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UBC Publications

The Summer Ubyssey Jul 26, 1990

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 S-UTVEIVEER,
THEUBYSSEY
I     D
Vigils and
roadblocks
Founded in 1918
Vancouver, B.C., Thursday, July 26,1990
Vol 9, No 4
Above:    Demonstrators blocade the street outside
of Tom Siddon's constituency office.
Police request that demonstrators end
road blocade.
Left:       Vigil participants mark the second week of
the standoff between Quebec police and the
Mohawks at Oka
■*  s    #
MIKE COURY PHOTO Classifieds 228-3977
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines,-$3.00, additional lines 60 cents,
commercial -3 lines, $5.00, additional lines 75 cents. (10% Discount on
25 issues or more) Classified ads payable in advance. Deadline 4H)0
p.m,. hoo days before publication. Room 266, SUB, UBC, Van^ B.C. V6T
2A7, 228-3977.
30 - JOBS
P/T PERSON FRIDAY
60 wpm very accurate, ex. spell/grammar
Word Perfect, dBase IV pref. 10 - 20 hre/wk
$9-12 hr. Resumes to
Canadian PID Soc 802-1160 Pendretl,
Vancouver, V6E 1L5
50 ■ RENTALS
RENT TOP QUALITY
Camping Gear, Mountain Bikes, Tents,
Kayaks (doubles and singles), etc. Lowest
rates in town. Reserve equipment.
228-3515
Located in Dispensary
WAH MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
75 - WANTED
BASS PLAYER wanted by the Session,
upcoming engagements, some original material please contact Glenn 879-7790 or
Louise 733-9177
85 - TYPING
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST, 30 years exp.,
word processing/typing. Student rates.
Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
7 Days    5    -	
a week pius low low prices
™* PIUS free services
Sat-Sun    SS-.S-: =*~      , •    _■    __
ne M=^^ laser printing
TYPING  /  WORD   PROCESSING.
Resumes, student papers, laser printer.
Call Debbie, eves 266-8716, days 682-2366
WORD PROCESSING SERVICES
Papers, thesis, resumes,
 call Dianne at 270-3389	
TYPING ■ EDITING - PROOFING, 24
hour service, Tapes-cassettes transcribed
Located beside campus 224-2310	
TYPING QUICK. Right by UBC.
All kinds, editing, $1.50 pg. dspc.
call Rob at 228-8989 anytime
QUALITY WORD PROCESSING laser
printers, student rates. Phone Agnes 734-
3928 or Lynda 736-5010.	
BIND YOUR THESIS
Library quality hard cover books
$15 plus gold stamping,
anything in soft covers $1.99 + up
 Call 683-2463 today	
WORD-PROCESSING
2.50/page 224-5242 Computersmiths
3726 W. Broadway (at Alma St.)
WORD PROCESSING, laser print
quality. Fast, accurate & reliable.
Kite. Laura 733-0268
DISCOVER THE
COMPETITION
IHOT
I FLASHES
SUMMER FILMS
Jul 27-29
War of the Roses
Crimes & Misdemeanors
is not available
Augl
"1900" 7:30 pm only
SUB Theatre 7:30 & 9:45
228-3697
UBC SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Music for Summer Evenings
Concert Series
Thursday, July 26
Featuring:   Karen   Rees,   soprano
with Mel Kirby, piano.
8:00 pm Recital Hall - Music Building - UBC contact 228-3113, FREE
Admission.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Dance for Strength: a 10 hour ballroom dance-a-thon. All proceeds to
Muscular Dystrophy Ass. of Canada.
12:00pm - 10:00pm Robson Square,
call Sheila 683-2000(wk), 224-
4272(home), 228-3248 (Club office)
UNIVERSITY VILL
AGE 2ND FLOOR 2174 W. PARKWAY, VANCOUVER, B.C. PHONE (604) 224-6225
HOMEMADE
• Soups/Salads
• Sandwiches
• Burgers, Quiche
Cappaccinos & Desserts
UBC Village  •   224-5615
2134 W. Parkway
OPEN STAGE TALENT
August 3 at 8:00 pm
Garden Room,
GRADUATE STUDENT CENTRE
Bring your flutes, bass guitars, violins,
keyboards, bagpipes, vocal chords
ALL WELCOME
PLUS, Friday's Summer Folk Series in the Garden
Room July 27, August 10 and 17, at 7:00 pm. And the
Dead Head Cool in the Banquet Room, Graduate
Student Centre, July 28, tix $3.00 in advance from
GSC Office.
Come
join the
AND HELP US
GET THE NEWS
OUT
ON TIME
Oops. A Belated
^;:,Blipjd_iJJitf^
:!i;:Lyanne;: ^ans .1;^
SUMMER SCENE
Volume 19. No. 4
July 26-August 2.1990
Hello and welcome to Summer Session '90
Sum m©T S-SSSJOn     The Summer Session Association is the student organization of Summer Session; if you
A .    i. have any problems, concerns or suggestions, please drop by our office-SUB 216E. We
ASSOCiaTlOn     are there Monday - Friday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Phone 228-3980.
SUMMER SOUNDS
Free, noon-hour concerts. Bring your lunch
and a friend. At SUB Plaza.
Thursday, July 26 Fantazea
Friday, July 27 Basin Street Jazz Band
Monday, July 30 Babayaga Strings
Tuesday, July 31 Phoenix Jazzers (SU B)
Tuesday, July 31 Hollyburn Ramblers
(Clock Tower)
Wednesday, August I The Crows Jazz
Quartet
Thursday, August 2 Gary Keenan Jazz
Quartet (SUB)
Thursday, August 2 Trombones To Go
(Clock Tower)
MUSIC FOR SUMMER EVENINGS
Free, Music Building Recital Hall, 8:00 p.m.
Thursday, July 26   -
Tuesday, July 31
Thursday. August 2-
Karen Rees, saprano and
Mel Kirby, piano perform
music of Mozart, Purcell,
Strauss and Bernstein.
Darryl Nixon, organ,
plays music of Willan,
Buxtehude, Bach and
Couperin.
Nicole Lee, piano,
performs Scarlatti,
Mozart, Brahms,
Schumann, Faure and
Liszt.
ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING
The 1990 Annual General Meeting of the
Summer Session Association will be held
Wednesday, August 8,12:30 p.m. in Room
216E, SUB. All members are invited to attend.
2/THE SUMMER UBYSSEY
July 26,1990 N£WS
Siddon's office, road blockaded
by Paul Dayson
^ Natives and members of the
Vancouver Road Blockade Support Group moved to occupy Minister of Indian and Northern Affairs   Tom   Siddon's   Richmond
j»     constituency office on Tuesday.
Arriving shortly after noon,
"* the protestors found the office
closed and settled down in the
halls to wait.
The Vancouver Road Blockade Support Group is in "full support ofthe Mohawks at Oka," said
% spokesperson Penny Singh. They
support "all the native nations
and their struggle for title and jurisdiction of their lands," she
said.
^ Singh said that the group
chose to occupy Siddon's office
** because they "want to know why
he hasn't been negotiating."
Singh said she believed "the
office was tipped and they knew
we were coming. Avoidance is a
big factor here."
Office staff did not return
until shortly before 2pm.
Vivian Vosberg, constituency assistant to Siddon said, "I
can assure you that he is dealing
with the situation," when she was
asked by Ron Dan of the Lil'wat
Nation about Siddon's position.
This was met with skepticism ofthe protestors.
Dan asked to speak with the
minister or a representative by
phone. Vosberg responded by saying she "would pass (the protestors') concerns on."
One protestor asked, "Why
don't you call him (Siddon) now?"
Another protestor added, "The
whole country's waiting."
Vosberg explained the office's closure by saying the staff
had been out running errands,
and the office would open shortly.
The staff then left again.
Dan said, "I think they'd like
to wait us out."
Soon after the protestors left
the hall and made their way out of
the building onto the street. They
then blocked east bound traffic on
Granville Avenue near Number
Three Road.
While protestors blocked the
road shouting slogans like "Native justice now" and "sit in, sitin,
get the word, this is not Johannesburg", others walked back
through the stopped vehicles distributing leaflets and talking to
the drivers.
The blockade lasted five minutes before being lifted, to allow
traffic to pass, and then the protestors blocked the street again
chanting while leaflets were dis
tributed.
Most drivers were sympathetic to the protestors. "I feel
like going to work," one driver
said, "but I support what they
[the protestors] are doing."
Many drivers honked their
horns and waved to the protestors
as they drove past.
Other people felt that while
the Mohawks had legitimate
cause to set up blockades these
protestors were, as the passenger
in one van said, "just blowing it
out of proportion... and shouldn't
be blockading a road that is not
disputed."
One driver tried, but failed to
drive a silver Volvo through the
blockade.
After the second blockade
had been removed a RCMP constable arrived.
Constable  Hermann  asked
the protestors to keep off the road
saying, "more than enough people
will see you on he side of the
road." He said that the RCMP
had received "a half dozen calls
about blocking the road."
After speaking to the constable, the protestors agreed to
stay off the road and left shortly
after.
Before leaving, Dan said that
the protestors might return the
next day, but whether there will
be any more blockades or sit-ins
in the lower mainland is up to
Siddon and the federal government.
Contacted by phone on Wednesday, Siddon's office stated
that Vosberg had passed the
protestors concerns on to the
minister and "came back to comment but (the protestors) had all
gone."
Government draws
flak over Mohawk
stand off
by Martin Chester support,"   Desmerais   said.
"And I think that calling the
A series of speakers at- Mohawk people of Kanawake
tacked the  federal  govern- 'a criminal element' was rep-
ment for its inaction on the rehensible."
blockade at the Kanawake Justice   minister   Kim
reserve near Oka, Quebec. Campbell was challenged on
The verbal attacks came her record in her present posi-
at a candlelight vigil com- tion and in her previous port-
memorating the two week an- folio of minister of Indian af-
niversary of the Quebec po- fairs.
lice's attack ofthe Mohawk "When she was minister of
blockade   at   Kanawake   in Indian   affairs."   Desmerais
which officer Marcel Lemay said, "she was going to talk the
was killed. B.C. government into the land
The vigil, organized by claims negotiating table."
the federal NDP along with "I think people like you
labour   and   peace   groups, and your leaders who have
drew 30 participants despite said enough is enough have
the hasty nature ofthe or- more   impact than   10   Kim
ganizationA Campbells," he said.
The participants, armed Karpoff said, "Kim
with candles that kept going Campbell is minister of jus-
out in the gusty winds, lis- tice. She is suppose to ensure
tened over the street noises civil rights and justice for all
outside federal justice minis- Canadians."
ter Kim Campbell's office on Tom Siddon, minister of
Broadway as native leaders, Indian and northern affairs
union representatives arid also came under fire from the
NDP party members com- speakers,
mented on the Mohawk block- "I find it distressing the
ade. minister of Indian affairs sit-
"With our candles," Jim ting in the federal cabinet to
Karpoff, NDP MP from Sur- represent the interests of our
rey said, "we're saying in the people, does nothing except
only way we can that we want allow his deputy minister to
peace in Canada and justice inflame the situation," Des-
for all the nation's people." marais said, referring to the
Lou Desmarais, a spokes- comments made by deputy
person for the Union of Indian minister of Indian and north-
Chiefs, said the government's ern affairs Harry Swain on
handling of the situation was Monday,
ill advised. Some speakers preferred
"I think that the spirit to tone down their comments,
behind everyone of you here Nellie Poplar, a native woman
tonight indicates the broad who  made  the  opening re-
level  of support we have," marks, prayed for strength.
Desmarais said. "We   need   to   take   our
But he warned of the fed- hearts and our thoughts," she
eral government's attempts said, "and rethink about what
to discredit the Mohawks and we want for ourselves in this
their supporters. beautiful country of ours and
"There have already been pray our leader will have the
attempts by the federal gov- strength to carry through the
eminent to undermine that struggle for our land."
Native blockades around B.C,
1. Mount Currie,  Duffey Lake
Road - closed
2. Fountain - roads reopened until
meetings take place
3. Pavillion - roads reopened until
meetings take place
4. Oliver, Hwy.97 - information
blockades
5. Pentiction, Hwy.97 - information blockade
6. Vernon - information blockade
7. Ts'ilhqot'in - roads reopened
until meetings take place
8. Moricetown - information blockade, may close road
9. Giwangak - information blockade, may close road
lO.New Aiyansh  - road closed,
open to tourists on weekends
ll.Meziadin Junction - information bockade, may close road
July 26,1990
THE SUMMER UBYSSEY/3 CLOSEST BYCYCLE SHOP TO UBC
BICYCLE STORES
open seven Days a week
12 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU
Kerrisdale
6255 W. Blvd. 4387 West 10th Ave.
263-3240 222-8200
We Also Have a Fully Stocked Service and Repair Department
UBC Aquatic Centre
The University of British Columbia, 6121 University Blvd.,  FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL: 228-4521
UNIVERSITY SWIMS
Moo to Fri
Mon to Fri
Mon/Wed/Fri
Tues/Thurs
7:30am   -      9:00 am EntirefacilityopentoUBCStudents,Suff,Facultyand
11:30am  -      1:30 pm Conference Delegates.   Upon presentation of 89/90
4:30 pm   -      6:00 pm UBC Library card. UBCstudentsareadmittedfreeand
4:30 pm   -      5:30 pm UBC  staff  and   Faculty  pay   $2.00.     Conference
Delegates pay $2.00 upon presenting residence keys.
PUBLIC SWIMS —
Mon to Fri
Monday
Friday
Wednesday
Sat/Sun
Sat/Sun
1:45 pm
6:30 pm
6:30 pm
7:30 pm
1:00 pm
6:30 pm
4:15 pm
10:00 pm
10:00 pm
10:00 pm
5:00 pm
10:00 pm
Pool is open to all ages. Children 7 years and under
must be accompanied by an adult and supervised in
the pool (within arms reach} at all times. Fitness area
is open to those 16 and over for an additional charge
of $.75. Shirts, shorts and runners must be worn in the
fitness area at all times.
FAMILY SWIMS  	
Wednesday 6:30 pm   -      7:30 pm
Sunday 10:30 am -       12:45 pm
"Parents without their own children are not admitted
to this session.
Parents with their own children only. Children are
admitted free only when accompanied by their own
parents. Passes and book tickets are not accepted and
the fitness area is not available.
ADULT SWIMS 	
Tues/Thurs 8:00 pm    -       12 midnight
Saturday 10:15 pm-      12 midnight
'Fitness area closes at 10pm. Sauna and steam room
remain open and co-ed for free.
Aduks only, must be 18 years old and over. Proofof
age may be requested. Fitness area open only until 10
pm for additional charge of $0.75.
FITSWIM	
MonAVed/Fri
Starts Monday June 18, 1990
Last dass Friday, August 31, 1990
Adults only, must be 18 years old or over. This swim
coincides with children's lessons and rentals,
therefore, the availability ofthe indoor and outdoor
pools is limited. Fitness area, sauna and steam
available. Cost is $2.00 for adults. Those over 65 are
$1.25. No book tickets or passes accepted.
CO-ED AQUAC1ZES	
Tues/Thurs 7:00pm    ■
'Starts Tuesday June 19/90
Last dass Thursday, August 30/90
8:00 pm Anyone 18 years and older.  Exerdse to music in the
shallow end. No book tickets or passes accepted. Cost
is $2.25; Seniors are $1.25.
SENIOR'S SHAPE-UP •
Tues/Thurs
9:30 am   -      11:25 am
•Starts Tuesday June 19/90
Last dass Thursday, August 30/90
FITNESS AREA (Check schedule for hours) -
Fifty-five years and older welcome. Stretch and
Strength deck exercise dass, 9:35 - 10 am, followed
by water exercises to music, 10- 10:30 am, or just do
your own thing. Restricted use of pool due to lessons
and rentals. Steam, sauna, weights are open with
limited Supervision. No book tickets or passes
accepted.
The fitness area is equipped with universal/global stations, hydra-gym exercise machines, stationary bicycles,
dumbells, wall mirrors, exercise posters, weight scale, steam rooms and saunas. All the equipment is suitable
for every level of fitness, so drop by to start your fitness program or to maintain your fitness level. Fitness area
is supervised by an attendant during the University, Public and Adult swim sessions and is open to anyone 16
years and older. Cost is $0.75 extra, over and above single admission pool fee. T-shirts, shorts and runners
must be worn when using the fitness area.
ADMISSION FEES   —
Single
admission
Book Tickets (10)
Pas
se_  4 Months (no Probating)
Under 3 years old
#1
January 1 -April 30
detained free
#2
#3
May t - August 31
September 1 - December 31
Children: 3-12
$1.25
$10.00
$30.00
Seniors: 65 and up
$1.25
$10.00
$30.00
Youth: 13-17
$1.75
$15.00
$35.00
UBC Student: Valid Student Card
$1.75
$15.00
$35.00
Adult  18-64
$2.00
$17.50
$40.00
Keep fit and Swim
$2.75
$22.50
—
FITNESS AREA:
To use the weight room, sauna and steam rooms
during Public arid Adult Swims there is an additional
charge of $.75.
Please Note: Swimscheduleand admission fees are
subject to change and/or cancellation without
prior notice.
C°ITIf- (WIGS was thrown in the nut bin for
refusing to put a cigarette out when her
plane was landing.
Do you want this to happen to you?   ^
Of course not. **^»
Join The Ubyssey and stop being silly.
Protest ban panned
by Rose Pacheo
TORONTO (CUP) — Proposed
changes to the University of
Toronto's academic code may allow the administration to punish
or expel students for holding
peaceful protests.
The code revisions would
make it an offence for faculty or
students to "engage in disruptive
behaviour with the intent or result
of preventing another member or
members of the university from
studying or participating in extracurricular lectures, seminars or
colloquia."
Students and faculty have
criticized the changes, saying the
proposed wording may allow the
university to suppress freedom of
speech.
"Any demonstration on this
campus wouldbe an offence under
this definition," said mathematics
professor Peter Rosenthal.
"Anyone — faculty or student
— could then be expelled from the
university."
Fred Wilson, president of the
university's faculty association,
said the university shouldn't discourage demonstrations.
"Society allows political demonstrations so it seems to me the
university should be a centre for
free speech and have roughly the
same rules society has.
"If any place should be a haven for political dissent, it should
be a university."
Arthur Kruger, a member of
the board which enforces the academic code, said the vague word
ing does not mean the university
would penalize peaceful demonstrators.
He said the wording was introduced because the board is
"concerned with preserving freedom of speech." He said it would
only prohibit demonstrations *•
"that have the effect of preventing
(one) from speaking."
Kruger said anyone invited by
the university to speak should be
allowed to do so. «.
He cited an incident involving
Glen Babb, the South African "*
ambassador to Canada, who was
assaulted by a student while at
the university to take part in a
debate.
"Although I am no fan of Mr.
Babb he had every right to be     «.
heard," Kruger said.
Students urged to Vuka!
VANCOUVER (CUP) — Students
should wake up and see the racism
in their own backyards.
That was the message at
Vuka!, a recent two-day conference organized to educate British
Columbia high school students
about the parallels between the
plight of Canada's native people
and black South Africans' struggle
for freedom.
In the Xhosa language of
South Africa, "Vuka!" means "to
awaken."
Black South African activists,
native leaders and students from
39 schools took part in the conference at UBC.
"All the ugliness happeningin
the world is happening right here,
right now," native activist Shane
Point told the students.
He urged students to look
beyond the problems of their everyday lives and learn about the
struggles going on around them.
"You've got to move beyond
the parameters set for you by your
family and their incomes," he said.
"I was sad when I heard of
what happened to many natives in
this country," said Vanessa Matthews, a representative of a black
South African squatter community at Disa River near Cape
Town.
"The imposed education system, the forced resettlement —
there are many similarities."
Vuka! was designed as a way
to get more teenagers to become
politically aware of national and
international issues.
"We wanted to have an educational linking with South Africa to
develop and sharpen the Canadian perspective and to draw some
parallels to racism in Canada,"
said Louie Ettling, one of the organizers.
Phil Stewart of the Van co aver
Indian Centre said the conference
enabled him to exchange ideas
with a many students, and leam
about the situation in South Africa.
"Once we were sitting side-by-
side with the South African people
we had concrete evidence of how
much alike we are," he said.
Caf scabs condemned in NFLD
by Mike Davis and Chris My rick
ST. JOHN'S (CUP) — Riot police
stormed a Memorial University
cafeteria July 4 and arrested 36
striking workers who were
protesting the use of "scab" labour.
The occupation went on for
about an hour, with strikers chanting, beating sticks on tables and
overturning tables and chairs.
Campus security andmaintenance
employees left their jobs for several hours to show their support
for the cafeteria workers.
The strikers, members of the
Newfoundland Association of Public Employees (NAPE), have been
off the job since mid-June. The
legal strike was called to protest a
decision by the company that runs
the cafeteria, Marriott Foods, to
cut many cafeteria employees from
full- to part-time. There are no
negotiations going on at the moment.
Marriott, a U.S.-based multinational corporation, runs cafeterias on campuses across the country.
NAPE official Tom Hanlon
said if the university continues to
let Marriott use "scabs," the strike
will continue indefinitely.
He said Marriott plans to bring
in scabs from the mainland, which
would worsen the situation.
The cuts in the hours of work
mean that on average the workers
will earn less than $6500 a year.
Their hourly pay is $10.03perhour.
Hanlon said Marriott is also
not respecting seniority of workers.
So far there have been 63
arrests in two separate incidents.
Both were the result of what
NAPE calls "scab" workers,
including other university
employees and workers from other
Marriott operations in St. John's.
On the night of June 18, 27
strikers were charged with mischief. Strikers, angry because two
university employees were working alongside Marriott management, entered the cafeteria to protest and were arrested.
Workers will be in court in
July and August to face charges.
Claude Horlick, the university
official responsible for labour relations, said the situation was "unfortunate."
University employees will no
longer   be   asked   to   work   as
replacement workers in the
cafeteria, he said.
The university disagrees with
Marriott's use of outside workers,
he said, but it does not want to get
directly involved in the dispute.
Union official Hanlon said "the
university was like Pontius Pilate
in washing its hands of the situation." He urged the university to
intervene and stop Marriott from
using replacement workers.
He also urged students to
complain about Marriott's cost-
cutting measures.
"Marriott severely underbid on
the contract, resulting in poor
quality food and smaller portions
than in the past," he said.
He also noted a trend towards
disposable dishes which cut down
on labour costs. Students should
showtheirconcernaboutthe effect
of this on the environment, he said.
Student council president
Wade Brake said he is concerned
that there is only one cafeteria open
now to serve 2500 students and
faculty and staff. But he said the
council will not take sides in the
dispute.
Marriott officials refused
comment on the strike.
4/THE SUMMER UBYSSEY
July 26, 1990 :??*
.jff
NEWS
UBC retirement
policy left in limbo
by Brenda Wong
On July 12 the B.C. Human
Rights Council ruled that the UBC
mandatory retirement policy violated the provincial Human
Rights Act.
The policy was brought to the
attention of the Human Rights
Council by Dr. Robert Harrison, a
retired professor from the faculty
of medicine, and John Connell,
who was an administrative assistant within the UBC administration.
The council also recommended that Harrison and Connell, who were forced to retire at
the end of 1985, receive back pay
and be reinstated to their respective positions.
In addition, Connell should
receive supplementary computer
training for his administrative
assistant post.
The council's decision, however, is secondary to an appeal
before the Supreme Court of Canada.
Harrison and Connell initially launched their case with
the B.C. Supreme Court on the
grounds that the Canadian Charter of Rights protected them
against age discrimination.
However the court's judgement ruled in favour of UBC, because the nature of the university's policy was non-governmental, and, therefore, did not contravene the Charter of Rights.
The B.C. Court of Appeal
judged that the narrow age definition in the provincial Human
Rights Code violated the Charter.
Section 1 of the code defines
"age" as more than 45 and less that
65 years of age.
Subsequent to the Court of
Appeal's decision, Harrison and
Connell attempted to strike down
the narrow age clause before they
could proceed with the case at the
Supreme Court level.
UBC law professor Albert
McClean cautioned that the provincial council's judgement is "not
absolutely definitive", as the case
awaits the decision from the highest court in Canada.
Official UBC reasoning for
mandatory retirement policy is
that it is necessary for the institution to achieve excellence through
constantly generating new intellectual ideas.
Council members, Harrison,
and Connell were unavailable for
comment.
Student health plan
goes to referendum
by Brenda Wong
The AMS will forge ahead
with a referendum for the proposed healthcare plan slated for
September 1991.
As tabled in council by AMS
vice president Johanna Wickie,
the extended healthcare plan will
provide coverage for a wide variety
of benefits.
Based on the experience of
other universities, it is anticipated that prescription drugs will
be the most utilized benefit of the
plan. The plan includes a 80%
discount on all prescription drugs,
including oral contraceptives.
One feature of this proposal is
the "direct delivery system" which
means the student will only have
to present a plastic identity card in
order to obtain healthcare services.
The first student levy increase will be $38.90, and minor
inflationary increases are expected in future years.
The amount of the student
levy increase will also depend on
the number of students on the
plan, as more users will decrease
the amount ofthe levy.
If the healthcare plan is implemented it will be involuntary as
only students who can prove they
have comparable coverage can opt
out.
Among the benefits of the
proposed plan is a data base which
will be able to detect double prescriptions, and "the dangerous
combinations of drugs", said
Wickie.
In addition, the language of
the plan allows for coverage of
same sex spouses.
Many students will probably
be interested in the eye glasses
option of $80 for a two year period.
Wickie hopes that the extended healthcare plan will offset
future cuts in provincial spending
in this area.
Mutual Life, who offered the
most extensive proposal, was chosen as insurance underwriter over
both M.S.A. and Blue Cross.
Wickie was pleased with the
unanimous AMS council decision
to place the issue before the students.
Wickie also said, "Realistically, the referendum should pass
with flying colours."
The Canadian Federation of
Students, a national student organization, has pioneered a standardized extended student
healthcare plan. They stated that
a typical referendum yields about
75% of students in favour of the
health plan.
University gets BoG
With the University of Northern B.C. Act having become law,
Advanced Education, Training
and Technology Minister Bruce
Strachan on Monday announced
the appointment of the university's interim council.
The council, created under
the Act, has the powers of a traditional board of governors and senate according to a Brent Thompson, a ministry spokesperson.
It will in turn appoint a president
and deans, hire faculty and staff
and start formulating courses.
The UNBC, headquartered in
Prince George, will operate under
the Act until the university's audited enrollment reaches the
equivalent of 2,500 full time students for two consecutive years. At
that time, UNBC will be brought
under the University Act, which
governs the province's other universities.
Council members, who will
serve a three-year term, are Murray Sadler (chairperson), Hans
Wagner, Charles Lasser, Ed John,
Russ Clinton, Walter Harwood,
John Chapman, Brent Campbell,
Jean McFee, Thomas Steadman,
Margaret Deiluke and Peter
Larkin.
A notice from IBM Canada
Dear Customer,
IBM recently issued a press release notifying customers of a potential safety problem with power cords
intended for its Personal System/2® products.
While there continue to be no reports of electrical shock or injury resulting from this defect, it is IBM's
intent to rninirnize any situations that may exist where users could be exposed to potential injury through
electrical shock. To this end, IBM intends to replace all "MULTILEC" power cords on both installed and
uninstalled systems. Please note:
1. IBM PS/2 systems which are installed and operational are safe to use, but should not be unplugged and
plugged into a different electrical receptacle, reconfigured or repaired before replacing the MULTILEC power
cord.
2. If the system has not been previously installed or is to be reinstalled, the system should be checked for the
MULTILEC power cord before installation.
3. In the rare situation where the system has been phyisically installed but not initially powered on, switch off
the power in the wall socket (if possible), unplug the power cord from the wall without touching the system or
any of its peripheral devices and check for the MULTILEC marking.
In all cases, system installation should not be attempted using the MULTILEC power cord, and all
MULTILEC cables must be returned to IBM.
To determine if a MULTILEC power cord is attached to a system, tum the power off the system and
peripheral devices, unplug the power cord from the wall, and inspect the plug for the "MULTILEC" marking,
which will be found embossed between the prongs of the wall plug or the end of the cord which connects to
the system. For customers with machines attached to a local area network, we recommend you contact your
system admistrator prior to powering off.
To obtain replacement power cables, contact IBM as soon as possible at 1-800-267-7526, or return the cable
to the UBC Bookstore for a replacement. There is no charge for this replacement activity.
We thank you for your cooperation in this matter, and apologize for any inconvenience this has caused you.
The "MULTILEC" power cord: fj
BOOKSTORE
Hong Kong
Chinese Foods
5732 UNIVERSITY BLVD.
Lunch Specials (combination)
$3.75
MSG Free
Licensed
224-1313
tOCATEl) IN THE VILLAGE
RED LEAF      /
RESTAURANT
LUNCHEON SMORGASBORD • AUTHENTIC CHINESE CUISINE
228-9114        LICENSED PREMISES
70% DISCOUNT ON PICK-UP ORDERS
MON - KRI l 1:30    9:00 I'M • SUNDAYS & HOLIDAYS  4:00 - 9:00 PM
CLOSED SATURDAYS
2142 WESTERN PARKWAY UBC
(opposite Chevron Station)
VOLUNTEERS REQUIRED
Genital Herpes treatment study. Volunteers
with recurrent genital herpes are required for
the testing of a potential new treatment(not a cure).
The study involves admission to the hospital for
5-6 days for the intravenous infusion of this new
agent or a placebo containing no active ingredient.
Treatment must be initiated within 12 hours ofthe
appearance of a new lesion. Volunteers must be 18
years of age or older, not pregnant, and off all
antiviral preparations for 7 days prior to enrollment.
An honorarium will be provided to cover expenses.
If you are interested in finding out more about
participating in this study, please call for details
660-6704 before your next recurrence.
July 26,1990
THE SUMMER UBYSSEY/5 Capitalism laid bare
They say that at university you learn at least as much outside the
classroom as in it.
This time of year, students of life can observe no better lessons
in freedom than those displayed by the regulars down at Wreck
Beach.
It's a fabulously unregulated place which somehow satisfies
both hardcore beach creatures, as well as the (tie) died-in-the-wool
free enterprisers.
Perched precariously on the fringes of not only Vancouver, but
of Canada too, this chink in the armour of our "mixed economy" is a
place where you can not only buy a cold beer, but also drink it when
and where you want.
The variety of goods offered by Wreck's entrepreneurs is surprisingly eclectic - much more so than just "ice cold" beverages. On
most days, one could sample the fare of master sandwich makers
Josef or Abdul, as well as trifle or chocolate mousse, and wash it down
with a locally mixed tequila sunrise or pina colada.
There is always a proliferation of clothing vendors, a fact that
clearly begs for an ironic wisecrack. The service sector isn't neglected
either - back massages and even haircuts can be had for the right
price.
For those who feel somewhat isolated so far away from the city,
there is now the opportunity to contact loved ones (or business
associates). Some truly handy person has set up a little business
offering use of his cellular phone for a nominal charge.
Adam "Invisible Hand" Smith would no doubt be enthralled by
this place. Some mystical force is apparently able to determine the
number of beer vendors required to quench the thirst of the beachgo-
ers who show up on a given day. Perhaps thisamazing correlation has
something to do with the fact that most of the sellers aren't exactly
against catching a few rays themselves.
Maybe Wreck Beach reflects the manifestation of deeply rooted
desires to return to a traditional market economy. Indeed, Wreck
sometimes resembles parts ofthe world where this system operates:
there looks to be simply too many sellers of the same product, yet
somehow they all manage to get by.
Our little enclave is regularly threatened by bureaucratic types
from up the hill. When the GVRD acquired jurisdiction lastyear, noise
was made about regular food quality inspection. Police, of course,
have also been known to stray down the trail and disrupt the "illegal"
substances trade.
We should fight to make sure that development and moralistic
forces from the big city don't corrupt this place any more. Since the
mid-seventies, there has been an admirable truce with the law as far
as optional clothing is concerned. Let's hope that the rest of Wreck
Beach's unregulated culture is preserved as well.
In a supposedly diverse society such as ours which purports to
be a haven for liberty, there really should be room for this tiny perfect
free enterprise zone.
?-; i_j ivi rvi _•_ i« _h «
theUbyssey
July 26,1990
The Summer Ubyssey is published Thursdays by the
Alma Mater Society ofthe University of British Columbia.
Editorial opinions are those ofthe staffand not necessarily those of the university administration, or of the
sponsor. The Summer Ubyssey is published with the
proud support ofthe Alumni Association. The editorial
office is Rm. 241k of the Student Union Building.
Editorial Department, phone 228-2301; advertising,
228-3977;   FAX# 228-6093
It was a dark and stormy night as the Ubyssey
staffers huddled in the doorway of the huge, haunting
castle. Lightning flashed, causing Mark Nielsen to bang
harder on the door as they waited for what seemed hours
for it to open. Finally, it did, and before them stood a palid
little man in a rumpled tuxedo carrying a violin.
"Where's the hot tub?" asked Mike Coury as he rushed
inside, soaked to the skin, as were the rest of the tired
hacks, menacing paparazzi and political outcasts who
trampled in behind him.
Before anyone knew it, Dale Fallon and Paul Dayson
were trying on the knight's armour that hung along one
stone wall, wondering how it would stand up against
rubber bullets in the event of an insurrection.
Meanwhile, Rebecca Bishop made her way down into
the basement looking for what she hoped would be torture
equipment, but turned out to be weight machines. Her
disappointment was soon dispelled by cries from Brenda
Wong.
"Hey! I found a rack!," she screamed victoriously. The two
were last seen chasing Steve Chan into the depths of the
catacombs.
Once David Loh and Martin Chester figured out how
the spot lights worked, the room was filled with a kaleide-
scope of colour. Yukie Kurahashi, meaanwhile, was spraying everyone with champagne from the wine cellar.
Overcome by the emotion, Ted Aussem started to
blow fire using his lighter, while Ernie Stelzer was dancing
with a skeleton found in a closet.
Suddenly, the little man appeared. "Everyone, get out
of here," he screamed in wild-eyed rage. "You're all just too
scary."
Editors
Rebecca Bishop   •  Michael Booth  •  Martin Chester •  Paul Dayson
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Letters
He's a man
I am a man. I've done
some good things. I've done
some bad. Define me by the
sum of my actions; then, you
will know who I am. I am a
man among men. We have
done some wonderful
things. We've done some
horrible things. Define us
by the sum of our actions.
Then you will know who we
are. You will not fear us,
through ignorance. I am a
man, among men amidst
humanity. We've done some
amazing feats together.
We've done some catastrophic crimes together.
Define us by the sum of our
actions. Then you will know
who you are.
I am a man. The
women's issue of The Ubyssey informs me that I can
not be a feminist, because I
am male. Thank you, but I
cannot be a feminist (as defined by The Ubyssey) because I am not sexist. Similarly I cannot be a racist or
fascist because these attitudes are based upon fear
and ignorance. The militant
feminist position asserts
that I am responsible in part
for crimes against women
because I am male. In fact,
I am responsible in part for
crimes against society in
general, because I am human. I would, however, like
to demonstrate the logical
error in asserting that my
maleness alone convicts me
of crimes against women.
Consider the following
simple arguments:
1) Amanmurdersawoman.
Therefore, the murdering of
this woman is an extension
of this man's maleness. I
have statistics to back up
my opinion. 2) A man invents penicillin (thereby
saving millions of lives).
Therefore, the brilliance of
the discovery is an extension of this man's maleness.
I have statistics to back up
my opinion.
These two arguments
are logically equivalent and
both suffer from the same
fundamental error. Correlation does not imply causation, or more formally, the
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any Issue. Letters must be typed and are not to exceed 300 words in length. Content
which is Judged to be libelous, homophobic, sexist, racist or factually incorrect will not be published. Please be concise.
Letters may be edited for brevity, but it Is standard Ubyssey policy not to edit letters for spelling or grammatical mistakes.
Please bring them, with Identification, to SUB 241k. Letters must include name, faculty, and signature.
converse of an argument is
not necessarily true. Why
are these errors made by
educated people? My opinion is that they are blinded
by the fear ofthe other (than
self). Men and women are
different. Not more valuable than the other, except
in biological terms, where
women come out on top in
terms of survival ofthe species (historically this has
been recognized: men have
defended women in war and
catastrophe). I hope that
the misanthropist views
expressed by the articles in
the women's issue are fringe
tirades and do not speak for
the views of all women. I
would ask women who feel
pain to express it openly, but
do not simply switch roles
with the oppressor. The
world is a fragile place and
there is need ofthe strength
of women and men to hold it
together in the face of hunger, poverty, war and greed.
I am a man, among
men, amidst humanity. I
am you.
Greg Beatch
Grad Studies
What is
the GDC?
The AMS did something of historic proportion
on May 9 this year: it voted
to make the Global Development Centre (GDC) a service organization. In light of
the fact that we live in an
interdependent world and
that there is a need for UBC
students to understand the
gravity of development issues that ultimately affect
their lives, that vote was
highly commendable.
The GDC is an umbrella organization consisting of many groups such as
Amnesty International,
WUSC, and Students for a
Free Southern Africa, to
name just a few. Each group
adds its strengths to the
social, political, and structural fabric of the Centre.
The Centre's mandate is to
inform students and to enable them to appreciate the
magnitude and complexity
of some environmental and
development issues, both
globally and in particular
countries and regions.
The GDC does that
through its library with
books and magazines, film
series, speakers, and possibly a conference. Students
can drop by the Centre and
sign out resource materials
for free of charge. There is
also information on opportunity to work overseas with
many organizations.
The destruction of the
world's rain forests, the
hunger and debilitating
poverty in certain regions of
the Earth, and the deplorable states of the natives in
our own backyard, to mention just a few, are a painful
reality ofthe world in which
we live. Many of these problems are invariably complex
and can be traced in part to
questions of development —
or the lack of it.
The GDC cannot solve
these problems, but it will
do its best to give you all the
pertinent information and
perspectives on both sides of
the issues, in the hope that
the information will lead
you to a careful examination
of conscience with regard to
your attitude towards
events around you and your
response to them.
In short, the Centre
hopes you will use the information in a way that will
move yourself and humanity in a positive direction —
and to enlarge your horizons
of care and responsibility.
But at the same time, it is
important not to lose sight of
the broader picture. Those
problems confronting the
people or planet Earth do
not exist, nor can they be
tackled, in isolation. Nor
will they be solved overnight. They require a long-
term commitment from everyone.
We at the GDC are
committed to change. Our
commitment is rooted in the
belief that poverty and injustice should be alleviated.
And the GDC draws its
strength from an understanding that everyone, irrespective of his or her background, can participate in
that process.
The GDC still needs
capable and talented
people, especially those who
have just returned from
their stints overseas, to run
it. If you would like to get
involved, please call Hai at
228-0350 after 10 PM or
John Lipscomb at 228-3973.
HaiV.Le
GDC member
The Ubyssey
joins the NRA
Your last editorial was
probably well-intended, but
it went a little out-of-con-
trol. By giving your "full
support to the natives in
pursuit of justice", you have
supported the use of automatic assault weapons on
behalf of justice. You have a
rather American vision of
justice.
Are not the poor people
of this country entitled to
more justice? Would that
justify using submachine
guns to reach their objective? What about Pro-
Choice and Pro-Life militants who have their own
but yet different concept of
justice? Would you give
them the right to promote
their cause with automatic
assault weapons? ON behalf of justice, of course.
If Canadians and Mohawks, like Americans,
want to defend their rights
with firearms, as promoted
by your editorial, it is their
own business. Fortunately,
Quebecois do not think in
this manner. The Surete du
Quebec protects the choice
ofthe population to live in a
society free of gun threats.
If the Mohawks want serious talks they must put
their guns down. Their
cause is certainly right.
They do not need automatic
assault weapons to defend
it.
Finally, may I suggest
that The Ubyssey become a
corporate member of the
National Rifle Association
since it shares their philosophy.
Guillaume Therien
Ph.D.
Forestry
6/THE SUMMER UBYSSEY
July 26, 1990 W_       S ^ulAjMMM       >"^\,"''}l>,_
-^r
--*---•**- *---v-
oNnion/ijtors
Cyclist basks in
light
I would like to express my thanks
to whomever is responsible for
turning the lights back on along
Sixteenth in the Endowment
Lands. As a cyclist I am not particularly fond of riding in the dark
at night on an empty stretch of
road. Riding back after Midnight
Oil played in Thunderbird Stadium, the street lights were out
and there was a great pile of brush
on the side ofthe road in the bike
lane. At least there are lights
along Sixteenth. There are no
lights between 41st and UBC.
Hopefully the condition of cycle
paths is becoming a recognized
issue in Vancouver. The City is
working on improving Tenth
(hopefully it will get widened) and
SW Marine has just been repaved
with room for bike lanes. If the
increase in parking fees, scheduled for the coming year, increases
the number of individuals cycling
to UBC, the condition of cycle
routes and bike racks will have to
be taken seriously on campus and
elsewhere.
Rebecca Bishop
Sth year unclassified
Pre-Meech/Post-Meech Quebec
a stark contrast for natives
The one thing above all else
that strikes me about this Oka/
Chateauguay business in Quebec
is the ironic contrast it provides
to the moralistic platitudes
spouted by the Bourassa government as it strove to get lonesome
Elijah Harpur "onside" during
the belated Meech Lake debate of
last month. How the Quebec
Liberals went on, deftly, almost
naturally appropriating the nationalist rhetoric, solemnly invoking the icon of natural solidarity between two peoples relegated to the fringes of the mainstream. Surely Quebec would be
the aboriginals' best, and only
real friend/ally in post-Meech
Canada, perhaps even negotiating in tandem a rejuvenated future for their children. If only the
noble savages would come "on-
side"....   ,..'..
But the Indians wouldn't bite
the beat and off Quebec went on
its own course as it had intended
all along.
And such a long way we have
all come since the twenty-third of
June. Hardly was the new Quebec out the gate, all full of hubris
and momentum, but they sought
to cut their own sisters and
brothers in the saddle. Guns and
golf greens. No, this was not the
high ground.
One is tempted to discover a
vengeful motive on the part ofthe
Quebec government in this sad
drama, but I think not. The Mohawk blockade has been up since
Marchi Open, even anxious for a
righteous siege .More likely
Bourassa (or Remillard) recognised that another instance of oppression of minority rights within
Perspective
Quebec prior to passage of the
Meech Lake Accord was simply
untenable. Better to wait. At best,
the accord would be passed and
the aboriginals would be neutered.
Again. At worst, the Quebecois
could burn that bridge when they
got to it.
Well, obviously the latteris the
case. Could it be that the Quebec
Liberals and the federal Tories
have been hanging about together
too long? Snatching defeat from
the jaws of victory, Bourassa has
put the lie to any claim Quebec
may have to a moral right to self-
evident self-determination.
More intriguing yet though,
are prospects for the future.
Should the aboriginal rights issue
finally come into its own, and
there is every indication that it
will, Quebec separatists may find
themselves reeling. A great deal
of Quebec's ability to negotiate
with the rest of Canada from a
"position of strength" draws on
economic counters. James Bay
power, for instance, and the pros*
peet of dumping it for Yankee
greenbacks south of the border.
But what if the first peoples
should sabotage that project (as
theyvwish), or even worse, work
oxita power-play with Newfoundland and Labrador versus the
French fact? Now that would be
irony of the highest political order. And what if, in the wake of
the Gitksan-Wet'suwet'en case,
(which I boldly predict will be
found in the plaintiffs favour),
the Supreme Court were willing
to recogni ze vast expanses of "Canadian" territory, (including
Quebec), as legally and morally
unalienated? What if the nationalists had to come to terms with
an ascendant power that gave not
a stinking shit about French or
English, but only wanted to get
Cree on the curriculum? Maybe
then the parochialists wouldn't
be in such a hurry to sneer at a bilingual, multicultural, federal alternative to the question north of
the forty-ninth.
Iain Hiscoe
Arts 3
___k____iHii______Pl>p _?-__________ll_ll__MVMH*
*-***-*9riP^
«(&•
-"*-.
!#
"'Ajia-a?
The "talking stick" arrives
at the Goodwill Games in Seattle.
More to come next week.
DAVID LOH PHOTO
/HORSETCCH
COMPUTER      INC
1237 WEST BROADWAY
Tel: 738-3886
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Fax: 738-2881
Presenting our Back to School Specials
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All systems include a two-year labour & a one-year parts warranty.
Mon.-Fri. 9:30 AM to 6:00 PM Sat. 10:00 AM to 5:00 PM
Prices may change without notice.
19 15-1990
ANNIVERSARY
UBC
SPEAKERS
BUREAU
Work study position available as an assistant
with the UBC Speakers Bureau, filling requests
from community groups for faculty/staff speakers, Sept. 5, 1990 to Mar. 31, 1991. Candidates
must be eligible for the work study program.
Skills required: pleasant, helpful phone
manner; reliable and responsible; ability to type;
some computer skills; ability to work without
direct supervision. Interest in public relations
an asset.
HOURS: 10 hrs./week,
preferably Mon./Fri. mornings.
WAGES: $11.25/hr.
Interested candidates should submit resumes to the UBC Speakers Bureau, Community
Relations Office, 207 - 6328 Memorial Road,
Vancouver BC, V6T 1W5.
July 26,1990
THE SUMMER UBYSSEY/7 66
M HHfl IN MIMI I
99
AUGUST IS PATIO MONTH AT THE THUNDERBIRD WINTER SPORTS
CENTRE.
"NAHC THE PATIO"
ENTER OUR CONTEST AND BE ELIGIBLE TO WIN WEEKLY PRIZES AND THE
GRAND PRIZE OF A CHRISTMAS SKATING PARTY FOR YOU AND 25 OF YOUR
FRIENDS. (INCLUDING SKATE RENTALS AND A CHILI DINNER).
NW TC ENTER
VISITTHE THUNDERBIRD WINTER SPORTS CENTRE'S NEW SUMMER
PATIO AND SUBMIT YOUR SUGGESTION ON ONE OF OUR ENTRY
FORMS. THERE WILL BE WEEKLY DRAWS FOR THUNDERCHICKEN
T-SHIRTS IF YOUR SUGGESTION IS CHOSEN BYTHE COMMITTEE
AS THE PATIO NAME YOU WILL WIN THE GRAND PRIZE.
mm are we?
THE PATIO LOUNGE IS LOCATED ATTHE SOUTH END OFTHE WINTER
SPORTSCENTRE OVERLOOKING THEOUTDOORTENNISCOURTSAND
FIELDS.
W SHOULDI VI.IT
THE NEW PATIC ECINGE?
BECAUSE IT HAS A GREAT VIEW, GREAT FOOD AND GREAT PRICES. ALSO
I CAN WIN WEEKLY PRIZES SUCH AS T-SHIRTS OR EVEN THE GRAND
PRIZE OF THE CHRISTMAS SKATING PARTY AND CHILI DINNER FOR 25.
PHONE 228-6121 FOR INFORMATION
OPEN MON-FRI     11:00A.M. -11:00 P.M.
SATURDAYS 11:00A.M. -   6:00 P.M.
LUNCHEON SPECIALS
SPORTS T.V.
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82.00* per page
RECEPTIONS:
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Phone   224-1922
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(6041228-6093 m: 228-4388
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OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
9:30-9:00 P.M. THURSDAY & FRIDAY
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CALI 09 3311 ^P**II_>___>_M
press or spw TaiKing
rTTK Yellow
■ mum   Paaes
Church evicts
hunger strikers
by Nicholas lonides
A hunger strike staged by six
foreign trained doctors was
brought to a halt Tuesday when
they were evicted from Our Lady
of Sorrows Church where they
spent 16 days fasting.
The doctors were protesting a
policy that prevents them from
practicing in B.C.
"It's a type of
discrimination,"
Bitonti said.
"These are all
qualified people."
Doctors trained in all but 5
foreign countries must serve a
year long internship. However,
newly graduated doctors trained
in B.C., who must also serve a one
year internship, receive priority
placement. The effect ofthe policy
is that foreign doctors find it difficult to complete the mandatory
program.
Doctors who have been
trained in Britain, the United
States, Australia, New Zealand
and South Africa are exempted
from this policy.
UBC is working on developing
a pre-internship program for foreign-trained doctors, according to
Dr. Martin Hollenberg, dean ofthe
faculty of medicine.
Hollenberg said: "There is a
need for such a program and the
idea is to provide opportunities for
foreign-trained doctors to practice
in B.C."
The program would be modeled on an Ontario pre-internship
program set up in 1986, which
assures the doctors a place in a
regular internship program after
36 to 48 weeks.
Hollenberg said the government is interested in such a program. "We were asked by the
ministry to work on such a program before the hunger strike
began," he said.
But John Bitonti, spokesperson for the hunger strikers, said
the program is unacceptable because it requires "a pre-assess-
ment for assessment."
"It's a type of discrimination," Bitonti said. "These are all
qualified people."
The protestors were also not
pleased with the decision to remove them from the church.
An unidentified woman at
Our Lady of Sorrows Church said:
"All I know is (the strikers) were
living on water and they left yesterday."
Father John, who refused to
give his last name, said the hunger
strikers were asked to leave.
"We felt they made their
point," he said. "They went far
enough. We would not let them go
to the extreme of dying."
Bitonti disagreed with the
decision to ask the protestors to
leave the church.
"The church said
they can't condone
dying in their
church," he said.
"But is it okay for us
to die elsewhere?"
"We were disappointed/1
Bitonti said. "We weren't breaking
the law."
"The church said they can't
condone dying in their church," he
said. "But is it okay for us to die
elsewhere?"
Adina Cimpeanu, a Romanian trained doctor who practiced
for three years before coming to
Canada in 1980, said the church
only gave them an hour and a half
to leave.
"It was very short considering
our conditions," Cimpeanu said.
"But we obeyed."
"We have been promised some
negotiations by the premier and
all we can do now is wait for the
negotiations," added Cimpeanu.
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8/THE SUMMER UBYSSEY
July 26, 1990

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