UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Jan 21, 1964

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0126979.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126979.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0126979-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0126979-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126979-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0126979-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0126979-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0126979-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0126979-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0126979.ris

Full Text

Array We've
got our
THE UBYSSEY
cunning
ham
Vol. XLVI, No. 42
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, JANUARY 21,  1964
CA 4-3916
TAKES EFFECT JULY 1
FEE RUSE NOW OFFICIAL
RUBBLE IN CHEM LAB . . . damage hits $14,000.
Two years of work lost
as fire rips chemistry lab
$50-$60 boosts
vary by faculty
By MIKE VAUX
It's official—UBC fees are going up.
In a statement released Monday, the board of governors
announced raises between $50 and $60, effective July 1.
AMS     President     Malcolm
Scott immediately branded the
increase backward and jnde-
fensible.
He said the board has failed
to consider the ability of the
students to pay the increased
fee.
Fees will go up by $50 to
$372  in the faculties of arts,
See full text of President
Macdonald's announcement.
Page 5.
science and education. They
will go up $60 in professional
faculties.
UBC president John Macdonald said the increase was fair
and necessary.
MALCOLM SCOTT
. "a backward step"
Indefensible — Scott
By STEVE BROWN
Two graduate research students lost most of their notes
and chemical compounds in a
$14,000 fire which ruined a
Chemistry Building laboratory
early Sunday.
The fire, the largest in the
current wave of blazes on
campus, destroyed about $10,-
000 worth of equipment in the
fourth-floor laboratory.
Damage to the walls and
ceiling was about $4,000.
The cause of the fire is unknown, but believed accidental, said UBC acting Fire Chief
R. W. Rowland.
Hans Koch, second year
graduate studies, said his notes
and compounds, representing
two years' work on organic
synthesis, were completely destroyed.
''My partner, Derek Absom,
was lucky. His desk didn't
burn up, so he has most of his
notes, anyway."
Koch said the alarm was
turned in at 6:30 a.m. Sunday
by research student Tadanobu
Inaba.
Inaba used his pass key to
enter the building to get a
passport from his lab, next to
Koch's, for a ski trip across the
border Sunday.
Inaba said there were a series of loud explosions in the
lab.
UBC fire department used
corridor fire hozes and extinguishers to put out the blaze.
The old wing of the chemistry buliding, where the fire
broke   out,   does   not   have   a
ceiling sprinkler system.
Koch said some research students were working in the lab
early Sunday evening.
Saturday, the eighth waste-
(Continued on Page 3)
SEE: FIRE
The board's statement said
the decision to up fees was
"taken in the light of UBC's
financial requirements, the
necessity of increasing revenue from all sources, and the
availability of bursaries and
loan funds for the support of
qualified students who need
assistance."
"Students who genuinely
want a strong UBC will recognize it is their responsibility to
support their university to the
same extent as  students  else-
Fund will handle boost — Gage
No increase in loans
By MIKE BOLTON
No increased loan funds
will be available next year to
help needy students overcome
the $50 fee hike.
But present loan funds are
sufficient to meet the increased demands,. UBC officials
said  Monday.
Dean Walter Gage said the
ceiling on the Student Aid
Loan Fund is sufficiently high
to accommodate all loan applicants.
"There has always been
enough available", he said.
He said $800,000 is available annually for loan funds.
Half of this amount comes
from the Student Aid Loan
Fund. The other half consists
of university funds and private donations.
DEAN W. GAGE
, enough available
The capacity of the Student
Aid Loan Fund is limited by
provincial legislation.
The legislation allows the
University to borrow up to
$2 million for loans from the
banks, with the loans guaranteed by the government.
Students can borrow directly from the bank if they have
an endorser and can show
ability to repay. But bank
loans are not made on a long-
term basis, say bank officials.
Students borrowing from
the Student Aid Loan Fund
need not begin repaying until
after they graduate. Both
bank and student loans bear
interest at 6 per cent per annum.
where in Canada,"   said Macdonald.
"I know students will recognize the board's decision as
necessary and fair."
"Further increase may be
necessary, but I believe UBC
students will accept such increases as long as the average
Canadian student is paying
more than they are."
"Students don't object to
paying their fair share, but
the board has failed to show
that 25 per cent of the operating expense is a fair share,"
said Scott.
Scott said if the board won't
conduct a probe into student
means, the AMS will.
We have the money to do
it, and a plan of how it should
be done," he said.
Scott said the board has
failed to consider the ability of
students to pay the increase,
and in doing so has reversed
its policy of making the university available to everyone.
Ralph Loffmark, Socred
MLA, said he considers it odd
that the board should release
the particulars of the fee increase before the education
estimates have been announced
by the legislature.
"Perhaps someone is trying
to   stir  up student  feeling   in
SEE: FEES
(Continued on Page 2)
WHO WILL
PAY WHAT
(See Page 2) Page  2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 21,   1964
HOMER TOMLINSON
.  . . for president
Homer hears
the call —
and answers
The former king of the world
has set his sights on the United
States presidency for the third
time.
Bishop Homer A. Tomlinson,
who spent hours barricaded in
Brock when he visited UBC in
1961, announced his candidacy
New Year's Day.
He will also campaign for
the Republican and Democratic
nomination.
It is his third attempt at the
post.
He is heading the slate of
The Theocratic Party. His slogan is: "Mighty man of God for
president. A man to be shelter
from  the   storm."
He said men of God would
take the helm of government in
every nation, in every state,
ccunty and village this year.
The 73-year-old leader is expected to face strong competition for the Democratic nomination from President Johnson.
Washington sources said
Tomlinson could! break the Republican deadlock between
Governor Nelson Rockefeller
and Senator Barry Goldwater.
Tomlinson said he had felt
the call of God to seek the presidency.
"I will conduct my campaign
entirely from the front door, of
my house," he said.
From Ottawa
Increased grants
needed - Douglas
The federal government should drastically increase its
grants to universities, New Democratic Party leader Tommy
Douglas said Friday.	
WUS offers
study plan
If not, students will find it
harder and harder to finance
;cr education, he told 1,000
students in Brock.
"The present $2 per capita
grant to universities is nothing
compared to what is needed,"
ht said.
"Students are going to find
themselves kept out of univer-
fity for financial reasons.
"It is the worst form of discrimination."
Douglas was answering a
question on the UBC fee increase. The increase of $50
was announced officially Monday.
The NDP leader also urged
otiidents to join him in a nationwide campaign to get nuclear
weapons out of Canada.
"I'm calling on all interested
groups to mobilize a great campaign to get nuclear weapons
off Canadian soil," he said.
Douglas charged that powerful lobbies were holding up progress on the federal portable
pension plan, and the National
Industrial Development fund.
"It is the most powerful
lobby I have ever seen," he
said.
He said the Liberals had promised a medicare plan as part
ol their first 60 days in office.
"We won't see it in 60 months
unless there is a public outcry,"
he said.
But Douglas praised the Literal government for putting the
business of parliament back on
an efficient basis.
He said the government
caught tip on estimates and expenditures for the first time in
two years.
"It was a very hard-working
session," he said.
Douglas said the municipal
loan fund and the establishment of the Economic Planning
Board are steps in the right
direction.
He said the ideas were taken
from the NDP's platform.
Interested UBC students can
spend a year studying in Germany, Spain, Chile or Russia
on a World University Service
of Canada Scholarship plan.
Requirements for the 1964-
65 WUSC scholarships are a
high scholastic standing and a
knowledge of the language of
the country where the student
will study.
Applications open Friday,
and close Feb. 4. Forms are
available from the AMS office
or International House.
Further information can be
obtained from Fred Tatlow,
CA 7-0786, or the WUSC office in International House.
FEES
(Continued from Page 1)
order to try to force the government to allot more money
to the university," he said.
AMS president Malcolm
Scott said if he wasn't sure of
a sweetheart arrangement between the board and the government before, he was sure
of it now.
The fact that UBC fees are
lower than the national average makes no difference, he
said. "The average is an artificial standard!"
"UBC pays more in fees
than the other universities in
the Western Provinces."
Government officials were
not available for comment.
Not another ?
QUEBEC (CUP) — ."A new
concept of confederation", seminar is to be held at Laval
University in September 1964.
BUDGET   RENT A CAR
CHEVY IMPALA
CHEVY ax
SAVE UP TO 40%
A FULL 24 HOUR DAY
PAY for ONLY
THE GAS
YOU USE
PROPER
INSURANCE
INCLUDED
VOLKSWAGEtV$3.95  per day 5c per mile
ACADIAN
CHEVY II
FALCON $5.00 per day 5c  per mile
BEAUMONT
CHEVELLE  __ $7.00 per day 5c per mile
PARISIENNE
IMPALA
GALAXIE 500 $8.00 per day 5c per mile
MINIMUM
RENTAL AGE
21
PICK -UP and
DELIVERY
SERVICE
FOR MARDI GRAS
TREAT YOUR BEST GIRL TO A BUDGET RENT-A-CAR
RESERVE your car NOW
CALL  685-0536   BUDGET
LESS PER MILE - LESS PER DAY - RENT A CAR THE BUDGET WAY
Here are the new fees
— and who pays them
Students in arts, science, education, home economics,
agriculture and first-year commerce will pay $372 per year.
Graduate students will pay $382, while students in
social work, forestry, and commerce after first year will
pay $422.
Fees for the professional schools—architecture, law,
engineering and pharmacy—will be $432 for the 1964-65
term.
These figures do not include the $24 Alma Mater
Society fee.
SPECIAL EVENTS
presents
Venezuelan Classic Guitarist
One of the supreme colorists on  his instrument
Tuesday, January 21  - Auditorium, 12:30 - 25c
also
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, BROCK LOUNGE at 12:30
MAX VARON and a discussion of current problems
on  the Middle East.
ALIRIO DIAZ
Admission FREE
STUDENTS
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT REMINDER
Approximately 1400 Summer Appointments, all faculties
included, will be made by the Federal Civil Service Commission this year. To assure consideration, your application
must be mailed before January 31, 1964.
For further information and relevant Summer Employment
charts, see your bulletin board or your University Placement Office immediately.
NOW!
HOOTENANNY
in the Cave
All your favorite folksingers from
HUTS - SHUTS - HUD & HAC
THURS.
PAT
BOONE
His First- Vancouver Appearance
CAVE
626 HORNBY    -    MU  2-3677
STUDENTS!
SPECIAL STUDENT TICKETS FOR BOTH SHOWS
ARE NOW AVAILABLE AT THE A.M.S. OFFICE Tuesday, January 21,   1964
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Into faculty "incompetence
Students launch
education probe
BY  DON HULL
An acamedic improvement committee has been formed
by   the   education   undergraduate   society   to   investigate
charges of incompetent teaching in the faculty of education.
Formation of the committee
CUS moves up
award deadline
Deadline for applications
for Canadian Union of Students exchange scholarships
has been extended until Friday.
CUS ran out of application forms and has sent to
Ottawa for a new shipment.
Deadline had previously
been set for Jan. 17.
The scholarships provide
for undergraduate study at
any Canadian university.
Sir Ouvry
tells all
Sir Ouvry Roberts will bare
his soul to students when he
gives his "last lecture" in February.
UBC's head of ceremonies
and parking is scheduled to
speak at one of the Last Lecture series on Feb. 4. The
series, sponsored by the arts
undergraduate society, has campus personalities give the lecture they would give if it were
their last.
First meeting will be on Jan.
21, when Dr. Roy Daniells of
the English department will
speak. Other speakers planned
for this term are Dr. C. W. J.
Eliot, department of classics;
Dr. F. C. Hardwick, department
of education; and Dr. Avrom
Soudack, department of electrical engineering.
All the lectures will be held
at noon in Bu 106.
FIRE
(Continued from Page 1)
basket blaze on campus since
early December struck the
least half of the earlier fires
were the work of a student
firebug.
Doug McCloud, third-year
science, discovered thick smoke
billowing out of the third-floor
study hall.
The fire was put out with an
extinguisher.
Only damage was a scorched
doorway.
Fire chief Rowland said the
fire probably started when
someone emptied an ashtray
into the canvas bag inside the
receptacle.
AUTHORS   AGENCY
Bring     your    manuscripts,     stories,
articles, books, songs, poems.
Free Advice and Help
1065 E.  17th Avenue
TR  6-6362
Clean modern rooms close
to University gates. Private
entrance and bath. Cooking
facilities. Girls only. Phone
228-8439.
took place at a meeting of the
Education Council Friday, and
was the outcome oi a suggestion in the editorial in the Education newsletter, Gooch.
• •    •
Chairman   of   the   five-man
committee is Jim Baldersor.,
editor of Gooch.
Specific complaints to be investigated by the committee
focus on course contents, poor
presentation of material, poor
items in exam questions and
"busy work" assignments.
Balderson called for all interested students to submit
their complaints in the form of
signed briefs, addressed to the
Academic Improvement Committee, room one, New Education building.
• •    •
Briefs should fall under the
heading of primary, intermediate or secondary education.
Balderson said that some
members of the faculty had offered to assist the committee
in sifting through the evidence.
Dean Neville Scarfe, head of
the faculty, has expressed his
support and co-operation with
the project.
At the same meeting Friday,
Balderson survived an attempt
to have him ejected from the
position of editor of Gooch.
• •    •
The move to unseat him
arose out of the controversial
editorial, which caused the distribution of the newsletter to
be stopped.
Balderson decided to continue distribution, and a motion supporting his decision
was passed.
Oh, rats
BELLINGHAM (CUP) —
Two armadillos and a rat died
in a fire which raced through
the rat room of the Psychology department at Western
Washington State University
recently.
HEAD OF DUPONT of Canada, H. H. Lank, will speak
at 24th annual commerce
banquet, Feb. 6, at Bay-
shore.
Winds tumble
trees on Marine
Winds gusting up to 50 miles
an hour hurled over at least a
dozen trees on Marine Drive
over the weekend.
Departments of highways
worked all Sunday night clearing trees from the road. No
3stimate of damages will be
available until later this week,
a Highways Department official said Monday.
Soward on 1963:
World thinks,
avoids brinks
The world stayed far back from the brink of total war
H. Soward told the Vancouver Institute
in 1963, Dean F
Saturday.
Domestic crises overshadowed international affairs,
the head of UBC's department
of International Studies said
in his annual review of world
affairs.
But we shouldn't get our
hopes for 1964 up too high, he
said.  .
"We have been spared the
experience of drawing towards the abyss of total war as
we did in 1962," he said.
No one talked of eyeball
to eyeball confrontations."
Domestic crises included the
tragic death of President Kennedy in the U.S., said Dean
Soward.
"It must be remembered
that three other heads of state
were also assassinated in
1963," he said. The other
deaths were in Iran, Togo and
South Vietnam.
Dean Soward saw the world
in 1963 as "a safer place than
it had been for years."
It was also a year marked by
new men in high places—President Johnson in the U.S., Sir
Alec Douglas-Home in Britain,
and Chancellor Ludwig Erhard
in Germany, he said.
"French President De Gaulle
reacted strongly against the
Anglo-Saxons," said Soward,
"and he is emphatic on the
greatness of France and the revival of its grandeur."
Soward said there is growing doubt in Europe that Russia  will break the peace.
"The East-West test ban
treaty is not in itself of major
international significance, but
it is an important first step for
more far-reaching attempts at
international co-operation."
He said the split between
Red China and Russia may
lead to increased Chinese aggression.
The prospects for international co-operation in 1964:
"A mixture of caution and
conciliation on the part of the
great powers."
c u. s. o.
LAST   CHANCE
Apply for Canada's "Private" Peace Corps
GO TO
AFRICA
ASIA
CARIBBEAN
Needed
Students
Graduating in
Education
Arts
Technical & Science Courses
Must fill information forms in AMS ofice by Saturday,
January 25 and return to MR. J. B. WOOD, Extension
Department, UBC.
UBC. WINTER SPORTS ARENA
announces
Starting Jan. 29, the arena will be available 8:00-10:00 p.m.
Wednesdays for STUDENT SKATING PARTIES,
INTERESTED PARTIES call arena for bookings.
CA 4-3205
UBC Local 365
CURLING
ICE AVAILABLE: MONDAYS & THURSDAYS 12:45 — 4:30
TUESDAYS & FRIDAYS ....     2:45 — 4:30
WEDNESDAYS 8:15 a.m. — 4:30
Vi
PUBLIC SKATING AFTERNOONS
EXPERT SKATE RENTAL & SHARPENING AVAILABLE THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those ot the editor and not necessarily those ot the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA
4-3242,   Loc.   26.   Member   Canadian   University   Press.
Authorized     as     second-class    mail    by     Post     Office    Department,
Ottawa,   and for  payment of postage   in   cash.
Winner 1963-64 Canadian University Press trophies for
general excellence and editorial writing.
TUESDAY, JANUARY 21, 1964
How overage?
Just when you thought you'd heard all the arguments about the fee raise, along comes someone like
George Cunningham.
With over-statement characteristic of someone trying desperately to sell something, Cunningham confided
to a Ubyssey reporter last week that the raise is necessary to turn UBC into a first-class educational plant.
Cunningham, of course, does have something to sell.
He's chairman of the Board of Governors, which sometime prior to last Tuesday decided that UBC students
could afford another $50 apiece.
But his statement about a first-class institution was
a bit hard to swallow.
In fact, with the fee raise and a somewhat increased
provincial government allotment of revenue, the best
UBC can hope to become is comfortably mediocre.
The fee raise—in fact, fee raises for the next three
years—will bring UBC's operating revenue up $o only
the average of other Canadian universities. And Canada's average universities could not even jokingly be
called first-rate.
The important fact neglected by persons—Cunningham included—is that UBC students are being forced
outright to make up money that should be forthcoming
from the provincial government.
Why, it might be asked, if UBC is striving for the
average in Canadian higher education and fees, does it
not seek average provincial assistance also?
The answer is hidden somewhere in the super-
secret dealing that goes on between the Board of Governors and the government.
The fact remains that, as indicated in the Challenge
of Growth pamphlet, the multi-colored, expensive-looking
monument to UBC's present impoverishment, the provincial government's grant to UBC next year will be
only in the neighborhood of $675 a student.
Not only is this far below the present Canadian average, but it is almost $100 below the Canadian average of
even five years ago—1958-59—when other Canadian
institutions were getting $765 per student.
And, of course, the provincial governriient's contribution now—or three years from now—will look ridiculous beside the provincial expenditure in that other
hotbed of Social Credit—Alberta.
Five years ago, the Alberta government was giving
$1,776 per student, a good two-and-a-half times as much
as UBC will be getting next year.
Charity begins ..
"We believe Mardi Gras is a time for fun and
revelry which, incidentally, raised a substantial sum for
charity."
Those are the words of the co-ordinators of this
year's Greek Week bash, Mardi Gras.
A refreshingly candid view compared to the pious
proclamations from past years to the effect that, "We're
only doing our humble little bit to help the poor, crippled
children."
That position was just a wee bit untenable when the
cynics seemed to doubt that several thousand students
went downtown and conscientiously got stoned out of
their minds just to help the crippled kiddies.
Perhaps this year's Greek Week orgynizers realize
that the altruistic motives of any socially-oriented charity
group are rather questionable, and they're only trying to
beat the cynics to the punch.
Regardless of their motives, their outspoken honesty
is really quite commendable, sort of.—R.B.
Well, how ELSE are you going to get the money to pay the
fee raise???
Tip for N.Y. tourists:
avoid upturned palms
By MIKE GRENBY
NEW YORK
New York is the richest
city in the world, a distinction, I'm sure, due to the lowly but cursed tip.
You tip the barber for cutting your hair. You tip the
waiter after having a simple
cup of coffee.
You tip the public washroom attendant if you want a
towel to dry your hands.
You even tip the theatre
usher for showing you to your
seat.
And if you don't tip, you
just don't go back to that barber or that restaurant. Unless, of course, you want to be
scalped or have your coffee
spilled into your lap.
• *    •
Haircuts average $1.25-$1.50
and one is expected to leave
about a 25-cent tip. Being
from Vancouver, where such
a barbaric custom is unheard
of, I didn't even think of tipping the barber the first time
I had my hair cut.
Now I can see why I had
such a hard time getting past
him when I tried to walk out
the  door.
I can go without having my
hair cut for several months,
but unfortunately I have to
eat every day. Since I must
buy my meals, I'm stuck.
• •    •
Eating    at    the    counter
doesn't mean you needn't tip;
it just means you tip less than
if you eat in a booth or at a
table.
The minimum tip at the
counter is a dime, and if the
meal costs more than 75c, it's
usual to leave 15c, and so on
up. Many times I've watched
people have coffee (which is
usually 15c) and leave a dime
tip.
Eating isn't the only necessity cursed by the tip.
Most public washrooms,
such as in the subway, cost a
nickel, so I was pleased to
find that the one at Grand
Central Station appeared to
be free.
But when I wanted to dry
my hands, I found the only
way to a towel was through
the washroom attendant. And
the only way to the washroom attendant was through
some loose change.
So now, completely oriented, I've tipped my way to dry
hands, a full stomach, and
trimmed hair.
•    •    •
I have 30 cents left in my
pocket and a ticket to the
1964 Ice Follies at Madison
Square Garden. Fifteen cents
for the subway gets me to the
Garden and I give my ticket
to the usher.
He takes me to my seat—
but why is he standing there,
blocking my entrance to the
row? Why is he still holding on to my ticket stub?
Oh, no! Not you too, usher.
No, I won't!  No. No . . .
Oh, well, I didn't really
want to take the subway home
after the show anyway. It'll
do me good to walk those 60
blocks.
EDITOR: Mike Hunter
Editors:
Associate
News __
Managing
City   	
Photo      _
Keith Bradbury
 Dave Ablett
George Railton
. Mike Horsey
Don Hume
Critics     Ron Riter
Sports
Asst. City _
Asst. News
Senior 	
Senior  	
. Denis Stanley
Richard Simeon
_    Tim Padmore
Donna Morris
Maureen Covell
LETTERS
TO THE
EDITOR
Lively arts
Editor. The Ubyssey:
What a dreary fellow Jack
Ornstein (Ubyssey, Jan. 17) is,
with his Point Grey scepticism
and his old fashioned ideas
about sex!
What a glum, depressing
world he offers us! Imagine it
—little white cubicles containing married couples who
equate love with bowel movements and who sip their
scnapps-and-Enovid whilst
conducting solemn, "enlightened" conversations about sex,
science and atheism in the manner of Kinsey or Havelock Ellis.
I thought such drivel went
out with the 1920's. Where's
his zest for life, his spirit of
adventure?
No, sir. Let us instead celebrate the free agent, the casual
contact, the chance encounter!
Let us recall the poetry of
beach, wall, telephone booth,
canal bank, hay-field and yes,
even back seat of discretely
parked car!
Let us revive the Dying Art
of the Knee-Trembler; the
Lost Philosophy of the One
Night Stand!
What Mr. Ornstein offers is
that last resort of the frustrated male who cannot get it any
other way—the entanglement,
the young-fogeydom of pseudo-
marriage.
JOHN MILLS,
Arts IV.
Stringing along
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Somewhat belatedly, I would
like to take exception to your
editorial "Boon or Bust," concerning the Red Ensign Jan.
16.
I would like to point out
that there are certain distinctions between a bare-breasted
harp and a bare-breasted woman.
For one thing there are fewer strings attached to a bare-
breasted woman.
Secondly, it seems that bare-
breasted harps tend to insure
continuity of the race in a
slightly different fashion.
Hoping, that these techniques of differentiation may be
helpful in the future anlysis of
the above. I remain,
yours truly,
FLAGSTAFF.
All wet
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I would like to make a suggestion: in the interests of the
common good, why doesn't the
Science faculty employ a few
Engineers, and fix that slanted sidewalk in front of the
Chemistry building, before a
few students drown in all that
water.
PUDDLES,
Arts II.
Maybe you can note an extra
sweetness in the pages today because Miss Lorraine Shore is now
an assistant city editor. Filling
the gap on the reorters desk were
Don [Hull, Steve Brown, Mike
Vaux, Graeme (pr.) Matheson,
Mike Bolton and the bearded
wonder Tom Wayman.
Filling   the   two   sporting pages
were   Bill  Willson,   Janet  Currie,
Bob Banno, George Reamsbottom,
Dave   Carlson.
We need reporters, typists, feature
writers, photographers, proofreaders, and lay-out artists. In
fact we need anybody who has
some command of the Queen's
English and can peck out copy on
a typewriter. If you have a name
like Erudichesekle Niedopdzinske
you don't even need those qualification* Tuesday, January 21,   1964
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
From the president
PRESIDENT
MACDONALD
ON FEE RAISE
An open letter
to UBC students
By DR. JOHN MACDONALD
I am using the pages of The Ubyssey on the invitation
of (he editor to inform you concerning the increase in fees
which has just been announced by the Board of Governors.
The student body knows well that the financial requirements of our growing and complex university are
increasing. The students demonstrated that knowledge
last year when they supported requests for additional funds
for the university and expressed their endorsation of the
Report on Higher Education in British Columbia. I quote
from that report supported by the students:
"Clearly the task and
cost of meeting the requirements for higher education
in the years ahead are of a
new dimension. These costs
cannot be met by any single
group within society, but no
group can avoid sharing in
the responsibility."
That statement is the basis for the Board's policy.
The university is seeking and expects to receive increased
support from all the groups who contribute to its welfare.
IWe seek to achieve in a three-year period a level of support equal to the average revenue per student in Canada.
Thctt is a realistic goal.
Among the groups who contribute to the support of
Canadian universities are the students. I personally would
welcome a form of support for universities which would
eliminate student fees, but that is not the Canadian tradition. At a time when demands on universities are as great
as they now are it is likely that the tradition of students
paying fees will continue in every university in the country.
This being the case, one can ask, "How much should
the students pay?" Since we seek the Canadian average
in revenues I believe it is fair for UBC students to pay an
amount equal to the Canadian average in fees. Students
who genuinely want a strong UBC will recognize that it is
their responsibility to support their university to the same
extent as the students elsewhere in Canada.
UBC fees have been significantly lower than the Canadian average—about $75 lower in Arts and Science, lower
than the average in eight of our faculties. The announced
increases will bring UBC fees closer to the Canadian average, but will still leave a gap. If resources increase sufficiently from other sources (and the university is vigorously seeking support from all sources), further. increases
might not be necessary. If they are necessary, I believe
UBC students will accept such increases (not happily, but
with equanimity) as long as the average Canadian student
is paying more than they are.
The university is always concerned that financial limitations must not be a barrier for any qualified student
seeking entry to, or continuing in, this university. We
now disperse approximately $1 million in scholarships,
loans and bursaries to deserving undergraduate students.
The amount increases each year, and we have maintained
the resources for this purpose at a level great enough to
meet the genuine need.    We will continue to do so.
I know the students will understand that what I
have said summarizes the position which the university
faces and will recognize that the board's decision is
necessary and fair.
Canada's Largest
Forest Products Company
Careers for 1964 Graduates
Mechanical, Civil and Chemical Engineering, Forestry,
Chemistry, Commerce, Arts
Interviews — January 13th to January 24th
Appointments — Placement Office, Hut M7
MACMILLAN, BLOEDEL &
POWELL RIVER LIMITED
JEAN BAZIN
.  . .  WUS delegate
Delegates
named for
WUS talks
Wendy Moir, chairman of the
UBC World University Service
committee, will be one of four
Canadian delegates to the WUS
International Assembly July 12
to 19.
Representatives of more than
5C nations will attend the assembly, to be held at the University of Lund in Sweden.
Other Canadian delegates
are: Dean J. F. Leddy, chairman of WUS of Canada, Prof.
Bill Hull of the University of
Manitoba, and Jean Bazin, president-elect of the Canadian
Union of Students.
To travel
CUSO on
alert for
graduates
Canadian University Service
Overseas is looking for UBC
students to work in Asia, Africa and the Caribbean.
Information can be picked up
at the AMS office.
They must be returned to
John Wood, of the Extension
Department, before Jan. 25.
Graduating students in any
faculty are eligible.
The students usually spend
18 months or two years in the
country to which they go.
"One year is too little time
to make a significant contribution," said Tony Best, of the
UBC committee. "The first
nine months is the learning
period."
Students are paid the local
wages, and live at the same
standard as the natives.
Many of the students serve
as teachers, although most have
had no formal education training.
There is a particular need for
French-speaking science teac-
ers.
"We also need people to fill
the 'middle gap'—the area between the highly specialized
person and the normal
worker," said Best.
Squadron Leader D. R. MacKay,
AFC, CD, was born in Calgary in
1917. A graduate of Drumheller
Higli School, he received his teachers' certificate in 1937 from Calgary
Normal School. He held Public and
High School teaching positions until
he joined   the RCAF  in   July,   1941.
S/L MacKay took his pilot training at Boundary Bay and Calgary.
After earning his "wings" he graduated from the Flying Instructors
School, Vulcan, Alta. During World
War II he served in instructional
and supervisory capacities with flying, bombing and gunnery schools
at MacLeod and Lethbridge, Alta.,
and   Paulson,   Man.
In the summer of 1945, on completion of aComposite Training Course
in Toronto for adminstrative training, he became Adjutant at the Navigational School, Rivers, Man. Later
that year, on disbandment of Station
Rivers, he was transferred to the
RCAF's detachment of the Defence
Research, Experimental Establishment, Suffield, Alta., for administrative and   flying  duties.
S/L MacKay's next move was to
Tactical Air Command Headquarters, Edmonton, in 1948, as staff officer responsible for recruiting advertising and publicity in the central and western regions. In 1952
he assumed his present assignment
in Directorate of Personne] Manning,
Air Force Headquarters, where he
supervises recruiting advertising and
publicity   for   the Air   Force.
S/L MacKay will visit the campus
Thursday, Feb. 14th, to interview
graduating students interested in
career opportunities  in   the  RCAF. Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  January  21,   1964
Blank Sapperton
Forward look
gives UBC win
By GEORGE REAMSBOTTOM
A revamped forward line led to a regained scoring touch
as   the   soccer   Thunderbirds    set    down    Sapperton   5-0
Saturday.
SCOREBOARD
SOCCER
Thunderbirds    5,
ton 0
Sapper-
RUGBY
T'Birds 16, Trojans 10
Braves 6, West Van 5
P.E.'s   9,   Ex   Gladstone  6
Frosh 24, Georgians II 8
BASKETBALL
Birds 5', U of A Golden
Bears 34, Fri.
Birds  57, Bears 48,  Sat.
Braves 28, Harlem Globetrotters  109, Fri.
Braves 47,  San  Francisco
Golden Gaters 111, Sat.
HOCKEY
UBC 5, Powell River Regals 12
(P.R. wins two-game total
point series 15-8 for Blackball Cup).
Olympians 0, Czechs 6
Trotters clean
local teams
, Abe Saperstein's fabulous
Harlem Globetrotters laughed
and clowned their way into
two wins before 10,000 fans
Friday and Saturday night at
War  Memorial Gym.
Friday, Trotters outclassed
UBC Braves 109-28, their victims Saturday night were the
Senior 'A', Grocers.
Lord Byng product Jim
Walker also potted ten points
for UBC.
The win left the Birds one
point behind first place Royal
Oaks who played to a 2-2 tie
with Italo-Canadians Saturday.
Oaks have played three more
games .than the Birds.
Playing on a muddy field the
slowed down Birds used a combination of short pass patterns and tight defensive checking as they controlled the ball
most of the game.
At the half the Birds had a
3-0 lead on two goals by Jim
Berry and a single by Jim
Jamieson. In the second half
they added two more on scores
by Dick Mosier and Joe Alexis.
Berry's second goal was
scored on a picture play as
Jamieson passed to Alexis who
fed a low cross to Berry connecting with it on the fly and
shooting it into the lower left
corner of the goal catching
Sapperton's goalie going the
wrong way.
Goalie Don Cary was also
in top form shutting out the
Sapperton forwards and pleasing coach Jo Johnson who has
the happy problem each game
deciding which of his goalers
will play. Goalie George Reni-
coff was sitting this one out.
Showing off his strong bench
coach Johnson brought in Dave
Wright, Merv Magus and
Harry Lendoy at half time and
suffered little by the  change.
In other UBC soccer games
the Tomahawks — Columbus
Junior Coast League two-game
total goal series for the Jim
Seggie Trophy was cancelled
Sunday because of rain and
poor field conditions.
Representatives of
THE
International Nickel Co.
OF CANADA LIMITED
Will visit the university to discuss career opportunities
with graduating and post graduate students in
ENGINEERING
• MINING
• METALLURGICAL
• CHEMICAL
• ELECTRICAL
• MECHANICAL
CHEMISTRY
GEOLOGY  and  GEOPHYSICS
Also interviews for summer employment will be held
with geology and geophysics students in 4th and
post-graduate years.
ON JANUARY 29TH, 30TH AND 31ST
We invite you to arrange an interview through
The Office of Student Personnel Services
THE
International Nickel Co.
OF CANADA LIMITED
COPPER CLIFF, ONTARIO
*
GRASS HOCKEY player
Diane Oswald scored one
goal as the UBC Varsity
team whipped Kits 5-2
Saturday.
Needed!  One girl
Wanted: girl interested in
playing the position of goalie.
For information call Marilyn
Brown. Wa 2-1376.
Birds cant bear
to lose to Bears
By    DAVE   CARLSON
UBC Thunderbird basketball boys enjoyed a successful
weekend, moving from third position to a first place deadlock in the WCIAA.
The Birds knocked off the
previously undefeated University of Alberta-Edmonton Golden Bears twice.
Friday night, UBC won 51-
34. Dave Way, with 16, and
Ken McDonald, with 14 points,
were high scorers for the
Birds. The only Bear to score
in double figures was Darwin
Semotiuk with 10 .
UBC led by a close 25-24
margin at the half time.
In the second contest, the
Bears bowed by a score of
57-48. Star quarterback cum
guard Gary Smith poured in
18 points, and reliable Semotiuk added 11.
Dave Way paced the Birds,
the big pivot plunked 17
points. Ken McDonald, replacing injured Dave Osborne for
the series, added 12 more
points. Ron Erickson hit for
10.
Once more it was a second
half blitz that produced the
victory. U. of A. led 35-30 at
half time.
UBC and the University of
Saskatchewan now hold down
first place with identical 5-1
records. U. of A.-Edmonton follows with 4 wins and 2 losses.
African minority
Out of every 10 college professors in Africa, only three
are African.
GRAD    CLASS    MEMBERS
Please complete this form and return to the A.M.S.
office, mail box No. 43, before January 24,  1964
Your Choice of a Grad Gift to the University:
First choice   .   __   _..   __       __
Second choice      	
Your Choice For-
Class Valedictorian           __    .._
Class Poet    .   _   . ..	
Class Historian __     :      __       _
Class Prophet      __     	
Class Will Writer ...__       __   _..   _
Honorary President (Faculty	
Honorary Vice-President (Faculty) Tuesday,  January 21,   1964
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
da yrs
EYE VIEW
OF BIRDS
Ey DAVE  CARLSON
It has been suggested that
UBC "look ambitiously at
the Big Six." This is strictly
bilge.
Before UBC could even
think of going big league, the
provincial government would
have to drastically alter the
entire school system.
It is a fact that the higli
schools of B.C. act -as^a- farm
systerq for this university.
iThje function of the farm
system is to develop players
for the parent team.
The calibre of athletics
played in B.C. high schools
cannot even compare with
that of the U.S.
Vancouver College plays
probably the best high school
football in B.C. Matched
against even a mediocre
Washington State team, VC
is lucky to win.
The situation is the same
for basketball, and much
worse for baseball.
If an increased concentration on sports in the high
schools were adopted in B.C.,
high paid coaches would have
to be sought. Most of these
would come from the U.S.
• •    *
At the present time, UBC
would have to attract top
athletes from south of the
border. To do so would mean
offering lucrative athletic
scholarships.
UBC is one school that
certainly cannot afford to
waste money on athletics.
Fees are being increased at
the moment to help raise our
teaching standards, and to
build much needed facilities.
To use such funds just to give
the university a big name in
athletics would be nonsense.
• •    •
In basketball, for instance,
UCLA defeated Oregon State,
who beat UBC by 40 points.
And UBC has probably the
best college basketball team
in Canada made up entirely
of Canadian players.
It may be true that UBC
should get out of the WCIAA,
but to join the Big Six is
fantastic.
It was also cited that UBC's
basketball loss to Linfield
College (enrolment 518) was
a disgrace. But it just happens
that Linfield is a so-called
renegade college.
It will accept athletes, no
matter how intelligent they
are. Linfield's star player had
D marks throughout high
school. Under these circumstances, UBC could lose to a
college with an enrollment of
ten.
• •    •
Similarly,      mention      was
made of the drubbing handed the same UBC basketball
squad by the Seattle Pacific
Falcons. (Seattle Pacific has
an enrollment of about one-
quarter  of UBC's).
Coach Peter Mullins ex
plained it: "Seattle Pacific
is weaker than last year, and
we beat them last year. The
reason we lost is that we were
too tired. (It was the team's
third game in as many
nights.) It was my fault for
scheduling so many game*'
together."
Puck team given
Regal blackball
By  GEORGE REAMSBOTTOM
The   'high-powered   Thunderbird   pucksters    regained
their scoring touch as they shot home five goals Sunday.
Unfortunately   their   opposition managed to score 12.
KEN CAIRNS
. . shoots low
Gillespie
breaks own
swim record
Bill Gillespie broke his own
week-old record for the 200
meter back stroke during the
weekend swim meet against
Oregon State University.
Gillespie's 2:32.1 record was
dropped to 2:29.7 in Empire
Pool Saturday when Oregon
whipped UBC 58-35.
Other UBC records which
went for a tumble were executed by Dave Smith who smashed team-mate Powly's week-
old record of 6:36.8 in the 500
meter freestyle with a 6:29.1.
Powly bettered his own time
with a 6:31.7.
The foursome of Gillespie,
Brian Griffiths, Jim Pearce
and Bill Campbell set a new
record for the 400 meter medley race recording a 4:31.6
beating the old time by 4.4
seconds.
Winners of the Blackball
trophy were the Powell River
Regals, a fine intermediate
team which outscored UBC 15-
8 in the two game total goal
series.
The first game, played in
Powell River, ended in a 3-3
tie.
S u n d a y's game at the
Thunderbird Sports Centre
entertained 200 fans with 17
goals.
Both teams featured the five
man rush which either resulted in a goal or a quick
comeback for the opposition
UBC scorers were Ralph
Lortie, Ken Cairns, Dave Mor
ris, Bob Parker and Peter
Kelly.
Cairns' goal was the best of
the night as he rushed from
his own end, stickhandling
around each Regal player at
least once and then whipped £
low shot past the Powell River
goalie.
An anxious moment camf
for the Birds when their top
forward Peter Kelley was accidentally cut an inch above
his eye by a stick. But Kelly
was driven to UBC hospital,
stitched up and back for the
third period.
Vies squeezed
in squash play
UBC squash champions defeated arch-rival Victoria Col
lege 4-2 in their weekend
tournament.
Royal Roads and Shawnigan
didn't show for the Saturday
tournament in Jericho Tennis
Club.
Set winners for UBC included Manager John Gibson,
Steve Williams, Dave Scarth
and Clark Shea.
Winners for Victoria College
were John Creighton and Pete
Julesburg who defeated UBC's
George Hungerford and John
Osborn respectively.
SOS call goes out
for team managers
Managers are needed for
most of the University extramural teams and Men's
Athletic President, Dave
Whitelaw is asking for
volunteers.
He tells the sports editor
that the essential qualities do
not include being a con-man.
No experience is necessary. Any men interested are
asked to contact Mr. R. J.
Phillips in the Athletic Office in War Memorial Gym.
Thunderettes
blank Portland
UBC Thunderettes basketball team took eight players to
Portland last weekend but defeated their Senior A team 48-
36 and 30-28 in exibition
games.
Injuries and ineligibility disqualified the other members
of the UBC team.
Diane Bond and Barb Robertson were high scorers.
UBC jerks
pull weight
at open meet
UBC lifters showed good
form at Saturday's open meet.
Klaus Hallschmidt set a
record in the clean and jerk
for the 181 pound class with
290 pounds.
Coach Andy Hinds, B.C.
champ, won the 148 pound
class and second in the overall rating.
Jack Christopher (lone
heavyweight) set a new clean
and jerk record with 288
pounds.
Vince Basile set a new
curl  record with  155   pounds.
Other winners were Geroge
Tsoi-a-sue, Raleigh Whitlinger,
Des   Tromens,   Deiter   Stamm.
Paul Truant, one of UBC'~
promising lifters, was third in
the 181 pound class.
John Minechello, ex-UBC
coach, was one of the judges.
ANGLICAN   CHURCH   OF  CANADA
"The Holy Eucharist"
CELEBRATED ON WEDNESDAYS AT
4 P.M. IN BUCHANAN 227
CAREERS FOR 1964 GRADUATES
AND POST-GRADUATES
A number of Federal Government Departments  are
offering challenging career opportunities in
Bacteriology, Biology Chemistry,
Pharmacy, and Veterinary and
Agricultural Sciences
Starting Salaries from $4740 to $7320
Per Annum
Obtain complete details from the Bio-Sciences Selection
Team when they visit your university on January 22-27,
1964.
Your University Placement Officer will arrange an
interview for you.
There's a rewarding future for you as a
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANT
Learn how and why, February 10 to 21
During this period, members of The Institute of Chartered
Accountants of B.C. will be at UBC to interview students who expect
to graduate in 1964. Arrangements for interviews may be made
through Mr. Hacking at the University Placement Office. Earlier interviews may be arranged by telephoning the Secretary at MUtual
1-3264.
YOUR OPPORTUNITY TO JOIN  A CHALLENGING AND
FAST-GROWING PROFESSION
Chartered Accountants play a decisive role in  Canadian business.
industry and government. Many have attained executive positions of
considerable stature and influence; their training and experience
enables them, as one writer has put it, "to disentangle the threads
of profitability  that hold  a company together."
C.A. training offers interesting employment with practising
chartered accountants. Your work "on location" will introduce you
to a wide range of industrial, financial, commercial, service and governmental   operations.
The Institute of Chartered Accountants
530 BURRARD ST., VANCOUVER T
MU 1-3264 Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 21,  1964
'tween classes
Here's that growth again
The Pre-Med Society present 'Smoking and Cancer" a
research film Wednesday noon
in Wes 100.
• •    •
ONTOLOGICAL SOCIETY
"Sanity in Religion", talk by
Richard Thompson (MA Cambridge) Wednesday noon, Bu.
221. Everyone welcome.
• •    •
SAILING CLUB
General meeting Wednesday noon in Bu. 104.
• •    •
CHORAL SOCIETY
Practices: Tonight in .Brock,
Tomorrow 6 p.m. Bu. 104.
Everyone must attend.
• •    •
BAHA'I STUDENTS    "
"You" speaker, Mrs. Daryl
Sturrock. Board Room, International House, Wednesday
noon. All welcome.
PHRATERES
Voting for 1964-65 officers
Wednesday 8:30 a.m. to 5:30
p.m.
• *    •
COMMUNITY PLANNING
Film, "Old Town Growing
Younger". How modern planning recreates an old Nether
lands town. Noon Wednesday
La.  102.
• • •
WEDNESDAY NOON HOUR
CONCERTS
Charles Ive's Piano Sonata
No. 1 played by Phyllis Taylor
in Bu. 106.
• •    •
PRELIBRARIANSHIP
SOCIETY
Miss J. O'Rourke will demonstrate microfilm technique
noon today, Social Sciences
mezzanine.
UBC  CLASSIFIED
FOR SALE: 1954 Vauxhall, new
clutch and transmission, good
tires, brakes relined, in excellent
operating condition. $295. AjM 1-
2905.
FOUND: Woman's lab coat, left
In Blue Chevy II, Thursday noon.
At  lost and Found.	
IMPORTANT announcement to appear Feb. 4th. Be sure to watch
this space! Coming soon the big-
gest event of the year!	
FOR SALE: Men's ski boots, size
10, Double boot, in good condition. Phone WA 2-9276 after 6
p.m. 	
WOULD the person who took a
new brown umbrella from the
Physics theatre, Thurs., Jan. 9,
please be good enough to leave
it in the umbrella rack at International House. 	
WOULD the person who took my
green umbrella from college library, Tuesday please return it
there immediately. I know what
you   look   like!	
WANTED: Six muscle men for Li'l
Abner. Apply Mussoc clubhouse
behind   Brock. 	
WOULD the person who rode a
maroon CCM bicycle away from
the rear of the Physics Bldg., on
■ Fri., Jan. 10 please return to
same place in lieu of taking over
payments or feeding one of tv,to
children for remainder of semester. 	
RIDER WANTED: Room for one
rider living: south of 41st. Ave-
or in Dunbar. Large, warm car.
Campus center drop-off. 8:30-5:10
p.m., Mon. to Sat. Ideal for working girl or student. Call 876-2315
after 6.
LEARN German quickly and easily
with the Living German Language Course, 40 lessons complete with records & manuals,
new, $10. Brian, Rm. 311, CA 4-
9063.
WANTED: Riders for car pool in
area rounded by Oak, 28th, 9th
and Grey Point. Phone Harold,
RE  8-3982,  after 7  p.m.	
HITOH-HIKERS who have been or
are planning to go to Mexico,
U.S.A. or Canada, phone Peter
Harr,ison, CA 4-3648. Purpose,
forming  a hitch-hiking  club.
LOST: Large black purse ir; vicinity of Brock. Finder please call
AM   6-4413. 	
FOR SALE: Man's laminated topcoat. Hounds tooth, belt in back,
size 42, Ex. cond. Man's white
labcoat, brand new, Size 42. 988-
1390 after 6:30.      	
CANON: 7 fl.4 camera. Built-in exposure meter, telephoto and accessories. In fancy leather case.
Going really cheap. Call Raj, CA
4-3389,  after  5:30  p.m
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Films: "Flight of a Dragon"
and "From a Chinese Brush".
Wednesday noon Bu.  102.
• *    *
SCM
"Honest to God", seminar
group led by John Shaver,
Tuesday Hut L-4.
• •    •
NATIVE CANADIAN
FELLOWSHIP
General meeting, Wednesday noon,  everyone  welcome.
• •    •
UBC SOCREDS
Herb Bruch MLA, slides and
impressions of a recent trip to
Malaysia. Tuesday noon Bu.
203.
• •    •
SPECIAL  EVENTS
Alirio Diaz, Venezuelan classic guitarist, noon today in
the Auditorium. Admission 25
cents.
Dr. Max Varon and a discussion on current problems in
the Middle East, tomorrow
noon, Brock Lounge. Free.
• •    •
EAST  ASIA  SOCIETY
FAR EAST WEEK: "Rash-
omon" — award-winning film,
noon today, Wes. 100 50 cents.
Tomorrow: Dr. Peter Harnet-
ty speaks on South East Asia
and the world today, Bu. 202.
"LOST: Jan. 13, brown wallet in
south Brock basement. Papers
very important. Contact Trevor
Alexander at AM 1-9595 anytime.
Reward.
YOUNG officers require assistance
of 9 co-eds for festivities during
weekend exercise. Quarters &
rations available upon request.
FA 1-0143 or, AL 5-3382 evenings
only. _____
LOST: Wed. night, Jan. 15. Man's
watch, between library and C-
lot. Phone Bill at CY 9-3839 after
6:30.
♦
3MMO_____M___ __________
__________H__b       ___HH_raw
mwwL.
ROYAL   C AH AD I AH  AIR  FORCE
The  RCAF has Engineering,
Aircrew, Medical and  Social
WELFARE CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
FOR UNIVERSITY GRADUATES
... AN  RCAF  PERSONNEL OFFICER
WILL VISIT YOUR CAMPUS TO . ..
INTERVIEW
All Final Year Undergraduates
Interested in Permanent
Employment in the Air Force
Jan. 28 - 29, Tues., Wed.
APPOINTMENTS MAY BE MADE THROUGH
YOUR   UNIVERSITY    PLACEMENT   OFFICE
Local 620
ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE
Award-winning film tops
Far East Week program
Far East Week continues today, with a showing of the
award-winning film Rashomon.
The film, winner of the 1948 Venice award for movie
excellence, will he shown in Wesbrook 100. Admission
is 50 cents.
At noon Wednesday, Dr. Peter Haretty of the History
Department, will speak on South-East Asia and the World
Today in Bu. 202.
Another film presentation will be shown Thursday in
Bu. 106.
Far East night will be held Saturday in the auditorium
to raise funds for the East Asia Society's scholarship
program.
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE'S
SHAKESPEARE    FESTIVAL    PRODUCTION
"Much Ado About Nothing"
FEBRUARY 7-15
TWO STUDENT PERFORMANCES
FEB. 10-11, 7:30 p.m.  ::  TICKETS 75c
GET TICKETS NOW!    AVOID DISAPPOINTMENT
HEAVY ADVANCE ORDERS BEING RECEIVED
BOX OFFICE: ROOM 207, FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
What's doing
in Aluminum
SMELTING?
More—much more—than meets the eye: the technology of
producing aluminum in our smelters is constantly changing.
Talented graduates in extractive metallurgy, chemical and
many other branches of engineering—experiment with and
develop new processes and design new technical controls.
They are responsible for the transforming, plant distribution
and rectification of electricity; the electrolysis of alumina
by the Hall & Heroult process; the production of carbon
electrodes and the casting of aluminum and its alloys. In
addition they may be involved in project, maintenance and
industrial engineering. Graduate chemists will also find
interesting careers in such fields as control, development
and research. Indeed—there's a lot doing in the five aluminum smelters we operate across Canada:
• At Kitimat, B.C.: (where our picture, showing a crucible filled
with molten aluminum, was taken): 192,000 tons installed
capacity of aluminum ingot per year.
•At Arvida, Quebec: 373,000 tons installed capacity of aluminum
per year.
• At Isle Maligne, Quebec:  115,000 tons installed capacity of
aluminum ingot per year.
• At Shawlnigan, Quebec: 70,000 tons installed capacity of alu
minum ingot per year.
• At Beauharnois, Quebec: 38,000 tons installed capacity of alu
minum ingot per year.
Please ask your Placement Officer
for an appointment to meet
the Alcan representatives on
January 27th, 28th, 29th, and 30th
The following booklets and information sheets are available at your
placement office: Presenting Alcan to the University Graduate. / The
Role of the Chemical and Extractive Metallurgist in Alcan and its
Associated Companies. / The Role of the Chemist in Alcan and its Associated Companies. / The Role of the Mechanical Engineer in Alcan and
its Associated Companies. / The Role of the Physical Metallurgist in
Alcan and its Associated Companies.
ALUMINUM COMPANY OF CANADA, LIMITED

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0126979/manifest

Comment

Related Items