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The Ubyssey Oct 18, 1983

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Array UBC Archive;
Socred delegates sneer at rally
By MURIEL DRAAISMA
They raised their arms mockingly
in a fascist salute. They shouted
"Sieg Heil" to smug Social Credit
convention   delegates   peering   at
them from the windows above.
They chanted, sang, marched and
even sat in the streets Saturday,
demonstrating their anger to a
government refusing to listen.
And their shouts of "Socreds
Out" and "Fight, Fight, Prepare to
General Strike" only elicited sneers
and laughter from the card carrying
Socreds attending last weekend's
annual convention at Hotel Vancouver.
One self professed free enterpriser standing in the Socred ranks
shook his fist at the demonstrators
streaming by. "These people axe a
small minority of pinko academics,
communists and rabble rousers,"
said Ernie F. Allistone, a retired
notary public realtor.
"They got the right color for
their flag, haven't they?" he said,
referring to the bright red Solidarity
flags waved by some of the protesters.
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVI, No. 11
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday,October 18,1983   ® sjjpgl^ 48        228-2301
ANGRY PROTESTER questions Social Credit delegates at their party convention held on the weekend at the
Hotel Vancouver. An enthusiastic group turned out to demonstrate outside the hotel, chanting and marching
against the recent Socred budget and legislation with media representatives out in full force.
McGeer may force tuition hike
By MURIEL DRAAISMA
The provincial government may
force universities to raise tuition
fees if they don't do so themselves,
B.C.'s universities minister said
Saturday.
"In the event that the universities
are indifferent to requests made by
taxpayers and the party, we'll have
to seriously consider giving
ourselves the legislative authority to
set fees," Pat McGeer told 200
Social Credit convention delegates
during a special "meet the cabinet"
session at the Hotel Vancouver.
But the government is
"reluctant" to give itself that power
because it would infringe upon
universities' autonomy, McGeer
said. He added the universities
ideally should set fees themselves.
Universities must seek different
means of income because the
government will not provide any
more funding, McGeer said. He added he is "personally convinced"
that operating grants to universities
will not increase next year.
"Indeed, there may be less
money."
Universities also have the option
of decreasing their operating costs,
he told a swarm of reporters after
the session.
"We've given the universities as
much as we can."
B.C. is the only province to impose a freeze in university funding
despite an eight per cent increase in
federal funding for post-secondary
eduction announced in March. The
provincial government  is  not  re
quired by law to pass on the full
federal contribution.
One Social Credit delegate, a
university professor, recommended
to McGeer that fees be raised to
cover 20 per cent of the $8,000 per
capita operating budget.
"I think our students shoui.d be
willing to pay a quarter of every
dollar we put up. And that's all I
ask. Bring it to 20 per cent for the
institutions and universities and
help us maintain high quality
without putting our hands out to
the taxpayers.
"When I was a student back in
1936 at UBC, we were paying
something like 15 per cent. It's
below that now," he said.
"Half of them shouldn't be
unemployed, they should be
washing windows for three or four
dollars an hour," he said. His
slightly balding head began to color
with anger as he spoke.
Another Social Credit party supporter, Central Fraser Valley
delegate Andrew Simpson, claimed
that the 50,000 demonstrators
represented "only a small fraction"
of B.C.
"If you go the the shopping
malls, they're not empty because of
this. The 'silent majority' has twice
as much support — they realize
there's no free lunch," he said.
"The government is a fair
government. Anybody who works
or produces properly will have job
security," he claimed.
Meanwhile, some of the marchers
pointed at the windows on the
hotel's third floor where a few
delegates were watching the crowd
with amusement. "Jump, jump!"
they shouted to the Socreds.
Others chanted "Billy Bennett's
got to go, People yes, budget no,"
while a few argued heatedly with
the delegates standing on the curb.
Many carried placards which read
"Hitler was elected too" and "First
Herpes, then Aids, now Socreds".
At one point in the march, about
30 people sat on the street outside
the hotel's main entrance, surrounded by protesters waving black
flags. They sang and chanted as
they demonstrated their opposition
to the provincial government's
budget and accompanying legislation, some of which has already
passed into law.
Eight police on motorcycles attempted to disperse the crowd
gathered on the street. They slowly
nudged their bikes into the group,
formed a single line and stopped.
But the demonstrators refused to
See page 2: UBC
Politicians deny
breaking pact
Provincial government officials
continue to deny allegations that
they have reduced their contribution to Canada's student aid program by 40 per cent.
"What we provide is a very
generous student assistance program," universities minister Pat
McGeer said Saturday at the Social
Credit convention held in Hotel
Vancouver.
Education ministry official
Madelaine Gale agreed, saying the
provincial government has not
broken an agreement made with the
federal government concerning student aid expenditures.
In July, after the Social Credit
budget was unveiled, secretary of
state Serge Joyal wrote a letter to
B.C.'s education minister Jack
Heinrich emphasizing that increases
in federal aid were not to be followed by decreases in the provincial
contributions.
"As you know, the understanding . . . that provincial aid will not
be reduced as a consequence of increased federal aid, was another
essential condition contributing to
the support of (amendments to the
Canada Student Loan act)," the
letter reads.
"I should like to point out that
the intent of the government and
parliament in Canada in adopting
the amendments, was to provide additional assistance to students
across Canada and it is consequently  our  understanding  that  these
funds will be passed on to students
and that there will be no reduction
in total provincial assistance,"
Joyal continued.
Joyal recently said several provinces, including B.C., have broken
the agreement and that the Social
Credit government also restricted
the program's use by introducing
the toughest eligibility rules in
Canada.
The federal government decided
in March to increase its contribution to student aid by $60 million.
But the B.C. government, after
spending $20.5 million on student
aid last year, only budgeted $12.5
million.
McGeer claimed in the legislature
recently that the government did
not reduce its committment to student aid. "Never before have
students received as much support
as they do today," McGeer said at
the convention. "Never in history
have they gotten as much."
UBC's financial aid office director Byron Hender said Monday
students aren't even aware of the
controversy.
"There's a rumour among
students that the government will
spend more money on the aid program if it runs out," he said.
But he added there are no indications to believe thegovernment will
step in. And the education ministry
official said it is too early to say if
there will be an increase in student
aid this year.
Chemical warfare threatens
By SARAH COX
Napalm and other chemical weapons
employed in Vietnam are currently used in El
Salvador under the direction of American
military advisers, a spokesperson from El
Salvador's Democratic Revolutionary Front
(FDR) said Friday.
The Salvadorean army uses chemical
weapons on areas controlled by the FDR and
the Faribundo Marti National Liberation
Front, coalitions opposed to the U.S. backed
military government, Pedro Cedillos told 40
people in SUB 215.
Despite prohibition by the Geneva convention, the U.S. has supplied chemical
weapons since 1981, and their use is
escalating because the FDR/FMLN are winning the war, Cedillos said.
The army most recently attacked the
village of Tenanciange with white
phosphorous bombs — which blacken the
area and make it an easy target for further attacks, Cedillos said in an interview.
"The gas burns all the forests and the
bodies of the human beings," he said. "Their
skin starts burning inside."
Although the military government massar-
cred 45,000 people in the past three years, the
FDR/FMLN killed one-third of the government's army, said Cedillos.
"When an army has been defeated in such
magnitude it is because we are getting closer
to victory."
But the U.S. administration's policies indicate its intention to intervene before the opposition seizes more of the country, he said.
"There is a great danger of Centra' America
becoming another Vietnam."
U.S. defence secretary Caspar
Weinberger's recent visit to El Salvador and
the increased presence of high ranking
military advisors indicate the extent of U.S.
involvement, said Cedillos.
Signs of increasing U.S. military involvement include the training of the
Salvadorean army and the establishment of a
naval base in Honduras, and the stationing of
U.S. naval task forces off both Central
American coasts, he said.
"The U.S. is looking for a military and not
a negotiated solution to the conflict," he
said. "But we still have time to stop this intervention."
Local governments have been established
by the FDR/FMLN in the one-third
of El    Salvador     under     their   control,
said Cedillos. These local powers are
in charge of collecting taxes, administering
health care, and providing education, which
includes the literacy campaign now under
way.
These governments organized a regional
govenment in May, Cedillos said.
"This is the seed of the future revolutionary democratic government in El
Salvador. In this way, the people of Central
America will be able to live in peace and to
construct a society where there is justice,
democracy, and equality."
The North American public is "misinformed" about the situation in El Salvador,
and few people are aware that chemical
weapons are being used, said Cedillos.
The Canadian media has ignored the situation becuase most of their Central American
correspondence is supplied by American wire
services, he said.
European journalists are the most
outspoken, but risk assassination if their
reports are critical of the government, said
Cedillos. American, Mexican, Salvadorean,
and more recently, Dutch journalists have
been assassinated by right-wing death squads,
he said. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 18,1983
UBC turnout poor
From page 1
move and continued to chant anti-
Socred slogans. One woman neatly
placed a purple flower on the back
of a bike and another put a copy of
Solidarity Times, Vancouver's new
alternative weekly, behind a
police officer's seat.
After a few minutes, the police
moved their motorcycles back a little, and veered off to the other side
of the street.
The crowd clapped and cheered.
Later the march wound its way to
the plaza at Queen Elizabeth theatre
where speakers criticized the
government's attitude towards the
Solidarity Coalition and for promoting the rumor that the movement had lost support.
One participant, UBC education
professor, Jim Gaskell, said he attended the march and rally because
the provincial government is
eroding human and democratic
rights in B.C. and abusing its
majority by "railroading" its bills
through the legislature.
Ubyssey staff are supposed to be
the horniest people on campus, but
we're to bleary eyed to muster up
the energy. Help us reinstate our
mazzola parties by coming to
Wednesday's staph meet at 3:30.
Don't forget to bring your lubricant.
"They're cutting back on social
services, while spending on
monuments to itself," he said. He
added he was disappointed by the
turnout of UBC professors and
students.
UBC student Sandra Melmes,
social work 4, said she also expected
more students and faculty to attend
and added that she is particularly
concerned about the recent cutbacks in social services.
"I think they're wiping out years
of hard work and progress that's
been made," she said.
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for the lest 24 years.
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Closed Sundays & Public Holidays
For the early ones,   we start serving
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hair design ltd.
FOR MEN AND WOMEN
When was the last time you
put out $7.°° for a professional
haircut and got change?
Basic cut 6.
JO BS   JOBS   JOBS
The Ubyssey has openings immediately for two part-time positions. Applications are now being accepted
for the paid positions of file clerk and photo coordinator. Students must be eligible for the university work-
study program, and do not need any newspaper experience. Wages are very good, and are better than any of
the editors currently receive. Apply to Muriel, Sarah or Chris In SUB 241k.
THE
THUNDERBIRD
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THURSDAY OCT. 20th
11:00 am - 4:00 pm
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*4;
95 Tuesday, October 18,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
1Missing' woman critical of U.S.
By VERNE McDONALD
The brutal coup in Chile which
ended the life of Joyce Horman's
husband was part of continuing
U.S. policies now threatening other
nations, she said Saturday.
Horman said that in collecting information on Charles Horman's
death in Santiago in 1973, she
found documented evidence of
U.S. complicity and possible participation in the coup which
brought General Augusto Pinochet
to power and led to the death or
disappearance of tens of thousands
of people.
Horman's husband was one of
them, reportedly arrested Sept. 20,
1973 and apparently executed soon
after. Both Chilean authorities and
the U.S. state department refuse to
disclose any information surrounding his death, she said.
Horman was in Vancouver to
speak on behalf of Amnesty International at a benefit showing of the
film Missing at the Ridge Theatre.
The film, directed by Constantin
Costa-Gravas and starring Jack
Lemmon and Sissy Spacek, depicts
the disappearance of Horman's
husband and the search for him she
undertook with her father-in-law
Ed Horman.
She told the audience she decided
to make her story public because
people have to be aware that those
unjustly imprisoned and executed
under repressive regimes are sons,
daughters, parents and lovers of
human beings.
Horman called for increased support   for   Amnesty,   a   worldwide
CFS to prepare for strike
By DOUG SCHMIDT
As the threat of a general strike
looms over B.C., the Canadian
Federation of Students is seeking
ways to inform students about its
possible implications.
CFS is preparing students for a
strike by the British Columbia
Government Employees Union
after Oct. 31, CFS- Pacific chair
Stephen Leary said Monday.
The BCGEU's current contract
expires on Oct. 31 and 1,600
members who have received their
layoff notices stand to lose their
jobs under the provisions of Bill 3,
the Public Sector Restraint Act.
"A strike looks fairly likely.
Students must realize the
seriousness of the situation — there
would be a loss of services and campuses could shut down," he said.
Twenty-five students, representing several post-secondary institutes and high schools in the
Lower Mainland and the interior of
B.C., attended a CFS action
assembly at UBC last weekend to
discuss student reactions to the
budget and to plan action against
the legislation.
Leary would not describe possible actions discussed at the meeting.
Student representatives were told
to contact unions and faculty on
their respective campuses for information about tactics and to find out
how a strike would affect campus
operations, Leary said.
Bruce Davidson, a BCGEU
member with the University Endowment Lands fire department,
said The chances of a Nov. 1 strike
are "pretty good."
But because the fire department
performs an essential service, it
would continue operating in
emergencies, Davidson said.
Even if no general strike is
organized, unions operating at
UBC could stage strikes in sympathy with the BCGEU's likely job
action, said Barry Morrison, the
faculty association's delegate to
Operation Solidarity.
Spokespeople for the UBC locals
of the Canadian Union of Public
Employees and the Association of
University and College Employees
were unavailable for comment.
Liberals push Cruise
By IAN TIMBERLAKE
Canada is testing the cruise
missile "because we want to" and
not because of U.S. pressure, said
the national defence minister in an
interview Saturday.
Jean-Jacques Blais, who has held
the defence portfolio for about two
months, said he does not believe an
approximate parity exists between
the superpowers.
But he contended that the North
Atlantic Treaty Organization's
decision to deploy ground-launched
Cruise and Perishing II missiles in
Europe has forced the Soviets back
to the Geneva bargaining table.
"When you negotiate with the
Russians, you have to do so from a
position of strength," Blais said.
During the interview and when he
addressed a policy workshop at the
B.C. Liberal Party convention
Saturday, Blais confused the SALT
1 negotiations of the late 1960's and
early 1970's with the START talks
proposed by U.S. president Reagan
as a replacement for SALT.
Tempers flared at times during
the workshop, as 25 Liberals
discussed a disarmament resolution.
Pandora's box opens
By SUE McILROY
Sixty people wearing trench coats, dark glasses, and wide-brimmed
hats gathered in front of a downtown office building Monday to protest Bill C-157 — proposed legislation for a Canadian Security Intelligence Service.
The rally, organized by the Coalition Against the CSIS, was held
outside the building where CSIS believes the Vancouver branch will
operate from, the present location of the RCMP security service.
Coalition spokesperson Kevin Annett said the bill will violate the
rights and freedoms it is designed to uphold.
"Bill C-157 simply makes it legal for them to tap our phones, open
our mail, open census files, and enter our homes," he said.
If passed, the bill will allow agents to operate outside current legal
restraints and they will not be accountable to Parliament.
Solicitor General Robert Kaplan said in May that under the proposed legislation, "legitimate dissent would not be targeted." ESut
an RCMP informant was discovered in an Ottawa peace group two
weeks later.
"Under the proposed bill anyone who supports the peace movement, Solidarity, the women's movement, Third World Solidarity,
gay and lesbian groups, and many others could be considered subversive," Annett said.
"The bill has been withdrawn for amendments and we demand it
remain withdrawn."
The protestors entered the building and attempted to gain access to
the sixth floor — the first floor of proposed CSIS offices — but the
elevator for the sixth to eleventh floors was locked, Annett said.
"The doors from the stairways had no door knobs either," said
Annett. "And there is no listing on the directory for the top five
floors."
The Vancouver directory has no listing for this building beyond
the fifth floor. Both Ottawa and the RCMP were contacted by the
Coalition but refused to comment on the building's purpose.
At one point in the rally two men peered out from a sixth floor
window and protesters began to yell, "Stop Bill C-157" and "No to
the CSIS."
One delegate emotionally argued
that "this arms race must be stopped ... I feel the horse that's pulling this cart — the United States —
is doing this for its own power and
wealth and is leading us to destruction."
He urged the Liberals "to go
down fighting for something we
really believe in."
Blais replied he was "as concerned as you are, (but) by itself
Canada, with 25 million people, can
have no influence."
The resolution under discussion
called for Canada to advocate the
principles of suffocation outlined
by prime minister Pierre Trudeau at
the 1978 and 1982 United National
Special Sessions on Disarmament.
Among the principles is a comprehensive, multilateral, verifiable
test ban treaty which will include:
• a halt to flight-testing of new
strategic delivery vehicles ,
• a prohibition of all fissionable
materials for nuclear weapons purposes, and
• an agreement to limit and progressively reduce military spending
on new nuclear weapons systems.
The resolution was preceeded by
a clause stating that "both the
U.S.S.R. and the U.S. are currently
escalating the arms race."
One delegate unsuccessfully tried
to amend the clause to read:
"Whereas the U.S.S.R. is currently
escalating the arms race ..."
His suggestion prompted one
furious Liberal to rise and hold up a
chart from Scientific American
magazine which showed how the
U.S. has consistently led the arms
race. "You lied, sir," he said.
Despite the furor, the resolution
was passed at the Sunday plenary
and is now B.C. Liberal policy.
human rights organization based in
London, England.
The   organization   attempts   to*
help prisoners of conscience, who
have been jailed for their beliefs,
language, opinions or sex, on an individual basis.
Once the status of a prisoner has
been determined, his or her dossier
is sent to one of Amnesty's adoption groups in 41 countries. The
groups write letters on the
prisoners' behalf seeking information from prison and government
authorities, and calling for the
prisoners' release.
"Many people's lives have been
saved by Amnesty International,"
Horman said after her speech. "It
puts the notice on governments that
someone is watching and taking
note, and taking documentation on
what they're doing.
Amnesty was not directly involved in Horman's case, she said, but it
was one of many groups and individuals who pressured the U.S.
and Chilean governments to explain
her husband's disappearance.
That pressure eventually resulted
in the authorities admitting Charles
Horman was killed during the coup,
ending the frantic search by Joyce
and Ed Horman in Chile.
She said without the help of those
people scattered across the U.S. and
in other countries, the Chilean junta and U.S. embassy might have
covered up her husband's fate entirely.
Horman verified the accuracy of
the vision of Chile in the film Missing as a nightmare conducted by
soldiers, with mass executions, arrests and killings on slightest provocation.
ONE OUTSPOKEN PERSON gave the Socreds his opinion about their recent legislation in Victora last Saturday, as Socred delegates enjoyed the
food and festivities inside the plush Hotel Vancouver.
AMS airs dirty laundry
By CHRIS WONG
The organizers of the Alma
Mater Society general meeting
which failed to reach quorum
Thursday, broke regulations by not
properly advertising the meeting a
student council member charged
Monday.
AMS vice-president Renee Comesotti said the meeting was not
advertised 14 days in advance as required by AMS bylaws. She added
posters and leaflets mentioned the
meeting in tiny print only, while
notice   of   the   accompanying
U.S. aid prolongs strife
The only obstacle facing popular
opposition forces in El Salvador is
the U.S.'s increasing intervention, a
native fighting in the area said at a
Robson Square rally Saturday.
A political and not a military
solution must be found, Pedro
Cedillos, a representative from El
Salvador's Democratic Revolutionary Front, told 500 people at
the Solidarity with El Salvador rally.
"It is (U.S. president) Reagan
who is preventing our struggle from
reaching its natural conclusion,"
Cedillos said.
Cedillos denied Reagan's allegations that Cuba and the Soviet
Union are supplying arms to the opposition forces, saying instead that
they have been greatly aided by
arms obtained trom El Salvadoran
military defectors.
And the guerrillas are finally
making inroads on both military
and political fronts in the tiny country, he said.
El Salvador could become
economically dependent with the
support of non-aligned countries
around the world, Cedillos added.
But the historical problem of concentration of power in a few hands
has to be overcome first, he said.
Two per cent of the population
has ownership of more than 60 per
cent of the arable land, he said, adding agarian reform was a priority
for the FDR.
"Our struggle has deepened and
is threatening the oligarchy."
Solidarity Coalition sponsored rally
was prominently displayed.
Comesotti said council only
agreed on holding a special general
meeting. "It was not presented to
council that there was going to be a
rally," she said.
But AMS external affairs coordinator Lisa Hebert, who helped
with much of the orgainizing for the
meeting, said all council members
were well aware a rally would take
place. The advertising was not
misleading, she added.
"The AMS general meeting was
much more prominent than the
Solidarity Coalition rally," she
said.
Hebert said council did not participate much in organizing the
meeting.
Council members should have
raised objections concerning the
meeting's organization earlier, she
added.
Hebert said the rally and student
forum held in place of the general
meeting generated support from
those in attendance for the Solidarity Coalition.
Opposition to the AMS's decision to join the Solidarity Coalition
as expressed at the rally by Neil
Smith, engineering undergraduate
society first vice-president, may be
shared by other council members,
she said.
"Basically council supports what
they're fighting for, but a lot of
council people regret joining the
Solidarity   Coalition." Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 18, 1983
\\(li"l Mil
THE UBYSSEY
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday throughout the academic year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are
those of the staff and are not necessarily those ot the university administration or the
AMS. Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB
241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
Neil Lucente was developing the tune to the American national anthem while Muriel Draaisma screamed that no one respected her in the
office. Chris Wong tried to entertain staffers by telling them Chinese swear words and Sarah Millin, Kelley Lee, and Holly Nathan were not
amused. Robby Robertson was so disgusted that he left early. Our favorite vegetarian, Sarah Cox was so upset by the racket she was unable
to finish her salad. Victor Wong choked on his cigarettes while Peter Berlin and Robby Beynon inhaled a pizza. Doug Schmidt went into
convulsions and then fainted while Patti Flather recited her vocabulary of extremely naughty words. Julie Stanton and ian Timberlake walked off into the sunset and eventually into the ocean with stones in their pockets. Monte Stewart and Sue Mcllroy soon followed them there
and N.J.D. initialed his consent. Due to the fact that first year staffers have developed a tendency to drown themselves after working for
more than a week on the paper, the editorial collective can now be seen wandering SUB looking for new victims.
Letters
Geer antics unwelcomed by geer
Entries from The UBC Student Dictionary:
Geer: Member of the Engineering
Undergrad   Society.   Displays
red plumage.
Moron: See above.
Now before anybody reading this
thinks that this letter is coming
from a radical arts student, check
the department I am enrolled in.
Yes folks, I am an engineer to be,
but do I deserve to be classified as a
lower life form for the sole reason
that I am an engineering student?
After the proceedings of Oct. 13
outside Sedgewick, I have no choice
but to believe that the above opinion is highly justified.
Last Thursday was the day when
an open meeting was held outside
Sedgewick concerning the Alma
Mater Society's affiliation with the
Solidarity Coalition. The EUS had
previously decided that it did not
quite agree with this affiliation and
was determined to voice its own
opinion. Whatever the EUS's stand
on this issue is of no concern at this
time, for in this letter I am concerned with the methods used to get the
point across.
That afternoon we engineers had
just finished attending the annual
leg auction for charity of course.
Emotions were high, and it was
mentioned after the Auction that
we all should go over to the AMS
rally and voice our concern over
budget cuts. A few of us actually
made conscious decisions to attend,
many more followed for the sake of
making noise.
Upon arrival, chants of "Bullshit, Bullshit" and our ever famous
"We Are, We Are" melody were
started. This caused the meeting in>
progress to come to a halt which
allowed    our    EUS    first   vice-
president   Neil  Smith,   to  give   a
speech concerning the cutbacks.
While he spoke, a strange and
wonderful thing happened: people
listened. Nobody shouted "Bullshit, Bullshit" to him; the audience
was fairly well behaved, even the
"geers" shutup. After his speech
was over, a non-engineer started to
speak and the derogatory chants
started all over again.
It seems that the "geers" weren't
prepared to let anybody else speak,
but expected those present to listen
attentively to their spokesperson,
not entirely fair, but we're talking
engineers here. To wrap it all up,
the "geers" showered the peaceful
crowd with a few water-filled
balloons, and then walked away. A
wonderful display of intestinal fortitude.
This leads to the main point of
my tirade: How, as engineers, can
we expect anybody to take us
seriously when we always succeed in
portraying the image of "geers".
Neil Smith's speech was a vain attempt to make an important point,
but the water bombs just dragged
the speech back down into the gutter from whence it came. Needless
to say, the audience was not entirely
impressed.
If all goes as planned, 1 will be in
Edmonton this winter as a member
of the UBC team participating in
the Great Northern Concrete
Toboggan Race. I hope that the
reputation that preceeds myself and
my fellow teammates is that the
UBC engineers are a bunch of fairly
hard-working people who have a
thing for red Volkswagens, and not
just a bunch of "geers".
Jim Hamilton
civil engineering 2
Gearing up fascism
Last Thursday I attended the Solidarity rally on campus to protest
the Social Credit government's budget. In particular I was there to
support the total campus community — students, staff, and faculty
in the fight against education funding cuts. Although the turnout
was disappointingly small, those that were there were enthusiastic.
Unfortunately my own enthusiasm turned first to annoyance and
then to anger as approximately 100 engineering students invaded the
meeting shouting their now infamous cham. They proceeded to
stand behind the platform yelling obscenities, effectively silencing
any opposition to their viewpoint.
Allowing any group, large or small, to step another from voicing
an opinion leads to fascism, now all too prevalent in our world.
Jill Tolliday
student counselling staffer
Power base
Power, is the bottom line in politics. What use, after all, is a government
that can not govern? This is the kind of rhetoric being employed by the
Social Credit government.
They say they have been elected by the majority of British Columbians
and therefore nobody else has a right to resist their wishes. For that
reason, they are stripping, or talking of stripping, power from the
democratically elected school boards, municipalities, the Greater Vancouver Regional District, the student representatives on the board of
governors at the B.C. Institute of Technology and, or course the trade
union leaders and giving it to the bureaucrats.
There are clearly several fairly serious objections to this governing mode.
In the first place the counterweight to power is responsibility. Not only is
the government taking power away from those traditionally answerable for
its use — the school boards for the running of schools, the GVRD for the
quality of life in the Lower Mainland — but it has shown a tendency to interpret its own mandate in the loosest way possible.
The second objection is that it is no bad thing for there to be blocs in the
state who have sufficient power to be able to prevent the government from
governing.
Any government which is able to do exactly as it pleases is likely to be a
menace to its people in the long run. (Readers can easily supply their own
examples of this.)
The smug and self-confident atmosphere of the Socred convention in
Vancouver last weekend therefore gave cause for concern. Even when
confronted with 50,000 demonstrators, the small group of Socreds remained unshaken in their belief that they know what is best for the province.
But one thing is certain. Nothing could be worse for B.C. than this party,
totally out of touch with the needs and wishes of a large part of the population, accumulating all power. It is not prudent that the government
should remove power from those who might disagree with them, using
that disagreement as a justification. And the fact that that is the argument
the Socreds are making shows just how little feel they have for democracy
and responsibility, and just how much they crave absolute power.
Letters
'Loud, egotistical'
There was a Solidarity Coalition
Rally Thursday at UBC. It was attended not only by people who
sincerely wished to hear what was
being said, but also by the engineers
who proved again that they are not
only the loudest but the most self-
centred egotistical group on campus. They proved this by shouting
slogans and obscenities, quieting
only to listen to one of their number
read a paper. He stated their opposition to the government restraint
budget because it affected the
students in engineering and their
opposition to supporting the
Solidarity Coalition because their
concern was for the engineers alone
and their voice would "be weakened" if they allowed it to be diluted
by the voices of Coalition members
and supporters.
Somewhere in the School of
Engineering there must be someone
who is not under the mob mentality
rule. To this person I would
paraphrase the familiar story:
"When they repressed the
minorities who cried out for help,
I did nothing. When they repressed the handicapped, the elderly,
the poor, the unemployed, the
employed, the renters they all
cried out for help but I did
nothing. When they repressed the
teachers and the education of
children, the doctors, the university professors, the other university students they all cried out for
help, but I did nothing. When
they said I couldn't be an
engineer because I wasn't rich
enough and the university was no
longer accredited because it
couldn't afford to hire quality
professors and staff, I cried out
for help, but there were none left
to care."
Audrey Fiene
solidarity coalition supporter
George 'cult leader'?
I was very surprised to read a letter in Friday's Ubyssey from
George Hermanson, especially after
hearing him speak at a UBC
political rally. It seems that Mr.
Hermanson is guilty of the same
recruiting tactics he ascribes to
Maranatha.
Just listening to the rally made
me think of the very "cult tactics"
I've heard so much about. The rally
contained all the elements he spoke
of in his letter. There was an
ideology provided, a definite sense
of mission or activity and there was
reinforcement by various speakers.
Mr. Hermanson are you promoting
a new type of cult or just using their
methods?
Secondly, I recognize Mr. Her-
manson's right to speak at any
engagement he pleases, but I do
hope he checked into the rally and
its promoters before attending.
There is every probability that the
reason he was invited to speak was
to be "a sales pitch to get people to
come to a recruiting event".
Hmmm — sound familiar doesn't
it?
If however, he was aware of what
was going to happen then is he not
guilty of doing exactly what
Maranatha does? Namely, express
ing his thoughts and stating his opinions to all students, whether they
were there to listen or just passing
by. Mr. Hermanson even went one
step further — Maranatha depends
on lung power, while he used a loud
speaker system.
I hope you will consider your in-
consistancies on these points Mr.
Hermanson, before it's too late. As
a chaplain you are no doubt
familiar with Matthew 7.2.
Lynn Snyder
commerce 4
Us inquisitive types here at the
Ubyssey (SUB 241K) just love to
hear from you, our readers. We've
tried everything: misquoting
sources, scathing cutlines under
photos, and even an occasional controversial editorial (alright, but at
least we're trying . . .). Now, as a
last resort, here's a direct invitation
from us to you: SEND US LETTERS! If it's typed on a 70 space
line and is not sexist or racist, we'll
do our best to print it. So here it is,
your chance to upgrade the quality
of the vilest rag west of Blanca.
Deadlines for letters are Monday
and Friday at 12:30. Tuesday, October 18, 1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
Refuse cruise at Jericho
Hi therel My name's Millie, and I'm a first year staffer on The Ubytsay. Right now my
editors h*y» stuck ffle in this grev box because they think I don't do enough wort. Whaf»
worrying m» now i» that at the errf of the school year ell the first-year staffers hold a banquet
for everyone else, including the di hacks, and af) the other paopla who joined this year don't
show up all that often. That means they're going to stick the whole job on me! Yipet Please,
all you first-year sttidents, comedOwHtothe staff itwetihg Wednesday at 3:30, That way, I'll
know I don't have to do this monstrous banquet job all by myself.
The arms race is not stopping. It
is not even slowing down a little bit.
The two major contestants are running neck and neck in a race that
can only produce losers.
Canada has played only a minor
role in the arms race but it has the
potential to be a major figure in
negotiating an end to this madness.
As Canadians we are showered with
compliments concerning our international reputation. I believe it is
now time to put this reputation to
work.
The first step is to disassociate
ourselves from the testing of the air-
launched cruise missile. This
missile, which has already been
deployed on B-52 bombers in the
U.S., is meant to be a part of the
American's strategic arsenal. It is
not associated with NATO forces
and was never meant to be.
The cruise missiles (air-launched,
ground-launched, and sea-
launched) represent a dangerous
new generation of "counter-force"
weapons. They are dangerous for a
variety of reasons. The first is that
their extreme accuracy threatens the
Soviet Union with the possibility,
real or imagined, of a first-strike
An exceptional week
Exceptional individuals include
the gifted and creative, the emotionally disturbed, the mentally
handicapped, the physically disabled, the visually and hearing impaired, learning disabled individuals and cerebral palsy persons. In short, anyone requiring
special services are exceptional.
In an attempt to promote awareness of such people, the Student
Council For Exceptional Children is
holding its fourth annual Exceptional Persons' Week, Oct. 17-21.
Our goal during this week is to promote awareness of special needs individuals in our society through
seminars, speakers, displays and activities. All sessions are free.
During the week individuals in
the areas of business, education,
medicine and technology and sports
and recreation will be guest
speakers. They will include world
class wheelchair athlete Diane
Rackieki as our feature speaker,
Wanda Justice from the Berwick
Centre with a presentation on preschool education, speakers from
Heros Restaurant and People First
to represent the mentally handicapped in the business world, hands-on
experience with computers designed
for exceptional people and visual
technology tours.
Simulation workshops,
wheelchair tours and mini sessions
will take place throughout the
week. Check Tween Classes for
time and locations.
Kinder Mattu
Student Council for
Exceptional Children iff
^caSe^
lecV.
C\o^eS
3$ -3*
$4.00 ot
AVetf^teV'."-*'
^       A,^e.^°l3o«
730 tA°r,oe
against them, thus destabilizing an
already precarious situation.
The small size of the weapon
makes it very hard to detect and as a
consequence makes arms control
agreements much more difficult to
achieve. Finally, the arms race, like
slow moving bodies, follows the
laws of Newtonian physics: actions
are   followed   by   reaction.
"What can I do as an
individual?" is an often asked question. As Canadians we live in a
democratic society where we have a
right, and some would argue, a duty, to express our opinions. Come
and show our politicians we do
care. On October 22, at 11 a.m. in
Jericho Beach Park, there will be a
rally protesting the testing of the
cruise missile in Canada. Under the
terms of the five year weapons
testing agreement we have signed
with the U.S. we can still change
our minds. It's not too late! Protest
now before it is! Don Olds
agriculture
SPEAKEASY
A Campus Information and Crisis Centre
FEEL LIKE TALKING?
Speakeasy is staffed by friendly people who
are willing to listen
STUDY WOES?
If you need a TUTOR or a TYPIST, check
our listings.
Located in SUB Concourse
Info: 228-3770
Crisis: 228-3700
VALUABLE COUPON    !
. Bernard
Labrosse
hair studio inc.
& Ken Hippert
Hair Co. Ltd.
MONDAY to FRIDAY
9:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
SATURDAY
9:30 a.m. - 4 p.m.
APPOINTMENTS
224-1922    224-9116
IN U.B.C. VILLAGE
NEXT TO BANK OF COMMERCE
WORTH
OFF ANY
HAIR STYLE
Mon., Tues., Wed.
GOOD ONLY ON
PRESENTATION OF
THIS COUPON.
Expires Nov. 30/'83
WE SELL
JO/CO PRODUCTS i
1 h h .4 ——.__.-_---
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE CECIL H. AND IDA GREEN
VISITING PROFESSORSHIPS
1983 Autumn Lectures
BRIAN SIMON
Brian Simon, professor emeritus of the University of Leicester, is a leading authority on the history and
theory of modern education. His historical, political and psychological studies of education, particularly his work on the education system in Britain, are considered milestones in the field of educational
history. Professor Simon is the author of such well-known works as Intelligence Testing and the Comprehensive School, Studies in the History of Education and the Half-way There report on British educational policy.
THE MODERN PRIMARY SCHOOL IN ACTION: New Research Methodologies
Thursday, October 20
In Room 100, Neville Scarfe Building, at 12:30 PM
THE I.Q. CONTROVERSY: The Case of Cyril Burt
Saturday, October 22
In Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre,
at 8:15 PM (Vancouver Institute Lecture)
JOAN SIMON
Social historian Joan Simon has contributed to the improvement of educational practices in Britain,
chiefly through Iter writings on early modern education. Her book Education and Society in Tudor
England is considered the most authoritative survey of educational ideas and institutions of 16th century England. Mrs. Simon is equally well known for her current research in the field of early childhood
education and the history of childhood and the family.
THE HISTORY OF EDUCATION AS SOCIAL HISTORY
Tuesday, October 18
In Seminar Room A/B, Ponderosa Annex G, at 3:30-5:30 PM
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE — PLEASE POST AND ANNOUNCE
Occasionally unadvertised seminars are presented.
Please call Mrs. R. Rumley at Local 5675 for information. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 18,1983
ia&3*#%
TODAY
SLAVONIC CIRCLE
Second meeting of newty formed social club for
any student interested in the Slavic countries
and cultures, 4 p.m., Buch E156.
LAW STUDENTS LEGAL ADVICE PROGRAM
i Free Legal Advice, noon-2 p.m., SUB 111.
PRE MEDICAL SOCIETY
Lecture on medical school admissions, speaker
Dr. Boggie, members free, non-members $2, all
proceeds donated to Childrens Research Foundation and Variety Club Telethon, new members
welcome, noon, IRC 2, note new room.
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF CANADA
Film, Welcome to Paradise, noon, BUCH A204.
DANCEWORKS UBC
Signup of dancers, stagehands, production and
publicity coordinators, noon, SUB 216E.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Fireside discussion, beeting basic needs
cooperatively, reps from branches of the coop
movement, 8 p.m.. Fireside Lounge, Grad Student Centre.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Chinese painting class, 3:30 p.m., SUB 212.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Co-op supper with involvement, 6 p.m.,
Lutheran Campus Centre.
STUDENT COUNCIL FOR
EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN
See and Use computers for special needs, 11:30
a.m. and 12:30 p.m., meet at SUB Foyer.
Displays and simulations re. exceptional persons
and wheelchair tours of campus, 11:30a.m.-1:30
p.m., SUB foyer.
Puppet show with disabled and non-disabled
puppets, noon, Scarfe 100.
Speech: "A unique concept in pre-school education," noon, SUB 207/209.
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Khane, 6:30 p.m., SUB 212.
CAMPUS PRO-LIFE
General Meeting, noon, SUB 212.
FIRST YEAR STUDENTS COMMITTEE
General Meeting, noon, Buch. B221.
HILLEL HOUSE
Free lunch and speaker, noon, Hillel house.
DEBATING SOCIETY
Meeting, noon, SUB 234.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study, noon. Brock 305.
WEDNESDAY
DANCEWORKS UBC
Organizational meeting,  noon-1:30 p.m.,  SUB
215.
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Khane daily, 6:30. SUB 212.
STUDENT COUNCIL FOR
EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN
Team wheelchair challenge,   11:30-2:30 p.m.,
SUB plaza.
HILLEL HOUSE
Faculty   lunch;   topic:   "University   Cutbacks,"
lunch available for everyone, noon, Hillel House.
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
Executive meeting, noon, SUB 119.
NDP CLUB
Semi-annual general meeting,  by-elections for
executive positions, anyone interested may attend, noon, Buch A205.
UBC WATER POLO CLUB
Practice,   everyone   welcome,   10   p.m.   UBC
aquatic centre.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Noon celebration - singing, sharing, and short
teaching, noon, Buch A100.
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
General meeting, noon, Chem. 150.
UBC SOCIAL CREDIT CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 212.
THURSDAY
ANARCHIST CLUB
Discussion group, noon, Buch D352.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
General meeting, all welcome, noon, BROCK
304.
INTERNATIONAL     ASSOCIATION     FOR
STUDENTS FOR TECHNICAL EXPERIENCE
Information meeting, noon-2 p.m., CEME 1202.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Weekly testimony meeting, all welcome, noon,
SUB 212A.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Cantonese class,  all  levels,  noon,   SUB 235.
Chinese painting class, 3:30 p.m., SUB 212.
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Khane, 6:30 p.m., SUB 212.
UBC MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Weekly meeting — come out and see what your
club is doing, noon, Angus 421.
STAMMTISCH
Social and conversational evenings, 7-11 p.m..
International House, Gate 4.
STUDENT COUNCIL FOR
EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN
Displays,   simulations   and   wheelchair   tours,
11:30-1:30 p.m., SUB foyer.
Visual Technology tour — visit Crane Library and
see the latest visual aids in Canada, noon, meet
at SUB foyer.
Computers for special needs display, 11:30-1:30
p.m. SUB foyer.
NEWMAN CLUB
Meeting, movie and discussion on cults, noon
St. Mark's College.
EDUCATORS FOR NUCLEAR
DISARMAMENT
Cooperative peace initiatives between Europe
and North America, Kathleen Wallace-Peering,
Project Ploughshares, noon, Hebb Theatre.
2*6 U/esr4m. Avenue
fiho or HOD e/mM^e ttay, Richmond
INTERNATIONAL SOCIALISTS
Book table, informal political chat, noon, SUB
concourse.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Monthly meeting, graduate student council,
departments are encouraged to elect representative, 5:30 p.m.. Committee Room Graduate
Student Council.
JEWISH STUDENTS NETWORK
Seminar with Prof. M. Amon, topic: "Zionism
and Messtanism," noon, Hillel House.
DEBATING SOCIETY
General meeting, with elections and discussion
of UBC invitational, noon, SUB 211.
UBC FLYING CLUB
General meeting, noon, Henning 302.
UBC MUSICAL THEATRE SOCIETY
Meeting for any people interested in auditions for
Oklahoma, noon. Math 100.
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY
Lecture — The Canadian Armed Forces Dental
Officer Training Program, noon, IRC 1.
CHESS CLUB
Semi-annual general meeting, by-elections for
various positions, noon, SUB 205.
UBC LIBERAL CLUB
Events and finance committee meeting,
everyone welcome, noon, SUB 111.
UBC WATER POLO CLUB
Practice, everyone welcome, 2 p.m., UBC
Aquatic Centre.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Small group meetings — singing, sharing, 7:30
p.m., phone 228-8564 for locations.
EXTERNAL AFFAIRS COMMITTEE
Meeting to discuss rally and potential general
strike, all welcome, noon, SUB 260.
FRIDAY
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Khane, 6:30 p.m., SUB 212.
Dance and merry conversation, 8 p.m.. International House upper lounge.
STUDENT COUNCIL FOR
EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN
Displays and similations, 11:30-1:30 p.m., SUB
foyer.
Speakers  from   People   First:   a   self-advocacy
THE
THUNDERBIRD
fJH£ SHOP
^
PERSONALISED
BUMPER STICKERS
&
SIGNS
BY OUTSPOKEN
DESIGN YOUR OWN
Say Whatever You Want
GREAT FOR GIFTS, GAGS OR ADVERTISING
$4.50 and up
NOW OPEN AT 8:00 A.M.
LOWER LEVEL
STUDENT UNION BUILDING
UNIVERSITY
OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
TELEPHONE: 224-1911
HOURS:
MON. TO FRI. 8 AM - 7 PM
SATURDAY 10 AM - 5 PM
VISA & MASTERCARD
ACCEPTED
movement  of  mentally  handicapped  people,
noon, Scarfe 205.
Puppet show: Kids on the Block, sponsored by
the Kinsmen Rehabilitation Foundation of B.C.,
noon, Scarfe 100.
Speaker from Hero's Restaurant: "The Reality of
Business and the Exceptional Person,"  noon,
SUB 212.
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Lecture by Hanrf Vitcani, noon, SUB 211.
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
The Great Pumpkin Chase Rally, 7 p.m., meet at
SUB loop.
UBC WARGAMING SOCIETY
Video/bzzr night, 6-12 midnight, SUB 215.
UBC FACULTY OF MEDICINE
Donald   Peterson  lecture:   "Glucose  and   Hormone — observations from Study of Children
with Type I Glycogen Storage Disease" by Dr.
John F.  Grigler Jr.,  clinical professor Harvard
University, 9 a.m., Shaughnessy Hospital room
D308.
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Winery tour; details at CSA office SUB 235.
THUNDERBIRD SOCCER
Canada West League game vs. Alberta Golden
Sears, 4 p.m., O.J. Todd Field.
HIGH SCHOOL VOLLEYBALL
UBC Jr. High School Boys Volleyball tournament, 4-11 p.m., Osbourne Centre.
THUNDERBIRD RUGBY
Thunderbird   varsity   vs.    Kats,    2:30   p.m.,
Thunderbird Stadium.
J.V. BASKETBALL
J.V. Men vs. Fraser Valley College, 5:30 p.m.,
War Memorial Gym.
BUY OFF CAMPUS
SAVE 50% &
GET NEXT DAY SERVICE
 ATTHE	
WESTERN OPTICAL EYE LAB
with your prescription & STUDENT I.D. CARD
Choose ANY FRAME IN OUR STOCK.
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such as Dior, Gloria vanderbilt,
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we're also fully equipped
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Mon.-Fri. 8:30-5:00
2nd & Burrard
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756-7516
WESTERN OPTICAL
 EYE LAB	
•THE CLASSIFIEDS-!
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.20; additional lines, 65c. Additional days, $3.80 and 60c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the
day before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
"« i       Charge Phone Orders over $5.00. Call 228-3977.
COMING EVENTS
BAHA'I FAITH. Building a United
World Community. Formal and
informal discussions on selected
topics every Friday. For more information phone 222-0261.
A/V SLIDE PRESENTATION
ON
NATUROPATHIC MEDICINE
Join John Keilholtz, Dean of Student Services, The National College
of Naturopathic Medicine, Portland,
Oregon and learn more about this
grad level alternative to medical
school.
FRI.. OCT. 21 2:30 P.M.
ROOM 114
BROCK HALL
INSTUCTORS Required for LSAT, MCAT,
GMAT courses. Leave name and number
738-4618.
40 - MESSAGES
INSTEAD of creating inner turmoil, try to
help fellow brothers through rough times.
C rooster.
KIM THOMPSON. Please phone me.
Christine.
BUDDHISM. Meditation, ethics, psychology,
personal relationships. Free information box
1314, Station B, Oshawa, Ontario L1J 6P8.
70 - SERVICES
"MODE COLLEGE OF BARBERING AND
STYLING". Students - $4.50 to $6.50.
M7 - 601 W. Broadway, 874-0633.
85 - TYPING
11 - FOR SALE - Private
63" CHEVY NOVA. Runs well $750 or
offer. 433-6187 evenings & weekends;
256-3551 (249) days.
THESIS TYPISTS!
Xeros 800 ETS Word Processor consisting of
typewriter, dual tape drive console, 58 tape
cassettes, operator manual, reference guide, and
box of continuous-feed paper for drafts. This
unit features unlimited memory 118 pages/tape),
search, duplicate, control page length, margin
control, and emphasized headings. $900 oi
terms. Contact Ruth Mitchell, 687-1721.
TYPEWRITING - Essays, resumes, MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED. Tapes
transcribed. Elite, Pica or Script. UBC
Village location. 224-6518 day or night.
WORD PROCESSING: & Typing, term
papers, theses, mscpt., essays, incl.
reports (tech., equational), letters,
resumes. Bilingual. Clemy, 266-6641.
YEAR ROUND EXPERT typing from legible
work, essays, theses, 738-6829, 10 a.m.-9
p.m. King Edward bus route.
WORD   PROCESSING   SPECIALISTS:   U
write we type theses, resumes, letters,
essays, days, evenings, weekends
736-1208.
20 - HOUSING
25 - INSTRUCTION
PIANO LESSONS by Judith Alexander.
Graduate of Julliard School of Music.
734-8323 or 261-8514.
LSAT. GMAT, MCAT preparation. Call
National Testing, 738-4618. Please leave
message on tape if manager is counselling.
FAST,    ACCURATE    professional typing.
Double-spaced page,  $1.50.  Call Audrey,
228-0378.
EXPERIENCED   TYPIST.   Essays, reports,
projects  -  $1.00  per  page  min. Contact
Louise, after 4 p.m. 731-0594.
30 - JOBS
BABY-SITTER REQUIRED for occasional
evenings. Kits area. Female with own TPT
preferred. 731-2669 evenings.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING, essays, thesis,
manuscripts, etc. Choice of type engineering exp. Reasonable 271-6755.
EXPERIENCED. FAST, accurate typing.
Term papers, thesis. Location close to campus. 732-1745.
90 - WANTED Tuesday, October 18,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Letters
Some Socialist corrections
AM right, you turksyj. Do you rsaiize what you've done by not attending the ami-budget
rally last week? Do you? For oris tiling, you made the entire AMS into Ham because that rally
was to decide whether or not joining the Solidarity Coalition was the choice of the students.
For another, Napoleon Bennett » going to interpret this as meaning students actually support
his budget. Geezl Whet are you people, apathstics of light-wingers?
This is just a note to correct some   the  meeting  as  covered   in  your
inaccuracies in your story General   report were Thorn Quine and Steve
strike may freeze B.C. (Oct. 12).
The "International Socialist
organization" of which you wrote
has a name that being the International Socialists. Please do not ever
confuse the International Socialists
with the Socialist International, the
Trotskyist league or anyone. Please
be accurate. Also, the speakers at
prsHinis
Anderson, not "Brian Henderson"
as was mentioned.
Just thought you'd like to hear
about your mistakes. Otherwise,
thank you for publishing the report
in your "vilest rag".
Ian Weniger
ubc international socialists
T*> 2
from
3 to4
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Finals in March '84
ADMISSION FREE Pages
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 18,1983
Thunderbirds bungle to victory
By MONTE STEWART
People went to Thunderbird
Stadium expecting to see top-notch
collegiate football last Friday. Instead, they witnessed a debacle involving a football team and a group
which aspires to be one.
The Thunderbirds extinguished
the Manitoba Bisons 35-8 before
1,219 action-hungry fans.
However, the story of the game was
not what the 'Birds did but, rather,
what they could have done.
The Bisions were the epitome of
ineptitude as their offence resorted
to numerous infractions to control
the outstanding UBC defence.
What is hard to digest is the fact
that this bunch of nincompoops
from the prairies actually handed
the 'Birds their first loss of the
regular season back in Winnipeg on
September third.
UBC enjoyed quarter leads of
4-0, 11-0, 21-0 in a game that
featured five quarterbacks.
Jordan Leith started his fourth
straight game for the 'Birds while
Mike O'Donnell was the original
Bison shepherd. After subbing in
and out once, Dennis McAree
stayed in the game after O'Donnell
suffered a separated shoulder late in
the second quarter.
Jay Gard came off the bench in
the second quarter to give the
Thunderbirds their first major. The
third year pivot from Federal Way,
Washington handed off to Peter
SPORTS
— n j d   photo
BOWLING ALONG...UBC running back Kent Bowling breaks Manitoba tackle in runaway win Friday.
Disabled athletes exceptional people
By PATTI FLATHER
Outstanding female wheelchair
athlete Diane Rakiecki launched
Exceptional Persons Week with a
speech in SUB Ballroom Monday.
Rakiecki, the Week's keynote
speaker, holds several unofficial
world records, has won medals at
the Pan Am Games, and is a
physical education student at UBC.
Rakiecki was paralysed from the
hips down in a 1977 automobile accident and in 1979 became involved
in track. Initially, "sports was a
rehabilitation measure," she said.
Now Rakiecki has international
status as one of the top female
wheelchair athletes in the world.
She recently became the first Canadian female wheelchair athlete to
finish a marathon.
"My training is basically like a
marathon," Rakiecki said. She
trains 10 miles per day and 10 to 15
on weekends, with weight-training
twice a week. Some training is with
marathon runners.
Rakiecki's immediate goals are to
finish the Vancouver and Hawaii
marathons in under three hours,
prepare for the 1984 Disabled
Olympics and complete her degree.
"I'm much more active now than
I was before the accident," she
said.
Wheelchair sports are expensive
— Rakiecki's specialized chair cost
over $1000. "The physical condition of the chair is very important.
It must be as light as possible," she
said.
Rakiecki said she faces problems
at UBC because of her handicap.
"A lot of my classes are in
Osborne so I have to have someone
lift me up and down stairs. I have
to use freight elevators sometimes.
It does cause difficulties because I
don't like to depend on other people," she said.
Patty Schaflen of the Canadian
Wheelchair Sports Association also
spoke of the wide scope of disabled
sports. There are many competitions for disabled athletes such as
the B.C. winter and summer games,
and national and international
events.
Many sports ranging from
basketball to swimming to archery
to scuba diving are offered at these
competitions, she said.
"We basically look for specific
sports for specific people and adapt
the sport. You can take the skills
and adapt them in a way that the individual still uses the true concept
of the skill," she said.
Currently there are 175
wheelchair basketball teams in
North America, Schaflen said. For
example, in swimming the basic
modification is in the turn but most
strokes are the same, Schaflen said.
Exceptional Persons Week is
sponsored by a number of groups,
including the UBC Student Council
for Exceptional Children and the
faculty of education.
LeClaire for a two yard touchdown
at 7:17. Although Gard paced the
'Birds on their first sustained offensive drive, he threw three interceptions and remained on the bench in
the second half.
In the third quarter, Laurent
DesLauriers would have had a punt
return touchdown; however, Brian
Branting took a foolish clipping
penalty. Branting later made
amends for his miscue with a 47
yard touchdown on an interception.
In the fourth quarter Leith pass-
to Rob Ros for a 37-yard
touchdown on the second play from
scrimmage. Bruce Barnett, who
earlier saw his would-be punt return
touchdown called back because of a
holding infraction, scored the final
UBC touchdown on a 54 yard interception.
UBC shut out the Bisons until
the last minute. With 50 seconds
left in the game, Cusati, the third
'Bird quarterback, was nailed from
the blind side as he set up to pass.
The ensuing fumble bounded back
to the UBC 15 yard line and, two
plays later, McAree passed to
Rogowski for a touchdown. The
two point conversion attempt was
good.
UBC kicker Tom Dixon booted
four converts, two field goals and
two singles for a total of 12 points.
For the first time in three years,
Glenn Steele did not suit up for the
'Birds. The running back has bruised ribs and trainer Ron Mattinson
said he felt that he should sit out.
The 'Birds now have a 4-1 record
in the league and sole possession of
first place.
CITR FM 102 will broadcast Friday's game in Alberta live beginning at 6:15 p.m.
WIFL Standings
GPW L   T   F    A   P
UBC 5   4   1   0 134 61   8
Calgary        5   3   2   0 164106 6
Sask. 6   3   3   0 140156 6
Alberta 6   3   3   0 114145 6
Manitoba     6   1   6   0  74 158 2
Birds net more wins
By PETER BERLIN
The UBC men's soccer team added to its string of victories with a
pair of the road in Southern Alberta
over the weekend.
The 'Birds defeated Calgary 3-1
on Friday night and then crushed
hapless Lethbridge 6-0 on Saturday.
The Friday game was played on a
cold prairie evening. It was also the
'Birds first experience of artificial
turf this year, one of the reasons
why they started slowly and were a
goal behind at half time, said coach
Joe Johnson.
At half-time Johnson gave the
'Birds a "Gettysburg Address"
which resulted in the team scoring
twice within the first five minutes of
the second period.
Frank Iule, a 'deep striker' hit the
first one with a first time shot thirty
seconds into the half. Then top
scorer Louis Miljanovic added the
second with a flicked header five
minutes later. El Lada then added
an insurance goal when he volleyed
a rebound in with quarter of an
hour to go.
Johnson   said   he   was   worried
before the Lethbridge game that his
team would find it difficult to
generate intensity for a team they'd
defeated 4-0 the previous week. He
solved the problem by playing the
players who hadn't been starting.
They replied with a convincing performance. The team scored three in
the first half and three more in the
second as they dominated
Lethbridge throughout.
Next week the 'Birds could clinch
first place as Saskatchewan and
Alberta come out to the coast to
take on the two B.C. teams. If UBC
takes one more point than the
Vikings do, their final game of the
year in Victoria the next week
becomes meaningless. "Either of
these teams could prove to be a
sleeper and take a point from one of
these games," said Johnson.
GPW L T F A   P
UBC 7 6 0 1 22 5   13
Victoria 7 4 0 3 17 6   11
Alberta 7 3 2 1 11 7    7
Sask. 7 1 3 2 6 12   4
Calgary 7 1 4 2 9 12   4
Lethbridge 7 0 6 1 3 26   1
'Birds go forward to win
The depleted UBC rugby team
kept up with the pace in the Vancouver league with a 17-6 win over
the Capilanos at Kinsman Park
North Vancouver on Saturday.
UBC trailed early after the
Capilanos scored with a couple of
penalty kicks. UBC replied with one
of their own, kicked by Adam Kendall, before half-time. They also
squandered a couple of good scoring opportunities when the backs
failed to turn breakaways into tries.
In the second half though they
scored three tries without allowing
the Capilanos any reply.
(   'Bird Droppings   )
WOMEN'S ICE HOCKEY
Lack of experience was again a
deciding element as the UBC
women's ice hockey team was
blanked 6-0 by the Kitsilano
Kanakas Sunday.
With the majority of the game
played in the 'Birds end of the ice,
the defense was hard pressed in
keeping the score from getting any
higher. Another good game by
goaltender Janet Adamson kept
UBC close until the third period
when the Kanakas broke away with
another three goals.
Kitsilano, a strong skating club,
forechecked tenaciously, not allowing the 'Birds any opportunity to
mount a sustained offensive threat.
Ex-Thunderbird Lynn Irwin scored
twice for the Kanakas, while UBC
student Mary Lynch added a single.
WOMEN'S SOCCER
The UBC women's soccer team
went down to a 5-0 defeat against
the Richmond Ruffians on Sunday.
The defeat, however, was no
disgrace. The Ruffians were
formerly the Superstars who were
Canadian under-17 champions.
They haven't conceded a goal in the
league yet this season and UBC
coundn't change that.
UBC's league record is now 2 and
2.
Flanker Brian Daniels scored the
first try. He picked the ball up at
the base of the scrum, broke
through the centre and raced 50
yards to the goal-line. Daniels also
set up the second try with a similar
move. He ran 30 yards before passing to fellow wing-forward Rob
McCarthy who scored.
McCarthy also scored the third
try. He gave good support to a back
breakaway and was on hand to take
the final pass.
Coach Donn Spence said that
after the UBC backs had shown
well in the first half the Capilanos
started to cover across the line to
prevent them running. This had left
gaps near the scrum for the forwards like Daniels to exploit.
Spence said that he will have
almost a full squad for the first time
this season when UBC takes on the
league leading Kats at UBC. The
Kats are 4-1-1 while the 'Birds are
4-1, a point behind with a game in
hand.
The injury problem has almost
cleared up and UBC welcomes back
their two internationals: Rob
Strong and Pat Palmer who both
played in Canada's 27-0 defeat at
the hands of England last Saturday
at Twickenham, near London.
Palmer nearly crowned his international debut with a try. But the
score was called back by the referee
for a mystery infraction.

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