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The Ubyssey Oct 4, 1991

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Array THElteSH
N
First-hand rape
account
see page 6
Founded in 1918
Vancouver, B.C., Friday, October 4 , 1991
Vol 74, No 10
FOUND! Courtesy of one hour's work by member of
the Student Environment Centre: your garbage,
where you left It, thrown on the ground around
campus. To reclaim It and recycle, reuse or at least
deposit K In a trash can pick It up outside SUB.
(You pigs!)
PAUL GORDON PHOTO
UBC plans threaten
Wreck Beach cliffs
by Sharon Lindores
UBC, with the Sandwell
Engineering and Construction
Group, is planning to resume
monitoring cliff erosion by Trail
3 and by the towers on Wreck
Beach.
David Griggs, manager of
UBC's Engineering Services for
Campus Planning and Development, would not disclose the
reason for the monitoring, at a
Pacific Spirit Regional Park
Beach Liaison Committee
meeting Tuesday night. Griggs
said they are testing the area to
see if there have been changes
since 1988, when the area was
last tested.
Judy Williams, chairperson
of Wreck Beach Preservation
Society reviewed the latest
campus plans.
"After vie wing both text and
schematics, our society even
more vehemently states our
strong distrust of UBC's intentions regarding the wildemess-
like beauty of Wreck Beach,"
she said.
WBPS is concerned about
future plans on UBC campus—
a 300-foot deep subterranean
lake exists beneath the present
campus and hydrological studies have not been completed.
Williamsissuspiciousofthe
campus plans. "If they persist in
building expensive buildings
next to naturally-eroding cliffs,
they must persist in trying to
armour and destroy both cliffs
andbeachesbelowthem in order
to preserve their investments.
[People] cannot stop nature;
[they] can only retard her relentless onslaught."
The plans ignore the 1979
Cliff Erosion Task-Force Hearing recommendations. The
GVRD, not UBC, has jurisdiction
over Wreck Beach and the cliffs.
The GVRD, however, seems
willing to work with UBC on
erosion control matters, she said.
Williams is adamant that
any erosion-control proposal be
submitted to full public input.
She said UBC's plans are grandiose and outrageous. "Their
long range visions will never
happen if the WBPS can help it."
Students turned away
CFS says 15,000 students not admitted
despite meeting admission standards
by Rick Htebert
Fifteen thousand would-be
students were turned away this
fall from BC's post secondary
education system, according to the
Canadian Federation of Students-
BC.
The s tudent lobby group found
that nearly 9,000 students were
put on waiting lists to enter school
and more than 6,000 were not be
admitted, although they met school
admission standards.
This figure does not include
several Lower Mainland colleges
and UBC, so CFS-BC chair Brad
Lavigne fears possibly 20,000 students could have been out of luck.
At UBC, according to the
registrar's office, 1,826 qualified
undergraduates were turned away
due to lack of space.
"The more information that is
coming in, the more we are floored
by the sheer numbers of refused
students we are seeing," Lavigne
said."Itis shocking that the system
is so underfunded. If we can document 15,000, then it is very safe to
say that there is at least double
that number who aren't even
thinking of attempting to get into
the system."
The CFS-BC documented
these figures through contacts with
registrars and student societies
across the province. For comparison, last year the Ministry of Advanced Education said there were
about 130,000 part and full time
post secondary students in the
1990-91 school year. Last year, the
CFS-BC documented that 10,000
students were not allowed into the
system.
"Looldng at the numbers, this
is a manifestation of years of
underfunding and misplaced pri
orities by the Social Credit government," Lavigne said.
He said even though there will
be a University of Northern British Columbia (UNBC) in Prince
George next fall and a university
in the Fraser Valley scheduled to
open in the mid-90s, these new
campuses may not create spaces
for all the turned away students.
"I don't think these two institutions will make that much of a
dent because we have in the
Greater Vancouver and Victoria
area a horrendous access problem,
"that won't necessarily be addressed
by universities in the Fraser Valley or Prince George.
"We have to increase our seats
system wide by a massive influx of
funding," Lavigne said. The CFS-
BC is calling for a return to the
funding levels before the early 80s
period of Socred fiscal "restraint"
and freezes in funding.
Advanced education minister
Peter Dueck is quick to defend his
Socred government's record.
"Last year, we launched the
Access for All initiative which is
already in operation. We have
spend 690 million dollars in just
over a year to develop an addition
15,000 spaces," Dueck said.
He said "he realized how bad
the problem was" when he became
the advanced education minister
in May. He got $8 million for an
additional 1,078 spaces from the
provincial Treasury Board and
distributed them where the need
was greatest. "So you could say
that with this programme, we have
come a long long way."
He said the government targeted accessibility problems by
building universities in Prince
George (UNBC) and the Fraser
Valley, setting up four BC colleges
to work with BC universities to
grant degrees as "university colleges" and planning a secondtrades
school to relieve pressure on the
overburdened BC Institute of
Technology.
"So when it comes to advanced
education, we have never had a
couple of years with such expansion
of post secondary education as the
past two. I'm sure of that," Dueck
said.
Dueck's opposition critic,
Barry Jones of the New Democratic
Party, disagrees.
"This figure of 15,000
turnaways is really symbolical of
the lingering inability of the government to offer educational opportunities," Jones said. "We are
far behind the national average in
participation rates and too many
talented young people are being
tuRned away."
He said he was not surprised
bythe CFS-BC figures. Jones spent
part of Thursday at Capilano College in North Vancouver, where
2,000 students were refused admission (4,000 are enrolled).
"We're havingto import skilled
professionals from other parts of
Canada and we are short changing
British Columbians who are
missing their chance for their education, those jobs and that sort of
good lifetime earnings," Jones said.
Jones said the NDP would
tackle the accessibility problem
with a four or five year plan, developed in consultation with academic
leaders, students and the community and appropriate funding.
"We've seen the last 15 years
of Socred government and it will
take a lot of years to repair the
damage done, but it's time to get
started. We need a change in government."
UBC incinerator project
makes NDP burn with rage
by Rick Hiebert
Two New Democratic Party
candidates in the upcoming provincial electionhave attacked UBC
for an alleged lack of public consultation regarding a hazardous
waste incinerator project on campus.
Darlene Marzari, Vancouver
Point Grey MLA, and Stuart
Hertzog, Vancouver Quilchena
candidate, saidThursday the UBC
administration is attempting to
build an incinerator for TRIUMF's
hazardous waste, which could be
dangerous without public input.
"People don't know about it.
People at the university don't know
about it and the community hasn't
been consulted effectively,"
Hertzog said.
A proposed $5 million incinerator is to be built where the
current incinerator of bio-medical
waste is. The project is a joint
venture between UBC, SFU and
the University of Victoria to de
stroy medical and chemical wastes
the three universities produce.
The incinerator will replace
the one currently in place and two
others shut down by the provincial
Ministry of the Environment in
1989. The project is in the process
of being approved by the Greater
Vancouver Regional District despite opposition by local environmental groups.
"I have no burning desire to
get rid of incinerators," Marzari
said, "I just want to make sure that
the process for public involvement
is improved.
"Putting a tiny eight inch long
application for waste disposal in
The Province and then expecting
the public to come out and comment
on the project is a backward way of
doing things," she said.
Both candidates said an NDP
government would introduce legislation to ensure that projects of
this type undergo a full public
hearing process involving an inde
pendent committee to address the
impact of the project on the community.
UBC has hosted one public
forum on the project. Another is
planned for October 8 and project
sponsors have participated in three
other public forums on the issue.
Thi sisn'tjustaneighborhood
issue. The winds from this area
carry up through Vancouver into
the valley," Marzari said.
The head of the proposed
project, UBC director of Occupation
Health and Safety Wayne Greene,
defends UBC's consultation process for the project.
"I'm not sure what more we
can do. The fact that some people
don't know is unfortunate, but ifs
not for our lack of trying. The
university doesn't always go to this
effort," Greene said.
see Incinerator, page 4 Classifieds 822-3977
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FLUID MECHANICS heat transfer & thermodynamics exp. Professor PhD in Aeronautical Eng. Call Alan 875-6512.
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PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 years exp.,
WD Process/typing, APA/MLA, Thesis. Student rates. Dorothy, 228-8346.
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Gays & Lesbians of UBC. BZZR
Garden. 4-7pm. SUB 215.
Students of Objectivism. Discussion "Philosophy: Who Needs It?"
Why is philosophy important?
Noon. SUB 215.
Friday. October 4th
School of Music. UBC Contemporary Players. Featuring: Eric Wilson & Peter Hannan, directors.
Noon, Recital Hall, Music.
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The eatery
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Application deadline is Friday,
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Applications are available in SUB Room
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2/TMrtrtrrssEY
October 4,1991 ™™-^~jr—r*-
KEWS
-   d       f*U>d'   ' ""'■
<v*£
►*.
Green Party
recruits Native
candidates
For those of you who missed it,the leader of the Libertarian Party stood
on the hill outside SUB at noon Thursday, speaking to a very small
group of people.
PAUL GORDON PHOTO
by Martin Chester
VANCOUVER(CUP)—After a
concerted effort, the Green Party
of BC has managed to recruit just
one First Nations person to run in
the BC provincial election.
Clarence Absasin, the former
head of the Treaty Eight tribal
council (the treaty which covers
the Peace River area), will be running in the Peace River North
constituency in the north-east of
the province. Absasin may be the
only First Nations person running
in the election, though not all candidates have been chosen at this
point.
ELECTIONS   |^|
Elizabeth Smith, candidate for
Burnaby-Edmunds and chair ofthe
party's Native Issues liaison group,
was the force behind the Green
Party's efforts to recruit First Nations candidates. She said she contacted between 20 and 30 possible
candidates, but only Absasin decided to run.
"It wasn't anything against the
Green Party, they were just too
busy with the Constitution and
that kind of thing," Smith said.
"Almost all of them agreed to think
it over. We received a great response to the party, we are very
pleased.
"The Green Party and the
Native groups are pretty much
looking at things the same way,
politically, spiritually and environmentally," she said.
Smith pointed to the Green
Party's policies on regional self-
government and Native self-government as examples of the way
the two groups mesh well.
Absasin said he chose the
party for two reasons: "First of all
the Green Party asked and none of
the others did. The other is that
the environment must be saved for
the future of our children. We have
to protect for all children, not just
native children," Absasin said.
He said he wants to "slow
down" the corporations, but not
take away jobs. Ideas like selective
logging, which are talked about a
great deal in BC but rarely used,
would help slow the destruction of
the environment without costing
jobs, he said.
He is also concerned about the
quality of water. "If you kill the
water you kill the planet. If you
kill the planet, you kill the people,"
he said.
Absasin said that First Nations people may be able to find a
home in the Green Party because
there are some similarities in the
concerns between the two groups.
"This is the first time they
have asked Native people to be
involved, and that is positive.
"Our people have been talking
about these things for thousands
of years. The Green Party has come
about at the right time for Native
people."
Smith said she will continue
to try to involve First Nations
people in the party after the election.
"I think it was a matter of
[First Nations people] not knowing
about the party," she said. "That
would fall on our shoulders, we
haven't done a great job of explaining ourselves to the public."
Smith said the party has only
been organizing for the election
since last May when the leaders of
the party quit en masse to create
an environmental lobby group.
However, no other party has
announced that they will be running First Nations candidates.
Neither Smith nor Mildred Poplar
of the Union of BC Indian Chiefs
had heard of any other First Nations people running for election.
Poplar said she was not aware
of other parties trying to recruit
candidates or even members.
"I haven't heard of them trying to recruit any Native people,
unless they're out there trying to
recruit on a local basis, but they
haven't gone through the provincial
agencies," Poplar said.
Smith said Absasin has the
best chance of getting elected of all
the Green Party's candidates. "I
think Clarence's chances are very
good. He is well liked and well
respected."
Absasin is more guarded in
his outlook. "I'm hoping for posi-
tiveness. It's the first time and
people don't know me that well.:
Broadbent receives award for human rights work
by Frances Foran
Former federal NDP leader
Ed Broadbent was presented the
first financial Gandhi award by
the Thakore Charitable Foundation Wednesday night at SFU.
Broadbent is currently involved in human rights advocacy
as president of the International
Centre for Human Rights and
Democratic Development. The
Centre is the primary funder ofthe
Jesuit Refugee Service in San
Salvador, andislobbying Canadian
Immigration for a moratorium on
deportations to El Salvador until
human rights are observed there.
Natverlal Thakore, who
worked with Gandhi to overthrow
the British raj, founded the organization to further the legacy of
the Hindu leader.
"[Gandhi] was a rebel and
prophet who won freedom from
the mightiest nation using a
weapon which won without killing," he said.
The Foundation has been
granting awards every October 2,
Gandhi'sbirthdayandnow Gandhi
Day in 13 municipalities, for the
past five years.
"We selected one Canadian
who promotes religious and democratic tolerance, human rights and
environmental concerns based
Gandhi's principles of non-violence, peace and love," said
Thakore, co-founder of the Foundation and the India Club.
The award was presented by
lieutenant-governor David Lam
whose philanthropic activity
Thakore praised. Lam said his
latest project is turning Government House into a People's Garden
for the handicapped and blind.
Lam compared Broadbent to
Nehru, the former Indian prime
minister who preferred the title of
"first servant."
"Dr. Broadbent's commitments through public life tohuman
rights, to fairness through leadership in his leadership for equality
for women and the entrenchment
of constitutional rights is well-
known," Lam said.
In his reception  speech,
Broadbent spoke ofthe imperative
that devolving states adopt
Gandhi's "realist-utopian" strategies.
"The conceptual aspect of
Gandhi, the philosophy of non-violence, bears; a desperate relevance
to the world today.
"To be a partisan of non-violence does not presuppose a lack of
courage. Rather it presupposes iron
will and the capacity to face death
without fear, because non-violent
strategies believe in the human
dignity in the heart of the adversary.
"The strategies of non-cooperation and civil disobedience recognize that the only legitimate
government is one which cooperates with the people. Ultimately
authority and orders are powerless
without obedience."
Broadbentgave as an example
of successful disobedience the Soviet soldier who refused to comply
with the authors of the coup and
arrest Boris Yeltsin in the Moscow
Parliament. He hoped similar
tactics would ensue in Yugoslavia,
between Serbian and Croatian
factions
"Or else Zagreb will become
another Beirut," he said.
Broadbent drew an analogy
between Imperial India and
Canada's treatment of its aboriginal peoples. However he characterized the Oka stand-off as a demonstration of self-restraint.
Broadbent read from a statement by First Nations leader Ovide
Mercredi, which said systemic
abuse crippled Natives spiritually,
economically, socially and politically.
"The truth about the aboriginal is normally invisible. They are
ghettoized or parked on reserves
so we can't see why they've got the
highest infant mortality rate or
why they are overrepresented in
the prison population.
"One death at Oka and subsequent courage and discipline on
both sides ofthe barrier compelled
a great many Canadians to think
atiout the injustice imposed on
Natives.
"The world wouldbenefitfrom
adopting Gandhi's philosophy of
non-violence and tolerance. This
doesn't mean accepting another
point of view, but recognizing the
rights and dignity of those with
whom you differ. Without tolerance well perish as a nation," he
read.
Broadbent stressed the importance of strategic non-violence
during the "most serious talks in
Canada's history" to resolve constitutional disputes between Quebec and the provinces and between
Eastern and Western Canada.
However, he refused to comment on the current provincial
election. "If I were here as a politician, I would make a speech full
of rhetoric, not necessarily based
on fact, that my father would have
liked to hear and my mother would
have believed. I hope to be interesting anyway."
He said he was honoured to
have been selected for the Gandhi
award and the $5,000 prize money
will be donated to the International
Centre for Human Rights and International Development.
October 4,1991
THEUBYSSEV/3 THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
AUTUMN   1991
The Cecil H. and Ida Green
^-^ Visiting Professorships
PROFESSOR LOTFI ZADEH
College of Engineering, Computer Science Division
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY
Dr. Lotfl Zadeh is internationally esteemed for his pioneering contributions in "fuzzy logic" and systems
theory. Fuzzy logic gives computers the ability to operate with a more humanlike intelligence, handling
ambiguous and relative data to accommodate the pervasive imprecision of the real world and of human
thinking. Recipient of the coveted Honda Prize, Dr. Zadeh is an experienced public speaker, who excels at
presenting complex material to a general university audience.
FUZZY LOGIC AND INTELLIGENT SYSTEMS
Wednesday, October 9
Hall 6, Woodward Instructional Resources Center, at 12:30 PM
FUZZY LOGIC: Calculus of Fuzzy if-then Rules
Thursday, October 10
Room 1204, Civil/Mechanical Engineering Building, at 11:30 AM
FUZZY LOGIC: Principles, Applications, Perspectives
Saturday, October 12
Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre, at 8:15 PM
NEWS
Flying to Ihe Island
has never been easier.
Or cheaper.
Starting September 5, we'll fly you to
Victoria or Nanaimo for an impossibly
low $25. That's about what you'd pay
to drive over on the ferry but we'll get
you there in a fraction of the time!
The $25 one-way fare is
available on two morning flights to
Victoria and one to Nanaimo. And you
can return for $25 too. But only till
December 31, 1991 on selected
flights. Beyond that, the only restriction is availability. So call your travel
agent or Air Canada right now.
RZ SPORT CLUB
SOLELY OWNED 8. OPERATED
What makes the RZ Sport Club cool?
The Girts, The Guys, The Attitude!
The foremost RZ Aerobic Classes,
the most sophisticated equipment
West 1st Ave. Burrard
across from the Bread Garden
Caff today for a fme mtmthtctofy Visit!
UBC counterattack
hits the road
by Charlie Gillis
Members of Counterattack
UBC were on hand to encourage
drivers not to drink at an RCMP
roadblock late Wednesday night.
The checkpoint, located just
west of the General Services and
Administration Building on
Wesbrook Mall, was organized by
the University Police Detachment's
Crime Prevention Coordinator,
constable Bernie Smandych, along
with Auxiliary Constable Steve
Trofinas.
Counterattack UBC combined
efforts with the RCMP as part of
its activities during Drug and Alcohol Awareness Week at the
university.
But the students made
Wednesday's roadblock different
from normal inspections.
When sober or "designated"
drivers passed the checkpoint,
Counterattack members offered
them congratulatory candies,
wastebags, and "Party Sensibly" t-
shirts.
"We're expecting the drivers
are their own peers," said
Smandych. "Everyone knows the
police don't want you drinking
and driving, but it's different if
someone your own age is telling
you."
The exercise also offered tangible benefits for the club, according to Michelle Ebel, one of the
students who worked the road-    »—•>
block.
"We know a lot of theory and    *""
statistics behind drinking and
driving, but we want to be able to
say we've seen what it's like out on
the road," she said. "Besides," she
added, "Counterattack was only   ,_^
constituted as a club last year, and
we're the first of our kind among     • -
western Canadian universities. It
would be nice to raise our profile."
For the RCMP officers on the
scene, the roadblock was especially
sobering. Twice during the plan- _
ning session, Smandych reminded
the auxiliary officers of last
weekend's fatal accident in
Duncan, in which a drunk driver
hi t and killed a constable directing
traffic.
But Counterattack members
were pleased to report the police    *"
made no arrests Wednesday.
"We stopped 150 cars, and
people were reallyresponsive,"said
Ebel on Thursday morning. "We
were really pleased."
.*•«.
Incinerator debate smoulders  |
... from page 1
The university, Greene said,
has sponsored public forums, advertised the project through the
administration newsletter UBC
Reports (which is distributed free
with The Vancouver Courier) and
Greene has discussed the project
in interviews on radio and television.
UBC president David
Strangway also struck a special
committee to deal with the issue of
hazardous waste on campus.
The present incinerator is
being replaced because it is nearly
20 years old "and is getting worn
out," Greene said.
"The special waste regulations
have been changed as well and
may be again with a new government. The old ones are pretty well
close to making the regulations as
it is, but we want to be safe," he
said.
Physical Plant worker Jack
Green, who operates the present
incinerator, said it must be replaced sooner or later.
"It's old, it cost a fortune to
keep up and it may not last too
much longer," Green said. "The ol d
incinerator has no scrubber, so that
means that particles get released
into the atmosphere...but what
comes out is not much different
from campfire smoke."
The NDP is also concerned
about the possible safety of the
new incinerator, according to candidate Hertzog.
"This isn't a large incinerator,
but it has great implications for
how these things will be treated in
the future," he said. "This incinerator project isbased on a four per
cent increase in waste a year at the
end often years, that means a 250
per cent increase in hazardous
waste burned by this UBC incinerator."
He said the Socreds were
calling for a 50 per cent decrease
over ten years and his party had
an even stronger stance, but the
project "flies in the face of what
even the Socreds have said that
they want."
However, Wayne Greene said
the new incinerator was "designed
to meet and surpass the most rigid
and stringent standards in North
America."
"The environmental impact [of
the new incinerator] is about 200
meters in diameter. It's not as if it
is a big cloud or something," he
said.
Although Mary Jean
O'Donnell of the Student Environment Center said the incinerator may be the only rational
solution to the problem, according
to some scientists she has spoken
to, and urged students to get involved.
"The process appears to be
really underhanded," she said.
"There has to be public debate between the UBC administration and
community groups that may be
concerned."
The next forum on the project
is on October 8 at 11:30am in
Wesbrook 100.
NATIVE ISSUE
SCHEDULED FOR OCTOBER 16TH.
IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN
SUBMITTING ARTICLES, PHOTOS,
GRAPHICS OR OPINION PIECES DROP
BY THE UBYSSEY OFFICE (SUB 241K)
AND TALK TO ELAINE,
THE ISSUE'S COORDINATOR.
YES, WE WANT YOUR IN PUT
AND WE HAVE IDEAS
YOU COULD HELP US WITH, TOO.
4/THE-UBVS8EY
0010^.^4^1^91 m^mm«x%w®fmmm*m*^^
m;^^^^^mm£im:^'¥^^:m^m
s I"
This man talks vicious hatred and big lies.
MA CHIA-NIEN PHOTO
Speaker capitalizes on rising fascism
by E. Griffith
Historical revisionists are
profiting from the international
rise of fascism, according to the
BC Organization to Fight Racism.
A speaker featured last Thursday
at a meeting in Vancouver is an
example ofthe increasinginterest.
The "Big Lie" of the Nazi holocaust is a "campaign of vicious
hatred against the German
people," according to speakerDavid
Irving. He claims by accepting that
six million Jews were murdered in
death camps, Germans are vilifying their national name.
BCOFR secretary Alan Dutton
said groups promoting the claim
thatthe holocaust never happened,
capitalize on the fears of society by
blaming common scapegoats.
The world is restructuring,
Dutton said, with manufacturing
centres moving to low wage areas,
producing unemployment and deterioration of urban centres. People
who begin to see their standard of
living change lay the blame for
such change either on immigrants
or on minority groups they deem
inferior.
Despite the $10 entrance fee,
the lack of publicity, and a last
minute location change, 150people
nevertheless showed up to hear
the featured speaker. This
turnout, according to Dutton,
suggests there exists an organized
network of people in Vancouver
involved in organizations that
promote the theory.
"Local and national police are
woefully misguided in their idea of
the numbers involved. They think
there's only 15 or 20 people organized in the Lower Mainland," he
said.
UBC history professor L.E.
Hill said he does not think the
speaker is motivated by a concern
for historical accuracy.
"He makes a living by writing
and lecturing. The more sensational his books are, the more
money he makes."
The revisionist speaker often
cites the studies of gas chamber
expert Fred Leuchter, who asserts
mass executions could not have
taken place at the concentration
camps in question.
Leuchter, however, was discredited at the trial ofErnst Zundel,
who hired him to make the tests.
Hill responds that historians have
confirmed lethal gases were used
and the original figures of 5.3 to six
million Jews killed are correct.
The meeting's organizer said
the speaker believes in what he
does. He said people of German
heritage are growing up being told
that they are responsible for the
holocaust and asked, "How can I
explain it to my children when we
are called a race of murderers?"
Dutton said of the organizer,
"He thinks Germans are his race
and he has to defend his race
against other races. But the whole
notion of race is ridiculous. We are
all part ofthe human race."
ARTS POSITIONS OPEN
THIS WEEK
6 GRAD REPS
GENERAL OFFICERS
WITH PORTFOLIOS
- 1styr Rep
-Secretary v
-Office Mgr;       r
- Social Co-ordinators
- Underground Newspaper
- Advertising
- Floaters   ;
PRESIDENT
VP ADMIN
VP CLUBS
OMBUDSPERSON
1 AMS REP
Announcing
The Sixteenth Annual
Dr. John F. McCreary Lecture
to be presented by:
The Honourable
Emmet M. Hall, CC, Q.C
The History of Medicare
in Canada
Monday, October 7, 1991
IRC-Lecture Hall 6
12:30-1:30 pm
Interested students and faculty are cordially invited.
An Important Notice Concerning the
Student Recreation Centre Contribution
Tax Receipts for the $40 Student Recreation Centre Contribution are available from the UBC Development Office upon
written request. Submit your request, including your full
name and student number to:
The UBC Development Office
6253 NW Marine Drive
Vancouver BC
V6T2A7
Requests must be received prior to December 31,1991.
Students who do not wish to contribute to the construction of
this facility may apply in person to the Department of Athletics
and Sport Services in War Memorial Gym to have their donation applied to their second installment of tuition fees. The
deadline for doing so is October 4.
Student contributions to the project are matched by the provincial government and are fully tax deductible. The facility,
projected to open in 1994, will be dedicated to Intramural and
Drop-In use and will help to solve this campus' acute shortage
of athletic facilities. Your contribution is needed to make this
possible.
The
Fireside
Application deadline is Tuesday October 8,1991
Lounge
presents
MONDAY
NIGHT
FOOTBALL
ALL WELCOME!
Graduate Student Centre
Bzzr:
Cheapest on campus
40" High Resolution TV
Great Menu
4:00 til 9:00 pm
October 4,1991
THEUBYSSEY/5 FOCUS ON WOMEN
■■'■ ■ yy&f y y ys ■ ■
'   ss * '
Office fights
sexual harassment
by Cheryl Niamath "■WB1*
Innini'iVi.- ..   /■
by Cheryl Niamath
What-do you do when you go
to class and your prof makes
comments about the shape of
your body?
What do you do when you
dread going to work because one
of your co-workers constantly
touches you?
What do you do when one of
your students is infatuated with
you?
You can feel angry, afraid or
embarrassed.
You can get headaches,
stomach aches or insomnia.
You can drop out of university or change jobs.
Or you can talk to the . ■ -
advisors at the Scxu.alHarass-
ment Office.
UBC's two-year-old Sexual
Harassment Office received 134
inquiries last year and 80 per
cent were considered to be cases
of sexual harassment.
Jon Shapiro of the Sexual
Harassment Office said most of
the other inquiries had to do
with off-campus situations,
sexism or racism. J
"There aren't places to turn        1
for racism and sexism, so people       i
call the office for help, but the
. Sexual Harassment Office only t
handles university-related b
harassment cases," Shapiro said.      s
Ninety-five percent of 1(
inquiries came from women.
"The vast majority, about 60
per cent* ofthe women were
fairly young, in their teens <)]•
early twenties," said Shapiro.
. "Harassers come from all age
groups."
"Half of the inquiries came
from undcrgrads, and 15 per cent
from grad students/Thirty eight
pel- cent of inquiries were about .
faculty members, while 28 per
cent concerned students.
"About three quarters of
cases had to do with what we call
'poisoned environment'. That
means anything from having
' comments directed al you, seeing
pin-ups at work, being hit-on. et
cetera," Shapiro said.
Other cases were in the
"quid-pro-quid" category. "This is
more common among grad
students, where they have
someone telling them 'you give  .
„ ...—,,i-n in give
you something.'" Shapiro
explained.
Nine percent of cases were
actual sexual assaults.
Shapiro and advisor
Margaretha Hoek held sexual
harassment prevention seminars
in September.
"There was good response to
the seminars, but there tends to
be come confusion about what
sexual harassment is. It scares a
lot of people," Shapiro said.
How
know
you are
being
harassed
UBC's Sexual Harassment
poljqy defines sexual harassment
as:  ...conduct or comment of a
sexual nature, including sexual
ssnsssssi. ti0 ^™^P,etedefiBi
The 00^^ ^
v/rewS£iSaCC01D^ed
th«at of repri^r8aJor^P«ed
vde*isstr°mpan^
threat of den°KT',y°rthe
comply       maifor Allure to
ofcr;asgThSast^eff^
£gP-[
f .'
"Rhea Kronia" was raped in April. She
is refusing to cooperate with the RCMP
because dealing with its officers has been
like being raped a second time. The
police recently told her mother she could
go to jail if she does not obey a subpoena
to appear in court in mid-October. She
says she will not "play the game" with a
system that is designed, defined and
enforced by men. It will change nothing.
by Rhea Kronia
reprinted from the Gleaner
Canadian University Press
Vancouver
I had my eyes shut, squeezed tight.
I thought if I could stop myself from
seeing, maybe I could stop myself from
feeling. I couldn't move and I had given
up struggling, it was only hurting me
more.
I was trying to hide somewhere in
my mind, desperately searching for a
dark secret place where the rest of me
wouldn't be touched. I was being raped
and he wasn't going away.
Somewhere, a voice was wailing.
Somehow, it belonged to me. There was
another voice muttering and moaning. I
couldn't see that voice but I could feel it.
Every sound seemed to be another knife
digging into my belly, tearing out my
guts and feeding them to a crazed,
starved seagull.
I was being raped. It was and still is
a reality for me. It has been andwill be
a reality for one woman every 17
minutes in Canada. It was not my fault,
nor is it any woman's fault.
After I was raped, someone took me
to the police station. I'm not sure how I
got there or how I got home. At the
moment, I don't want to remember. I do
remember the constable that "interviewed" me. He wouldn't let anyone
come into the office with me. As it was a
small town, there was no one else on
duty. I was alone with a man, the exact
same situation I had been in hours
earlier.
The constable didn't rape me physically. Instead he asked me questions:
Were you a virgin before this happened?
What were you wearing? How did you act
to provoke this? He assumed I had in
some way wanted or asked to be violently
abused. No woman has ever wanted or
asked to be raped. With his words, he was
raping me again.
I tried desperately to find some way
to forget. I found ^,. myself wishing
that I was dead, &$■$'■'': Part
of me was and is.  £?■>;■ :// -
For a period I
felt I was an
empty shell,
void of any
feeling except
fear. Fear
became a
dictatorial
power in
my life.
Fear
was the
reason I
ran off
the bus
last
week
when
it
became
crowded and I
couldn't breathe. I had
closed my eyes and found that dark
spot I had hidden myself in and it all
came back. I screamed—I don't know if
anyone cared or heard.
I had to leave work. I had to find
some way to heal myself.
There aren't many places for women
to go. The local rape crisis and counselling centres are extremely supportive,
resourceful, caring and...
..understaffed.
The government is spending another
$10 million on a Royal Commission
dealing with violence against women. The
commission is to verify the findings of a
similar study the same government
poured money into last year. The government refuses to give money to women's
shelters (the few that do receive funding
do not get t . j/tgh).
Out of work and out of money, I
started to think of what would happen to
my attacker if he ever went to jail. They
don't put sex offenders in with the general
prison population. In fact, there are a
couple of federal institutions in Canada
that deal primarily with rapists.
While in jail, this man would have
access to entertainment systems, food,
room and board, and university courses.
He could earn a bachelor's degree and go
on golf excursions. All courtesy ofthe
taxpayers.
He's the criminal. I'm the victim.
I have lost my job. I am
struggling to
pay
rent
and
buy
food.
I
have
to pay
for
education. I
have to
fight to
get into
college.
A few
weeks ago
the police
called. They
had decided
that they
finally had
enough complaints against
this man to take
him to court. Four
other women had
an   pressed charges and
they wanted me to do the same. I had
only made a statement at that point. (Ten
percent of all rapes are reported to the
police, an even smaller percentage see the
accused go to trial.)
The constable asked if I would press
charge"  —-11 hesitated before answering. He must have taken that as a
negative response because he proceeded
to coax me. First he tried to persuade me
to press charges by explaining that the
other women weren't white and a judge
(being white himself) would be more
X^'^d''1-
{Xi d, /S*|?»
sympathetic to a white victim and therefore impose a harsher sentence. At that
point I refused. I was not going to put up
with any more shit and I was not going to
press charges.
It was at that point the monster
removed its mask.
The RCMP located and called my
mother without my permission. I don't live
with her and I didn't and couldn't tell her
about my assault. After explaining to her
the details of my rape, they told her that
since I had made a statement, I could be
subpoenaed. If I ignored the subpoena, the
police would not hesitate to put me in jail.
The police gave my mother the same
reason why I had to testify—I was white
and so was the judge. Despite my mother's
pleading, I am still refusing to testify.
That was the RCMP's first threatening
call. They have yet to stop. As of today, I
have not been subpoenaed and I am not in
jail. Tomorrow, however, is another day.
If my situation was an isolated
incident, it could be seen as a slight
miscarriage of justice. But by the age of 19,
one of every four women will have been
raped. My story is the story of thousands of
women every month. It is in no way
isolated or unique. It is typical ofthe way
women are treated in a system designed,
defined and enforced primarily by men. It
is a system that punishes the victim and
rewards the criminal. It is a system that is
unsympathetic to those who did not have
the good sense to be born white. It is a
system that puts fear in women and
swallows children whole. A system instilled
with bias and inequality.
For those men out there who read this
and complain about being made to feel
guilty: DONT BOTHER. Work to change
society or shut up. Don't talk to me about
equality until 51 per cent ofthe population
can stop living in fear.
Don't twist my rape 'til Tm the
criminal.
Judicial pro<
omen
OTTAWA(CUP>—Annual reports
of sexual assault have more than
doubled since 1983, when the
"rape shield" law—part of which
was struck down in August by
the Supreme Court—came into
effect. Women could not be
questioned about their past
sexual relations while the
statute was in effect.
• 29,111 sexual assaults
were reported in 1988, a 127 per
cent increase over the 12,848
assaults reported in 1982,
according to a study by the
federal department of justice.
"This is significantly higher than
the increase in the incidence of
non-sexual assaults reported to
the.police," the study found.
Police tend to filter out
,JanaD->oone
yottf
%%Vto\
Tncve is » nc ..-u c.aung woW«> ^
, About }°X    Women uo\ of
Sera-        lhc„roup^f"nS'        *>rvi
■ sW   During*^ dayAo-da>
-A     svomencan^ fo0d and ^-
dieting- B>       vo uncoN c ,v
i     .,ne»*    D,   V.1V10U1 <-"" cni\
-,lg food and _ c%
lav from i°ou -Friedman*'
^^^Bi>
^^eneed^
a«**T ,     -*on*
-S^^^.eef
that thO . wv to U»     ■.   ■
^ix^r
,e      SC^Fnedman^.*men-J'
1 A,c^«fsCTV1 'XeWmed^
v1^ i(brftyt" ,    city
.,,     buiy<«^ uh
•i»* X«Xi»i*xl
■as" xxx^xx^^
^weight-        lllCyondOa
nation ol s^t\.
Bayl
re.
wh(
rei.
berby _
Advisory
of Women s
women who
raped to be
innocent, e
and vice-:"
Police a
a woman serious!
hysterical, s
beaten, and
doesiH
!-free\
idea of
A
.   6n-
_Jand
m the Status
ilice expect
ley've been
ial, untouched,
i, middle-class
tore likely to take
ily if she is
.cidal, has been
tas ripped clothing
'©rk for women
x •- 6J
of sexual ja^sault con
trauesu) be ill-Beweiiijy the
judicial'pFpcess.'' }
xSome police comments
from the files studied
DeULCU,   aUU^LUC   *!£.£»..-   v-^	
and witnesses. "The fact is,
though, very few complainants
have all the attributes ofthe
'good' victim," said the report,
released September 17. "As a
result, the overwhelming
majority of women who are
u>
o
ally assault
Sit more of a
JOK.U! \ \
• Th&pffender does not
deny touching the victim's
brfeasts but did so with the
intention of being friendly."
\ • The complainant "does not
appear to be a very intelligent
person and I d^n't feel she would
be a ^ry credible witness in
court*
Some other statistics on
sexual assault:
• an estimated ten per cent
of rapes are reported to the
police.
• surveys in the United
States indicate 25 per cent of
women at colleges or universities
are survivors of rape or
attempted rape.
• 84 per cent of survivors
knew their assailants.
• 30 to 40 per cent of
American college men surveyed
in various studies over the past
decade have indicated they
might force a woman to have sex
against her will if they knew
they wouldn't be punished.
• preliminary studies in
Canada have shown similar
results.
Sources: Toronto Star, Globe
and Mail, Village Voice
6/THE UBYSSEY
October 4,1991
October 4,1991
THE UBYSSEY/7 o
o
5
*G FOR CRU/
1A
Like to cruise the streets in the wee hours of morning, pondering the
meaning of life? Then these jobs with Pacific Press are for you. Asa Roving
Sub-Manager, you're paid $585 to $955 a month to roam from 4to 7 am,
six days a week. Or use your wheels to deliver the Province and Sun from
4 to 6 am. For that you get $400 to $800 a month and an extra hour
in bed. Interested? Call 736-2281 today. Philosophers and insomniacs
particularly welcome.
THE NEW GENERATION
Richard Wright
A VOICE YOU CAN TRUST
SocialCredit
 Cr—
Campaign Office • 3036 West Broadway • 739-1128
Total experience
MIKE COURT PHOTO
KJ^S^"lKf4^i5:^S!
Vancouver
International
Film Festival
The Following Is a Hating for The Vancouver International Film
Festival's films Shown at the UBC SUB Auditorium until October 11:
Id
MONDAY OCTOBER 7
12:00 pm Boiling Point-dxr.
Takeshi Kitano Japan 1990
2:00 pm The Bostard-dir. Seijun
Suzuki Japan 1963
4:30 pm Lost Horizon-dir. Frank
Capra USA 1937
7:00 pm Love In The Time Of
Hysteria-dxr. Alfonso Cuar6n,
Mexico 1991
9:30 pm World Apartment
Horror-dir. Katsuhiro Otomo,
Japan 1991
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8
12:00 pm Young Cinema-(film
series) Canada 1991
2:00 pm Youth Of The Beast-dir.
Seijun Suzuki Japan 1963
4:30 pm Sink Or Swim /First
Comes Love-dir. Su Friedrich,
USA 1990-91
7:00 pm Jit-dir. Michael
Raeburn Zimbabwe 1990
9:30 pm Face Value-dir. Johan
van der Keuken, Netherlands
1991
WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 9
12:00 pm Louvre City-dir.
Nicolas Philibert France 1990
2:00 pm The Flower And The
Angry Waves-dir. Seijun Suzuki,
Japan 1964
4:30 pm Dead OfNight-dir.
(.multiple) Great Britain 1946
7:00 pm Chaindance-dir. Allan
A. Goldstein Canada 1991
9:30 pm The Ambulance-dir.
Larry Cohen USA 1990
THURSDAY. OCTOBER 10
12:00 pm The Duration Of Life-
(film series) Canada 1991
2:00 pm Gate OfFlesh-dir.
Seijun Suzuki Japan 1964
4:30 pm Close Up-dir. Abbas
Kiarostami Iran 1990
7:00 pm All OfMe-dir. Bettina
Wilhelm Germany/Switzerland
1990
9:30 pm Marriage Of The
Blessed-dir. Mohsen
Makhmalbaf, Iran 1989
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11
12:00 pm Peter Ibbetson-dir.
Henery Hathaway, USA 1935
2:00 pm Our Blood Won't Allow
It-dir. seijun Suzuki Japan 1964
4:30 pm Island Of Lost Souls-
dir. Erie C. Kenton, USA 1933
7.00 pm My Father Is Coming-
dir. Monika Treut, Germany/
USA 1990
9:30 pm My Love, My Bride-Sir.
Lee Myung-Se, South Korea
1990
WIN A TRIP TO
PARAGUAY OR SPAIN
REPRESENTING THE REIYUKAI CULTURAL CENTRE OF CANADA AT
THE REIYUKAI INTERNATIONAL SPEECH FESTIVAL
FIRST PRIZE
SECOND PRIZE
THIRD-FIFTH PRIZES
Expense paid trip to Asundon, Paraguay.
Expense paid trip to Barcelona, Spain.
$100-$500 Scholarships.
Contest is open to all Canadian citizens or landed
immigrants 16-25 years old.
Entry deadline: November 3,1991.
For more information and an official entry form, contact us by
mafl or Fax at: R.C.C. International, Canadian Office,
1076 W. 49th Ave., Vancouver, B.C. V6M 2P8
Fax:266-3406 Phone:263-1919
Mon - Fri 2 pm - 6 pm
8/THE UBYSSEY
Octobers 1991 Danish debut
by Anthony Grieco
IMAGINE a Vincent Pricelike voice engaging you in a
mesmerizing train ride through
1945 war-torn Germany. The
Danish film Zentropa takes you
on such a voyage. And though
~ "    the voice is in fact that of Max
von Sidow, the effect is nothing
short of hypnotic.
VANCOUVER INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL
Zentropa
- '    October 6, Van. Centre 1, 7pm
October 9, Cinematheque,
7pm
Director Lars von Trier's use
of engaging narration is only the
immediate wonder ofthe film.
,.,   Indeed, it is the display of
technical mastery that makes its
"*    capturing ofthe 1991 Jury prize
at Cannes well deserved.
The use of black and white
adds well to the historical
context ofthe film, while the
numerous yet subtle switches to
colour coupled with modern
m*    Gothic scenery in an ever-
present night do well to define
the mood.
It is the characters that
actually pull you out of this
visual nightmare and inspire you
to laugh. Leo Kessler (Jean-Marc
Barr) is a young American
journeying to Germany with the
idyllic intention of being a part of
the post-war rebuilding process.
As a sleeping-car conductor
trainee, he encounters a less
idyllic condition.
Yes, there is a love interest
here. Leo falls in love with
Katherina Harmann (Barbara
Sukowa,) who has possible
connections with the anti-
American terrorist group called
(appropriately) the
"Werewolves".
The comedy lies in the
portrayal ofthe occupying
American army and the demoralized German population, with
Kessler caught in between.
And perhaps the contrast
between the darkness and the
humour is best exemplified by
the hypnotic narrator's funny yet
fateful instructions throughout
the film.
Zentropa is curiously able to
meld the character-audience
relationship with this voice. It is
something that can only be
described as hypnosis.
Black Robe is
intense
by Adrienne Copithorne and
Be mice Ma
IF you enjoyed the noble
romanticism and gentle
humour of Dances With Wolves,
do not go to see Black Robe. The
only elements these two films
share are Indians and grandiose
music.
VANCOUVER INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL
Black Robe
October 7, Ridge 7pm
October 8, Van. Centre, 4pm
Black Robe offers harsh
scenes of raw intensity. It
portrays, perhaps for the first
time, a fully human view of
Native people, revealing them as
neither stoic, tomahawk-wielding
masochists, nor as lovable,
environmentalist buffoons.
The visual images here are
awe-inspiring in their power.
The camera is used innovatively
to convey the stark coldness of
both the environment and the
events in the plot.
The brutal circumstances of
the story are conveyed effectively
by the morbid acting of a solemn
cast. Lothaire Bluteau, of Jesus
of Montreal, gives a masterful
portrayal of a Jesuit whose faith
is shaken when confronted with
the Native resistance to conversion.
One warning, those of weak
stomachs should steel themselves for the searingly honest
scenes of lust and mutilation.
The filmmakers have held
nothing back in their attempt to
realistically portray life in
this era.
Sexual
Harassment
Seminar
Wednesday, October 9,1991
12:30 pm at SUB 241K
EVERYONE
WELCOME!
Public meeting
concerning the
status of abortion
rights and access
in BC after the
election with
women candidates
from the Liberal,
New Democratic
and Social Credit
Parties.
Thursday, October 10 at
7:30pm.
Ukranlan Hall, 805 East
Pender St.
sponsored by
the BC Coalition for
Abortion Clinics
•Have to
•Have to
•Have to
•Have to
•Have to
•Have to
•Have to
•Have to
•Have to
•Have to
•Have to
•Have to
<§b
sign up for my classes ■ ■ mg\
find an apartment |
dress up and look G...O...O...DI tommorrow
phone my mother
go pay my fees
rent a TV •VCR
rent a bed
get furniture for my place
make sure I sit next to... in class
go on 'like' a real date
keep up with my reading each week (.. .right!)
get some coffee now... I
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Volunteers should be on an antiviral(AZT or DDI) for at least 6 months. They should
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The study will last 48 weeks and will require follow up visits at St. Paul's aproximately
every 4 weeks.
For more information, please contact:     Nancy MacNeil, Trials Coordinator
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BRHrSgW^I Editorial
No room
for
students
This editorial is about the students
who are most unlikely to read it.
If you are reading this editorial, you
are one ofthe lucky ones. The problem of
accessibility to higher education is worsening year by year.
Last year in BC, 10,000 eligible students were refused admission to post-
secondary institutions. This year, the
number increased to 15,000. This figure
does not include those students who are
currently enrolled in classes they do not
want or need simply to keep their student status and eligibility for student
loans.
More space is needed for these 15,000
eligible students. But where will we get
the room for the students in Vancouver
and Victoria, who are the ones primarily
affected by the systemic crisis?
New universities in the North and
the Fraser Valley will not sufficiently
alleviate the problem. Post-secondary
education needs more funding for existing colleges and universities, as well as
in the Fraser Valley, the interior and
northern BC.
UBC students know tuition fees continue to increase year after year. How
much of this money is used to fund more
professors and more sections of courses,
so students will not be turned away
because all sections are full?
Expecting students to foot the bill is
not the answer. We need to encourage a
partnership between academic leaders,
the public and students to solve the
problems with the system.
Our responsibility as students is to
learn about the details of "our" educational system and take action.
Students deserve only the post secondary educational system that they are
content to accept.
THEUBYSSEY
October 4, 1991
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays and Fridays by the
Alma Mater Society ofthe University of British Columbia.
Editorial opinions are those ofthe staff and not necessarily those of the university administration, or of the
sponsor. The Ubyssey is published with the proud
support ofthe Alumni Association. The editorial office is
Rm. 241k of the Student Union Building. Editorial
Department, phone 822-2301; advertising, 822-3977;
FAX# 822-6093
lb Ufa/ssey is afevn&ng maniaoj'Canadian University Vrtss
Everyone was getting tired of hearing The Cure. Rick Hiebert offered
to sing Stairway to Heaven but Terrie Chan politely declined the
offer. Paul Cordon rushed off to catch La Boheme while Diya
Nijhouse hummed the aria from Carmen and Frances Foran sang the
sad part in Madame Butterfly which got Charlie Gillis thinking about
turning the lights off and on. Sharon Lindores searched around for
leftover pirate costumes while Matthew Johnson flexed his leg
muscles to do those dance numbers in Chorus Line and Sam Green
looked for the sheet music for West Side Story while Paul Dayson
sang that ca.tchy song from Bringadoon and Yggy King shaved his
head to do' Ixe King & L Panninder Parmar got serious and reminded
everyone about the true nature of art. Next thing you know we'll be
doing The Phantom, trilled Melissa Lemieux, and Effie Pow got major
wine gum flashbacks. Franka Cordua-von Specht warned against
Cats and Jana Dionne heartily agreed. Helen Willoughby-Price and
Anthony Grieco did La Traviatta while Hao Li, Bemice Ma, Adrienne
Copithome, and Tanya Paz helped Charles Nho and Elai3ne Griffith
paint the backdrop for Salome, with Carla Maftechuk as soprano.
Martina Scarff and Don Mah announced the debut of Mike Coury in
the Magic Flute and then Martin Chester said to Raul Peschiera that
maybe we just weren't ready for opera yet and CheTylNiamath
turned on the radio. Editors
Paul Dayson  • Sharon Lindores  •  Carla Maftochuk
Raul Peschiera • EJfl* Pow
Letters
B-lots or
blackholes
It started out as 25 cents
a day. Then along came
somebody with a brilliant
idea of introducing hikes in
parking rates: "fifteen cents
an hour to the maximum of
one dollar a day" the sign
read outside those fancy
booths in B-lots. The idea
was not bad. No matter what
they asked we had to pay it.
There is no other way to get
around it. Where would you
park, on the road? Sure, that
is a way to go if your dad is a
salesman.
It was not long before we
got used to the 15-cent idea.
Nobody ever complained.
Greedy hands got greedier.
"Twenty-five cents an hour
to the maximum of one dollar and 50 cents a day" the
sign read, this time it was
coloured. Well, that is a 600
per cent hike in just two
years.
Somebody has gotta
make a stand. If we do not
take appropriate action now,
it will not be long before it
will cost us an arm and a leg
to rent a few square feet of
space to park our set of
wheels. So, guys do something about it. I know there
are quite a few of you out
there. It is time when we got
to have our say.
J.S. Sidhu
Science 2
More fashion
comments
I feel compelled to respond to Martin Chester's
bizarre attempt at comedy
and fashion analysis in the
September 27 edition ofthe
Ubyssey (Letters: "Myopia
runs rampant").
Mr. Chester, you claim
that "the Federal debt is
meaningless when it comes
to day to day life for working
people." I don't know what
degree you graduated with,
sir, but it clearly wasn't in
economics...or perhaps even
reality. Read this slowly, to
make sure you understand
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any Issue. Letters must be typed and are not to exceed 300 words In length. Content
which Isjudgedtobe libelous, homophobic, sexist, racist or factually Incorrect will not be published. Please be concise.
Letters may be edited for brevity, but It Is standard Ubyssey policy not to edit letters for spelling or grammatical mistakes.
Please bring them, with Identification, to SUB 241k. Letters must Include name, faculty, and signature.
it: a debt equals deferred
taxation. What the government spends now, they will
have to take out of all our
hides in the years to come.
Do you claim, possibly, that
taxation has no meaning in
the day to day life of the
working people whom you
claim to represent? In 1991,
the AVERAGE Canadian
family paid just over 46% of
its income in taxes. The
federal debt, which you
mysteriously assert is
"meaningless," will only result in this shameful tax rate
going up. And after you call
the debt "meaningless," you
next arrive at the strange
conclusion that "it is time we
got our priorities right and
took the burden ofthe federal
debt off the working people
of this country." How do you
magically propose to do this?
By taxing the hell out of
corporations (which means
fewer jobs for Canadians as
more companies join the
exodus south)? Or by leaving
your head in the sand and
gibbering that there really
isn't a problem? My solution
is to spend less—what's
yours?
You say that it is my
"mioptic" (do you mean
"myopic"?) attitudes that
have to change. Which attitudes are you talking about?
The attitude that ifs wrong
to spend more than you
have? Or the attitude that
people should work for their
money? Stop the rhetoric,
Mr. Chester—what exactly
is it about fiscal responsibility that you disagree with?
Perhaps you could explain.
Oh, and thanks for the
fashion comments; I would
have worn something different in the Sun photo, but
my Doc Martins and "Eat
the Rich" shirt were at the
cleaners.
Jason Ford
Science 3
Well-deserved
respect
I would like to express
my appreciation and respect
for the courageous woman
who reported her sexual as
sault to the campus RCMP.
The publication of your
attacker's description in The
Ubyssey has sent a clear
message to this man that
what he has done is wrong
and you are going to do everything in your power to
hunt him down and hold him
accountable for his actions.
It has also sent a message to
the other attackers on our
campus that they too may
one day see their descriptions published and have to
face the possibility of being
held accountable for their
crimes.
Finally you have
warned other women on
campus of a particular attacker. We know of the location of one of his attacks
and we have a description.
We will all be watching for
him. I would argue you to
push the RCMP to produce a
composite portrait of this
criminal if you are able to
describe some of his facial
features. The publication of
such portraits by The Province last year led to the arrest of two violent rapists.
Finally, I would hope
you will connect (if you have
not already) with one ofthe
excellent Rape Crisis centres in your city. The women
at these centres will serve as
your allies in the struggle to
see that the law enforcement
agencies follow correct procedure and treat you with
the respect you deserve.
Hilary Mason
Graduate Studies
So, don't flip
the pages
Okay, maybe ifs just me,
but every flippin' Ubyssey
this year has been peppered
with feminism, feminism,
feminism. Enough is enough.
I want the old Ubyssey back.
You know, the interesting
one?
I have no complaints with
feminism as a movement, or
as something being reported
on in The Ubyssey; however,
I do take issue at our student
newspaper being used as a
vehicle for this or that po
litical movement (ie femi-   ~
nism).
Is it because most of The
Ubyssey writers are feminist, or because the student
body, however large it is,
cannot produce enough
writers to get a balanced „
weekly journal?
Perhaps as the year rolls
on more writers will be
compelled to join the newspaper and finally, I will be
able to read The Ubyssey
without getting the same
message shoved in my face
every time I turn the page. ,
Jason Skipness
Discrimination
by defintiion
Mr. Gordon Chan, you are
blaming the victim. To say
that "most ofthe time people
are discriminated against,
it is because of what they do
(eg., fail to assimilate dominant culture) not what they
are" is to put the onus upon
people to adapt themselves    "-
— or accept racism. Focusing on assimilation into a
community as a way of alleviating racism misses the
fundemental point. Racial
discrimination, by its
very definition, is the failure    *
to accept people who are
different.
Michelle Lavallee
Music 3
correction:
Diachem Bowl
date error
The eighth annual
Diachem Bowl, between
UBC and SFU, will take
place on Wednesday, October 9 and not on October 7 as previously advertised. The Thunderbirds
lead in the series 3-2-2
including last year's 2-2
draw. Game time is
7:30pm but it will be preceded by a UBC-SFU
alumni match at 5:30pm.
10/THE UBYSSEY
October 4,1991 LETTERS/OP-ED
*
A cry for some depth and rigour
To Orvin Lau and the AMS:
Allow me respectfully to ask
you to take a step back and consi der
again something to which I am
sure you have already devoted
much thought: the role and purpose of teacher evaluations.
I do not deny that there is a
problem at UBC with profs who
are abusive and/or negligent towards their classes. Furthermore,
I am fully aware that once profs
gain tenure there is little that can
touch them, and they know it. I
heartily applaud any action that
could alleviate these very real
problems at UBC. On the other
hand, during my time here I have
seen little from the students of
UBC to inspire my confidence in
their capacity to pass judgements
on the quality of their teachers.
Cases of discrimination and/
or harrasment are far too serious
to be dealt with based on what is
quickly jotted down on the last day
ofthe term. We need an immediate,
effective, and confidential way to
address these problems—more
than inadequate teaching, this is
intolerable behaviour that has all
too real consequences for students.
Teacher evaluations couldnt begin to effectively serve this need.
On the other hand, I wonder if
there is anything close to a consensus on what constitutes good
teaching at UBC anyway, and if
there is, just what would that be.
What Fm getting at is that I've
been in too many classes where the
students' main goal seems to be
'good grades easy and to hell with
learning' to have much faith in the
typical UBC students' idea of a
good prof. I fear that by "toughening^ teacher evaluations we will
above all amplify the voices, already far too loud, that say "make
it easy, make it fun, teach to the
exam (at the expense of depth and
rigour)." As democratic as that
may be, perhaps you too would
agree that it is not really a step in
the direction ofhigher quality education.
Max Todd
Unclassified 3
Toxic waste in your backyard
A few days ago I learned that
UBCisplanningtobuildanewhigh
capacity toxic waste incinerator
right here on campus (less than a
mile away from family housing).
For UBC officials thisis not news—
an ol d, low capacity, and inefficient
incinerator has been there for almost 20 years. Afewyears ago UBC
decided to replace it with a new
one at a cost of 5 million dollars.
What are the risks involved? I
shall list only a few. In addition to
all other air pollutants, toxic metals will be emitted. Dioxin and
PVC which are extremely toxic will
be releasedto the atmosphere. The
"toxic rain fall" will pollute the
forest, the soil and the underground
water threatening the balance of
the natural habitatin Pacific Spirit
Park.
Only upon the repeated request
by environmental groups did UBC
agree (reluctantly) to meet and
address concerns. In a series of onesided meetings (outside experts
were excluded from the panel) UBC
agreed to answer questions from
the public. I must mention here
that this involves very specific
technical detail and that members
of the public who participated in
the meetings do not have the
technical expertise to ask all the
right questions nor the means to
evaluate UBC answers.
We all appreciate the need find
willingness of UBC, as a respected
institution, to treat toxic waste
generated in UBC research labs
(the incinerator is intended to treat
only lab waste). But, why burn it
together with toxic waste from
UVICandSFUresearchlabs? Why
burn it at all? Why here on campus? Exactly what are the risks?
UBC financial wizards and administrators have the ultimate
answer for that. Their scientists
have allegedly checked all other
alternatives and decided that it
will be the most cost- effective if the
waste is incinerated right here on
campus. Moreover, their conclusions appear to be so clear-cut that
they did not even bother to ask for
any second opinion outside UBC.
They also never bothered to hold a
review or a public hearing of this
decision by those affected by it.
I, not just as a geophysicist and
environmentalist by profession,
but as an individual who happens
to live right here on UBC campus
would like to take this opportunity
to ask the public to raise their
stakes and go to the representatives in their jurisdictions and request that a formal public hearing
be held.
Yehoshua Keshet
Canadian Liver Foundation Is looking for people
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WAREHOUSE
U   •   B
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WEDNESDAYS:
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THURSDAYS:
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FRIDAYS:
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871  BEATTY
Photo by Rob Butctwr
October is Teaching Month at UBC
join us for the following events:
The Faculty Association and Faculty Development Program are Co-Sponsoring a
FORUM ON TEACHING/RESEARCH TENSIONS AND ON THE
POSITION OF LIBERAL ARTS IN A RESEARCH UNIVERSITY
UBC Faculty speakers take a variety of positions on the subject of university
teaching, research and curriculum.
Come and give us your views on the subject!
Tuesday, October 8,12:30-2:00 pm, Angus Building (Commerce), Room 110.
The Faculty Development Program invites you to the
GREAT TEACHERS SYMPOSIA
Award-winning faculty members will discuss their relationships with students,
ways in which they deal with teaching/research tensions, ways of working with
large classes, multi-cultural classes, graduate courses and other issues. Audience participation encouraged.
Science/Applied Science Symposium
October 10, 3:30-5:00 pm, Angus Building (Commerce), Room 210
Professional Schools
October 17, 3:30-5:00 pm, Angus Building (Commerce), Room 210
If you require more information, call the
Faculty Development Office
at 822-9149.
Open to All
HOW DO I GET MY CAREER OFF THE GROUND?
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Whatever I ultimately decide to do, Doane Raymond
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Ait^nt^f^^fv
October 4,1991
THE UBYSSEY/U NEWS
V>X
Shivji looks to self-determination for Africa
by Tanya Paz
"In Africa if you are an intellectual you are an activist—
whether by pressure or by choice,"
Dr. Issa Shivji said Thursday.
Shivji, visitingfrom the University
of Dar es Salaam in Tanzania,
spoke about the right to African
self-determination.
Shivji projected an optimistic
future for Africa, due to changes in
the developed world in the last few
years.
Shivji thinks that the decline
ofthe superpowers opens doors for
Afiica. "It may just be a change of
masters but maybe it could mean
an opportunity for Africa. The
European Economic Community
is not as integrated as you think.
Peace can no longer be taken for
granted there. Everything is
changing."
Shivji is an advocate for the
right to self- determination, as
opposed to the right to development.
The structural transformation
"has to be people-centered and
popular—amass movement, more
profound and more protracted than
the mass movement that brought
thefirstindependence,"Shivji said.
UBC professor Robert Jackson, a specialist in African politics,
is not as optimistic. "He's got a big
fight on his hands," Jackson said of
Shivji's structural transformation.
African governments want
western governments and international organizations like the
International Monetary Fund
(IMF) and the Worl d Bank to cancel
their debts, Jackson said.
He also said the African debts
are trivial. "They could write them
off in a minute. All of Africa's debt
does not even equal that of Brazil's."
Jackson gives two possibilities
for Africa's future. "The end of
communism is such a drastic
change. This gives a tremendous
boost to the West and institutions
in the West, including the IMF.
Eastern Europe and Africa want
money but there is only so much
money going around. The IMF will
be driving a harder bargain," he
said.
Jackson said that eventually
the African debts will be written   K
off. But if African nations thought
strings were attached before, they   ■>
will have to be prepared for larger
ties once their debts are erased.
Jackson feels the African nations will have to accept "a new
internationalized supervision
through the IMF and the World '
Bank." Supervision entails western s
economic experts in African governments getting rid of waste,
mismanagement, and corruption.
Jackson's alternative prediction
is that "the West says the hell with
Africa and focuses on Eastern
Europe."HefeelsthattheAfricans .
have a great fear of this happening.
However, Jackson said he did not
think that this will occur, for
"reasons of morality."
Shivji is presently on a cross- ^
Canada speaking tour.
Elections
British Columbia.
~
\bting in the
Provincial General
Election*
To vote on October 17, 1991
you need to know these basic facts.
You must be a Kl Where to vote,
registered voter.
Qualifications:
• 19 years of age or older
• Canadian citizen
• Resident of British Columbia for the past 6 months
™* ^Br                    VOTER lOCNnFICAIIOf. CARD
V% REGISTERED VOTER
1234 ANY ST
* BC CITY
THIS DAY. 1M1
'■»*"*'         1234587
^JS^~
You will receive a "WHERE TO VOTE' card in the mail. KEEP this
card. IT IS VERY IMPORTANT. Take this card with you to your
polling place.
How to vote.
If you do not have your voter ID card please check at a Registration
Centre or contact the Registrar of Voters.
Remember: You cannot register on Election Day.
Candidate
You must remember two things:
• Choose only one candidate
• Mark the ballot with an X
Special Voting
Early Voting.
It you were a registered voter as of Thursday, September 19
and are not able to vote on Election Day or at an Advance Poll, you
may vote Saturday, October 5-Tuesday, October 8, 4-8 p.m. at the
office ot the Returning Officer.
Advance Poll.
If you arc unable to vote on Election Day, you may vote at
an Advance Poll. Wednesday, October 9-Saturdav, October 12.
Ho
1-9
p.m.
Disabled Voting.
It you are physically disabled, you may vote at an
Advance Poll. All Advance Polls are wheelchair accessible. It you are
assisting a blind person, please inform them that they may vote at
an Advance Poll. If you are unable to leave your home because of a
physical disability, contact your Returning Officer regarding a
mobile poll or postal vote.
Voting if you're away from
home on October 17, 1991.
If you cannot get to the polling place shown on your 'WHERE TO
VOTE' card, you may go to any other polling place and vote by
ballot envelope.
It von will be out ol British Columbia on Election Day and not able
to get to any other poll you can apply to your Returning Officer for
a postal ballot.
For more
information.
Contact: Registrar ot Voters
1C0-475 E. Broadway, Vancouver
660-4049
OR
Elections British Columbia Information Line
1X00-742X683
(loll Eree)
Remember: \bu cannot register on Election Day.
Chief Electoral Officer
Province of
British Columbia
12/THE UBYSSEY
October 4,1991

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