGill University
From HERO TO SORCERER'S
APPRENTICE
WED. - 12:30 - CLUB'S LOUNGE - SUB
brought to you by some of the same people who brought you
Creation II. Ang-United Campus Minister University Religious
Council. _
 FEB. 10-

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