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The Ubyssey Oct 23, 1984

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 Beer on trial
By DAVE STODDART
Students in Gage Towers
residence will have a trial beer night
that will influence the future of
residence functions at UBC.
The trial function Nov. 14 is part
of a proposal put forth by the Gage
Residence Association to the
Alcohol Policy Review Committee
in an attempt to have mid-week
beer nights reistated. Beer nights
were a weekly occurence at Gage
and other residences.
Eighty per cent of Gage residents
signed a petition demanding change
in the new regulations.
"We got a really positive turnout
on the petition." said Bruce Ham-
mersly, Gage residence association
vice-president. "I think it had a real
effect on (housing's) decision (to
permit the trial beer night).
Hammersly added this function
will have some stipulations attached. "Since noise was a big factor in
the alcohol regulation changes, we
have to turn the music down at
11:30." But Hammersly said a new
air-conditioning system will mean
doors can be closed and noise kept
in.
Student housing director Mary
Flores said the beer night is only a
trial and does not indicate any
policy change.
"This function meets both our
objectives and theirs." Flores said.
"If it goes off well then maybe we'll
consider allowing more alcohol
related functions in the future.
We'll see what happens on the fourteenth."
Craig Farndon, Vanier residence
association president, said the
results are in on a survey of 650
Vanier residents.
"Forty-one per cent of the
residents approved housing's
regulations." Farndon said. "This
is a clear indication that students
want to study. 1 guess you could say
that the partiers are more vocal."
Farndon said the residence
association submitted compromising proposals to housing. "We're
working to find solutions that are
acceptable to both the students and
Housing." Farndon said.
I
VlHlr SSEY
Totem pole rises
Activists raised a totern pole at
UBC's museum of anthropology
Monday to bring attention to provincial government plans permitting
logging on Meares Island.
Supporters and onlookers hoisted
the twenty-five foot nude male
figure into place with muscles,
ropes and pullies.
Organizer Mike Mullins said he
and others organzied the totem raising and a protest outside the
legislature this weekend because
they hope to pressure the provincial
government into imposing a temporary moratorium on winter-
logging on Meares Island.
He said before logging begins he
and others "would like an outside
agency to conduct a proper cost-
benefit analysis into the impact of
logging on (local) tourism."
The Environment ministry and
MacMillan-Bloedel wants to log the
island located near Tofino on Vancouver Island, and agreed to proceed with Meares Island without
consulting the public, Mullins said,
agrees with Mullins.
"MacMillan-Bloedel pulled out
of the (public) planning team and
decided its own interests were better
served by lobbying the government
directly," Mullins said.
"They hired a Vancouver firm to
produce a slick audio-visual presentation and invited the forest service
for tea at the Empress Hotel in Victoria. It was there the mysterious
fourth option was born," said
Mullins.
He said the public made presentations to a planning team but the
government ignored the planning
team's three options, ranging from
total   preservation   to   a   roughly
Pat stays away
Universities minister Pat McGeer
has once again declined an invitation to speak at UBC.
McGeer was invited to attend a
public meeting sponsored by UBC's
Campus Community Alliance and
the Canadian Federation of
Students to take place on Wednesday, Oct. 25.
"We tried to get McGeer to attend," said CFS spokesperson Donna Morgan, "but, as usual, it looks
like he's afraid to make public appearances in the universities." The
minister could not be reached for
comment.
The "Education Day of Concern" will involve public events
throughout the province to draw attention to the deterioration of the
province's education system.
equal split between logging and
preservation.
"When the government decided
to give 90 per cent of the island to
MacMillan-Bloedel it did not even
listen to it's own public planning
teams," Mullins said.
Mullins said, "The whole public
planning process was to deflect
public pressure away from the
government in what was an election
year."
Rory Annet, forestry 3, who
helped lift the totem, said he
agreeswith Mullins.
"The goal of proper management
is supposed to be the optimization
of social benefits from a given
resource," Annet said. "In some
cases this means preservation."
He said the socreds do not place
enough emphasis on long term
planning and should be reforesting
and preserving out wilderness as
well as organizing its harvesting.
Clayoquot native carver Joe
David, who :arved the massive
pole, said the figure represents the
native's efforts to save their land
from exploitation. "I wish to portray the beauty and harmony between man and nature," David said.
— Charlie fidelman photo
CLAYOQUOT NATIVE CARVER Joe David carved a totem pole raised outside Museum of Anthropology
Monday. The 25 foot carving aims to bring attention to plans to log Meares Island. Covey of engineers observing
the spectacle mourned disappearance of the revered Volkswagen.
Soviets sincere about arms
By DAVE MAGOWAN
The bright spot in arms control
negotiations is the U.S.S.R.'s
sincere efforts and continuing
desire for progress in arms control,
political scientist Jane Sharp said
Friday.
Sharp told 200 students in
Buchanan 100 the current state of
superpower relations resembles the
cold war. "The 1980's are reminiscent of the '50's," she said. "There
has been a return to a war of propaganda."
Sharp said the blame for this lies
mostly on the shoulders of the U.S.
The Soviet Union is interested
mainly in its own security, she said.
They have a traditional fear of Germany, are apprehensive of the
Chinese on their southern border
and subsequently they require
sizeable conventional forces.
They are also adamant that the
— Charlie fidelman photo
U.S. not gain strategic superiority
over them, said Sharp. The current
increases in military spending in the
United States and the attitudes of
the U.S. administration, Sharp
said, are responsible for the Soviet's
unwillingness to negotiate now.
"The Soviets will not and have
not negotiated seriously when the
U.S. enjoyed ambiguous advantage
(in nuclear capability) and when
chances of nuclear war are high,"
said Sharp.
Sharp said the Soviet unwillingness to negotiate arms control
agreements in the past have been
due to continual American efforts
to achieve nuclear superiority.
When arms control negotiations
were successful in the 1970's it wa.s
because the Soviets achieved
strategic parity, said Sharp. "They
were able to negotiate
confortably."
Sharp said the U.S. must bring
steady purpose and direction to
their arms control priorities. "The
U.S. has been unreliable and incon
sistent as a nuclear power," she
said. "The Soviets are secretive and
stubborn, but consistent."
"The Reagan years have been
disastrous," she said.
Peace club seeks new stock for cyanide solution
By PATTI FLATHER
The Alma Mater Society will ask
Student Health Services to stock
cyanide for students who want it in
the event of a nuclear war, pending
student support of a new petition.
UBC Students for Peace and
Mutual Disarmament are circulating the petition calling for a
referendum on whether "students
will have the choice of a quick,
painless death rather than the slow,
inevitable death in a world
destroyed."
The AMS requires 500 signatures
from a group before they hold a
referendum. Ten per cent of
students must vote yes in the
referendum for a vote to pass.
SPMD member Mark Fettes said
the group wants the vote at the
same time as the mid-November
Canadian Federation of Students
membership vote.
"The intent is to make students
realize the gravity of the issue and
think of alternatives to cyanide
pills. Basically it's disarmament or
cyanide," said Fettes.
Brown University in Rhode
Island sponsored a similar referendum in which 95 per cent of
students voted and the vote passed,
Fettes said, adding the event made
headlines in the U.S. and Europe.
But Fettes said if the vote passes
it is not necessarily binding
because health services can refuse
the AMS request, as they did at
Brown. "The (Brown University)
health services said 'No way — are
you nuts?'," Fettes said.
The   petition    cites   a   recent
Massachussetts Institue of
Technology study estimating ai
least 14 million Canadians will be
killed outright in a nuclear exchange. The study added, "thr
deployment of a new generation A.
counter-force, war fighting, nuclear
weapons and the militarization r:
outer space increases the likelihoc.-
of nuclear war through accident c \
design."
The Swedish Royal Academy
Science, says the petition, estimate-
Vancouver is targeted by at lea.s:
three Soviet nuclear warheads. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 16, 1984
THE UBYSSEY
A ghost contest. The first line is "I
couldn't find my car in B-lot."
The contest is open to the entire university community except
Ubyssey staffers. Please submit 2,000 words or less, typed on a 70
space line at SUB 241k before Friday, Oct. 26 at 4 p.m.
ENTER A FREE MAN
by Tom Stoppard
Directed by Beth French
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GET INTO THE ACT
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To be presented with full song and dance interludes
Two casts needed — 12 Actors for the play plus
12 Singer-Dancers for the interludes
TIMES: THURSDAY, October 25
FRIDAY, October 26 5:00-9:00 pm
SATURDAY, October 27 10:00 am-4:00 pm
PLACE: Frederic Wood Theatre, Room 206
(OPEN TO ALL U.B.C. STUDENTS, FACULTY & STAFF)
[Arrange audition appointments in Room 207,
Frederic Wood Theatre or Phone 228-2678
NOTE: Singers please bring music with you
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GET INTO THE ACT
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BOOK OF TEN
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Loto excites
Tammy Mennie was exhilerated
when a 12:30 a.m. call Friday night
told her she had won Loto UBC.
Mennie, geology 4, said the
$1,450 she won from the Alma
Mater Society sponsored lottery will
help her a lot in the upcoming year.
"It will definitely help considering I
didn't work last summer," Mennie
said.
But she said she had not yet
celebrated her win because she was
saving the money to help her
through the coming school year.
Mennie said she bought two
tickets   and   she   was   surprised
Story false
A UBC student politician claimed
a Ubyssey article accusing the Alma
Mater Society of withholding student publications was "totally
false."
"The AMS did not withhold any
CFS publications this year," said
Nancy Bradshaw, AMS external affairs coordinator, Monday.
In the Oct. 19 article, Tami
Roberts, Canadian Federation of
Students Pacific chair, said hundreds of pamphlets delivered to the
AMS and publicizing CFS were not
made available to UBC students.
Bradshaw said The Ubyssey
should have obtained the AMS' version of the incident, adding the
story was "a straight editorial."
Bradshaw was not available for
comment Thursday when the story
was written.
Bradshaw said the AMS received
copies of B.C. Student, a CFS
newsletter, Aug. 15, after the summer session ended. Copies of B.C.
Student were distributed
throughout SUB until Aug. 31,
when the paper became outdated,
she said.
Roberts said she would not comment on either her charges or Brad-
shaw's rebuttal until she had a
chance to speak with Bradshaw.
students did not buy all the 10,000
tickets for the contest. "Maybe if
it's better advertised next year they
will sell more tickets," Mennie said.
Everyone has got a dollar's
change in their pockets, said Mennie.
Glenna Chestnutt, lottery
organizer and AMS director of administration, said the lottery was
successful although not even half
the project's 10,000 tickets were
sold.
Chestnutt said the lottery raised
public awareness of students
monetary needs and provided one
student with $1,450, as well as adding money to the new AMS bursary fund.
The lottery was not as successful
as it might have been because many
students did not attempt to sell their
tickets, she said.
She said students sold over 2,000
tickets and that faculty bought close
to 1,000 of those.
But she said universities minister
Pat McGeer, who was sent tickets
for sale, sent back a university card
with "No. Thank-you" written on
it in a corner. He also returned the
tickets.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 16, 1984
Shocking
The Peace Club at UBC has been circulating a petition which will
shock many.
And so it should.
The petition calls on the Alma Mater Society to ask Student
Health Services to stock enough cyanide capsules so every UBC
student has the option of committing suicide in the event of a
nuclear war.
This explicit support for suicide is shocking. Many people,
religious or otherwise, will find this position morally reprehensible.
But hopefully this petition will stir people beyond the initial revulsion to make connections and distinctions between personal
suicide and the threat of mass genocide.
In the former case, the individual makes the decision to take his
or her own life after a nuclear bomb has been dropped. The decision may not be wholly rational, but it's voluntary.
Nuclear holocaust, on the other hand, is either mass murder in
the event of war or a damn silly accident. The vast majority of people will have no say in a nuclear war or accident, just as they have
no say in the arms race, the Canadian government's decision to
test cruise missiles, or how chummy our new prime minister gets
with Ronny Ray-gun.
At least with suicide each person who survives a nuclear bomb
can have a small, inadequate say in his or her own destiny. Surely if
humans have regressed so far that a nuclear exchange occurs it is
not too much to allow people this small dignity amid the waste.
It is understandable that many people can never be reconciled to
this concept of organized suicide. But it is incomprehensible that
these same people who deny this right to suicide do not condemn
the increasing number of nuclear weapons and weapons systems
all over the world.
It is hypocritical to condemn a person's right to a painless, self-
determined death without condemning and working against the
danger of uncontrollable, mass extermination we all face. It is even
more ironic not to realize the parallel.
Letters
Most UBC students 'whiny' and * wimpy'
I took a break from studying this
weekend to jot down some personal
opinions on the financial cutbacks
UBC is facing, and I hope The
Ubyssey has the honesty to publish
First year
not hardest
Upon reading Peter McDo'igalPs
letter Oct. 10, we were awestruck by
the shallowness of his insight and
experience.
Speaking from the vantage point
of a first year student, he makes a
pitiful attempt to convince the
reader that first year science is, in
his words, "one of the heaviest
years on campus."
"Speaking from personal experience, these authors can'assure
Mr. McDougall that he doesn't
know his ass from a hole in the
ground. If Mr. McDougall is looking for an academic challenge based
on volume of work we suggest he
investigate first year law or
engineering.
On the other hand, if he wants to
give his brain some exercise, he
should take such second year
courses as Multi-Variable Calculus
for Engineers, or Honours Inorganic Chemistry.
If Mr. McDougall thinks, "It
also gets easier from here on in!"
then he is a sadly deluded man.
We leave the following comforting thought for Mr. McDougal:
"Don't   fret,   Peter,   Mommy's
never more than 25 cents away."
Michael J. L. Day
David M. Rawsthorne
civil engineering 4
these in their entirety as a sincere,
alternate viewpoint.
After reading the education issue
of the Ubyssey Oct. 19, I found
myself quite outraged. 1 was not,
however, outraged by the effects of
government cutbacks or the claims
of "declining educational quality"
here at UBC. Rather, I was outraged at the whining, selfishly wimpy
attitude of some (not all, 1 hope) of
my fellow students at UBC.
I was irate to be labelled, as a student, "apathetic" and "cautious",
and too "conservative" to "pick up
a pen in defense of the quest for
knowledge." This, I knew, was
pure journalistic trash, the type of
garbage we get from the hallowed
Sun and Province newspapers
regularly.
I will grant that funding cutbacks
have played havoc with previously
available educational services. Professor Paul Marantz cites his inability to assign many writing
assignments,    and   he   predicts
students will be less prepared as
critical thinkers. As well, overcrowding has caused problems in
many classes.
Yet it appears to me that a larger
problem faces UBC students. This
is the problem of some students' attitudes toward education. As an
idealistic, hopeful student I find it
shattering that some students at
UBC display so much animosity
toward the provincial government,
the very institution which made it so
inexpensive to study here in the first
place. It would appear that these
students believe the government is
trying to destroy the quality of
education in  B.C.  wholeheartedly
and for no other reason than the
sheer pleasure it derives from watching students squirm.
I feel assured that this is not the
case. The problem as I see it is a
typically Canadian one. Too many
of us expect a big fat slice of
something for nothing. If we don't
get it, we cry foul on the system we
elected.
I would pay twice my tuition to
study on this beautiful and rare
campus (as it appears I may have
to), as long as I am ensured a stable,
high quality education. As it is, I
pay half that, and don't complain
except I feel partly responsible for
the lack of funds.
However, I earn my own tuition
by dint of hard work (this summer
at just barely above minimum
wage), and I am not pretending I
am special — any student willing to
accept lower wages and to work
hard can still finance his/her UBC
education, despite tuition increases.
What I am saying is that educational quality will suffer only as
much as we students believe it will,
and therefore only as much as we
believe our newspapers (such as the
opinionated Ubyssey) which persist
in feeding us an outspoken, doom-
and-gloom picture.
John Kinahan
zoology 3
Politician claims CFS story false
I am continually amazed every
time I read The Ubyssey. I never
know where I am going to be misquoted or see my words placed
totally out of context.
Demons plague Ubyssey
Dr. Billy Graham's visit obviously did not benefit The Ubyssey.
Even after his "exorcism" of the
student masses, as you put it, The
Ubyssey is still plagued by all the
basic journalistic demons such as
inaccurate reporting, quoting out of
context and weird editorials.
Ironically, the editorial on Billy
Graham (Oct. 16, p. 4) had the tone
of an Ernest Angeley crusade gone
bad, suspecting evil spirits
everywhere. In an alarming display
of paranoia, the editorial equated
"heart   warming   accents"    and
"warm welcomes" with the covert
activity of a fiery evil empire.
Of course we realize the difficulties of part-time journalists.
The pressures of mid-terms affect
the ability to hear and see well.
Nevertheless, let us hope that The
Ubyssey staff will take time to
meditate on these mistakes and turn
from phobias of this nature to a
more mundane and sensible journalism.
Jeff Howard
registrar's office
THE UBYSSEY
October 23, 1984
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout the academic year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are
those of the staff and are not necessarily those of the university administration or the
AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB
241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
"Oooooh . . , cynaide is soooo boring . . . i mean it went out when Agatha Christie died, at the laaaatest," groaned Denise Coutts and Dave Stoddart in their
best Board of Governors drawt. Charlie Fidelman wasn't sure - she wanted to see what other Kinds of poisons there are before signing the petition Rick Klein and
Yaku said they'd only kill themselves as martyrs for some environmentally sound cause. Monte Stewart said he'd prefer to die of a concussion caused by being in
the path of a really big football player, but Chris Goldrick argued a hockey stick is the only way to go Rory Allen's dream is to have a Nikon F-3 dropped on his head
from four storeys above. Patti Flather said being the victim of a staff revolution would be interesting. Victor Wong and Robert Beynon said they'd have nothing to
do with suicide because life is valuable and shouldn't be trivialized. A
The last Ubyssey story with the title "AMS Witholds CFS Publications" was downright false (Oct.
19, p. 17).
The article is not classified as an
editorial yet it only provides one
point of view. I looked around for
the "30 pounds of information"
that had not been circulated, and of
course, I did not find anything except some leftover B.C. Student
Magazines (The Canadian Federation of Students Regional
Newspaper). I did not receive this
Summer Survival Guide of the B.C.
Student until Aug. 15.
Although the UBC summer session was over, I did put stacks down
on SUB Concourse for students
who were visiting the campus, and
our Alma Mater Society Job Link
office was always supplied with
them. There was no possible way to
distribute all three boxes of this
Summer Survival Guide in the last
two weeks of summer with relatively few students on campus.
It would have been useless to
distribute a Summer Survival Guide
to UBC students in the fall, so I
kept them for examples of CFS
material. It was very poor journalism to print a completely false
article.
Also, 1 would like to clear up
some of the misunderstanding
regarding the CFS referendum, as I
am continually  misquoted  in  The
Ubyssey.
During the beginning of summer,
AMS student council decided they
would suspend debate on CFS until
the winter session. It seemed to be
the consensus in September that information circulated on CFS to
UBC students wold simply add to
registration confusion, therefore it
would be left until October.
Nobody, including student council members, CFS representatives,
and UBC students, disagreed or
suggested alternatives.
I prepared an Information Page.
After permission is granted from
housing, it will be distributed in
residents' mail boxes, in Sedgewick
and on SUB Concoruse. Speakeasy
has agreed to distribute the CFS
Members Handbook for a more
detailed description of the federation.
Finally, my comment "CFS is
not a black or white issue" was
taken totally out of context. I was
trying to emphasize to council that
to facilitate serious discussions we
should try and be more open minded. Obviously, whether an individual wants to join CFS is either
yes or no, and I certainly was not
trying to suggest otherwise.
Nancy Bradshaw
Alma Mater Society external
affairs officer Tuesday, October 16, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Taidu dissidents survive despite challenges
I was totally disgusted when I
read Cindy Yen's letter to the editor
(Oct. 16) in response to Robby
Robertson's article on Taidu, the
Taiwanese independence movement
(Oct. 5). She not only deleted some
very important facts to make her
letter look good, but also failed to
provide her credentials over the
Taiwanese issue. Some of the points
she made are misleading. I would
like to clarify them and in turn
show how ugly the Kuomintang
really is.
First, she inferred the Taidu
movement is not worth supporting
from the fact that Robertson could
not meet any admitting Taidu supporters in Taiwan. There is a very
simple explanation. Taidu supporters are branded as dissidents
Rag 'masochistic'
Perhaps The Ubyssey is reflecting
the despair of our times. What else
can explain the masochistic glee
with which your recent article
("Student Inactivism," Oct. 19,
p.20) bemoaned campus apathy?
Of course students are apathetic.
So why repeat the obvious ad
nauseum? Progressive journalism
should not wallow in the obvious,
but probe beneath the surface for
some alternatives. Many of us know
already that we aren't going to
mobilize the majority of UBC
students; what do you have to say
to the concerned and active minori-
ty?
How can we work together and
be more effective? The Ubyssey gives
that minority no hope or positive
direction, only depressing
platitudes.
In dark times like these, we have
to be setting examples for people
with positive thoughts and actions.
That's the only way to encourage
the majority to become politically
active. Let's quit wallowing in
pessimism, which is itself a kind of
apathy.
Kevin Annett
graduate studies
HAIR
CORKY'S
STYLING
APPOINTMENT SERVICE
731-4191
3644 West 4th Avenue
At Alma
and are put in prison. And since
there are so many undercover police
working for the KMT on the
lookout for Taidu supporters, who
in their right mind would admit to a
stranger that they are Taidu supporters, even if they are?
Second, she questioned Robertson's credentials over the Taiwan
issue, citing that he had only worked
in Taiwan for two summers. But
one can learn a lot in two summers.
I found his article on Taidu to be
concise and truthful, whereas I
found Yen's letter illogical, immature and ill-informed.
For example, Yen left out some
facts when she commented on the
picture with the three children. She
said "the three pre-school children
will soon go to school and become
fluent bilinguals, speaking both
Mandarin and the Taiwanese
dialect." But she never mentioned
the children who are taught Mandarin at school are prohibited from
speaking the Taiwanese dialect.
Why didn't she say the Taiwanese
programs on television were banned
and only returned with the dialogue
changed to Mandarin? Isn't this a
systematic way of eradicating
Taiwanese language and culture? I
doubt   Yen's  credentials  over the
Taiwanese issue. Can Yen name
some of the banned political
publications in Taiwan? Does Yen
know of the banned political
magazine called Formosa?
Third, her statement on the
freedom of public speech makes me
laugh. "KMTs and non-partisans
alike are free to make public speech
at prearranged time and places."
How can she use the word free
when one has to arrange with the
police and government officials the
time and place to speak? How can
she say the non-partisans are free to
speak when they have to be careful
of what they say because every
word will be recorded by secret
police in the audience?
The human rights organizers in
Kaoshiung did arranged a time and
place with the KMT to air their opinions, only to be surrounded by riot
police who confronted the crowd
with water cannons!
Robertson was right when he
wrote "being heard is a challenge
for Taiwan's dissidents," because
they are either under house arrest or
surveillance. Furthermore, their
books and publications are banned.
To make matters worse, of the 18
million people in Taiwan, the majority are Taiwanese, and yet the
Punchlines
Wednesday October 24
SUB AUDITORIUM
12:30 p.m.
ENTER THE
STUDENT CONTEST
& WIN $$$$
"THIS WEEK AT HILLEL"
Tues. Oct. 23
Snack Bar Open 12:30 p.m.
Wed. Oct. 24
Hot Home-cooked Lunch 12:30 p.m.
Thurs. Oct. 25
2nd Session of THE ISRAELI POLITICAL
SYSTEM series with Dr. Shmuel Sandler
12:30 p.m.
Snack Bar open
Class on Basic Jewish Beliefs and Practices
begins,  meeting on Alternate Thursdays at
1053   Douglas   Crescent   -   8:00-9:30   p.m.
PHONE 224-4748 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION
Mandarin minority holds the majority of government seats.
Fourth, Yen denied the fact that
the KMT is unfit and villainous.
The KMT is unfit to rule anyone,
even itself (an army defeated by the
communists). Does she know that
parliamentary seats are handed
down in the Mandarin section and
there are still senile senior Mandarin
MPs (70 to 90 years old) who have
to be carried in on stretchers to
vote? Does she know they were not
required to sit in on the discussion
of bills, and only had to come out
to vote according to what KMT
members told them? Does she
remember several incidents where
KMT members paid people 10 vote
for them during elections?
Yes, we would relinquish 5,000
years  of ancestry to remove the
KMT. What is 5,000 years of
ancestry when Taiwanese have no
say in their own political affairs on
Taiwan?
Yen stated that Taidu is on the
road to distinction. I am happy to
say she is wrong. There is a Taidu
organization right here in Vancouver. There are Taidu organizations in Canada, the United States,
Japan, Europe and underground in
Taiwan. The will to fight for an independent Taiwan did not die with
the Kaoshiung incident. We the
Taiwanese will fight till the KMT is
overthrown.
The author of this letter requested anonymity because the
author said relatives in Taiwan
would be in danger of political
persecution.
'"■■" ■■««M»»««»»»»«»« I1111111HW
THE ANNUAL
AMS - EUS
HALLOWEEN DANCE
Featuring
GILT
FROM MONTREAL
OCT. 26th & 27th
The ARMORIES
Door 8 p.m.
$5 ADVANCE from AMS Box Office
pr EUS Rep
Enter The Costume Contest $150 1st each niteE
$100 2nd each nite !
$50 3rd each nite    j
1111 f fin 1111111 n r >rn inf r»i >>
JOE |
The Annual Rehab. Wheelchair Challenge
3 men, 3 women teams test their skills through an
obstacle course in a wheelchair.
THURSDAY, NOV. 8, 12:30
SUB PLAZA
Register your team today. WMG Rm. 203
Registration ends Nov. 1, 3 p.m.
$10 team fee goes to the
Wheelchair Sports of B.C. Society
SPEAKEASY
IS A PEER
COUNSELLING
CENTER
STAFFED BY EMPATHETIC
PEOPLE WHO ARE WILLING
TO LISTEN AND
OFFER SUPPORT
Mon - Fri: 9:30 AM to 7:30 PM
Sub Concourse
DROP IN OR PHONK: 228-3700
- ATTENTION FOOD LOVERS -
In January, 1985, the new SUB expansion will officially open. The new addition will include
club space, a student typing center and two new food outlets, a restaurant and a snack bar.
The AMS wants you to name the restaurant and snack bar! The winner will receive a $50 gift
certificate for a dinner for two at the 9th Ave. Grill.
Drop entry forms off at the Pit or the Gallery Lounge.
NAME
PHONE NO STUDENT NO.
RESTAURANT NAME.
      I
  I
>f 1111111111» 11111 Wtf H 111111 tl   U—Z--~----——--- — — J
SNACK BAR NAME Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 16, 1984
w^diz&r
TUESDAY
AMS ART GALLERY COMMITTEE
Meeting, noon. SUB 260.
AMS ART GALLERY
Show of sculptures and works on paper by Jean
Kempinsky, all week, SUB art gallery.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration, noon, SUS 216e.
PRE-MEDICAL SOCIETY
Opthalmology lecture, noon, Woodward 1.
UNDERCOVER UBC
Pick   up   photo  assignment,   noon,   SUB   concourse.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Weekly testimony meeting, all welcome, noon,
SUB 213.
CHINESE VARIETY CLUB
Aerobic class, 4:30-5:30 p.m., SUB 205-209.
OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS
Open  sharing  meeting,   newcomers welcome,
noon,    Lutheran    Campus    centre    conference
room.
INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR
STUDENTS OF ECONOMICS AND COMMERCE
Selling  Canada  Savings  Bonds,  all  day    SUB
230e.
JEWISH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION/HILLEL
Snack Bar Open, noon, Hillel House.
WEDNESDAY
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF CANADA
I. Brown, resident United Nations high commissioner, speaks on "The International Politics of
Refugee Resettlement." noon, BUCH A104
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration, noon, SUB 216e
UNDERCOVER UBC
Pick  up  photo  assignments,   noon,   SUB   concourse.
UBC ANARCHIST CLUB
Literature table and logistics meeting, 10:30-2:30
p.m., SUB.
CAMPUS COMMUNITY ALLIANCE
Public Meeting: the future of education, noon,
SUB 200.
VANCOUVER ADVENTURE AND TRAVEL
CLUB (UBC>
Slide presentation on African safaris, noon, SUS
205
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Lounge   meeting,   4:30   p.m.,   Gallery   Lounge,
SUB
LATIN AMERICAN SUPPORT COMMITTEE
Information  Table,   11:30-2:00 p.m.,  SUB  con
course.
INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR
STUDENTS OF ECONOMICS AND COMMERCE
Selling Canada Savings Bonds, 11:30-1:30 p.m.,
SUB concourse.
JEWISH STUDENTS ASSOCIATION/HILLEL
Hot home-cooked lunch, Hillel house.
NDPCLUB
Events   committee,   noon,   all   welcome,   SUB
230c.
THURSDAY
UBC ANARCHIST CLUB
Film    showing    of    Jean    Vigo's    "Zero    de
Conduite", noon, BUCH B216.
ENVIRONMENTAL INTEREST GROUP
Speaker   on   Lower   Mainland   Water   Control,
noon, Geography 212.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Paula  Ross  Dance  Company,   free admission,
noon, SUB auditorium.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Home   group   fellowship   meeting,    7:00   p.m.,
phone 228-8554 for location.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Weekly meeting, noon, Brock hall 302.
UBC AMATEUR RADIO SOCIETY
General meeting, open to all, noon, Brock extension 358.
APOLOGETICS OF CHRISTIAN THOUGHT IN
SCRIPTURE
Discussion:   Christian   Evidences,   noon,   Scarfe
204.
UNDERCOVER UBC
Pick up photo assignments today, noon, SUB
main concourse.
AMS CYCLING CLUB
General meeting, noon, Hennings 302.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversation and slide show, 1:30 p.m., International House.
HISTORY STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
History   professors   discuss    "Writing    History
Papers:   Mission   Impossible?",   4  p.m.,   Buch
penthouse.
STUDENTS FOR A DEMOCRATIC UNIVERISTY
Public meeting — questionnaire results — where
to from here, noon, Buch A 204.
ANTHROPOLOCY/SOCIOLOGY
UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Halloween Bzzr Garden and free film. Oct. 25,
5:30-9:00 p.m., Anso 207-209.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Guest   speaker   Don   Larventz   on   recent   day
literature, noon, SUB 215.
INTRAMURALS VOLLEYBALL
Tournament/Bzzr Garden, Halloween theme,
7:30-11:00 p.m, combined. War Memorial gym
and foyer.
INTRAMURALS
Horseback riding — registration ends 3 p.m. today for riding on Oct. 27, War Memorial gym
203.
INTRAMURALS
Rehabilitation Wheelchair challenge registration,
War Memorial gym 203.
INTERNATIONAL      ASSOCIATION      FOR
STUDENTS OF ECONOMICS AND COMMERCE
Selling Canada Savings Bonds, all day, SUB
230E.
JEWISH STUDENTS' NETWORK
Second session of "The Israeli Political system"
series with Dr. Shmuel Sandler, noon, Hillel
House.
PHOTOGRAPHIC SOCIETY
Social evening, 7:30 p.m., SUB 205.
*»
$*•
HOTEL,
VANCOUVER B.C.
Good to October 31,1984
Present your student card for this special offer.
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LSAT
Preparation
Training
18 HOUR
WEEKEND
COURSE
(Sexton m
Educational Centers Y
<I4-1200 Burrard Si
Vancouver. 8 C
V8Z2C7
(604)664-4411
KenDryden
Best-Selling Author of THE GAME & Former
Montreal Canadiens Hockey Player will be at the
UBC Bookstore Friday, October 26th, from
12:30-1:30 p.m. To sign copies of THE GAME in
paperback.
Reserve your copy now. $4.50 each
BOOKSTORE
228-4741
Isn't it about time we joined with students across the country to strengthen our national voice for
education? Find out about the Canadian Federation of Students referendum at U.B.C.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
I RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.50 additional lines, .70c. Additional days, $4.00 and .65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the
day before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $10.00. Call 228-3977.
11
FOR SALE - Private
WANTED TO BUY!! Old records: scratched
or unscratched. Call Al before 9 a.m. or
Sat. all day 228-0995.
MOTORCYCLE: 1971 BMW R50/5. Ex. cond
New muffler, new batten,-. $1000. 681-0161
days, 738-1217 eves.
FIRM 21 PRESENTS PRODUCT 3. Be the
1st in your neighbourhood to have this product. Each unit is only $23. To order now,
call 228-6953. Limited supply available.
15 - FOUND
FOUND  at  Arts'  20.   Watch.   Call  Wayne
929-5202 aft. 7 p.m.
RING   FOUND   in   chemistry  dept.   Phone
Diana at 228-2786 to identify.
20 - HOUSING
FOR RENT: Bach, basement suite, on King
Edward bus route. Ph. Penny or George at
874-2891 aft. 5 p.m.
WANTED: M/F to share 2 br. apt. at 12 &
Clark $200/mo. & Vi util & food. Avail Nov.
1 Call Shannon 879-5464.
RM-MATE WANTED to share 2-bdrm apt
on 10th Ave. 1 block from gates. Avail, im-
med. (19-221 preferred. Call 224-6688.
25 - INSTRUCTION
LSAT, GMAT. MCAT preparation. Call
National Testing 738-4618. Please leave
message on tape if manager is counselling.
LSAT/GMAT preparation courses, coming
to Vancouver. For info call 1-800-387-3747
LEARN TO BOX
come out & visit us
At The Point Grey
Boxing Club
Mon. 5:30-7:30
Wed. 7:30-9:30
Room 203 Armouries
40 - MESSAGES
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE 1984 FALL
PLEDGE CLASS OF KAPPA SIGMA.
FROM YOUR ACTIVE BROTHERS.
NEVER HAVE THE STAR AND CRESCENT SHONE SO BRIGHTLY.
SPROUT
DOES ANYONE HAVE a video cassette
of "Hiroshima Mon Amour" or "Last Year
at Marienbad"? Please phone Drew at
738-8315 or 266-2433. Thank you.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY STEVE! Hope you enjoyed the party to the fullest. Have a great
B-day doing whatever you want.
FIND A TUTOR
BE A TUTOR
Register at
SPEAKEASY
Mon.-Fri.
9:30am-9:30 pm
SUB concourse
(Phone 228-3777)
70 - SERVICES
MODE COLLEGE of Hairdressing & Barber-
ing. For students with ID, body wave from
$17. 601 West Broadway (B'way Plaza)
874-0633
BOOKKEEPING & TAX SERVICE. Expert
& personal attention - individual, sole proprietor & corp. Reasonable. We service
your account at your location or at our office. 434-9185.
80 - TUTORING
NEED HELP with English or a review of
high school math? Experienced tutor
available 733-3135.
ENGLISH   AS  A   SECOND   LANGUAGE
SPECIALISTS.   Whatever   you   need   -
grammar, composition, pronunciation,
conversation, vocabulary — we can help.
Call us for individual and group rates.
731 1252.
85 - TYPING
TYPING  — Fast, accurate, reasonable rates
734-8451
WORD PROCESSING $1,50/PG IDS)
CRWR major Winona Kent 438-6449
located in south Burnaby.
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers,
factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses, IBM Selectric II, reasonable rates.
Rose 731-9857.
WORD   PROCESSING   SPECIALIST.   All
jobs,  year around student rates, on King
Edward route. 879-5108.
WORD WEAVERS - word processing.
Student rates, fast turnaround, bilingual
5670 Yew St. at 41st 266-6814.
YOUR WORDS PROFESSIONALLY
TYPED - TO GO. Judith Filtness, 3206
W. 38th Ave., Van. 263-0351 (24 hrs.). Fast
and reliable.
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST.    U
write, we type theses, resumes, letters,
essays. Days, evenings, weekends.
736-1208.
WORD PROCESSING (Micom). Student
rates $14/hr. Equation typing avail, ph
Jeeva 876-5333.
WORD PROCESSING 90c/pg. Dot matrix
$1/pg Daisywheel. Mon-Fri. Pick-up on
campus.  Spelling correction. Call 433-0167.
TYPING WITH EXPERTISE. 1.25/pg ds
Prof, quality: university exper. with
resumes, essays, term papers. Joan
299-4986 in Kitsilano.
MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED. Typing
essays &■ resumes. Spelling corrected
733-3676.
TYPING SERVICES. Experienced typist.
Reasonable rates. Call Mary Lou at
421-0818 (near Lougheed Mall).
TYPING: Essays, theses, term papers,
mscps. Reasonable rates. Call 876-2895:
872-3703
ABOVE AVERAGE TYPIST. For accurate
professional results call Audrey, 228-0378.
W/P & TYPING: Term papers, theses,
mscpt., essays, incl. reports, letters,
resumes. Bilingual. Clemy: 266-6641.
WORD PROCESSING. Reports, essays,
resumes, etc. For professional results at
very competitive rates call 266-2536.
EXCELLENT TYPING English, French,
German, Italian; editing English. Verses for
special occasions cards. UBC references.
Good rates. 734-1081.
October Special
10% Discount
Double Spacing
Reg. $1/pg, NOW 90c/pg.
Single Spacing
Reg. $1.80/pg., NOW$1.60/pg
Fast, Accurate Typing
Competitive Rates
CALL 734-8561
eves, or weekends
WORDPOWER
3737 W. 10th (at Alma)
PROFESSIONAL
•Editing
"Proofreading
AND
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ALL
At a Word Processing
hourly ratel
15% Student Discount
All types of written material accepted.
SUPPORT SERVICES INCLUDE:
"Xerox photocopying
"Binding (Unibind)
"Printing
"Translation & Tutoring
222-2661 Tuesday, October 16,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Officials restrict liquor
ST. JOHN'S, Nfld. (CUP) —
Fed up with complaints about late-
night parties and smuggling of beer
into residences, housing officials at
Memorial University are making
every effort to restrict the flow of
alcohol on campus.
In a letter to Newfoundland's
breweries Carson Leonard,
Memorial's manager of liquor services, says all liqour transactions
must now be handled through his
office and all deliveries of beer into
residences must immediately cease.
Leonard told the general
managers of Labatt's, Molson and
Carling-O'Keefe and the secretary-
treasurer of Newfoundland's
Brewery Association he was aware
that the breweries and students were
breaking liquor laws governing
bootlegging. He said students were
smuggling beer into residences at all
hours of the night, including Sundays and holidays.
Brian Johnson, student housing
and food services director, said all
social activities in residence involving liquor must now end at 1 a.m.
and lobby parties can only be held
from Thursday to Saturday. Any
violation of the new housing regulations means residences will not be
able to hold any social events at all.
"The university in general, and
this office in particular, have
become concerned about the misuse
and abuse of alcohol in residence,"
Johnson said in a letter to all
students in residence.
But the new regulations have
made student leaders uneasy. At a
recent meeting, student council
members expressed concern about
the impact the new regulations
would have on students' recreation.
Danny Crummell, Memorial student vice-president executive, said
he thinks students will not be able
Ooops
Alma Mater Society president
Margaret Copping did not say
"Usually it's just 25 people bullshitting," as reported in The Ubyssey
(Student Inactivism, Oct. 19). And
she did not say discussion at
Wednesday's council meeting was
excellent or she had no position on
joining the Canadian Federation of
Students (AMS affirms CFS, Oct.
19).
The Sept. 28 Ubyssey quoted
Maclean's magazine which said
university minister Pat McGeer
authorized UBC to buy grass tennis
courts. However, Maclean's later
printed a retraction of these
statements. The Ubyssey must too
therefore. The story "Minister
spends $80,000 on grass" was not
accurate.
to enjoy themselves as much outside
academic life. He added that housing officials were not willing to listen
to the students' side of the story.
Council later passed a motion
urging housing officials to review
their policy on bar licences in
residence and consider the possibility of allowing Wednesday night
social events in residence to continue.
STUDENT DISCOUNTS AND
SAME DAY SERVICE
SAVE 20% &
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AT THE.
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STUDENT I.D. CARD-
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 EYE LAB	
Mon.-Fri. 8:30-5:00
2nd & Burrard
(1742 w. 2nd Ave.)
731-9112
JEWISH STUDENTS' NETWORK
ANNUAL CONVENTION
November 1-4, 1984
Chateau Granville, Vancouver, B.C.
• an opportunity to meet, learn about and interact with
Jewish students and young adults representing the entire
spectrum of Jewish identification from across Western
Canada.
• An educational experience featuring sessions and
workshops on a wide range of topics, including Zionism,
threatened Jewish communities, media analysis, parties
and much more.
"If you will it, it is no dream'
m;us n r**
For  further  information  and registration call  network  or
Hillel House at 224-2512.
kJOUTH AMtRICAN JEWISH STUDENTS' NETWORK
t^
HALLOA
For zany wigs, masks
clown costumes and
the best masquerade
make-up come and see
Tfee
Daisce Shop"
DANCE, EXERCISE & FASHION
We have moved to
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Vancouver B.C.
733-6116
554 W. GEORGIA
Watch for the
opening of
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on Granville
Island!
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(With this ad student I.D. required)
□ All our frames & lenses, including
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Designer Classes at Discount Prices
No other discounts apply, expires Sat., Nov. 3/84
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Costume
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TICKETS — $4 in advance, $5 at door
-Available at the Grad Centre 228-3202
or AMS Box Office 228-2711
I
LESAX LQN
3673 W. 4th Ave.
International Hair Fashions
Nov. & Dec: Special Offer
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Call 732-7671 for
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x^mmWmmmmam^tm^mWm^mm Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 16, 1984
Vikettes steal championship at UBC
Bv DENISE COUTTS ■ ■
By DENISE COUTTS
Two hundred spectators saw an
exciting afternoon of field hockey
Sunday.
The UBC women's team tied the
University of Victoria 1-1 in a
challenge for first place in Canada
West Conference play. The game
was the final one before the Canadian Interuniversity Athletic Union
championships.
Going into the tournament UBC
needed to win all remaining games
to edge Victoria out of first place
and unfortunately came up short
due to the tie.
On Saturday, UBC easily
defeated both the University of
Calgary and the University of
Alberta with matching 4-0 scores.
Sunday morning UBC destroyed
the University of Manitoba team
6-0. Less than two hours later, UBC
and UVic faced off for the game
everyone had been waiting for.
UBC's Lisa Lindell capitalized on
a well executed crossing play from
Jody Blaxland that let to a 1-0
lead early in the first half. But UVic
responded with a goal by Ann
Evamy late in the half to tie the
game, spoiling UBC goalie Alison
Hoens' tournament-long shutout.
UVic placed first and UBC second in the final, league standings.
UBC coach Gail Wilson said she
was extremely pleased with her
team throughout the tournament
but was especially proud of their
performance against Victoria. She
said her young Thunderbird squad
is showing signs of maturity, adding
she is confident they will be ready
^JBim   -   -     JtEP-  i
-rory a. photo
DI POPOWICH FIRES ball just wide of UVic goal. UBC tied UVic 1-1 in Canada West tournament final.
Soccer 'Birds ready for title
By MONTE STEWART
Looking over the statistics for the
UBC men's soccer team, one would
notice a big fat zero where it is
needed most — in the nets.
The T-Birds have had an average
year offensively but the club's
defensive play has been excellent.
The 'Birds swept a pair of road
games last weekend, moving within
one game of a Canada West championship.
The 'Birds extinguished the
Pronghorms 3-1 in Lethbridge
Saturday. Friday, the 'Birds narrowly defeated the University of
Calgary Dinosaurs 1-0 in the
foothills city.
While the strong offensive performance of Rob Shelley paced
the club to a 6-1 record, the defense
has gone virtually unnoticed. Such
players as Murray Mollard, Mike
Hockey evens out
The UBC Thunderbirds hockey
team entered a two game series in
Edmonton last weekend sporting an
unblemished record but dropped
two games by identical 8-4 scores to
return home with an even 2-2
record.
In the first game Saturday the
Birds stayed close, being down 3-2
and 4-3 at the period breaks, but
were knocked out by four third
period goals. The Golden Bears
were aided by a two goal effort
from Breen Neeser as well as several
penalties handed out to the Birds in
the final period.
The second game was also close
— UBC was behind only 4-3 at the
end of the second period. But the
Birds were again shot down by four
third period goals.
The final period was marked by a
fight at the eight minute mark.
Players from both teams were ejected
Although the Birds were defeated
convincingly in both games Coach
Fred Masuch said he does not feel
the Birds were outclassed. But he
added UBC must tighten up their
checking in their own end as well as
play more aggressively in the opponents zone. The Birds will host
the Golden Bears Nov. 23 and 24.
And they meet the Lethbridge Pronghorns in Lethbridge this
weekend.
Malana, and El Ladha have been
tricky playmakers while stopping
goals. However, goalkeepers Brian
Kennedy and Bun Pavan have been
the most inconspicuous 'T-Birds
this season.
Kennedy was in the nets for both
games last weekend, improving his
goals against average to less than
0.40.
Kennedy had an easy time
Saturday, thwarting the few threats
the Pronghorns managed. Friday he turned in a stellar performance against the team many
regarded as the "sleeper" club
this season.
The 'Birds can wrap up the
Canada West title this weekend
with a victory either Friday or
Saturday at home.
The Thunderbirds lead the
University of Victoria Vikings —
the defending conference champions by two points with only two
games remaining for both teams.
The club has never won a Canada
West   title   since   the   league   was.
formed eight years ago.
If the 'Birds win this weekend,
they will advance to the national
championships following the completion of the regular season. This
year's finals will be held in Quebec.
WHERE CORPORATIONS BUY SOFTWARE
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Software
438-2142
AMEX
VISA
MC
accept University PO's.
HORSEBACK RIDING
SATURDAY, OCT. 24
m
A
:*.-j
BEAT THE MIDTERM BLUES
Go for crisp autumn trot along the trails of BUHTZEN LAKE.
$25 includes 2 hrs. of riding & transportation to and from UBC
Register by Thurs. Oct. 25 3 p.m. WMG Rm 203
for the CIAU Championships in
two weeks. But the team must work
hard to defeat the competition from
such eastern Canadian universities
as Toronto and St. Mary's.
In an awards presentation after
the final game, four UBC players
received all-star recognition including Heather Benson, Joni
Franks. Carrie Lockwood and
Diane "Pop" Popowieh. In addition to the Canada West Ail-Star
Awards, UBC's coach Gail Wilson
was named Coach-of-the-Year.
Season over
By MONTE STEWART
Frustration.
That's the best way to describe
the Thunderbirds' 1984 Western Intercollegiate Football League
season. The T-Birds won their first
road game of the year last Saturday
but the convincing 33-10 victory
over the hapless Manitoba Bisons
proved meaningless in the end.
For the first time since 1980, the
'Birds have missed the play-offs —
even before the end of the regular
season. The Alberta Golden Bears'
surprise triumph over the Calgary
Dinosaurs on Saturday sealed the
'Birds' fate as also-rans.
Ironically, everything came
together for the T-birds as they
thrashed the winless Bisons. Glenn
Steels, quarterback Jordan Gagner,
and linebacker George Petrovas
scored touchdowns in the final four
minutes of play while Terry
Cochrane, on a third quarter major, and Tom Dixon, on two field
goals and three converts, scored the
remaining UBC points.
After going through training
camp as if no obstacle could be too
formidable, the 'Birds struggled
through their first seven games.
Serious knee injuries to receivers
Bruce Rainier and Bob Skemp, offensive lineman George Piva, and
defensive back Mark Norman proved too detrimental to a team many
considered to be on the way to a national championship this season.
The frustration began for head
coach Frank Smith during training
camp.    Mike   Miller,   a   back-up
defensive back last year, was having
an outstanding training camp. Two
days before the start of the season,
Miller suddenly quit the team and
left a big gap on special teams. The
next day Larry Wilson — who
would have been entering his first
season as linebacker coach — also
packed it in.
Following the 'Birds' first game
in Saskatoon Sept. 1, team equipment manager Hughey MacKinnon
left the team to take a counselling
position at a high school in Golden.
Although MacKinnon's departure was expected, nobody replaced
him as the team's goodwill ambassador. In (he past, players could
go to MacKinnon if they were having problems.
Smith, who led the 'Birds to a national title in 1982, has been tight-
lipped all season, refusing to talk to
campus reporters or any representatives of the city's major television
and radio stations.
With only one regular season
game remaining Friday against
Alberta at Thunderbird Stadium
the 'Birds' trail the second place
Golden Bears by four points. Alberta stunned the Dinosaurs 31-22 in
Calgary on Saturday, handing the
defending Vanier Cup champions
their first loss since a 22-16 setback
here last year.
Revenge will be the only motive
for the T-Birds this weekend. The
Bears managed to defeat UBC 8-3
three weeks ago in Edmonton.
CITR will broadcast this Friday's
game live, starting at 7:15 p.m.
THE
THUNDERBIRD
SHOP
HALLOWE'EN
PARTYING!
Monsters
Ghouls
Bums
Devils              Babies
Dim*
Bunnies       Bumble Bees
rigs
™      Masks
Wigs              Body Paint
Make-up          r^
Teeth
ft
! Spray Paint  A^         W
•*   *
SEE US
Lower Level             Hours: Mon.-Fri.        Telephone: 224-1911
Student Union        8:00 a.m.-7:00 p.m.     Visa & Mastercharge
Building, U.B.C.    Sat. 10 a.m.-5:00 p.m.            Accepted

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