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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Feb 18, 1992

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Array the Ubyssey
p
Guatemala
students
under fire
Founded in 1918
Vancouver, B.C., Tuesday, February 18,1992
Vol74,No,3{r37
Pay equity under negotiation at UBC
by Carta Maftechuk
Lack of progress in negotiations between Canadian Union of
Public Employees (CUPE) Local
2950 and UBC administration may
lead to a strike.
The university offered a 3.85
per cent salary increase for 1991 to
CUPE members, compared to
seven per cent for management
and professional staff and nonunion technicians.
The union is claiming unfair
treatment of employees and discrimination against women.
CUPE 2950 is made up of library, clerical and secretarial
workers. More than 90 per cent of
the members are women, while 78
per cent of UBC's high wage
earners are men.
"There is evidence of a widening gap between ourselves as
women workers and the higher
paid ones who are mostly men,"
said Ann Hutchison, chair of the
contract committee for CUPE 2950.
"We have single parents clearly
living in poverty," she said.
Hutchison said some employees have had two jobs, even though
they are full-time employees at the
university.
"We see it as discriminatory
treatment to offer 3.85 per cent.
They are ci-ying *we don't have the
money,' but they have a lot of discretion in their priorities," she said.
One CUPE member said she
could not afford to strike. "In a
way, we can't complain because
we're doing fairly well. But it seems
unfair the administration is passing on the budget problems to us,
the lowest people on the ladder.
Things aren't getting any cheaper,
and we aren't making any more.
It's like we're losing."
Local 2950 has been negotiating since January 1991. They have
been without a contract since
March 31. A negotiation meeting
is set for February 19 and the motion to take a strike vote will be
discussed on February 27.
"We're not going to settle for
anything less than the going rate
in the Lower Mainland. The closest parallel is the workers at BCIT,"
Hutchison said.
Secretarial and clerical workers at BCIT went on a two and a
half week strike after being offered
a seven per cent increase over 27
months. The support workers—
Lesbian and gay
rights on agenda
by Effle Pow
Amid challenges to government policies affecting the lives of
queers, the second Canadian conference on lesbian and gay rights
ii* scheduled for October.
Conference co-chair barbara
findlay, a Vancouver lawyer, said
she has received calls from people
across Canada interested in participating in Out/Rights - Les
Droits Visibles.
"[The conference] will address
homophobia at large and apart
from the courts," findlay said.
Currently in BC, the Human
Rights Act does not protect lesbian
and gay rights.
The BC Supreme Court has
said it is willing to extend the act
so it includes discrimination on
the basis of sexual orientation,
findlay said.
Recent developments are
heading in the direction of
amending the Charter of Rights
and Freedoms in the Canadian
constitution to include sexual orientation.
"It appears lesbian and gay
rights will be protected under the
Charter of Rights [and Freedoms]
and in the next five years there
will be lots of cases that will define
what that means," she said.
The steering committee for
Out/Rightahassentletterstolegal
and community groups across
Canada to solicit input for the
conference.
Conference topics include
AIDS and the law; immigration;
custody and benefits for lesbians
and gays; fighting homophobia in
the justice system; legislation; and
community action.
Out/Rights is co-sponsored by
the Gay and Lesbian Law Association (GALLA), a group of UBC
law students.
Patrick Walker, a GALLA
member, siu d representation at the
conference is important.
"The goal i s to create a network
for groups who use the law for
social change," Walker said.
Approximately 30 workshop
spaces are available and the conference will take place October 9-
11 at the Robson Square Media
Centre.
A one dayconference called A
Leap for Rights: Lesbian and Gay
Rights on a Queer Day will be
held at UBC on February 29.
"The conference will be an
opportunity for people to hear
about current developing issues
affectinglesbians and gays, [such
as] developing issues in immigration and family law," saidlwbara
findlay, one of the conference
speakers.
XI will be speaking on whether
lesbians and gays should adopt a
strategy that lesbians and gays
are just like [heterosexuals],"
findlay said.
"There hasnt been much discussion in the lesbian-gay com
munity anil people don't know it's j
aquestion.," she said.
Other speakers include UBC ;
professor Doug Sanders and
Vancouver lawyer GwenBrodsky,
who will ttilk about immigration
and developments in spousal
benefits respectively, findlay is
completingamasteroflaw degree
andteachingaUBC courseabout
women and the law. She was part
ofthe Vancouver delegation that
attended the first conference on
lesbian and gay rights, which was
held in Kingston.
Svend Robinson will also
make an appearance (February
29 is his fourth anniversary of
coming out publicly).
mostly women—won an agreement
for ten per cent over 22 months.
"We know the university can
afford to pay us. It's a downright
disgrace that a university should
tolerate a situation where university employees are living in poverty,'' Hutchison said.
CUPE 2278, the teaching assistants union, and CUPE 116,
which consists of housing, parking
and security, food services, clerical, telecommunications, and
campus planning employees, are
also negotiating with UBC administration.
The negotiator for UBC administration was unavailable for
comment.
Aboriginals: a footnote to the
great Kanadian conversation
by Frances Foran
The aboriginal peoples' inherent right to self-government won
support from "ordinary Canadians"
at the Canada Round constitutional
conferences. However, some members of the First Nations doubt
public consensus will translate into
concrete changes in the federal
government's relations with the
aboriginals of Canada.
The pressure to create a constitutional deal satisfying Quebec's
demand for distinct
society recognition
may decide what is
included in the Parliamentary report on
the conferences.
A special conference on Native
issues has been set
for next month after
the parliamentary
unity committee
submits its recommendations for constitutional reform on
February 28.
Ernie Cray of
the United Native
Nations said the
broad public consensus on self-government is encouraging, but "the most
senior bureaucrats
maytry to reduce the
will ofthe people."
"At the end ofthe day, it's ten
white guys in suits with the guidance of thousands of Canadians."
Native Council of Canada
(NCC) BC leader Ron George noticed the message from the
aboriginals became convoluted
even before the conference was
over.
"It is pretty well understood
that we've got an inherent right to
self-government. But the draft of
the final report says "within the
context of Canada". That's not what
we're saying. I think the writers
are putting a spin on this."
The phrase "within the context of Canada" reflects the sentiments of Minister of constitutional
affairs Joe Clark. Clark rejected
the Assembly of First Nation's chief
Ovide Mercredi's use of "distinct
society" because it implies the creation of internationally recognized
separate nations. Clark warned
Mercredi a constitutional deal
could be made without aboriginal
contribution if the First Nations
leader obstructed the goals ofthe
constitutional reform. Clark prevented another clash withMercredi
at Toronto by keeping him in pri
vate meetings for much of the
conference.
In preparation ofthe summit
with the government's negotiators
the four major aboriginal groups
(NCC, Inuit, Tatirisat, and United
Native Nations) are in "parallel
process" forums, discussing what
they want out of constitutional reform and settling contentious issues such as the application ofthe
Charter until a First Nations bill
of rights is drawn.
to participate in statecraft, White
was reportedly barred from
workshopswhere self-government
was discussed by non-Native participants. At least one workshop
chose not tc discuss aboriginal issues because there were no
aboriginals among them.
UBC law associate professor
Marlee Kline is cautious in considering the governments' use of "inherent righ-f.
"Recognizing the right to self-gov-
FIDDLING w,rH the
WHILE CANADA
is^AmSm-"
Haida Nation elder Levina
White fears that negotiations cannot be conducted between equal
parties because unlike the Canadian state, aboriginal groups do
not have 45 million dollars to donate to their conferences and to
promote their interests.
"It is too bad they didn't extend the same rights to (the
aboriginals') conferences. We dont
have their money or even TVs so
the country can be informed as to
what we're talking about. Nobody
is going to know what we say at
our conferences."
White considered the poor
representation of First Nations
delegates at the conference an indication the government will not
be as amenable as the conference
delegates to the idea of self-government.
"I don't think it was an over-
si ght," she sai d ofthe lack of representation. "There was only one
aboriginal in each workshop. They
never intended anything for us in
this round."
Although the Canada Round
talks were promoted as the opportunity for "Ordinary Canadians"
SHARON LINDORES PHOTO
ernment isn't recognizing self-
government," she said. "Even if
recognition of inherent self-government is entrenched in the constitution, there is room for that
right to be extinguished."
Neither does Jenny Jack put
much faith to government promises. Speaki ngfrom experience, the
Oka veteran and Tlingit Nation
member needs proof that the first
minsters who rejected the idea of
self-government in the 80s have
had a genu: ne change of heart.
Speaki rig at a benefit for the
women involved in the Oka crisis,
Jack said, "Today when aboriginal
people got to the table to negotiate,
the old attitudes are still there.
The old bureaucrats who used to
say, We're not going to negotiate'
are still there. What we hear in the
media is that the government is
willing to negotiate and yet when
aboriginal people are at the table
we don't see that."
The United Native Nations
open forum on constitutional
change for First Nations will be
held the 22 and 23 of February at
the Maritime Labourers Hall. Classifieds 822-3978
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THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
Saturday, Feb. 22
Professor Peter Crowcroft
Department of Zoology
University of Texas at Austin
on
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at 8:15 pm.
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Need a roomfaxxnmate? Call us!
Quality listings, quality people.
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Pref one to 3 mths only. 588-6643.
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Sea Wing Sailing School is seeking candidates for the 1992 Spring C.Y.A. Instructor's
clinic. Successful candidates will be offered
emp. with Sea Wing. Call 669-0840.
INTERESTED IN RUNNING
a business? Student Sprinklers still has
openings in B.C. Last year our average
manager made $7-12K. For more info, call
944-6397.
SUMMER JOBS!!
Earn money painting outdoors.
Good earning potential!!
Call Paul at 228-9990
EXP. SALES PERSON for established sen*,
oriented bicycle shop. Sports minded bike
enthusiast preferred. Resume to 6069 W.
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STUDENT WORKS Painting now hiring
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Exp. pref. but not req. Inquiries call 263-
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LOOKING FOR AN EXCITING job this
summer? Gain valuable real world exp. with
advance to earn $10,000 or more. Call Works
Corps at 298-7429 or 1-800-665-4992.
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GEOLOGY STUDENTS gold panning and
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compliment your studies. Phone 597-0286.
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99 - PERSONALS
We apologize for the omission of this very
special Valentine:
THE SWAN'S HEART-
THERE IS NO WHERE ELSE I CAN
HIDE MY HEART EXCEPT IN YOURS!
-THE MUTE SWAN
SNIPER,
sad we may not always hunt together. Hope
you'll take me out to fly once and a while.
FALCON
Deadline fi>r submissions: for
Tuesday's paper is Friday at
330pm, for Friday's paper,
Wednesday at 330pm.
NO LATE SUBMISSIONS
WILL BE ACCEPTED.
Note: "Noon"m 1230 pm.
Tuesday, February 18th	
Hillel/Jewish Students' Assn. Famous
Hot Lunch. Noon, Hillel.
Inst, of Asian Research. The Development of the Narmada Valley: Politics,
Environment & Human Rights." John
R. Wood, Noon-2, Asian 604.
Art Exhibition; The AMS Art Collection. 9:30-4:30 M-F. SUB Concourse,
'til Feb. 28.
Student Counselling & Resources Ctr.
Resume Prep. Noon Brock 200.
Film: "Black Mother, Black Daughter*
for Black History Month. GDC,
Women's Ctr, Anti-Discrim Cmte.
Noon, SUB 24IK (Ubyssey Office).
Women Students'* Office at Outreach
Desk. Noon-1:30, SUB Concourse.
Int'l House. Lunar New Year Party
(Karaoke). 7:30pm-12:30am
Progressive Conservative Youth Gen.
Mtg. Noon, See SUB 249D for location.
Arab Student Soc. Movie: Wedding in
Galilee. Speaker: Mordecai Briemberg.
6:30pm, SUB Aud, $2.
Arab Student Soc. Dr. Rabab& Hanadi
Loubani. "Women of the Arab World."
Arab Awareness Week. Noon-2, Buch
D323.
Women Students' Office. Mature
Women Students support group (drop-
in). Tues 1:30-2:30, Wed: Noon-l:30.
Wednesday, February 19th	
Global Dev. Ctr. Open discussion on
cultural appropriation, focusing on images in various media. 6pm, SUB 100D.
The Sexual Harassment Policy Office
at the USS Outreach DeBk. Noon
Hillel/Jewish Students Assn. Adv. Hebrew Class & Torah Study. Noon, Hillel.
Student Counselling & Resources Ctr.
Film-Be Prepared to Speak. Ncon-l:20
, Brock 200.
Walter Gage Toastmasters. Forum to
improve communication and thinking
on your feet. Exec, nominations this
week. 7pm, SUB 215,
Inst, of Asian Research, Brown bag
seminar — Grief, Grudge and Nostalgia: The Consciousness & Logic of
Japanese "Immigrants" to Manchuria
by Shinzo Araragi.
Concert- Festival Players Canada.
Noon, Recital Hall.
Arab Student Soc. Hani Farts & Adel
Safty. "The Peace Process: What prospects?" Arab Awareness Week. Noon-2,
SUB 205.
Arab Student Soc Party: Arab Cultural Night. Arabic music, dinner &
dancing. $5, bar avail. 8pm-midnight.
SUB 207/209,
Thursday, February 20th	
Intl Socialists. Mtg: Women & Work:
The battle against gender discrimination. 7:30, SUB 215.
Global Dev. Ctr. Org'l mtg. Noon, SUB
100D.
Student Counselling & Resources Ctr.
Procrastination. Noon, Brock 200.
"Doing Business w/ Business." Noon,
WoodS.
Life Drawing Club. Weekly Drawing
Session. Noon-230, Lasserre 204.
Concert: An evening of Chamber Mu-
sic.7:16 Prelude Lecture;8pmConcert.
Recital Hall, Music.
Women Students' Office. Managing
School Related Stress (drop-in). Noon-
1:30 every Thurs. Brock 261.
The Ubyssey. All-nighter experts. Production staff. 5pm-wee hours.
Friday, February 21st	
PRISM. Annual Fiction Contest Awards
& Reception.Reading by Susan
Musgrave. $5 [$4 Btudentsj at door.
822-2514 to reserve. 8pm, Recital HalL
Music
Gays & Lesbians of UBC at Outreach Desk. Noon-l:30, SUB Con-
Chaplain at USS Outreach Desk
11-30-Noon, SUB Concourse.
Live music, free. "Sylvi" (folk/rock/
blues). 8-11, Fireside lounge, Grad
Ctr.
Monday, February 24th
Student Counselling & Resources
Ctr. Change your mind & manage
stress. Noon -1*20 pm, Brock 200.
Global Dev. Ctr. "Development"
Days. Campus groups with info
tables/displays, workshops, lectures.
All week. SUB Concourse.
Tuesday, February 25th	
Sustainable Develop.Research Inst.
Aldyen Donnelly, SPARK Environment Industries
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February 18,1992 <1
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NEWS
Violence against students
escalates in Guatemala
by Lucho van Isschot
Last week, Estuardo Pefia, a
history professor, and Luis Solares,
a medical student at the University
of San Carlos, Guatemala, were
assassinated.
Pefta, an activist with the
Asociaci6n Magisterial
Guatemalteca (a progressive
teachers' association) was shot
outside of his home in Guatemala
City by two men on the night of
February 10.
Two days later, 21-year-old
Solares was found in a plastic
garbage bag with multiple bullet
and torture wounds.
Guatemalan activi sts working
in Central and North America are
certain the armed forces are responsible for the assassinations of
Pefta and Solares because of the
kind of weapons that were used.
"These two people were assassinated with 45-calibre firearms
and such high calibre firearms are
used exclusively by the army," said
Oswaldo Godoy, a representative
of Guatemala's national high
school students' union.
These murders are part of a
current wave of repression in
Guatemala.
Since Jorge Serrano was
elected president of Guatemala in
January 1991, there have been
more than 500 political disappearances and more than 140 assassinations in the country. In the
last decade, there have been at
least 40.000 disappearances in
Guatemala.
Ingrid Mendez de Cruz, a
spokesperson for the AEU (the
Student Association at the University of San Carlos), said university communities have been
targeted frequently by the Guatemalan government and armed
forces in recent years.
Only two weeks before Pena
and Solares were assassinated, the
AEU offices were bombed.
At 10:30pm on January 30,
half an hour after a meeting ofthe
AEU executive had ended, a bomb
was set off.
"The bomb destroyed the
equipment of the AEU administration, the office, the walln, the
windows. It also destroyed a part
ofthe Faculty of Pharmacy building which is situated adjacent to
the AEU office," said Mendez de
Cruz.
The lrombing and the two assassinations occurred just before a
peasant protest, which the AEU
helped organize, and was to take
place in Guatemala City.
Byron Cruz, an AEU representative who recently fled Guatemala, said recent events are
targeting activist organizations.
"We see the bombing, not only
as a direct terrorist act against the
AEU, but also as an act of terrorism designed to hurt popular
movements and popular organizations in Guatemala.
"Attacks against the university community, against the professors and against the students,
are nothing new in Guatemala.
The government and the army were
participating in these kinds of attacks a long time ago," Cruz added.
In 1984, for instance, ten
members of the AEU executive
were kidnapped and to this day,
they are still missing.
Five years later, in 1989, 14
students from the University of
San Carlos were kidnapped. Five
of these students were found dead
and tortured.
Constant threats and acts of
intimidation have forced many
student leaders either to stop organizing or flee to other countries.
i        For one month, from Feb-
[ ruary 23 to March 24, a repre-
[  sentative of the Student Association ofthe University of San
Carlos (Guatemala) will be
touring Vancouver and BC.
The representative will be
Will the government listen?
tour, they have bought radio
ads in Guatemala to protest
the recent series of tragic
events.
"At this point, support
should involve lots of letter
writing and signing petitions
condemning human rights
Guatemalan student
to visit UBC
speaking at UBC during Development Days (February 25
and 28). At both appearances,
petitions calling for action on
the cases of Estuardo Pefia and
Luis Solares will be circulated.
"It is essential that Canadian students be made aware
of the current repression facing students in Guatemala,"
said Robyn Laba, a UBC student and spokesperson for BC
Central American Student Alliance (BCCASA).
"Their situation is life-
threatening and the support of
the international community
is crucial to let the Guatemalan government know that we
are concerned and attentive to
what is happening."
BCCASA is involved in
solidarity work with students
in Guatemala and, in addition
to sponsoring the upcoming
abuses by the Guatemalan
armed forces," Laba said.
Letters of support can be
sent to:
Ing. Jorge Serrano Elias—
Presidenle de la Republica
Gen. Jose Garcia—Ministro de
la Defensa Nacional
Lie. Fernando Hurtado Prem—
Ministro ie Gobernacion
Palacio Nacional
Ciudad do Guatemala, Guatemala
FAX (011 502 2) 53 74 72
and
Secretary of State for External
Affairs
Ho. Barbara McDougall
House of Commons
Ottawa, Ontario. K1A 0A6
FAX (613) 996-3443
by Sharon Lindores
Despite a wide -range of opinions, women at the constitutional
conference in Vancouver this
weekend agreed on one point: the
necessity of promoting equal rights
and social programmes.
One ofthe main topics of discussion was the Charter of Rights
and Freedoms.
Karen Mock, chair ofthe Canadian Multiculturalism Committee, wants Section 15 ofthe charter to be exempt from the Notwithstanding Clause.
Section 15 ofthe charter deals
with individual equality rights and
prohibited grounds for discrimination.
Mock also wants the charter
to be proactive.
"I would certainly hope and I
believe that this conference will
endorse the notion that yes, aboriginal self-government, yes, distinct society, but yes, the Charter
of Rights and Freedoms should
predominate over any government
within Canada."
Mock was pleased with the
equal representation of women and
men at the fifth and final conference, something she said was
missing from the previous four.
She was also satisfied progress
had been made during the talks,
although some did not agree with
her.
Levina White, a Haida elder,
has been fighting for Native self-
government since she was placed
in a residential school and permanently separatedfrom her brother.
The charter will not apply to
aboriginals until they enter into
confederacy.
"Well have our own charter
and come in'on our own terms. We
haven't said we're going to yet, we
just want them to recognize our
sovereign nations with inherent
right to self government."
White is skeptical about the
proceedings to follow the constitutional conference.
"I think the Canadian people
finally understand and agree that
we should have fair treatment from
Canada. I dont think the government is reading the Canadian
people and I hope that they will.
"I thi nk there needs to be more
meetings. I don't think [the government is] going to recognize
anything further than the inherent right to self-government. It's
been pretty evident throughout
these meetings that there are no
aboriginal people here except a very
select few and they intend to keep
us out because we've had a very
hard time, even getting into the
workshops. I think that says
something—it's very, very controlled."
Judy Rebick, chair ofthe National Action Committee on the
Status of Women (NAC), is more
optimistic about the outcome and
the charter.
"Certainly I think that Ontario
will insist that [a stronger charter]
will absolutely happen.
"I think that there is a strong
message coming out of these conferences that politicians cant ignore and Mr. Clark has already
said that yes, this has to be part of
the Constitution, so Tm very optimistic about that.
"I think the sticky point is
spending powers because we feel
strongly that we have to have a
formula, that only Quebec can opt
out of joint programmes. We feel
that quite strongly and we're afraid
that the other provinces won't
agree to that, so that's something
we have to be lobbying premiers
about."
Rebick is also concerned about
Section 121, which would take
down trade barriers between provinces without protecting the have-
not provinces.
Tdliketosee 121 offthe table.
We're against it because we think
that the competition among provinces, once all the barriers are
down, will lead to a downward spiral of social programmes and equity programmes, labour codes,
environmental regulations."
There are varying opinions
on Senate reform, another issue on
the government's agenda. Abolishing the Senate was not discussed, although there was some
question among participants about
how to make the Senate more representative.
Representation could be obtained through appointment or
elections. The NAC supports an
elected senate, with 50 per cent of
the slates being women and with
proportional representation of minorities on all slates.
"Most of the women I think
who don't support that are women
who are already in -political office,"
Rebick said.
"We support employment equity and affirmative action everywhere else. We need it in politics,
because that's where we're most
under-represented."
Rebick originally proposed a
constituent assembly review the
results of the conference, but the
idea has been cancelled because of
a lack of time.
"I dont think a constituent
assembly will happen, but I think
it's possible well have another
conference to look at the final proposal and options in case we dont
agree."
No proposal has been finalized about the outcome of this con-
PAUL GORDON PHOTO
stitutional report.
Women voiced a lot of their
opinions this weekend and Nancy
Riche, a participant from Ottawa,
articulated many concerns when
she said, "Our fate is in the hands
often white men in suits."
WUSC SYMPOSIUM 1992
ACADEMIC FREEDOM
A Panel Discussion
February 25,1992
SFU-AQ3159 time: 2:30pm
UBC - SUB212 time: 7:30pm
with guest speakers
HEMA GOONATTLAKE - SKI LANKA
S.SANTHO-LESOTO
and other local speakers
• Free admittance •
February 18,1992
THE UBYSSEY/3 (p
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PERFORMANCE SPONSORS: Digital Equipment or Canada Limited, Rull HN
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A Ballet British Columbia DanceAHve! presentation
Taiwan Association of UBC
Chinese New Year Invitation
We cordially invite you to join us for a Chinese New Year
celebration which will take place in the UBC SUB Ball
Room on February 22 at 7:00 p.m.. All programs will be
presented in both English and Mandarin.
The Programs are as follows:
A Kung Fu Show
The "Lions" Play
Folk Music Performance
Chinese Flute Performance
Karaoke Championship Final
Traditional Dance Performance
Traditional Chinese Fashion Show
During the intermission, several different traditional
Chinese arts will be demonstrated by their respective
masters. They are as follows:
Paper Clay Show
Tea Ceremony Show
Chinese Painting Show
Chinese Knotting Show
Chinese Wind Mill Show
Ticket Prices
Member $ 5.00
Non-member: $ 7.00
At Door $10.00
Sold at: UBC SUB 241H, 12:30 -1:30 p.m.
ttOKft
■x\«c3^c-,c*.«^». \
Thunderbird droppings
compiled by Mark Nielsen
Women hoopsters approaching best season
The UBC Thunderbirds are
two wins away from their best
Canada West women's basketball
season in 16 years.
If the Thunderbirds are able
to sweep the Alberta Pandas this
weekend in Edmonton, they'll finish the season with a 12-8 record,
tying their 1975-76 performance
when they finished in third place.
And if the undefeated and
nationally number one ranked
Victoria Vikings sweep their series
with the Lethbridge Pronghorns,
the Thunderbirds will move into
second place.
The Thunderbirds let the
matter of second place slip out of
their hands this weekend, however,
when they split with the
Pronghorns at War Memorial Gym.
After losing 64-54 to
Lethbridge on Friday night, the
Thunderbirds bounced back to win
71-62 on Saturday behind a 26
point performance by Lisa Nickie.
Gymnasts second
The UBC men's team finished
second to the Calgary Dinosaurs
at the Canada West gymnastics
championships in Calgary over the
weekend.
While the Dinos racked up
200.95 points, UBC followed up at
194.60, beating out Alberta at
181.25.
Calgary also won the women's
side with 135.03 points, while UBC
was fourth with 124.51 points.
As well Dino gymnasts won
the all-round results in both the
men's and women's divisions.
Volleybirds fighting for
playoff life
Both the men's and women's
volleyball teams are facing do-or-
die situations as they head into the
final weekend of Canada West
regular season play.
The 8-6 UBC men must defeat
10-4 Alberta in order to tie the
Golden Bears for the second of only
two play-off spots.
The 13-5 UBC women, meanwhile, also need to beat Alberta
twice and hope that first-place
Saskatchewan wins a pair of
matches at home this weekend over
second place Calgary, which boasts
a 14-4 record.
The women Thunderbirds
blanked the Lethbridge
Pronghorns 3-0 (15-9, 15-6, 15-9)
in volleyball play in Alberta on
Friday.
Pucksters sweep
Saskatchewan
The UBC Thunderbird hockey
team rounded out its regular season home game schedule with a 4-
2 Canada West victory over the
Saskatchewan Huskies on Saturday at the Winter Sports Centre.
Jeff Dods, Jim Inkster, Dean
Richards and Dave Bond scored
for UBC, whose record improved
to 10-14-2.
The win came on top of a 3-2
defeat ofthe Huskies the evening
before.
Swimbirds named to World
Cup team
UBC swimmers Kevin
Draxinger and Turlough CHare
were selected as wild card entries
to the World Cup finals in
Majorca, Spain on February 28
and 29, just one week before the
CIAU swim championships in
Montreal.
CHare won the 200,400 and
1500 metre freestyle events at a
World Cup meet in Montreal
while Draxinger won the 200
metre backstroke.
w* ■•.•SSflfe'*
Tania Gladluk In action during women's hoop play
over the weekend.
BOB FORCIER PHOTO
at the UBC Bookstore.
Thursday, February 20, 1992
3:00-4:00pm.
She will be signing copies of her
latest book,
"Revolution from Within: A Book
of Self-Esteem"
(Little, Brown; $27.95)
m
: BOOKSTORE
6200 University Boulevard
Tel. UBC-BOOK (822-2665)
]
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i*XX****J*************X***fk
You've read it!
Now write it!
Join The Ubyssey at
SUB 241k.
4/THE UBYSSEY
February 18,1992 SPORTS
T-bird trio honoured
Basketbirds steal first
from Lethbridge Horns
by Charles Nho
UBC Triunderbirds basketball
coach Bruce Enns put matters in
perspective following Saturday's
103-94 win over the Lethbridge
Pronghorns at War Memorial Gym.
He took the microphone and
bade farewell to three of his finest
recruits—guard J.D. Jackson from
Vernon, and forwards Jason Leslie
from Vancouver and Mike Clarke
of Kelowna—all in their final season at UBC.
"You can't replace the quality
of these three guys," Enns said in
an interview after the game.
"You can talk all you want
about coaching, but when it comes
down to it, more is said than is
done. It's what they do out on the
floor that matters."
He couldn't have put it better,
particularly i n the case of Jackson.
Not only is Jackson UBC's all-time
leading scorer but was the CIAU
player ofthe year last season.
During the post-game ceremony Enns called Leslie "the
leader of our team" and Jackson a
"special player" whom the younger
team members can learn a great
deal from.
As for Clarke, who was suspended from the Thunderbirds last
season Enns acknowledged that
they've had their differences.
"Contrary to what you've
heard, Mike and I are friends,"
Enn said.
Unfortunately, although
Clarke was invited back this season, he twisted his knee seven
games into the season, sidelining
him for the campaign.
Despite the tributes, the season isn't over yet, however. The
Thunderbirds clinched first place
with the victory on Saturday which
also raised their record to 13-5.
UBC jumped ahead 30-16 by
capitalizing on fast-break baskets
and running the floor ahead of
their Pronghorn opponents andled
58-44 at halftime.
Making such long outlet
passes, admitted Enns, was indicative of UBC's "risk taking"
nature on offence as well as creating match-up problems for the
other team.
When the offence was forced
to set-up, however, they worked
the ball around the perimeter,
spreading the defenders before
flicking the pass inside to one of
their big forwards operating in or
near the painted box.
According to Enns, that was
Thunderbirds Jason Leslie (34) and Bob Heighten
(52) make a Pronghorn sandwich out of Lethbridge
forward MHce Lynagh.
the strategy: "middle first" and
then if that is firmly taken away,
take what is available — usually
an open jumper. Interior shooting
translated into a shooting percentage of 65 percent, well over
their season's average of just over
51.
In the second half, Lethbri dge
managed two serious runs to get
within six and seven points. Their
wide-body center, Mike Lynagh,
was impressive not only as a
rebounder and a rock-like pick,
but as a neutralizer to UBC power
forward Bob Heighten who managed to get just four shots off the
entire game. Though he ran the
length of the court, Lethbridge
point guards rarely looked to him,
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instead choosing to either go all-
the-way themselves or pull back.
Why have your big man run then?
A center who exerts the energy to
hustle down the lane should get
rewarded with the ball whenever
possible.
J.D. Jackson finished with 25
and Leslie 20 along with 12 rebounds.
By finishing first the
Thunderbird are assured of hosting any team besides the last-place
Pronghorns in the first round of
the playoffs starting February 28
at War Memorial.
The three graduates each received plaques, UBC sweaters, and
a tartan print tie.
Tuesdays
Coming soon
Jam Night
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Thursdays
■Alternative Music
Student Nite
3 Bands
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Wednesdays
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Monday, March 2,1992
711 W. Broadway • Oak Rm. • 7:00 PM
A Palmer College of Chiropractic West
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Palmer West's Program and Facilities
Admissions Procedures & Financial Aid Opportunities
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932 GRANVILLE • 684 - 7699
February 18,1992
THE UBYSSEY/5 Eu I lO IT 1211
Au Kanada Our Home
On Native Land
These weren't just ordinary Canadians enjoying the weekend at the luxurious Pan Pacific. These were Supercanadians on a mission
from god and joe dark with an agenda to
follow, deadlines to meet, Meech Lake's wounds
to heal.
Nine million dollars of magic buys group
therapy for 200 of Canada's select. Warm
squishy goodwill gushed from participants
and spilled into the Musqueam land under the
Pan Pacific as they pleaded for harmony, understanding and the distinct society clause.
And, oh, the Tories do know how to throw a
party in the name of politics. Supercanadians
got to schmooze with politicians and bureaucrats and listen to their bowels gurgle.
With Mercredi's unexpected demand for
inclusion in the discussion of Quebec's right to
distinct society snuffed, it was inevitable that
the final constitution talk was a resounding
success. After all, the constitutional crisis is
the legacy of Meech, not Oka. Mercredi and
the aboriginal question were safely contained
by the final round, and Clark's face stayed a
pleasant shade of rose.
And what will be the product of this experiment in Athenian democracy? What will the
"kinder and gentler" Canada that Clark asked
us to embrace look like? It is not hard to guess,
considering that many participants who also
attended the other conferences across Canada
complained that the reports from those conferences did not accurately reflect the discussions on certain contentious issues. Coinci-
dentally the reports concurred with the Tories'
original proposals for constitutional reform:
Yes to an economic union and free trade among
the provinces, No to a social charter, and
aboriginals' inherent right to self-government
within the fence ofthe state.
Saving Canada wasn't so difficult.
It was a piece of cake, really. Cake, croissants, and nouvelle cuisine, courtesy of the
Royal Bank of Canada. It's a good thing the
conference wasn't better publicized: the Pan
Pacific palace would have been stormed by un-
ordinary Canadians who can't turn their minds
from their stomachs to ponder constitutional
reform. But three meals a day for the riffraff
wasn't on the agenda.
theUbyssey
February 18,1992
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays and Fridays by the
Alma Mater Society ofthe University of British Columbia.
Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not necessarily those of the university administration, or of the
sponsor. The editorial office is room 241K ofthe Student
Union Building. Editorial Department, phone 822-2301;
advertising, 822-3977; FAX 822-9279.
The Ubyssey is a founding -aember of
Canadian University
It wasn't a particularly stormy nijs_. ut it sure was dark.
Frances Foran struggled to find a light switch, only to trip
over Lucho Van Iaschot who was sitting on the floor having
tea with Mark Nielsen. The tea spilt all over Chuck Nho
who developed a phosphorescent glow. Immediately Hao Id
adopted "Bruce* as his middle name, and with the help of
Effie Pow, lifted Chuck up and used his glow to locate the
light switch. But it was too late. The Uniter-we-stand-
Uniter-we-van group of Elizabeth, Tim, Janet, Jackie had
lured John from the Cap Courier, Christine from the
Bricklayer and Alayne from the Manitoban into destructively
frentic dancing. Tim Crumley and Martin Chester could
only shake their heads in despair .Paula Wellings, Dianne
Rudolf and Helen Willoughby-Price donned invisible suits
while Carla Maftechuk handed Matthew Martin a guitar
which he quickly handed to Singing Sage and drumming
Ellen Pond. With Sam Green accompanying on the waxer,
and Mike Coury on the light table, the resulting music
soothed the writhing dancers. Sharon Lindores quickly
switched the light back off, Rebecca Bishop continued to
dance while Paul Dayson and Paul Gordon admired Chuck
who was still glowing.      Editor*
Paul Dayson • Sharon Undoros • Carta Maftechuk
Rafil Poachlara • Bfto Pow
Photo odltor • Paul Gordon
' ilenemq...
Guatemala
Letters
Exam Crunch
Preliminary Exam
scheldules are now up. You
have ahorrible scheldule and
your are wondering just what
you can do?
Your class may possibly
move an exam by requesting
that your professor change
it. The professor can speak
with the registrars office and
have it moved. Alvia Branch
ofthe Registrars office states
that the exam scheldule is all
done on the computer. An
attempt is made to space out
exams for first year science
and Engineering courses. The
Registrars office relies on
feedback from professors in
order to alter the exam
scheldule. The exams can be
changed while the preliminary scheldule is up, but once
the final scheldule is posted,
it is very difficult for any
further changes to be made.
This process does not guarantee an exam will be moved,
but it is currently the best
approach for students to take.
Julie Lah
Senator-at-Large
Three cheers
for the geers
Friday's editorial appeared to be simply following
Ubyssey policy by condemning the engineers' Rose Bowl
heist as "illegal and wrong";
in fact, it was the first "imaginative, funny" stunt the engineers have pulled since I've
been at UBC, far outdoing
the annual Volkswagen-in-
a-strange-place. To your
charge that the action was
"wrong", I remind you that
the engineers phoned U of W
within hours of taking the
trophy and guaranteed its
safe return. That isnt stealing. Thaf s borrowing without
asking, and when it's done as
a harmless joke, there's
nothing ethically wrong
about it. The Ubyssey will
dispute the harmlessness of
the joke, saying that it was
inconsiderate ofthe victims'
feelings, who had worked so
long and hard for their trophy. Well, I think those big
Husky linemen can take it.
As a varsity rugby player
who works as hard at my
game as those Huskies do at
theirs (and harder at my
studies, I would guess), and
who regularly plays before
crowds of 20 in the rain at
WolfsonField,Ihaddifficulty
mustering sympathy for the
U of W player on the news,
whining about how much
hard work and dedication
thattrophyrepresents. What
the Rose Bowl actually rep-
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any Issue. Letters must be typed and are not to exceed 300 words In length. Content
which Is Judged to be libelous, homophobic, sexist, racist or factually inco-Tect will not be published. Please be concise.
Letters may be edited for brevity, but It Is standard Ubyssey policy not to edit letters for spelling or grammatical mistakes.
Please bring them, with Identification, to SUB 241k. Letters must Include name, faculty, and signature.
resents is about a zillion dollars in television revenue for
a university which is already
so wealthy that it can carry
and outfit close to a hundred
players on its football team.
(I believe UBC carries 40)
Come on, Ubyssey, you're
always siding with the underdog. Why the sudden realignment?
The Huskies may have lost
their trophy for a few hours,
but theyll always have the
memories of their victory
parade through the downtown streets, something that
no UBC team will ever erg'oy.
Why not? Because school
spirit is all but dead at UBC,
and any action that might
strike a spark among the comatose student body or create a friendly rivalry with
another university is adamantly discouraged by the
student newspaper.
As for The Ubyssey's gripe
about the illegality of the
engineers' prank, I have to
ask when exactly did The
Ubyssey begin to have such
reverence for the laws which
keep wealth flowing into the
hands of our American
neighbours? The engineers
walked into a giant institution and took away their most
prominent symbol of wealth
and power right out from
under their overprivileged
noses. It was a victory—albeit a small one—for the underdog, and yet The Ubyssey
condemns the taction because
it was "illegal and wrong".
Glad to see the spirit of rebellion is alive and well at
The Ubyssey. Not.
Erik Rolften
Arts 4
History, letter,
set straight
The sole virtue in Adam
Rabiner's attack (Letters,
Feb. IDonmyFeb. 7thletter
about Zionist racism is his
uniformity; every statement
he makes is untrue. He has
misrepresented what I wrote,
and history.
Nowhere in myletter did
I argue, as Mr. Rabiner says
I did, "that Israel's occupation of the Territories ... is
completely illegal because it
hinders the freedom of the
Palestinians." Nowhere did I
"pretend, or somehow imagine that Palestine was an
autonomous state". Nowhere
did I "attribute Zionism as
the reason for Israel's control
over the Territories." Creative as he is, though, Mr.
Rabiner has not answered a
single point that I did raise;
not one!
Mr. Rabinerreportsfrom
the history books in the same
way he does from my letter.
Most outlandish is his claim
that in 1967 "[Egyptian
President] Nasser called on
the entire Arab world to annihilate Israel and to *push
the Jews into the sea." This
'quote' is a Zionist invention.
A British court case in 1976
revealed that no evidence exists of Nasser ever making
such a call.
Israel, not Mr. Rabiner's
monolithic "Arab world", was
theaggressorinthe 1967 war.
If, as he dreams, the Occupied
Territories are truly "essential to secure its borders and
to inhibit any further [sic]
attacks", then why is Israel
being so stupid as to settle
these lands with civilians?
In the words of Mordechai
Bentov, an Israeli government minister during the Six
Day War, "this whole story
about the danger of extermination was made up from
start to finish and enlarged a
posteriori to justify the annexation of new Arab territories."
Mr. Rabiner is unable to
get even the smallest historical details right; Jordan, not
"Trans-Jordan", once controlled a part, not all, of Palestine. Furthermore, why
should the fact of this outside
control invalidate Palestinian national rights, when the
fact that the Jews were not
the original rulers of what is
now Israel does not invalidate
Israeli national rights? Mr.
Rabiner's grotesque suggestion that I might want Palestinians to be ruled by Syrian
or Iraqi dictators is
unforgivably offensive.
Israeli General Ezer
Weizmann said, The Jews of
the diaspora would like to
see in us, for their own reasons, heros with our backs to
the wall. Butthiswishcanin
no way change the realities."
Despite the inhuman brutality Israel inflicts on Palestinians in the Occupied
Territories, the P.L.O. has
recognized its right to exist.
The frontline Arab nations
are negotiating face to face
with Israel in the ongoing
peace process. So much for
"the Arab world's never-ending goal to destroy the Jewish
state"! These are the realities.
It is time that Israel's apologists woke up to them.
W. Mark Roberts
Graduate Studies
Stop sanctions
against Iraq
I was really impressed
with what I have read for the
last two weeks on the front
pages of The Ubyssey. I felt
for a few moments that I was
not living in North America,
but rather in some neutral
spot on this earth if there is
any left with regard to the
"economic war against Iraq;"
since the whole North
American media in general
is pro-economic war against
Iraq.
The Iraqi population has
been deliberately convicted
to death by the whole world
community represented by
the "so called" United Nations and has been left to
suffer from starvation, malnutrition and disease because
of the economic war against
the "Country of Iraq."
If the economic sanction
resolution was adopted in
August, 1990 to force Iraq
out of Kuwiat, why is it not
lifted now? Is Iraq still occupying Kuwait? Hasn't Kuwait
been liberated?
What have Iraqi children
done to die due to these
sanctions?
What have Iraqi women
done to die due to these sanctions?
What have ill Iraqis done
to die due to these sanctions?
I personally have lost six
of my closest family members since the war was ended
by Mr. Bush-not during the
war-they had nothing to do
with the invasion of Kuwait
or withn politics and politicians at all. They just died
due to lack of medicine and
medical treatments in hospital. I am still looking for a
logical answer to my question:
why is this economic war
being waged against the
people of Iraq? Is it to starve
the government of Iraq or the
people of Iraq? The government of Iraq and on top of it
the president will be the last
to starve or be effected by the
sanctions. So the target is
the people of Iraq! Now, why?
It looks like the period of
Jan 17, 1991 - Feb 27,1991
was not the real war. It was
only a nintendo game and
now after Feb. 27,1991, the
real war has begun and I
don't know when it will end.
I hope someone has the
answer.
Sadiq J. Toma
Iraqi Citizen
Research Associate
Department of Food
Science
WAVAW/Rape Crisis
Center is looking for
women volunteers to do
rape crisis work. Training
begins Feb. 19 and runs
for 11 weeks (Wed. 7-10pm
and Sun. ll-5pm). Call
255-6228 for information.
6/THE UBYSSEY
February 18,1992 A false prophet for a brand new age
by Rick Hiebert
There is much to write about
this biography, but briefly this
tale ofthe cultist Brother XII
wont be on the reading list of
your average local believer in the
tenets ofthe New Age movement
of religions.
PRINT
Brother Twelve
By John Oliphant
McClelland and Stewart
Edward Wilson was a British
sea captain who, through study of
ancient Eastern mystic religions,
concluded he was the reincarnation ofthe Egyptian god Osiris
and one ofthe twelve brothers
chosen by the "Masters ofthe
universe" to set up a new civilization that would crank out
humans turned into gods as
Detroit does Fords off an assembly line.
Wilson, a writer in occult
magazines, decided in the late
1920s a new colony based on his
teachings would be a good idea.
So, the self-styled Brother XII
gained an interesting niche in BC
history by forming a commune
with his devoted followers in the
Gulf Islands of Georgia Strait in
the 20s and 30s.
Although the story ofthe
Aquarian Foundation has
resulted in several articles and a
couple of books, there are still a
lot of rumours about what
actually went on in Wilson's
colony. Brother XII, by
Vancouver writer John Oliphant,
goes a long way towards a
definitive explanation ofthe
history and teachings ofthe cult.
Oliphant unearths new
information through years of
research and interviews with
former members ofthe cult,
which, combined with his
inviting writing style, makes for
fascinating reading without
being sensationalistic.
The writer portrays Wilson's
cult as one run by a rule of
terror. Wilson and his accomplice Madam Zee ran the cult as
absolute autocrats, grinding his
followers down with hard
physical labour and emotional
oppression. He allowed no
opposition, forcing members of
the cult to take him to court to
keep their rights and try to have
some say in the commune's
affairs.
Wilson was also out to
ensure his project got all the
money it needed and Oliphant
shows how money may have
become more important than it
should have been to the leader.
He also adds some interesting
speculations about the ultimate
fate of Wilson, who disappeared
when his cult collapsed with
several million dollars in gold.
The book is very interesting,
even to someone who can't tell a
Theosophist from a theocrat,
because Oliphant concentrates
on the cult's members and helps
the reader understand the
peculiar hold that Wilson had on
his followers.
Brother XII was quite a
cause celebre at the time he was
active in BC. Tales of what he
did appeared in The Province,
The Sun and other newspapers,
and the book can be used to
study Wilson with the benefit of
hindsight, particularly his
heated battles with the provin
cial government that looked
unkindly on the odd lifestyle and
ethics ofthe movement.
Oliphant's book, however, is
perhaps too fair to Wilson. After
documenting what a cruel person
Wilson was, Oliphant stops short
of asking whether Wilson's
beliefs were discredited by his
inability to treat others as he
wanted to be treated himself. He
asks a psychic to offer
otherworldy insights on the
ultimate fate ofthe cult leader,
which is a bit of a letdown.
That aside, Brother XII is
the definitive treatment ofthe
life and times of a BC cultic
leader whose vision outmeasured
his compassion and ethics.
Grapes go punk
Grapes of Wrath rock the Ballroom.
ROSA TSENG PHOTO
Upcoming Films:
by Carla Maftechuk
WHAT a way to spend
Valentine's night...with
The Grapes of Wrath.
The band started by saying
they played their worst show
ever in the SUB Ballroom six
years ago, and they could not
possibly do any worse this time.
Fortunately, they were right.
MUSIC
The Grapes of Wrath
SUB Ballroom
February 14
The show was one of their better
ones, with a surprisingly good
mix of dance tunes and their
slower, more mellow songs.
The size ofthe crowd for
Friday night's sold-out show
helped people pretend they were
in a real club rather than the
gymnasium-like SUB Ballroom.
Despite the less-than-desirable
venue, the sound was good.
Most of the songs were from
their latest release, but the band
played older material when they
heard requests from the crowd.
The Grapes were slow to get into
playing, but they got more
energetic by the end ofthe show.
They kept the crowd screaming
for an hour and a half, and the
Grapes were called back for two
encores.
I wouldn't have expected
stage-diving at this show—the
crowd was entertaining the band
as much as The Grapes were
entertaining us. People underneath them, however, didnt like
being fallen on very much and
we could have done without the
bruises given out by both the
divers and security.
Wednesday - Thursday (Feb 19 - 20)
7:00 Strangers on a Train $2-50 P61"
9:30 Raging Bull
Show
+ $2.00 Membership
Friday - Sunday (Feb 21 - 23)
7:00   Homocide
9:30 The Meaning of Life
$3.00 per
Show
Next Week: My own Private Idaho
film
All Screenings are in the SUB Theatre
Phone: 822-3697 for more info
kr TRAVEL AGENTS i
ARE ALL
THE SAME...
*•*
► WK ABB THB 8TUDBBT TBAVBL 8PBCEALX8TS. <
TRAVELCUTS
Lower Level
Student Union Building
822-6890
ii
AN EROTIC FUNNY ROMANCE!
A POWERFULLY AFFECTIHG FILM
-Peter Trovers, ROIUNG STONE Magazine
11
****!
"Denzel Washington shows a suppleness and sweet sexuality that he has only hinted at before,"
-Lawrence Frascella, US Magazine
fe*i*>a*^rfir>1tt^*#^
DENZEL WASHINGTON
ROSHAN SETH    SARITA CHOUDHURY
MISSISSIPPI
MASALA
A FILM BY MIRA NAIR
The Director of "Salaam Bombay!"
Itlltl (UH FflMI'i
fe % ^f*>a>»rfir**^*«i»
ALLIANCE-SCSFIUttri™ ""^OOraEY/GAK^
MOVIEVVORKS« BUa RIVER mmcime DENZE WASHINGTON ROSHAN SETH SAMTA CHOUOHURr CHAR1ES S. DUTTON »JQE SENEU 'MISSISSIPPI IMSAWTSaa MUCH EPSTEIN
s^EDUCHMAN SSSLYDiAD£AHP1LCHB ,«£ MITCH EP51BN SCHEME RODCEItS ^SOOIIIUMPOIEM
"■"S MICHAEL NOZIK m MIRA HAIR ""S MIRA NAII
HlUHIW.KtKWS
kununi
i a n <: E
Major sneak preview Saturday February 22.
Check daily newspapers for locations and times.
February 18,1992
THE UBYSSEY/7 CAN YOU
ENROL FOR A McGILL C.A.?
You can, if you have an
undergraduate degree in any
discipline.
You may start in May, September, or January
on a full-time or part-time basis.
COME TO OUR INFORMATION SESSION
Monday, 24 February 1992
10:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon
Henry Angus Building
Room 109
OR WRITE OR TELEPHONE:
McGill University
Department of Chartered Accountancy
(514) 398-6154, Fax (514) 398-4448
Redpath Library Building, Room 211
3461 McTavish Street
Montreal, Quebec
H3A1Y1
? McGill
Centre for
Continuing
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANCY
CANADA WEST SCOREBOARD
Basketball
NATIONAL STANDINGS
Women
W
L
F     A     Pet  GBL
Basketball - Men
Victoria
18
0
1368 849   1.000   ■
1. Brandon                      2. Brock                      3. Manitoba
Lethbridge
11
7
11771143 .611    7
4. St Francis Xavier     5. Guelph                  6. UBC
UBC
10
8
1211 1261 .665    8
7. Cape Breton               8. Winnipeg               9. Acadia
Alberta
6
13
1104 1248 .277   13
10. Concordia
Calgary
Saskatchewan
5
5
13
13
1073 1231 .277   13
1088 1289 .277   13
Basketball - Women
1. Victoria                       2. Laurentian             3. Winnipeg
Men
W
T.
F     A     Pet  GBL
4. Toronto                       6. Manitoba                6. Western Ontario
UBC
13
5
1646 1499 .722   -
7. Lakehead                   8. St Francis Xavier 9. Laval
Calgary
10
8
14481461 .666   3
10. UBC
Alberta
9
9
1386 1369 .600  4
Track and Field - Women
Victoria
9
9
1443 1427 .600  4
1. Winsdor                     2. Manitoba               3. UBC
Saskatchewan
8
10
1683 1680 .444  5
4. Western Ontario        5. Sherbrooke             8. Toronto
Lethbridge
6
13
1426 1606 .277  8
7. Saskatchewan           8. Queen's                 9. Victoria
VolleybaH
10. York
Men
MPMW MLSWSL Pta.
Volleyball - Women
Calgary
14
14
0     42   4    28
1. Manitoba                    2. Winnipeg               3. Saskatchewan
Alberta
14
10
4     32   17   20
4. Laval                           6. York                        6. UBC
UBC
14
8
6     26  24   16
7. Calgary                       8. Sherbrooke             9. Toronto
Saskatchewan
14
4
10   18   36     8
10. Montreal
Victoria
16
0
16   10  48     0
Track and Field • Men
Women
MPMW MLSWSL Pta.
1. Winsdor                      2. Toronto                   3. Manitoba
Saskatchewan
18
16
2   62   16   32
4. York                            6. Sherbrooke             6. Western Ontario
Calgary
18
14
4   48   16   28
7. Alberta                        8. Saskatchewan        9. Queen's
UBC
18
13
6   42   22   26
10. UBC
Alberta
18
8
10   33   33   16
Victoria
Lethbridge
18
18
3
0
16   13   60     6
18     3   64     0
THIS WEEK-                                Track and Field (men and women)
„                                                        Last Chance Meet
w^L.-. miw~n                       Sat, Feb. 22,11 am
^en* volleyball                       Minor*. Park, ffichrnond
UBC vs. Winnipeg Wesmen
Hockey
W
L
T F       A  Pts.
Regina-xy
19
4
3  166     98 41
Tues., Feb. 18, 7*30 pm                    Away
Alberta -x*
lb
6
6  124     97 35
War Memorial Gym                         Basketball (men and women}
Calgary
Saskatchewan
13
12
12
12
1 111   112 27
2 106     98 26
*,,,.„,             .             »      UBC at Uof Alberta. Edmonton
Manitoba
12
13
1   109   107 25
Lethbridge
10
13
3   110   123 23
W) 6 pjn. M) 7:45 pm                      Hockey
UBC
10
14
2   103   127 22
War Memorial Gym                         UBC at U of Calgary
Brandon
3
20
3    82   137    9
-,         ,_                                        Fri., Sat, Feb. 21,22
Women's soccer                                                        '
z - clinched playoff position
UBC vs. SFU                                   Tennis
y • clinched first place
Sat, Feb. 22,10 am                         UBCat Uof Idaho Invitational, Boise
z - clinched second place
OJ. Todd Field                                  Feb. 19 - 23
Bud Kanke, CA: President, Kanke Seafood Restaurant Ltd.
The restaurant business for many is an expensive
lesson in risk management. Not so for Bud Kanke.
In 1971, with a $900 savings balance, Bud and several
partners gave Vancouver diners the city's first upmarket
seafood experience. The Cannery.
Mulvaney*s followed in 1975. Seafood with a dash
of Southern spice. Viva in 1979. A classic supper club. In
1984, The Ninth Ave. Fishmarket. Then Joe Fortes, in
1985. Seafood downtown style.
The menu grows. And now Kanke Seafood Restaurant Ltd., with some 300 employees, reels in annual
sales of nearly $10 million.
Along the way, Bud Kanke has earned
the deserved reputation of a man with the skills
to transform the most modest opportunities into
prize catches.
He credits his CA for providing him the base to
develop his entrepreneurial strengths. "It gives me discipline ... going by instinct is one thing, but there's merit
in managing with good, sound numbers'.'
Bud Kanke. CA with a string of seafood restaurant
successes.
If you think a future in chartered accountancy
would serve your career ambitions, write the Institute of
Chartered Accountants of B.C.
Our standards are higher.
Institute of Chartered Accountants of British Columbia
1133 Melville Street, Vancouver, B.C. V6E 4F.5
Telephone: (6(14) 681-3264 Toll-free 1-800-663-2677
BudKankdsCA
helped him acquire
his taste in seafood.
SILKSCREEN1NG
(1 WEEK DEUVEST ON STOCK ITEMS)
T-SHIRTS   . ...X
SWEATSHIRTS .
Other styles ^oio.ns & f
d   $7.85 ea.
XX.  $15.20 ea
contents availarjle
' based on 25* units '
TERMS AND CONDITIONS: Price includes 1 colour
print, choice ot ink colour, screen set-up &
artwork. No hidden charges. Options: flashcure-
add ,38C/pnnt (for solid coloured fabric! & puff
ink - add 75C print S-M-L-XL sizes only XXL
by quotation omv. Additional colours by
quotation only PST & GST added where
applicable.
Call the:
KENNY OYE SPORTSWEAR HOTLINE:
875-1245
GMAT    LSAT
GRE
Weekend Test
Preparation
Next seminars:
GMAT: Mar. 6-8
GRE: Mar. 27-29
Call: 222-8272
Spectrum Seminars™
PROFESSIONALS IN TEST PREPARATION
DISCOVER THE
~   COMPETITION
0fU3   * Colour Laser
* Print..$1.95
UNIVERSITY VILLAGE
2nd FLOOR
2174 WESTERN PARKWAY
VANCOUVER, B.C.
224^225
FAX 224-4492
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
M-TH 8-9 FRI 8-6
SAT-SUN 11-6
8/THE UBYSSEY
February 18,1992

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