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The Ubyssey Feb 23, 1978

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Array BoG holdings
in Chile hit
(Vol. LX, No. 53        VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1978    <~>,R    228-2301
The UBC board of governors is coming under fire again
for the university's indirect investments in Chile, home of a
military dictatorship.
In a five-day crusade next week the committee for the
defence of human rights in Chile will ask students to sign a
petition demanding the board state its opposition to the
investments by Noranda Mines, a company in which UBC
owns $260,000 in shares.
Five hundred people have already signed the petition
which demands that the "UBC board of governors, in its
capacity as shareholders of that company (Noranda) send
a representative to its next annual meeting in order to state
its opposition to the investment or, alternatively, turn its
proxy over to the inter-church coalition."
As part of the week-long campaign, the committee will
present three films, a night of Chilean music and will host a
Chile Night at International House March 1.
John Foster, a member of the task force on corporate
responsibility and chairman of the inter-church committee
on Latin America will speak Tuesday at noon.
Petitions will be available at all the committee-sponsored
events.
Last April, another group named Project Chile approached UBC during its campaign against Noranda's
plans to invest $350 million in Chile. UBC owns 8,000 shares
of Noranda.
With the support of the Anglican, Catholic, United and
Lutheran churches, Project Chile asked the board to hand
over to them by proxy UBC's right to vote at Noranda's
annual meeting last April.
The board refused the request and gave its votes instead
to Noranda's management, which is backing the proposal to
invest in Chile.
George Hermanson, UBC Anglican and United Church
chaplain and former board member said Wednesday the
board decided last April that the withdrawal of investments
in Chile was not within its jurisdiction.
But Hermanson said legal opinions can be smokescreens
and that the situation is open to legal interpretation.
The board was given a legal opinion that trustees cannot
apply moral or ethical arguments to money management,
said Hermanson.
But Charles Bourne, advisor to the president, said Wednesday the board could be open to criticism if it made investments for non-business reasons.
A trustee should be a prudent investor, he added.
But other Canadian universities have taken a moral stand
on the issue. At the University of Winnipeg, the board of
governors passed guidelines outlining appropriate and
socially responsible investments.
At Queen's University in Kingston, the senate asked the
board to apply the principle of socially responsible investment.
Bourne questioned the stand of considering politics in
making investment decisions.
"The board sees no reason why it should do anything for
political reasons."
A spokeswoman for Noranda who did not want to be
identified, said the investment controversy is a philosophical one.
"We're not Chileans, we can't do anything," she said.
In an April press release, Noranda president Alf Powis
said Noranda's position on this matter has not changed
since 1967.
"We reject the concept of an economic boycott as a
means of improving conditions in Chile on both practical
and moral grounds," Powis said.
FOLK MUSICIANS PLAY on, oblivious to shouts of "Disco"
from dance-crazed denizens of decadent Gage Towers. From left
are Don Davidson, Dave Lidstone and Dave Hally, who comprise
—matt king photo
three-quarters of Road Apple Pie, folk band that regularly
appears at the grad centre's folk music nights, held every third
Friday of the month.
Cancer treatment found by accident
By JAN NICOL
Scientists in the U.S. are beginning to
administer an accidentally discovered
cancer drug that can treat two-thirds of the
forms of the disease.
UBC chemistry professor David Dolphin,
says that although the drug is in the early
stages of research it shows promise as a
major new cancer treatment.
"Of the 70 per cent which respond (to the
drug) there is a very high cure rate,"
Dolphin said in an interview Friday.
Among the types of cancer treated with
the drug called Cis-Platin, are leukemia,
breast and lung cancer and tumors of the
ovary, thyroid and kidney.
Dolphin has been following research being
conducted by American universities and has
attended several of their conferences.
He says Cis-Platin has only recently been
administered to cancer patients in the U.S.,
and is still in the first stages of research.
The accidental discovery of Cis-Platin
occurred in 1964 when a group of American
researchers headed by Barnett Rosenberg
applied an electric current through a cell
using platinum electrodes and a buffer of
ammonium chloride.
It was discovered that the cell failed to
divide because the electric current created
a new chemical which inhibits cell division.
And the new chemical, Cis-Platin, which
causes cells to grow instead of divide, is
proving to be a very potent cancer drug.
After testing the drug on mice, doctors
gave Cis-Platin to cancer patients. Other
anti-tumor drugs were administered at the
same time but it was found that the other
drugs were not as promising as Cis-Platin,
says Dolphin.
The drug comes in the form of a powder
and is dissolved in sterile water before being
given to the patient by rapid intravenous
injection over a three- to five-minute period.
In the first clinical tests given to cancer
victims, patients exierienced some side
effects from the drug such as stomach
cramps, loss of hearing and kidney failure.
The hearing loss proved to be only temporary and the kidney failure was treated
with chemicals which increased the flow of
urine and decreased the poisonous effects of
Cis-Platin on the kidney.
But doctors observed that the patient
would become extremely nauseous after
taking the drugs.
Dolphin says reports from a conference
which he recently attended in Santa Barbara, Calif show that marijuana may cure
vomiting induced by Cis-Platin.
Fifty patients with cancer of the testes
were given Cis-Platin in a research study by
U.S. doctors in 1974.
Although cancer of the testes accounts for
only one per cent of all malignant tumors in
men, it ranks first in cancer deaths in people
25 to 34.
The study was very successful, Dolphin
says. Thirty-eight of the patients are still
alive and 32 of the patients no longer had
cancer.
Dolphin warned that Cis-Platin may not
be the "miracle drug" to treat cancer but he
says the cure rates are looking good.
Clinical researchers have been attempting to calculate the dosage of Cis-
Platin necessary for the patient.
The question of how much of the drug can
be withstood by a patient and over what
See page 8: SCIENTISTS
STRIKING  ENGINEERS . .. picket steam plant
UBC's normal
despite strike
by engineers
UBC will remain open despite a strike by
the university's operating engineers, administration president Doug Kenny said
Tuesday.
The 25 engineers, responsible for
operation and maintenance of the heating
plant, walked off the job Tuesday over a
contract dispute with the administration.
Kenny said the heating plant will be
operated by supervisory personnel and that
all classes will be held as usual.
Bill Kadey, business manager of International Union of Operating Engineers
local 882, said the dispute arose because of
the administration's position on arbitration.
Kadey said the union wants arbitration
only on wages while the university is insisting on arbitration for all outstanding
issues between the union and the administration.
He said the purpose of the strike is not to
disrupt the activities of students, professors
or other unions.
But Kadey said the union intends to affect
the operations of the university by picketing
See page 8: INTRODUCTION
'Open university
proposal kills
UBC program'
By BILL TIELEMAN
Education minister Pat McGeer's
proposed open university program has left a
UBC plan for establishing degree-granting
education centres throughout the province
"pretty dead," UBC administration
president Doug Kenny said Wednesday.
And McGeer's whole approach to
providing post-secondary education to those
unable to attend B.C. universities or community colleges has come under fire from
university administrators, who say the
minister failed to properly consult them
about the open university proposal.
The open university, which would grant
university degrees through correspondence,
television programs, telephone seminars
and other methods, has left UBC's plan
unlikely to be implemented, Kenny said.
"I suspect those proposals of ours could be
pretty dead," he said.
"We were proposing mini-arts faculties
across the province. We were prepared to
offer degree-granting centres throughout
the province."
Last week McGeer signed a letter of
agreement between the education ministry
and the Open University of Britain whereby
the two bodies will co-operate in developing
a B.C. open university that would grant
correspondence degrees.
Brian Wilson, academic vice-president at
Simon Fraser University, said Wednesday
the  ministry  went   ahead  on   the  open
See page 2: McGEER'S Page 2
THE        UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 23, 1978
Open university
McGeer's plan attacked
From page 1
university plan without any consultation with B.C. universities or
community colleges.
"The universities haven't been
consulted in terms of how they
could assist in any way," he said.
"What Dr. McGeer has done is
simply to say he supports the open
university system and is going to
implement it. Essentially the
decision has been made by the
government without any
significant interaction with the
universities," Wilson said.
"I guess we're concerned about
how the hell it's being done."
Kenny also said McGeer had not
involved UBC in the planning or
development of the proposal.
"Not in the fullest sense of the
word consultation," he said.
"People were informed this
(program) was going to be implemented."
Wilson said McGeer's intention
to import British open university
instructors to help implement the
program was an insult to B.C.
educators.
"It's kind of a bit insulting to the
universities here for McGeer to
say, 'We're bringing in people from
Britain to maintain the quality of
education,' " said Wilson.
McGeer's intention to buy
educational programs developed
by the British Open University for
use in B.C. was also criticized by
Wilson.
"We think it's just not the way to
go," he said. "When you buy open
university courses you're buying
courses from a different culture
and geography."
Both Wilson and Kenny said the
open university program could
lower enrolment in community
colleges.
And Wilson said B.C. universities
will also feel the program draw
students away from traditional
education institutions.
"It'll also have an effect on the
universities," he said. "We may
find ourselves competing (with the
open university)."
But Kenny said that while the
program would probably have an
effect on community college
enrolment, UBC would not likely
be affected.
Funding for an open university
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) —
Inhabitants of this balmy island
kingdom were alarmed to hear
that blorg rep Pale Can-do had
seen the blight and stopped
smearing in public, thanks to the
malignant influence of director of
disservice Rave Piles.
Can-do, a noted masochist since
elected, requested that he be bound
and quipped for any inflections of
the blah.
should not be at the expense of
other post-secondary institutions,
Kenny said.
"I would certainly hope that this
thrust is not going to be at the
expense of the three universities or
at the expense of the province's
community colleges," he said.
* L ij/ AUTOPLAN
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WEST
McDonald
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Super Value
GREWING NORTH
KERR LTD.
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3291 WEST BROADWAY, VANCOUVER
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FREE
VANCOUVER
SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA
TODAY
War Memorial Gym
12:45 -2:00 p.m.
A.M.S.
1978-79
Student Administrative Commission (S.A.C); Student
Representative Assembly (S.R.A.) Commissioners, and A.M.S.
Ombudsperson.
Applications will be received for the positions of:
—Director of Services (SAC)
— Director of Finance (SAC)
—Commissioners of S.A.C. (8 positions)
—Commissioner for Teaching and Academic Standards Committee
(SRA)
—Commissioner for Student Housing Access Committee (SRA)
—Commissioner for Programs Committee (SRA)
—A.M.S. Ombudsperson
at the AMS business office Rm. 266, SUB
Applications close 4:00 p.m. on Friday, March 10, 1978.
Applications may be picked up at Room 246 and 266 SUB
Arnold Hedstrom
Secretary-Treasurer
NOTICE
Tuition Fee
Income Tax
Receipts
Available
Feb. 21, 1978
Dept. of Finance
General Service
Admin. Building
8:30 to 4:00 p.m.
FREDERIC
WOOD
THEATRE
PURPLE DUST
By SEAN O'CASEY
MARCH 3- 11
PREVIEWS - MARCH 1 & 2
8:00 p.m.
Student Tickets: $2.50
BOX OFFICE * FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE * Room 207
Support Your Campus Theatre
Light, smooth
Heineken.
Full flavour
satisfaction-for
those times when your
taste demands it.
Ids all a matter of taste.
IMPORTED HEINEKEN -AVAILABLE AT LIQUOR STORES
Represented in Canada by Sainsbury International Agencies Ltd. Thursday, February 23, 1978
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
SRA reverses past decision
to hold vote on NUS, BCSF
—matt king photo
MODERN DAY DAPHNE turns herself into tree outside SUB
Wednesday to avoid lecherous quasi-cop who pursued her around
campus. Instant metamorphosis occurred, by coincidence, at same time
that physical plant workers were pruning other nearby trees as part of
annual arboreal frolic.
By KATHY FORD
Celebrating its final meeting of
the year, the student representative assembly rescinded eight
motions passed to set up two
referenda.
The referenda, to have taken
place Feb. 28, March 1 and 2, would
have asked students if they wanted
to join the B.C. Students'
Federation and the National Union
of Students.
SRA secretary-treasurer Arnold
Hedstrom said the people who
would be responsible for the
campaign on campus do not have
enough time to put into the campaign.
"People don't have the time to
push, to make the issue well-known
on campus," he said.
Most assembly members
agreed.
Student board of governors representative Paul Sandhu said an
ad-hoc committee organizing the
referenda thought there was not
enough time to do an adequate job
of organizing a good information
program.
"We feel it's impossible to carry
the referenda," Sandhu said.
Trudeau must go, says Tory
Another four years of Liberal
government in Canada will "finish
the country off," the Progressive
Conservative industry, trade and
commerce critic said Friday.
"They (the Liberals) are
governing in the dark and we're
being kept in the dark," John
Crosbie told about 25 people in
Buchanan 316.
Crosbie, MP for St. John's West,
said Canadian consumers and
investors have lost faith in the
government.
"The business community has
been kicked in the ass lately by
(prime minister Pierre Elliott)
Trudeau," he said.
Crosbie said Canadian industry
is weak because the government
has no official policy concerning it.
And consumers are losing faith
because of government leaders'
hypocrisy. Crosbie said Canada
had a $2 billion tourism deficit last
year.
"Trudeau says that Canadians
shouldn't travel outside of
Canada," he said.
"Then we hear that Trudeau is
scuba diving in the Bahamas. What
should we think?"
Crosbie also accused the federal
government of selling out to the
U.S. on the $10 billion Alcan oil
pipeline deal.
"This deal looked good for both
of us (the U.S. and Canada)," he
said.
"Then MacEachen (deputy
prime minister Allan) went there
and messed everything up."
a
And Crosbie also criticized
recent three-day federal-provincial economic conference. He
said it amounted to nothing.
"That conference was
propaganda, pure pre-election
publicity," Crosbie said.
Crosbie said that if the Progressive Conservatives were
elected in the next federal election
their official policy toward Quebec
would be to approach premier
Rene- Levesque without hostility.
"Clark doesn't have the rivalries
with Levesque that Trudeau does
and that in itself is an advantage, I
believe," he said.
"If after approaching him there
does not seem to be any alternative, then we would try to defeat
his government in a provincial
election."
"It would be a waste of money to
spend it on a half-hearted campaign."
The assembly also voted to put
back a proposed coffeehouse
referendum to March 14,15 and 16
from Feb. 28, March 1 and 2.
The AMS director of finance had
recommended a $20,000 coffeehouse be constructed in SUB.
Council also voted to ask the
National Union of Students to ask
MPs, federal finance minister
Jean Chretien and the federal
revenue department to work
toward an increase in the $50-per-
month education tax deduction and
in the basic $500 fellowship, bursary and scholarship exemption.
Outgoing arts undergraduate
society president Fran Watters
criticized the assembly for entertaining the motion. She said
most assembly members oppose
NUS, but that now when as individuals they can get something
out of the union they are in favor of
asking it for help.
As a result of another assembly
decision, the Citizens' Lobby for
jobs will move its anti-unemployment campaign on campus.
Council voted to transfer $1,000
from the now-defunct cutbacks
committee's budget to the campaign.
The campaign was started by the
B.C. Federation of Labor and is
working toward a mass rally in
Victoria March 31 where delegates
will demand a full employment
program. Organizers are hoping
for a turnout of at least 2,000.
Members generally favored the
motion, but senator-at-large Anne
Katrichak was dubious about the
program, saying that if people do
not have the energy and time to
carry out the BCSF-NUS campaigns they probably do not have
time and energy to conduct an unemployment campaign.
Katrichak asked to be put on the
record as opposing the motion.
"I hope you don't have a job this
summer," said graduate student
representative Rob Marris in
reply.
And finally, in other business,
Watters moved a motion to ask the
bookings office not to book any
musical groups into SUB 212
during assembly meetings.
Assorted council members,
reporters and spectators were
"entertained" intermittently by an
unidentified group of women that
insisted on doing slowed-down
imitations of Liza Minelli singing
Life is a Cabaret.
The motion passed unanimously.
Tuition fees
raised despite
budget surplus
CALGARY (CUP) — The
University of Calgary board of
governors has voted to increase
tuition fees at the university by 10
per cent effective in April.
The board made the decision,
which will result in a $50 increase
for most students, after a meeting
attended by 150 students protesting
the increase.
The board voted 9 to 3 with two
abstentions to go ahead with the
increase after listening to more
than 12 presentations by students
on behalf of various groups and
constituencies.
The most frequently asked
question was how the board could
justify an increase in tuition when
there was a $2.9 million surplus
from last year's budget and a
further $1.3 million surplus
budgeted for the upcoming year.
Finance committee chairman
Merv Devonshire explained that
the surplus was really deferred
spending and that with a total
budget of $72 million the projected
•surplus was not much. The increase in tuitions will bring in
$700,000.
The meeting was, as student
union president Doug Mah had said
in his introductory remarks, to
"give the man a fair trial and then
hang him."
?^^P^K
V. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 23, 1978
Good idea or debacle?
Ever since education minister Pat McGeer made his
announcement last week that
he plans to do something or
other along the lines of Britain's Open University, academic snoots throughout
B.C. have been hitting the
ceiling.
As usual, many of the
boffins are missing the point
because it isn't on the tips of
their noses.
The open university, in its
British incarnation, has proven its worth through the
acceptance of its graduates
by other universities, according to its vice-chancellor, Sir
Walter Perry. It is this the
academics in many cases
question. But at first inspection, the open university idea
is   a   damn   good   idea   for
increasing educational accessibility, something high
tuition, for instance, is hurting.
But there the questions
should begin.
Like frinstance, is McGeer going to take hold of
this good idea and turn it
into a monster, as he has
done too many times before?
Is this proposal an attempt to deliver Interior education on the cheap?
As Perry himself hinted
last week, an attempt to replace Interior universities
with this correspondence
system won't work. The scale
of size in B.C. may render
impossible the hope of setting up a quality open university and saving money.
McGeer   has got to  quit
THE UBYSSEY
FEBRUARY 23, 1978
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS
or the university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in room 241K of the
Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301;
Advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Chris Gainor
In a blur of Innocence, Heather "I never say no" Conn dashed to the
phone, an action that would drastically alter her life. Grasping the receiver
In her cold, clammy hands, she listened Intently as a deep, soothing voice
warmed her Insides. "Why are you giggling?" asked Bill Tieleman and Ed
O'Brien. "Oh, he's so cute," she replied. Curious Chris Bocking contemplated what short, dark handsome stranger could lurk on the other end of
the line. Jan Nicol, Kate Andrew and Matt King looked disgusted, as they
weren't accustomed to receiving suggestive obscene phone calls. Kathy
Ford fondly recalled the days when she got calls from another short, dark,
but no so handsome man, Ralph Maurer. To compete tlth the mysterious
caller, Steve Howard and Chris Gainor demonstrated their deep breathing
techniques, as Verne McDonald clutched his private parts In envy. "What
debauchery," sighed Marcus Gee who eyed Mike bocking suspiciously.
Explaining that "It" was still tender and that he needed jeans that didn't
chafe, the man of mystery revealed himself — It was bashful Tom
Hawthorn.
- .   . .      m
making glib, ill-thought-out
pronouncements and spell
out what his intentions are.
While we criticize academics
who question the whole idea,
those who question what
McGeer wants to do with it
are dead on.
If McGeer's plan gets going  by  next fall, as he has
suggested, then it will be a
useless patch-up job or one
of the great feats of modern
teamwork.
Given the reaction of
people who should have
known about McGeer's plans
before they picked up last
Thursday's papers, such as
university    administrators
planning Interior education,
we would bet on the former.
McGeer's department will
be exploring the idea in the
next few months with Open
University people. We hope
McGeer abandons his tinpot-
dictator style and lets the
people of B.C. in on the
process.
IF YOU'RE HOT GOOD
iLL TAKE AWAY HOUK R£RR£5£NT4TjOM
WHAT KIND OF DEMOCRATIC
PRINCIPLE IS THAT?
UBC board can kelp Chilean human rights
In 1970, Salvador Allende was elected
president of Chile through universal suffrage. Popular Unity (a coalition of left wing
parties) of which Allende was the representative, replaced the centre government
of Eduardo Frei which had failed to solve
domestic political and economic inequities,
as had the right wing parties before.
Almost a year after assuming the
presidency Allende began the process of
nationalization of companies considered
vital to the country as a step in creating a
socialized sector of the economy. This for all
practical purposes signed his death warrant
and the eventual demise of democracy in
Chile.
Multinationals in conjunction with the CIA
and the local big business worked for the
downfall of the new economic strategy.
Large retailers and distributors
collaborated in the formation of a black
market for essential commodities. The
country was paralyzed through the actions
of the large trucking companies. The owners
of agricultural estates created food shortages by not planting crops. These actions
contributed directly to the military coup of
1973, the murder of the elected president,
and the massacre of thousands of Chileans.
Since Sept. 11, 1973 a state of siege has
existed in Chile providing the conditions
within which the military junta has encouraged the return of foreign investment.
In the early days after Sept. 11, brutal and
indiscriminate repression resulted in 40,000
deaths, 120,000 imprisoned and 800,000
exiled.  The  latter  according  to   church
A statement by members of the committee for the defence of human rights in
Chile. The committee will be holding Chile
Week on campus next week to familiarize
students with investment in Chile. Perspectives is open to all members of the UBC
community. New opinion pieces are needed.
CHILEAN POLICE
an
destroy human rights but boost business confidence
^1
statistics is now in excess of 1 million, that is
about 10 per cent of the population. Furthermore, president Augusto Pinochet has
crushed unions, closed the Congress (the
national parliament), dissolved all political
parties and abolished all the media which
were opposed to him.
The media which has been allowed to
survive is strictly censored. In short, in the
name of "national security" and to counteract "Red Terror," Pinochet has created a
reign of terror. His major instrument in this
and keystone of his regime is the infamous
DINA.
The systematic elimination of even those
who could offer a minimum opposition to his
regime has produced a ''country at peace,"
covered with graves, with full prisons,
concentration camps, exiles, mysterious
disappearances and super-exploited
workers.
Wages of six cents an hour are common.
His actions transformed the economy so
that the income of his people is insufficient
to buy what they produce; so that in 1974
inflation at 365 per cent per year was the
highest in the world. Despite intricate anti-
inflationary measures, it is currently
running at 65 per cent per year. In
Pinochet's country, a worker does not have
the right to strike or organize if he wants to
be one of the privileged who has work. Unemployment at present exceeds 20 per cent
of the work force.
Consequently Chile is an ideal country for
business in search of high profits and low
costs. "Perceptive enterprises" like
Noranda Mines recognize the economic
gains which are possible and under the
humanitarian guise of giving work to
Chileans have been quick to take advantage
of the situation.
Noranda's gains are the political and
economic losses for Chilean workers.
Furthermore Noranda's planned investment of $350 million in the Andacollo
copper deposit of northern Chile provides
support for a regime which has been internationally rejected. Four times the United
Nations has condemned Pinochet's Chile for
the violation of human rights.
Labor and student movements in Europe
have instituted a boycott of Chilean
products, and European banks refused a
loan to finance the balance of trade deficit.
In Ontario, Queen's University as a shareholder of Noranda has recently decided to
oppose the investment in Chile.
UBC holds $260,000 worth of Noranda
shares, a vote which could also oppose the
Andacollo project. So far approaches by the
Interchurch Working Group on Chile and the
Committee for the Defence of Human Rights
in Chile have failed to make the UBC board
of governors use their vote in this way.
The board, by saying No to Andacollo, will
aid the resistance to Pinochet and hasten the
return of human rights in Chile. Thursday, February 23, 1978
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
Review laughable
This is my annual letter to The
Ubyssey.
I see that college humor has not
left the paper, despite the
departure of Ken "How can I miss
you when you won't go away?"
Dodd, three-quarters of whom, of
course, is odd.
I'm referring to that masterpiece of understated humor which
appeared in Friday's issue, to wit
(or not t'wit, cf. gainor, 1843), a
review by Carol Read of Dorothy
Livesay's book, Right Hand Left
Hand.
The sly manner by which Read
reveals her undoubted appreciation of Livesay through
what, on the surface, appears to be
vicious innuendo, grotesque
generalization, snotty sarcasm and
an unending stream of self-
righteous sneers left me laughing
and giggling all night long.
I reaSy liked the part where
Read pretends to criticize Livesay
for failing to describe the beauty of
Paris.
"Instead, she sees hunger, unemployment and poverty," Read
quips. Exactly. It reminded me of
how amused I was by all those un-
Full house
We the undersigned, are replying
to the misleading letter published
Feb. 17, concerning the events of
the Totem Park Beernight of Feb.
8.
This "disgusting and degrading"
act was watched by a large
audience of both sexes. Indeed,
prior to the "act," the females of
the audience were holding their
own in the race for the acquisition
of a front row seat.
There was a distinct lack of
exiting during the show; thus it
appears that those who were
subjected to such "blatantly sexist
attitudes" were not motivated
enough to leave. As well, there was
a distinct lack of screaming,
protesting individuals being
chained to chairs and forced to
watch the show.
We suggest that those "concerned residents" who uttered
such a hypocritical cry of dismay,
as was printed in the Feb. 17
Ubyssey, were noticeable by their
absence, and that those in the
audience at the time enjoyed the
attempt by the organizers of the
Beernight to brighten up a run-of-
the-mill social event in a way that
was obviously not intended to be an
"antifeminist activity."
The members of First Kwak,
Kwakiutl House, Totem Park
*■
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Big or Small Jobs ,
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CLEAN-UP
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I TO JAZZ
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i Everyone Welcome                I
employed bums in Vancouver
during the depression who kept
complaining about having no jobs,
nothing to eat and nowhere to stay.
Not a word about the magnificent
beauty of the city — snow-capped
mountains, lush vegetation,
beaches and the dancing sea.
Then there's that hilarious
section when Read, who almost
succeeds in disguising her undoubted working-class origins,
objects to Livesay's description of
poetry written by well-known
Roman Catholic T. S. Eliot as
"socially valuable only to a very
small coterie of bourgeois intellectuals."
Those of us who know how many
union meetings and lower-middle-
class suppers fail to get under way
without the reading of at least one
verse from The Waste Land will
understand just how funny Read's
feigned outrage is.
But the tears of laughter really
ran down my face at the tut-tutting
of Livesay for letting condescension creep into her plays,
poems and stories. I merely had to
note Read's various references to
Livesay, such as: "her work does
not regularly appear in anthologies, although she won two
Governor-General's Awards." Or
how about, "There are many excellent Canadian writers; Livesay
is not one of them."?
This has a nice touch to it, too:
"Livesay's writing is as profound
as Rod McKuen's." And finally,
the crowning guffaw in the last
paragraph: "She (Livesay) seems
a 'nice' woman, but politically and
culturally naive."
What makes all this so
uproarious, of course, is Read's
attempt to masquerade as a young
first-year student accusing one of
Canada's finest writers — someone
who has never wavered during
close to 50 years of struggle in her
determination to advance the
causes of humanism, feminism,
socialism (horrors!) and, yea,
even Canadian Literature — of
condescension.
Read is fooling nobody and she
knows it. Her own arduous
struggles on behalf of the downtrodden, the Third World and the
oppressed Canadian working class
are simply too well known for
anyone's funny bone to fail to be
tickled by her review.
Just say I laughed and laughed.
Uncle Rod Mickleburgh
Eat Christ's fruit
Mid-terms
In the letter Christians face the
cross of the Feb. 14 Ubyssey the
writer made the following
statements, "I would like to forward my opinion that Jesus Christ
is not the answer to life's problems.
Christ offers us the cross of
following his example and
teachings in our lives. I feel that
anyone who tries to be a Christian
in today's world, to stand up for
truth and justice, will find more
hardship than happiness."
I am not saying anything about
the campus crusade films, but I
would like to offer not my opinion
about these statements, but what
Jesus Himself said in the Bible,
which is also true to my experience.
First of all, Jesus Christ is not
only the answer to 'life's'
problems, he is Life Himself. "I
am the way, and the truth, and the
life (John 14:6)." God considers
those without Christ as those
without life. "He that hath the son
Jesus was indifferent
I am writing in response to the
controversy that seems to have,
been generated by the film, How's
Your Love Life? One thing that
seems to have been overlooked is
that Christianity is not a religion of
love, nor is Jesus a teacher of love
and compassion.
According to the gospels, Jesus
believed that God would torment
the majority of men in all eternity
and this would not bother Jesus.
Also, Jesus, as shown in" the
Gospels was totally indifferent to
the social order — to oppression,
slavery and torture, for he believed
this would not matter and was
shortly coming to an end.
Compassion for unbelievers is
implicitly condemned. Would not a
compassionate God accept even
those who reject him into his
kingdom of heaven? Yet many
people, non-Christians included,
believe that Jesus was mankind's
greatest moral teacher.
If you wish to learn about a
religion of compassion, study the
Buddha and the emperor named
Askoka the Great.
Not deluded by the
Christian message
Indignation runs away
Many people would agree with a
good deal of the longwinded
grumble (Feb. 17) of our esteemed
student Gary Toops about the inadequacy of the lecture, Recent
trends on the Russian pop scene. It
must be admitted that there is no
way the arrangers of a lecture or
performance by someone personally unknown to them can be
absolutely certain beforehand
about his or her expertise.
Unfortunately, Toops lets his
indignation run away with him and
displays uncharacteristic naivety.
He was by no means the only
person present with  recent  ex
perience of the Soviet Union, and if
the lecturer had stopped in time for
questions some of the shortcomings of his exposition would
certainly have been corrected — if
by no one else, then by
Michael Futrell
acting head
Slavonic studies department
hath life; and he that hath not the
son of God hath not life."
Therefore, as dead people we are
in no position to solve any of life's
problems. We need life himself.
This is not to say that we will have
no problems, but that with God's
life, everything turns into a
blessing. "And we know that all
things work together for good to
them that love God, to them who
are the called according to his
purpose (Romans 8:23)."
Christ also did not offer "the
cross of following his example and
teachings." We have the human
life, but God has the divine life. To
try and follow Christ's example
and teachings by our own abilities
could be compared to trying to
make a dog a human being. We are
helpless to follow Christ's examples and teachings in our strength.
Paul said, "For the wishing is
present in me, but the doing of the
good is not (Romans 7:13)." What
Jesus shows us is that we need to
invite him into our being as
another life, and as we feed on that
life we spontaneously express that
life.
This was God's intention from
the beginning when He set man
before the tree of life to eat of its
fruit.
Thirdly, there is the opinion that
anyone who tries to be a Christian,
to stand up for truth and justice,
will find more hardship than
happiness. This opinion is really
true if you try to be a Christian. A
dog trying to be a human would
have similar hardship.
However, if you are a Christian,
not trying to be one, the hardship is
not comparable to the happiness.
While Jesus was suffering terribly
from the hardships he faced, he
was enjoying the riches of God set
before him as on a table.
"And they departed from the
presence of the council, rejoicing
that they were counted worthy to
suffr ■ shame for his name (Acts
5:41;. When as a Christian, I
learned how to enjoy God as my
life, this became my experience
also.
Dave Sisson
engineering 1
Henneken Auto
MERCEDES-VOLKSWAGEN RABBIT-VOLVO .
Service—Repairs—Used Cars
8914 Oak St. (Oak & Marine) 263-8121
'       THE COLLISION SPECIALISTS       N
WORLD'S AFLAME
A first-hand account of
conditions in Ethiopia
Somalia, Uganda & Kenya
GODFREY DAWKINS FROM NAIROBI
Tues., 12:30, SUB 205
COMPLETE AUTO
BODY REPAIRS
ALL MAKES & MODELS
COURTESY CARS AVAILABLE
USED
HONDA
CARS
FOR SALE
INTERCONTINENTAL
WHOLESALE AUTO BROKERS LTD.
669-3213
1630 MAIN (1 Block from C.N. Station)
~AMS PROGRAMS COMMITTEE	
Third World Week Preview Speaker
MR. BERNARD WOOD
from the
IMorth.N'South Institute,
on the recently published
N.S. Institute Report titled
"THE THIRD WORLD AND CANADIAN PERFORMANCE"
Thurs. Feb. 23rd, 12:30
Math 100
SCIENCE Sf UDENTS
There will be elections on Friday Feb. 24th as
follows for the Science Undergraduate Society
PRESIDENT -
TREASURER -
S.R.A. REPS _
(four (4))
ANNE GARDNER
LLOYD LYSON
KENNETH NG
KURT RAYNOR
ED AUERSBERG
JAMES BODNER
JEFFREY COIL
DAVID'DUNNISON
SHEETAL SAPRA
ROBERT SHIPMAN
Polls will be open from 9:30 - 3:30 and wi!S be
located in Sedgewick and Hebb.
«   VOTE TOMORROW Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 23, 1978
Learn about
debts,
If you're thinking of joining
that great capitalist plot — credit
— you'd better be well armed to
deal with all the slimy things you
might encounter.
The UBC awards office wants
you to be prepared, so it's sponsoring a seminar on credit today
at noon in SUB 215.
The seminar will be conducted
by  Pat Mugridge, former deputy
Hot flashes
director of the debtors' assistance
division of the B.C. consumer and
corporate affairs ministry and will
deal with how to use credit, how
to shop for credit and many other
goodies.
South
South Africa today will be the
topic of a speech by Keith Phila-
der, who has been a community
worker with black migrant
workers in South Africa, in SUB
213 at noon today.
The speech is sponsored by the
Co-operative Christian Campus
Ministry.
Spring fest
Looking for something to do
Sunday? Why not come to the
Chinese cultural centre's spring
festival show at the Queen Elizabeth Theatre at 1:30 p.m.
The show will feature singing,
dancing, instrumentals and other
performing arts and will be MCed
by Miss Chinatown, 1978. Oh joy!
wsrtrsss.rrss.txmsss.-s/S.'.'.'.'X.'syss^^^
Tween classes
TODAY
PREDENTAL SOCIETY
Speaker, Wendy Halowski on Dental
Hygiene, noon, IRC 1.
E. S. WOODWARD LECTURE SERIES
Lecture, Andre RaynauJd, The
Economics of Confederation, noon,
Buch. 102.
DEAN OF WOMEN'S OFFICE
Free concert, VSO, conducted by
Kazuyoshi Akiyama, 12:45 p.m.,
War Memorial Gymnasium.
TASC
General meeting, 1:30 p.m., SUB
230.
CAMPUS MINISTRY
South Africa from a South African
viewpoint, noon, SUB 213.
AWARDS OFFICE
Officer available for Information on
financial assistance, 1-2 p.m., Speakeasy.
GAY PEOPLE
Reunion gathering, noon, SUB 211.
AMS PROGRAMS COMMITTEE
Bernard Wood on Canada's performance In aid given to Third World,
noon, Math 100.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Women's drop-In, noon, SUB 130;
couples' sex role workshop. Introductory lecture, noon, Mildred
Brock lounge.
INTER-VARSITY
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Bruce Waltke, Insights on psalm 51,
noon, Chem. 250.
FRIDAY
UBC SKYDIVING CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 212.
AUS and SRA
Creative writing students' departmental association meeting, noon,
Brock Hall lounge 206.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE MEETING
Women's committee meeting, noon,
SUB 130.
NDP CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
UBC HANG GLIDING CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 215v
POLISCI STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
Talent night, $1.50 tickets on advance from Buch. 1220 or 472 at
noon, 7 p.m., SUB 207-209.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Chinese painting class, 5:30 p.m.,
SUB 125.
SATURDAY
NEWMAN CLUB
Talent night,  all  welcome, 8 p.m.,
St. Mark's College.
CHINESE CULTURAL CENTRE
Helping new Canadians fill out Income tax forms, training session for
volunteers,   2 p.m., 313 E. Pender.
SUNDAY
CHINESE CULTURAL CENTRE
Chinese spring folk festival variety
show, 1:30 p.m., QE Theatre.
MONDAY
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Women's  drop-In,  noon, SUB 130.
SCIENCE UNDERGRADUATE
SOCIETY
Paper    airplane   throwing   contest,
noon, Hebb Theatre.
COMMITTEE FOR THE DEFENCE
OF HUMAN RIGHTS IN CHILE
Chile  week, noon, SUB concourse.
TUESDAY
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Committee meeting, noon, SUB
130.
a wowwn's
OWi BOO
2766w,4^ cwenuc
Vancouver cvo
v6l<jrl   cc*\c&<\
^604)733-351)        y
CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Speaker on Africa, noon, SUB 205.
COMMITTEE FOR THE DEFENCE OF
HUMAN RIGHTS IN CHILE
Noranda-board of governors response forum on Chile, noon, SUB
200.
WEDNESDAY
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Lesbian drop-in, noon, SUB 130.
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
E. S. WOODWARD LECTURE SERIES
1977-78
TWO LECTURES
by
DR. ANDRE RAYNAITLD
on
THE ECONOMICS OF CONFEDERATION
Thursday, February 23, at 12:30 p.m.
Friday, February 24, ar 8:00 p.m.
Buchanan Building, Room 102
Dr. Andre Raynauld is formerly a Professor of Economics at the
University de Montreal and Chairman of the Economic Council of
Canada. He is presently a member of the Quebec National
Assembly.
A NAME,
ATITLE,
7V*'T
fci
The G/o/y of God
At key points in history, humanity's fortunes have been revolution-
ized-by the appearance of a unique
individual wSose influence and character far exceeded human capacity.
Such have been the Prophets -
Moses, Buddha, Christ, Muhammad, and in the last century,
Baha'u'llah, Frophet-Founder of
the Baha'i Faith. Through them
God has directed the course of
human development, and revealed
His purpose for man.
Their revelations have impelled
mankind through successive stages
of spiritual and moral evolution in
much the same way as an individual passes through infancy, child
hood, adolescence and maturity.
The promise of mankind's eventual arrival at the age of maturity is
to be found in the Sacred Scriptures
of all the world's religions. "The
New Jerusalem", "The Kingdom of
God", and the "Garden of Allah"
all refer to the same God-given
promise when after a period of un-
paralled conflict and suffering,
mankind will complete its transition from adolescence to maturity
and enter an age of justice and peace.
Through the Revelation of
Baha'u'llah, God has set in motion
those forces through which mankind will ultimately attain maturity.
The promise has been kept.
The Baha'i Faith
A Promise Kept.
The right and duty of the individual to investigate truth for himself
is a basic principle of the Baha'i Faith. For further information, please
contact Baha'i Club, SUB Mailbox 11 or Fridays at 12:30 in SUB 115.
COUPLES:
A workshop for WOMEN and MEN who want to be free of sex
role stereotyping in their relationships.
LEADER: DAWN FARBER
INTRODUCTORY DISCUSSION:
Thurs. Feb. 23, 12:30
Mildred Brock Lounge
FREE
Both couples and individuals welcome!
Sponsored by the A.M.S. Women's Committee
AUS and SRA
Asian studies students department
association meeting, noon, Buch.
4276.
COMMITTEE FOR THE DEFENCE OF
HUMAN RIGHTS IN CHILE
Film, When the People Awake,
noon, SUB clubs' lounge; Chile
night, 7:30 p.m., IH.
Subfilms laughs twice as hard, presenting this double bMI I
!HIIBIC FUN SHOW! j&S&S&e
S.U.B. Aud Thurs, Fri, Sat, Sun   7:00       $1.00
Authentic old movies; authentic old price, too!
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c.
Commercial — 3 lines, .1 day $2.50; additional lines
50c. Additional days $2.25.and 45c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Boom 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T 1W5
10 — For Sale — Commercial
WINTER SPECIALS. Bauer Black Pan-
ther skates, $53.50; Down ski jackets,
$36.95 up; Ladies figure skates,
$27.95. Adidas Boms, $19.95; Squash
racquets, $12.95 up; Racquet-ball racquets, $6.95 up. Community Sports,
3616 West 4th Ave., 733-1612.
WHY SHOULD WE HELP? "The Third
World and Canadian Performance."
Mr. Bernard Wood speaks at Math
100, lunch time today. Why not?
FREESEE TODAY: Vancouver Symphony
Orchestra. Free concert. War Memorial Gym, 12:45-2:00 pjn.
11 — For Sale — Private (Cont.)
•U VOLKS   BEETLE  for $450  or lew.
City approved. Call Patrick, 682-1062.
20 — Housing
ROOMS — CHEAP! Room with a view;
room at the top; L-shaped room; room
of one's own. At Duthies 20th annual
book sale, our rooms of books are
20% off (or more). Feb. 23W to 25th.
30-Jobs
CAREER/SALES
OPPORTUNITY
"Vancouver is a growing city and
Sun Life of Canada want to grow
with it. We are actively in search
of people with a success pattern.
People who enjoy working with people in a sales capacity with one of
Canada's leading insurance companies. A company you can be
proud of — Sun Life of Canada.
Phone 521-3781, Darran Birch &
Pierre Dechaine to arrange on campus interviews, March 1st and 2nd "
35 — Lost
FOREST-GREEN RUCKSACK on aluminum A-frame, papers inside. $10 reward. 2779 or 3039.
LOST ON CAMPUS — A female Collie,
black and white, 24 inches high. Answers to Bree. 874-2897.
40 — Messages
WHY SHOULD WE HELP? "The Third
World and Canadian Performance."
Mr. Bernard Wood speaks at Math
100 lunch time today. Why not?
40 — Messages (Continued)
A BELATED but forever I love you. To
the French Princess from your shaggy dog; the English rock star.
DEAR BOYS (especially Harry), your
monogrammed knee pads are in the
mail. The Hunk.
65 — Scandals
HAVE A FIFTH on Duthies tenth! All
books are 20% off (or more) at Duthie's 20th annual book sale. February
23rd to 25th.
HA HA HA HA HA HAI Subfilms presents Marx Bros.' "A Day at the
Races" and Chaplin's "The Great Dictator."
ANNE GARDNER already does most of
the work. She might as well be the
S.U.S. president. Vote tomorrow.
70 — Services
WE PRINT RESUMES. Our Xerox 9200
prints and sorts in one fast operation.
Low cost ... no wait! Typing service
if needed. Stapling, too. Phone for
prices. Evening and weekend service
by special arrangement. Burnaby In-
staprint, 433-9713, 5487 Kingsway,
Burnaby, B.C.
85 — Typing
TYPING — 75c per page. Fast and »©•
curate by experienced typist. Gordon,
669-8479.
CAMPUS DROP OFF point for typing
service. Standard rates. Call Liz, after
6:00 p.m., 732-3690.
FAST, accurate typist will do typing at
home. Standard rates. Please phone
anytime,  263-0286.
TYPING ESSAYS, THESIS from legible
copy. Fast, efficient service. English,
French, Spanish.  324-9414.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING on IBM Correcting Typewriter by experienced
secretary.   Reasonable.   224-1567.
FOR ACCURATE TYPING at reasonable
rates, call Jeanette, 732-3042.
'""""USE""'-"
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
TO SELL - BUY
INFORM
=Ji=Jr=Jr=Jr=Ji=ur=Jr=Jr=Jp=Jr^Tp Thursday, February 23, 1978
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 7
UBC wins world,
loses to Victoria
The UBC rugby Thunderbirds
beat the Long Beach 49'ers 40-10 at
the University of California at
Long Beach Tuesday, defending
their World Cup title. Ross
Davidson ran for two tries and Don
Halliday scored a try and added
four converts for UBC.
Last year the 'Birds beat Long
Beach 35-13 in the competition,
which was originally sponsored by
the World, a defunct Vancouver
newspaper.
UBC visits the University of
California at Santa Barbara
Saturday, a team it beat 33-12 last
year.
But on Saturday the defending
champion 'Birds lost a title, the
McKechnie Cup, falling to the
Victoria Crimson Tide 20-12 in
round-robin play in Victoria.
UBC's only try was scored by Ian
Leitch, while Victoria's leading
scorer was Pat Trelawny, who
kicked four penalty goals.
Pucksters win
The hockey 'Birds, already
guaranteed a playoff spot against
the league-leading University of
Alberta Golden Bears, boosted
their record to 14-8 with a 5-0 win
Friday and a 9-8 overtime win
against Saskatchewan Huskies
Saturday.
Goaltender Ron Paterson turned
back 24 shots to record the shutout
in the series opener, while Terry
Shykora netted the winner
Saturday. It was a come-from-be-
hind win for the 'Birds, who were
down 3-0 before getting hat tricks
from Jim Stuart and Sandy Bain
and a goal each from Rob Jones
and Derek Williams.
In its final games of the regular
season, UBC hosts the Golden
Bears March 1-2 at the Winter
Sports Centre. Then both teams
travel to Edmonton for a best-of-
three series March 3-5 for the
Canada West University Athletic
Association championship.
ffoopsfers win
The Basketbirds finished their
season with a weekend sweep over
the University of Saskatchewan
Huskies in Saskatoon. But UBC's
11-9 record leaves it in third, out of
the playoffs. Frank Janovitz
scored 18 points and Chris Trumpy
16 to lead the 'Birds to a 70-50 win
Friday, while Trumpy scored 18
and Doug Mosher 16 in Saturday's
75-51 victory.
Meanwhile, the University of
Victoria Vikings swept a pair 88-72,
90-78 from the University of Lethbridge, to finish on top of the heap
at 18-2.
In other action. Alberta split with
Calgary 96-85, 94-98 in Calgary.
Sinking lower, the UBC Thunderettes were upstaged somewhat by
the University of Victoria Vikettes,
UBC losing a pair while the
Vikettes swept a doubleheader
from Lethbridge 90-56, 83-47 to
finish the season 20-0. The Vikettes,
led by Carol Turney, have not lost a
league game in three years.
The Thunderettes were beaten
69-55 by Saskatchewan Friday,
then lost 78-48 Saturday i n
Saskatoon.
Volleyball
The women's volleyball team
will defend their national intercollegiate championship March 3-5
in Moncton, having won their third
straight western title in Edmonton
over the weekend. UBC went
undefeated in the five-team round-
the
the
the
robin tourney, and beat Alberta in
the final series 15-7, 15-10, 15-4.
Captain Dorothy Schwaiger, Janet
Livingston and Kim Brand were
named to the western all-star
team.
Six teams will compete for the
national   title,   including   the
University of Sherbrooke,
University of Moncton and
champions  from   Ontario,
Prairies and the Atlantic.
Unfortunately, the defending
champion Thunderbirds were not
so favored, losing 3-1 in the final to
Calgary.
Jayvee hoop
Coach Terry Wood's dream of
leading the Jayvee basketball
team to provincial and national
titles is still possible. UBC beat the
North Shore Dogwoods 70-45 in the
final of the Lower Mainland
playoffs, after splitting the first
two games of the best-of-three
series 69-71, 68-57.
Ross Marshall, Dave Martin and
Pat Kelly were all in double figures
to lead UBC in Saturday's final.
Next stop for the Jayvees is 7
p.m. Saturday at the British
Columbia Institute of Technology,
where they will meet the winner of
the Vancouver Island playoffs.
Soccer dismal
The UBC soccer 'Birds lost yet
another game in their race to
escape relegation from the First
Division of the B.C. Soccer League.
The Eldorados beat UBC 1-0, while
the division-leading Dover
Olympics lost 2-1 to the New
Westminster Blues.
Next action is March 4 at UBC
Stadium against Wesburn.
Swimmers fly
In the Canada West swim meet in
Edmonton on the weekend, Kathy
Bough won the 100- and 200-metre
backstroke, Sandy Filippelli won
the 200 butterfly and finished
second in the 100 fly, while Robyn
Miller finished second in both the
100 and 200 freestyle. The three
women, who led UBC to a second-
place finish behind the University
of Alberta, are waiting for the word
from the national organizers about
whether they will compete in the
CIAU/CWIAU meet in Toronto
March 2-4.
Gymnasts flip
At the Canada West gymnastics
meet in Victoria on the weekend,
five women and three men from
UBC qualified for the two
collegiate championships in
Winnipeg this weekend.
With 136.97points in the women's
events, UBC was runner-up to
Alberta (145.90). UBC's Tami
Knight took the all-round medal by
winning both the vault and the
bars, and will compete in the
national invitational intercollegiate meet, which will be held
alongside the national championship, in which men compete but
women don't. The women's events
were cut last year from the
nationals because not all conferences compete in gymnastics.
The men's team placed third
with 181.55 points, behind Calgary
(187.30) and Alberta (185.9).
Buddy Osborne, Ralph Bereska
and Walter Hayashi will represent
UBC at the nationals.
—edmond o'brien photo
UBC REASSURED SUPREMACY in Canada West wrestling on weekend as they grabbed back Rawson
trophy from University of Alberta Golden Bears, who took it after UBC had held trophy for three years.
Peter Farkas, Martin Gleave, Vance Coan and Craig Delahunt won their weight classes for Thunderbirds.
Easy Page 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 23, 1978
Introduction of scab workers
could escalate steam strike'
From page 1
the steam plant, now being run by
supervisors.
Kadey said the engineers will
picket other buildings if the
university brings in "scab"
workers to repair heating equipment.
The supervisors will have
trouble running the steam plant
because they don't have the know-
how, he said.
"They'll have to go like a blue-
assed fly to keep things going."
Kadey predicted that as
equipment begins to break down
the university will be forced to
bring in outside help.
"The university seems to think
they're prepared to fight us this
time."
And he said there might be some
discomfort to students if heating
equipment breaks down.
According to Kenny the
university wanted to go to arbitration on all outstanding issues
including length of contract, but
the union insists that the university
agree to a 12-month contract
before there can be any arbitration.
The administration is proposing
a 15-month contract to expire on
Scientists angry
about allocation
of research $
From page 1
time period the drug can be effectively  administered   is   being
explored.
The laboratory work which
produced Cis-Platin is used as an
example of the importance of basic
research by scientists.
Much of the charitable funds and
government grants for cancer
research have gone to clinical
researchers, scientists complain.
Basic and theoretical research is
often neglected.
Scientists are calling for more
basic research into the
mechanisms by which Cis-Platin
functions.
A partnership between fundamental and applied research so
that cancer can be fought more
effectively is necessary, they say.
CALCULATOR
REPAIRS    |
ALL MAKES AND MODELS        j
FREE ESTIMATES j
CfiL~D~TRDfliCS.|
438-6496 |
4857 Kingsway, Burnaby '
George & Berny's
VOLKSWAGEN
REPAIRS
COMPLETE SERVICE BY
FACTORY-TRAINED
MECHANICS^
FULLY GUARANTEED
AT REASONABLE RATES
731-8644
2125 W. 10th at Arbutus
March 31,1979, the end of the fiscal
year.
The university originally offered
a wage increase of four per cent in
a one-year contract.
The union rejected this,
demanding parity with UBC
tradesmen who are members of
the Canadian Union of Public
Employees. The union said a
maintenance engineer should
receive the same monthly pay as a
CUPE plumber.
The university agreed to give the
operating engineers  parity  with
CUPE workers Jan. 10 but only if
the union agreed to a 15-month
contract.
The administration's proposal
would give operating engineers
yearly salaries ranging from
$17,746 to $23,490.
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 SEYMOUR ST.
688-2481
SENATE COMMITTEE
HEARING ON
STUDENT ELECTION
Pursuant to a resolution of Senate at its meeting of February 15,
1978, an ad hoc committee has been established under
chairmanship of Dr. J. K. Stager, to investigate alleged
irregularities in the recent election of students to the Board of
Governors and the Senate.
The Committee will meet at 3:30 p.m. on Monday, February 27,
1978, in the Board and Senate Room, Main Mall North
Administration Building, and hereby invites anyone who has any
knowledge of purported irregularities to appear before the
Committee at this time. This is not a public meeting. Witnesses
who wish to be heard will be called singly.
I
THE CO-OPERATIVE
CAMPUS MINISTRY     Sou,h AMca To^
Keith Philader of W.S.C.F.
South African Student
FEB. 23, 12:30
S.U.B. 213
THE ANNUAL
GENERAL MEETING
of the
ALMA MATER SOCIETY
will be held on
THURSDAY
MARCH 2, 1978
at
12:30 p.m. IN THE
SUB CONVERSATION PIT
ARNOLD HEDSTROM
Secretary-Treasurer
hair studio inc.
UNISEX HAIRSTYLES
FOR APPOINTMENT
master charge
P
224-1922
224-9116
5784 University (Next to Bank of Commerce)
THE MONARCH LIFE ASSURANCE
COMPANY
WE CAN ALLIVIATE
THE EMPLOYMENT
SITUATION!
Interviews will take place Monday,
March 6, 1978, in room 211,
Student Placement Building.
Appointments must be made on or
after 24th of February through
the Student Placement Office.
MONARCH LIFE ASSURANCE
COMPANY
L0ND
From VANCOUVER
LONG DURATION FLIGHTS
April 27-June 21	
April 27-July 5	
May 7-August 16	
May 7-September 5	
May 11-June 21	
May 11-July 5	
May 11-July 19    	
Mat 14-August 16	
May 14-September 5
May 31-August 16	
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AMSTERDAM
May 21-August 23
$479.00
BOOK AT LEAST 45 DAYS AHEAD
The above Advance Booking Charter flights are approved by the
Canadian Transport Commission. $50 non-refundable deposit is payable
on booking, with balance payable 45 days before departure. Ask about
Fare Protection Insurance. Not included: $8 Canadian transportation
tax.
BUDGET STANDBY FARES
SEATTLE to
LONDON From $202.00 (U.S.) one way
From $355.00 (U.S.)    return
BANGKOK From $399.00 (U.S.) one way
HONG KONG From $349.00 (U.S.) one way
AROUND THE WORLD $999.00 (U.S.)
'Subject to Government approval. Ask C.U.T.S. for full details about
above and other discount fares.
c.uxs.
CANADIAN UNIVERSITIES
TRAVEL SERVICE LIMITED
Student Union Building, Room 100P,
Phone (604) 224-0111

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