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The Ubyssey Feb 11, 1969

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Array I FEEL THAT RUNNING the university is like running any other business. You must have
three things: plant, money and good management. We have a good plant at the university
and excellent management, but not too much capital investment to turn out a first-rate product." - Donovan F. Miller, Setp. 23, 1963. Mr. Miller is a board of governors appointee to the
committee which will choose UBC's new president.
State of emergency declared
on U of California campus
By PHIL SEMAS
BERKELEY, Calif. (CUP-CPS) — Despite a
relatively peaceful day Wednesday on the University of California campus here, governor
Ronald Reagan has declared a state of emergency at Berkeley.
Reagan said he made the declaration at the
request of Alameda county sherriff Frank
^ Madigan and administration president Charles
J. Hitch in order to make state highway patrolmen available on a continuous basis to help
maintain "law and order" on the campus.
Edwin Meese, Reagan's executive secretary,
said the number of .highway patrolmen who
will be available "is a matter best left for the
dissidents to speculate on." Meese said highway patrolmen can assist local police at any
time but a state of emergency must be de-
clared to make them available on a continuous
basis.
He said a state of emergency was not declared  at San  Francisco   State  because  local
Posters
plagerized
The Ubyssey is in no way connected
with Les Horswill's campaign for president of the Alma Mater Society.
Despite Horswill's choice of our format for his campaign 'posters, and his
use of a Ubyssey photograph, we are not
necessarily in favor of his policies.
His use of our photo was totally unauthorized. Students should not connect
the paper with his name.
police were able to deal with the disorders
with only occasional assistance from the highway patrol.
The additional police will be under the
command of sheriff Madigan, who earlier this
week criticized the university administration
for not taking a strong enough stand against
student srikers.
Berkeley campus chancellor Roger Heyns,
who asked Hitch to join Madigan in the request, stressed that "the state of emergency,
required for technical reasons, does not imply
any change in our normal campus life."
But Reagan said he made the declaration to
"clearly indicate that the state of California
is determinde to maintain law and order on
the campuses of its university as well as all
other educational institutions.
"I just feel we have come to the end of
the road in depending on local law enforcement," he added. "It isn't good enough any
more to wait until rocks are flying and beatings start and then come in and restore order."
Heyns said the police assistance presently
available from local agencies "cannot continue
to meet our needs."
Reagan also announced he has sent severe
new laws to the state legislature to curb
student protest. The measures, he said, will
end "acts of violence caused by a coilition of
dissidents and criminal activists who have attempted to close down the university."
The laws would cover not only the multi-
campus University of California but also its
junior equivalent, the state college system
which includes junior colleges and high schools.
One proposed measure would prohibit from
public schooling for a year students convicted
of a criminal offence during campus demonstrations.
However, the campus was fairly quiet Wednesday after Tuesday's battles between
students and police. About 500 students
marched around the campus chanting "On
strike, shut it down" and "Power to the people" but did not enter any buildings where
they assumed there were police.
About 100 police were on the campus, maintaining the corridors at the main campus entrances. There were only two arrests.
Reports endorse
Arts I success
By  STAN   PERSKY
Arts I: the experiment that succeeded—at least, so far.
That's the finding of three evaluation reports released this week.
The most significant of these, from a committee chaired
by academic planner Robert Clark, ought to quash widespread,
but unfounded rumors that the program is going to be dumped.
In addition to the Clark comittee evaluation, a second report reveals that Arts I students far outdid other froth in the grade
scramble. And the third report,, from the Arts
I faculty, saysi the Tussman-styled college is
healthy.
Now to sort out the welter of statistics,
findings, impressions, and recommendations:
Arts I students scored about 6 per cent
higher than other incoming arts freshmen on
the university test battery; and they were generally seen as more involved in literary, musical, political and religious activites than other
students. (The 200-plus students who applied
last year were all accepted.)
Given this slight difference, the results of
first-year academic standings are startling.
Arts I students registered four times as many
first-class marks, on the average, as regular
first-year students. Even more important, 69
per cent of the Arts I students passed all their
courses, compared to the arts faculty average
of 46 per cent.
This is significant considering that one of
the major financial drains at the university is
the high first-year drop-out rate.
You may object: True, Arts I students got
good grades in their 9-unit program, but how
did they compare to other students when they
too their two regular courses, like biology 101,
french 110, find arts 125, geography 101, etc.?
Again, Arts I students scored high, with twice
as many first-class grades on the average and a
seven per cent lower failure and drop-out rate.
Although there is currently much criticism
of statistical measurement, both the Clark report and the Curriculum Committee evaluation relied heavily on numbers for lack of
other valid criteria.
Arts I staff members, now having favorable statistics to back up their program, point
out however, that though statistical evaluation
has been done, had the figures been critical,
it would not have undercut their argument.
They say evaluation of the program must
ultimately be an intellectual judgment about
the quality of the Arts I concept of education.
The Clark committee did administer an
open-ended subjective questionnaire to Arts I
students. They found that favorable comments
about the program outnumbered unfavorable
responses seven-to-one, and 94 per cent of the
Arts I students said that if they had it to do
all over again, they would.
A further survey conducted by the Clark
group showed that 66 per cent didn't want to
go into an Arts II program, but the reasons
mostly related to structural requirements of
the university and career objectives. An Arts
II program was offered this year to about 20
students, and last week a group of about 25
incoming arts freshman on the university
test battery; and they were generally seen as
more involved in literary, musical, political
and religious activities than other students.
(The 200-plus students who applied last year
were all accepted.)
Continued  Page 13
See: ARTS I
ELECTIONS
WEDNESDAY
Story page 3
Candidates' statements
page 11
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THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 11, 1969
'Adverse reaction   prompts
council to retract Untrek
By JOHN GIBBS
Ubyssey Council Reporter
The Ungreat Untrek un-
trekked itself out of existence
at Sunday night's council meeting.
The trek to Vancouver courthouse was planned to take
place Thursday to protest the
education budget brought down
in the legislature Friday.
Alma Mater Society president, Dave Zirnhelt said the
change of plan was due to
"adverse reaction" from both
students and. the public.
"Marches are all right if it's
the only way to get the attention of the news media," he
said, "but there are many
people and organizations in the
community that are receptive
to the students and this march
would hinder this relationship."
Zirnhelt also said that a
$2000 fall program of continual
public education on the
universities needs would be
planned.
An AMS submission to the
Perry commission on interuniversity relations was also
endorsed at the meeting.
The commission, set up last
year by the provincial government is studying the financing
of B.C.'s post secondary educational institutions and the relationships between them.
The AMS brief calls for the
establishment of a B.C. higher
education board to be responsible for evaluation of the
province's educational needs,
the setting of academic and
financial priorities, the establishment of uniform academic
regulations and standards, and
evaluation of the quality of the
institutions.
The brief recommends a
committee of eleven with four
academics appointed by the in-
Students do  it again
as  prof pad  invaded
MONTREAL (CUP)—The occupation of the computer centre
at Sir George Williams University spread two floors Tuesday
(Feb. 4) when 200 students moved into the seventh-floor faculty
lounge at the one-building school.
The students seized the faculty lounge to supplement their
holding of the computer centre, which they hit last Wednesday
after disruption of a hearing into racism charges against a biology
professor.
They plan to use the lounge's facilities for sleeping and eating
while they hold down the computer centre in shifts. Another 200
students are in the computing area in support of demands that
the hearing committee be reconstituted by agreement among
both blacks and the controversial professor.
The invasion of a faculty lounge followed a two-hour meeting while the hearing committee continued its sessions — in
private to avoid a repetition of last week's disturbances.
The talks were broadcast on closed-circuit television around
the university,  however.
Oops,   it wasn't   a   Ubyssey  ad
The Ubyssey wishes to apologize for any inconvenience
incurred by the Vancouver
City  Hall  Employees   Society
due to the advertisement regarding their charter flight to
Japan which accidentally appeared in Friday's issue.
Legend Reading Centre
NEW SPEED READING
CLASSES
Mon. Feb. 17, 7 p.m. Bu. 3218
Tues. Feb. 18, 7 p.m. Bu. 3218
MEET INSTRUCTORS
WEEK OF FEB. 10
Mon.,  Wed.,   Fri.,   12:30-1:30
Bu. 3210
Non-Stop     Calypso
CARNIVAL DANCE
FRIDAY,    FEB.    21 ST
THREE BANDS
8:30    SUB    Ballroom
Tickets    I.H.   $2.00   per   person
Why Wait,
RESPOND
FEB.  11-18
An Attitude Survey Student's Assembly
The Ubyssey regrets any inconvenience
caused the Vancouver City Hall Employees
Society by the advertisement in Friday's
paper regarding the charter flight to Japan.
The error was made in the composing room
at our printers.
stitutions, six lay members appointed by the government,
and one student elected by the
B.C. Union of Students.
In calling for the committee,
the brief called the present
system of financing "highly inefficient," "lacking in impartiality" and unco-ordinated.
The Perry commission is expected to report to the present
sitting of the legislature.
Blorgs gorge
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) —
The 35th annual asparagus-
eating festival ended in mass
hysteria Tuesday when gurgling pink, red and scarlet
blorgs refused to eat the
winner. He is traditionally
shredded and served to vomit-
ting competitors as a booby
prize.
the BISTRO
2081   West  4th  Ave.
p.m. - 1 a.m. Tues. through Sun.
AS    SHERIFF
and
THE    MINT   VERSION
with   Vancouver's
Janis, Wanda Walker
736-9920
CON FUSION IV
THURS. FEB. 13
12:30
THE WOOS AND WOES
OF   INTER-RACIAL
DATING AND MARRIAGE
INTERNATIONAL   HOUSE
UPPER LOUNGE
//
SPEAKERS" COMMITTEE present...
CLARA CULHANE
Canadian Nurse with Canadian Medical
Aid to Vietnam
speaks on
"Canadians in Vietnam
rr
WEDNESDAY,
FEB.  12th
NOON
BUCHANAN  104
JOSEPH TUSSMAN
Philosopher from Berkley University
Head of Experimental College at Berkley
THURSDAY,
FEB.  13th
NOON
HEBB  THEATRE
FREE
FREE Tuesday, February 11, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
VOTE, BABY
CANDIDATES
.SAY  LITTLE
Election warm-up cold
By NATE SMITH
Monday's all-candidates meeting generated
little heat and not much more light.
About 200 students gathered in the SUB
auditorium to hear candidates for the first
slate of the Alma Mater Society elections.
"Sltudents must get out to the people of the
province and convince them that the entire educational system needs more support," said
presidential candidate Fraser Hodge. "The public is not too sympathetic towards the universities, but they must be made aware of
overcrowded classrooms and lousy profs."
Hodge proposed a "person to person campaign" in cooperation with other educational
institutions, school boards and the B.C. Teachers Federation. "Bennett must be defeated, he
said. "There will probably be an election this
year and if we miss this chance there won't
be another for a long time."
Hodge's opponent Les Horswill agreed with
the need for a province-wide campaign but
said students must first present a comprehensive plan for higher education. "We have to
hold our thunder until we know what we're
talking about," he said.
Horswill emphasized the need for increased
support to higher education. "We are not only
very angry but are afraid of another year of
disaster for higher education."
Hodge pointed out his expeience on council
as engineering president and member of several
committees. "I know the ins and outs of the
AMS, its capabilities, its potential an dits shortcomings."
Dave Gibson, candidate for internal affairs
officer, said the university must improve its
image and communications with the public.
He  proposed a   special,   off-campus  edition
of The Ubyssey and regular press releases to
the downtown newspapers. Gibson also stated
the AMS should  support and finance under-
' graduate societies, work for academic reform
through course unions and student-faculty
committees, and press for greater student representation on the university senate.
Internal affairs candidate Dave Mossop suggested the creation of an "ideal university in
miniature" through the establishment of special
lectures and inter-faculty seminars in SUB. He
also proposed equal representation for students
on all committees concerning student interest.
The third internal affairs candidate, Ken
Collier, stressed the need for increased contact
with the outside community, particularly labor
organizations. He said workers and students
are linked in a social struggle around the
world.
Hanson Lau, candidate for activities coordinator, proposed a SUB coffeehouse, a co-op
bookstore and improved student information
services for registration week. Lau even had a
campaign promise for the dogs which frequent
SUB. "We should help the janitors and place
foam rubber fire hydrants at strategic corners."
Lau's opponent Dave Graham suggested decentralization of the AMS, strengthening of
departmental unions and a regular column in
The Ubyssey by a member of the SUB management committee. He supported the idea of a
co-op bookstore but said it is financially impossible at the present time.
Ann Jacobs, new AMS secretary by acclamation, favored decentralization of the AMS
and reduction of "red tape and bureaucracy."
Voting for the first slate will be held Wednesday with advance polls Tuesday.
Students voting must present either their
white library card or both the library card
and pink AMC card as identification.
Second slate elections for vice-president,
treasurer, external affairs officer and ombudsman will be held Wednesday, Feb. 19. Nominations close Thursday noon. All candidates
and seconders statemnets must be handed in
to The Ubyssey by Thursday noon.
EdUS circulates questionaire
A questionaire to discover how highly education students value their courses will be
circulated in that faculty Feb. 11 to 14.
EdUS spokesman said data gathered will be
computerized and published for the use of
faculty, administration and students planning
to enrole in courses.
"There is some criticism in the faculty that
you get some of the same crap in some courses
you've had in another course," he said.
Rodenhizer asked all students to bring their
lead pencils.
Bennett's gift
'not so big'
By CHARLES HULTON
University expansion has been denied again.
Administration officials who were hoping for a capital spending quota of $17 million were given only $6 million in Premier
Cece Bennett's budget, brought down Friday.
Bennett called it his "miracle budget", a milestone for B.C.
from the "most experienced and dynamic government in our
nation."
The premier promised $65 million operating costs and $15
million as capital spending to be divided up among UBC, Simon
Fraser University and University of Victoria.
Former administration president Ken Hare warned last
fall that higher education in B.C. has reached a crisis point.
"Merely to catch up with our present lack of space we need
to start at once buildings that will cost $60 million," Hare said.
"The university problem depends on whether the people of
the province want better planning and more money for higher
education."
Only $6 million was allocated to UBC from the capital
fund, which by Hare's estimate will not meet the needs of UBC.
"I find the capital grant very disappointing," acting administration president Walter Gage said Monday, "but until
further information is available or until the advisory board
meets it is very difficult to know where we stand."
Board of governors member J. E. Liersch said the board had
had no time to consider the implications of the budget.
The budget was termed disappointing as there was not
indication of a new five-year plan to replace the capital commitment which terminates March 31.
Administration information officer Arnie Myers said it is
still possible that the provincial government will announce
another five-year plan before the expiration of the current one.
U of Chicago occupied,
students ask for more
CHICAGO (CUP-CPS) — University of Chicago students
began their second week of a campus administration building
occupation Friday after adding new demands.
They originally began their sit-in over the sociology department's refusal to rehire a radical woman professor, but
have extended their grievances.
Three new demands were listed as negotiable: establishment
of a suppressed people studies department, making public all
university files, and a rule that 51 per cent of all new students
and professors be female with an end to nepotism regulations
which excluded relatives of teaching staff from teaching at the
school.
Other new demands include an end to the university's
destruction of buildings it owns in a predominantly black area,
a day care centre for faculty children, and admission of black
and third world students and workers.
The original "non-negotiable" demands were: rehiring of
sociologist Marlene Dixon, who students say was discriminated
against because of her sex and politics, parity student membership on committees with hiring-firing-tenure power, amnesty for
the occupying students, and full pay for workers whose work
has been interrupted by the sit-in.
The number of demonstrators fluctuates from 150 to 300.
No attempt has been made to remove them, but the university
has suspended 61 of the occupiers.
Hare evicted from residence
moves to Endowment Lands
To add to all his troubles, Dr. F. Kenneth Hare has been evicted from residence.
Sheila Woinoski, phys ed 1, who has
been living with Hare since he moved
into his new home a month ago, told
The Ubyssey Monday, "I can't understand why he had to go."
"Everybody liked him,"  she said.
A spokesman for Hare's landlords
said it was -"only fair to Hare" that he
be asked to leave, since he had to go
too often.
"I mean, we couldn't have someone
like  him  running around   doing  the
things he was doing," said the spokesman.
Miss Woinoski agreed that Hare was
being mighty strange, if not downright
obscene.
Asked if he were contemplating
running for any Alma Mater Society
positions, Hare indifferently refused to
comment.
Residence officials say Hare was
evicted last week from Fort Camp because of the "no pets" rule and complaints from the cleaning staff.
He has since found a new home on
the University Endownment Lands. Page 4
THE
UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 11, 1969
THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by the
Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those
of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey also subscribes to the
press services of Pacific Student Press, of which it is a founding member.
Ubyssey News Service supports one foreign correspondent in Pango-
Pango. Authorized second class mail by the Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage rn cash. The Ubyssey publishes
Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 228-2305;
editor, 228-2301; Page Friday, 228-2 309; sports, 228-2308; advertising,
228-3977.
FEBRUARY   11,  1969
Department-wide chair
for science philosophy
By FRED BUCKWALD
Earlier this year I wrote an article for Page Friday in which I
proposed a mandatory course on the philosophy and responsibilities of modern science, to be taken by all science students at
some point in their university life. At the time, my only source
of satisfaction was the realization that there was one elective
course on this topic.
As a result of that article I became a member of a student-
faculty curriculum committee which has since been looking into
more philosophy of science courses as well as a Science I program. In wake of the recent dismisal of Robin Harger I feel
that I should present my views on the affair.
Everyone seems to agree that a philosophy of science course
—such as Zoology 400—and a corresponding professor—such as
Dr. Harger—must be retained in the faculty. But most people
are pinning the blame on the zoo department. An examination
of this, therefor, appears in order.
First, we must bear in mind that Harger was hired primarily
to do research in the field of population ecology. As a result of
his involvement with Zoo 400 he let his research slide until he
was producing virtually nothing.
In order to evaluate the actions taken by the zoo department we must consider the bureacratic policy in the handling of
money grants. The faculty of Science receives its cut of the
provincial government's grant and then turns around and dishes
out shares to each of the nine departments—usually with some
basis on the amount of research the department turns out.
Therefore, departments are always leery about keeping faculty
members who do not turn out their quota of research.
We must now consider the plight of a course such as Zoo
400. As it presently exists the philosphy of science course is
neatly tucked away in the more unused and unseen corners
of the zoology department. It's not really the department's fault;
after all, it's not really a zoology course.
It is for this reason that I propose that the faculty of science
create a chair of Professor of the Philosophy of Science. We
students must bring pressure on the faculty to meet this proposal and hire Dr. Harger for the job.
If you feel that we must move towards education rather
than technical training then do your bit now. Drop a note in
the campus mail supporting the above to Dr. K. Okulitch, Dean,
faculty of science. Five minutes of your time might) help to
create a better educational process.
LETTERS TO THE  EDITOR
Brutal cops bust Bistro patron
EDITORS:
Co-ordinating       Al   Birnie
News      John  Twigg
City   Alex Volkoff, Peter  Ladner
Managing       Bruce   Curtis
Associate    Paul  Knox
Wire       Irene   Wasilewski
Page  Friday    Andrew  Horvat
Sports .. Jim Maddin
Photo  .. Fred   Cawsey
Ass't  News John  Gibbs
Here's who did what when and who
knows how: Nate Smith (nothing nohow), Carey Linde (a little sometimes),
Nader Mirhady (a little a head), John
Gibbs Qater, baby), Charile Hulton (now
and never), Elaine Tarzwell (slightly
engaged), Bab McKee (now and then),
Frank Flynn ("tomorrow you die"), Nick
Orchard (reform now), Stan Persky
(momentarily ossified wi*th statifica-
tional ramifications), Rik Nyland (basket-balled), Tony Gallagher (phantom
pusher), John Frizell (took it now), Dick
Button (PNE photo service) and Dirk
Visser (last and least).
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
It is difficult to determine what redress
there is for high-handedness on the part of
RCMP narcotics officers. Perhaps the answer
is exposure.
On Tuesday evening, February 4th, 1969,
at approximately 11 p.m. at the Village Bistro,
the Mock Duck were into their second set when
Stan came up to me and said that two narcs
were at the door. True enough two young men
were bristling with bad, vibes as they grabbed
customers and searched then. I asked to see
their I.D. They flashed their wallets showing
badges, but didn't allow enough time to see
badge numbers or names. I suspected that they
were not real RCMP because of their young
age and their ski-jackety greaser appearance.
One fellow was shorter than the other who
appeared to be of Eurasian descent.
In the office I contacted the city RCMP
who asked to speak to the alleged officers.
They were called and angrily the two came
into the office. One, who was later identified
as C spoke briefly to the radio operator
on the other end. Then the other, subsequently
identified as G , demanded, "Who phoned
H.Q.?" I said, "I did." They shouted expletives
like "Next time we'll break down your door"
as they slammed the ticket booth door which
they might have smashed had it not been
caught intime. They continued into the club
itself. I was searched as were other people.
Door smashed off hinges
A tall unagressive guy named Pat was
about to be searched when he demanded to
see I.D. Again the officers flashed wallets. Pat,
suspecting they weren't really officers, wanted
to see numbers and names. They refused, and
swearing at Pat, grabbed him and shoved him
out the door. The door was smashed off its
hinges in the process.
A number of us followed. I emerged from
the front door in time to see G  punch
Pat in the stomach. We gathered and I asked
the two if they were arresting Pat. They were
of   differing   views.   C    said,   "We   just
want to talk to him," while the other said,
"Yes, we're arresting him." They dragged the
terrified fellow across Fourth Ave., put him
into a car and sped off peeling rubber.
Newspapers too busy
We phoned city police and the newspapers.
"Too busy" said the Province; "Not newsworthy" said The Sun. However, three of the
ciyt's finest appeared and took down information.
I strongly suspect that G  was under
the influence of liquor at the time of the invasion of the club. I thought I smelled liquor
on his breath as he was shouting at me in the
office. As well, the hapless Pat who returned
ten minutes later said G  has been staggering. Pat had been driven two blocks* into a
lane. After some harrassment he was let go.
He returned asking us to phone the police:
"They were not police officers!" He could not
believe they were.
Other incidents in the club are of note.
People were shoved and treated abominably.
The bust, if that was what it was, was the first
in two years of Bistro operation. As a bust
it was a fiasco. But the brown-shirt tactics
were the first this writer has ever seen. I was
shocked. DO PEOPLE KNOW WHAT POWERS
HAVE BEEN GIVEN TO THESE NARCOTICS
OFFICERS?
The aftermath was usual.
// no justice, suits
If money for the broken door is not soon
forthcoming, the Bistro will sue C  and
G  in   a  malicious   damage   action.   The
victim Pat will probably sue in an action for
assault and false imprisonment.
The crucial question now seems to be
whether  the RCMP will back the  actions  of
G   and   C  or  whether  they  will
discipline their own. I do know that the power
tactics that took place thrive in secrecy.
Police give excuses
The person in charge of the narcotics division seemed to get uptight and anxious when
I mentioned the papers and exposure. At first
he said that G and C  were junior
members of the force and were not directed
to the Bistro. Later he seemed to take the position that they were doing their job. They were
questioned about  the  incident at  1:30  a.m.  I
asked about liquor on the breath of G	
at that time. The staff sergeant said that as
much was not noted. He also said that the two
said Pat was high on LSD which is a laugh.
Will the RCMP condone this action?
People: I can't reproduce the look on the
faces of the two, C  and G . Their
actions were brutal. Except on television I
have never seen anything quite like it. If their
actions have the backing of the police authorities we must do something about it. What redress is there for assault on human dignity?
Why the unwarranted intrusion? There was no
reasonable cause to suspect any breach of the
narcotics act. I hope what happened was merely juniors exceeding their authority. Otherwise1 I have seen the face of the pig.
Sincerely,
HOWARD LUKE
Sports promote alienation, disunity
By JOHN TWIGG
Whither sports?
Or more correctly, whither sports
at UBC?
That is the question before this
campus as it faces a blitz by the physical education students to raise their
AMS grant to $10 from the present $5
But are sports at UBC serving their
purpose? To answer that one must decide what the purpose of athletics on
campus is. And nobody seems to know.
Among the purposes of athletics that
can be considered are 'to promote
physical fitness', to 'promote the name
of the university' and the obvious 'to
conform with all the other universities which proudly push athletics'.
The physical fitness argument is
valid, but judging from the number
of students now using the intramural
system, not too many students care
about physical fitness.
How long is it since you last ran
out to the gates just for the exercise?
A long time I'll bet.
But what about the 'furthering the
university name' aspect? How does it
affect the students?
The prime example is our 'rivalry'
with Simon Fraser University as perpetrated in the downtown press, and
by the athletic departments of both
universities because it draws fans.
What does this rivalry do for the
students?
It   subconsciously   alienates   them,
drives them further into their ivory
tower at a time when unity and understanding are sorely needed.
It creates city-states when a national
union is needed. For example, how
does it look to Joe Taxpayer, who already has a dim view of universities
because of stunts like the faculty club
and the nine o'clock gun, when all he
reads in the downtown press are quotes
like 'We'll clobber the bums.'
If Joe Taxpayer ever toured the
Campus, he'd read such enlightening
graffiti as 'Clan eats Birds', 'SFU
rules' and other, gems such as 'Science
at shzt'. He certainly wouldn't find
any tangible unity.
And The Ubyssey is as guilty as any
one. For example, we allow ads saying "Clobber the Clan" to appear on
our sports page. (We need the money,
but that's another story.)
Such thoughts engendering hate are
a sad comment on the times. Competition yes, but hate never.
It is much better to work with
students from other universities to a
common end, as was done between
UBC and SFU over the 114 incident,
and is still being done.
How does such unity reconcile with
the heated rivalry among the jocks?
Obviously it doesn't; there's a disparity somewhere which must be considered before sports at UBC are given
any more support — financial or otherwise. Tuesday, February 11,1969
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
source that has nothing to do with freedom of individual expression. They
want to escape this, to overturn this, but they see no need to form a
structure or a real, disciplined vanguard movement. Their reasoning is
that setting up a disciplined organization they feel they'd be replacing the
old structure with other limitations. They fear they'd be setting themselves up as directing the people, therefore limiting the individual again.
But what they don't understand, or it seems that they don't understand, is as long as the military-industrial complex exists, then the structure of oppression of the individual continues. An individual would be
threatened because there will be an organized lower group there ready to
strip him of his individual freedom at any moment.
State disappears after imperialism goes
In Cuba they had a revolution, they had a vanguard group that was
a disciplined group, and they realized that the state won't disappear until
imperialism is completely wiped out, structurally and also philosophically,
or the bourgeouis thoughts won't be changed. Once imperialism is wiped
out they can have their communist state and the state or territorial boundaries will disappear.
In this country the anarchists seem to feel if they just express themselves individually and tend tq ignore the limitations imposed on them,
without leadership and without discipline they can oppose the very disciplined, organized, reactionary state. This is not true. They will bef oppressed as long as imperialism exists. You cannot oppose a system such
as this is to oppose it without organization that's even more extremely
disciplined and dedicated than the structure you're opposing.
I can understand the anarchists wanting to go directly from state* to
non-state, but historically it's incorrect. As far as I'm concerned, thinking
of the recent French Revolution, the reason the French uprising failed
is simply because the anarchists in the country, who by definition had no
organization' had not people that were reliable enough as far as the mass
of the people were concerned, to replace DeGaulle and his government.
Now, the people were skeptical about the Communist Party and the other
progressive parties, because they didn't side with the people of medium
living. They lagged behind the people, so they lost the respect of the
people, and the people looked for guidance from the students and anarchists.
But the anarchists were unable to offer a structural program to replace the DeGaulle government. So the people were forced' to turn back
Anarchists, blacks and revolution
By HUEY NEWTON
Minister oi Defence, Black Panther Party
(from The Block Panther)
We should understand there is a difference between the rebellion of
the anarchists and the black revolution or liberation of the black colony.
This is a class society; it always has been. This reactionary class
society places its limitations on individuals, not just in terms of their occupation, but also regarding self expression, being mobile, and being free
to really be creative and do anything they want to do.
The class-society prevents this. This is true not only for the mass of
,the lower or subjugated] class. It is also true within the ruling class, the
master class. That class also limits* the freedom of the individual souls
of the people -which comprise it.
In the upper class, the individuals always try to free themselves from
these limitations — the artificial limitations placed upon them through
external sources: namely, some hierarchy that goes by the name of State
or Government Administration.
In America, we have not only a class! society, we also have a caste
system, and black people are fitted into the lowest caste. They have no
mobility for going up the, class ladder. They have no privilege to enter
into the ruling structure at all.
Within the ruling class they're objecting (resisting?), because the
people have found that they're completelv subjected to the will of the
administration and to the manipulators. This brings about a very strange
phenomenon iri America. That is, many of the rebelling white students
and the anarchists are the offspring of this master! class. Surely most of
them have a middle class background and some even upper class. They
see the limitations imposed upon) them and now they're striving, as all
men strive, to get freedom of the soul, freedom of expression, and freedom of movement, without the artificial limitations from antiaue values.
Blacks and colored people in America, confined within the caste
' system, are discriminated against as a whole group, of people. It's not a
question of individual freedom, as it is for the children of the upper
classes. We haven't reached the point of trying to free ourselves individually because we're dominated and oppressed as a group of -people.
As a group, whites partially free
Part of the people of this country — which is a great part — part of
the youth themselves. But they're not doing this as a group of people.
Because as a group they're already free to an extent. Their problem is not
- a group problem really, because they can easilv integrate into the structure. Potentially they're mobile enough to do this: They're thei educated
ones, the "future of the country." and so forth. They can easilv gain a
certain amount of power over the society by integrating into the ruler-
ship circle.
But they see that even within the rulership circle there are still antique
values that have no respect for individualism. Thev find themselves subjugated. No matter whati class they're in they find themselves subjugated
„ because of the nature of this class society. So their fight • is to free the individual's soul.
This brings about another problem. They're being ruled by an alien
to DeGaulle. It wasn't the people's fault; it was Cohn-Bendit's fault and
all the other anarchists who felt they could just go from state to non-state.
In this country — getting back home to North America now —■ we
can side with the student radicals. We would try to encourage and persuade them to organize and weld a sharp; cutting tool.
In order to do this they would have to be disciplined and they would
have at least some philosophical replacement of the system. This is not to
say that this itself will free the individual. The individual will not be free
until the state does not exist at all} and I think — I don't want to be redundant — this cannot be replaced by the anarchists right away.
Black fight is to free group
As far as the blacks are concerned, we are not hung up on attempting
to actualize or express our individual souls because we're oppressed not
as individuals but as a whole group of people. Our evolution, or our
liberation, is based first on freeing our group. Freeing our group to a certain degree. After we gain our liberation, our people will not be free. I
can imagine in the future that the blacks will rebel against the organized
leadership that the blacks themselves have structured. They will see there
will be limitations, limiting their individual selves, and limiting their freedom of expression. But this is only after they become free as a| group.
This is what makes our group different from the white anarchist —
besides he views his group as already free. Now he's striving for freedom
of his individual self. This is the big difference. We're not fighting for
freedom of our individual selves, we're fighting for a group freedom. In the
future therei will probably be a rebellion where blacks will say, "Well,
our leadership is limiting our freedom, because of the rigid discipline.
Now that we've gained our freedom, we will strive for our individualistic
freedom that has nothing to do with organized group or state." And the
group will be disorganized, and it should be.
But at this point we stress discipline* we stress organization, we do
not stress psychedelic drugs, and all the other things that have to do
with just the individual expansion of the mind. We're trying to gain true
liberation of a group of people, and this makes our struggle somewhat
different from the whites.
Now, how is it the same? It's the same in the fact that both of us are
striving for freedom. They will not be free — the white anarchists will not
be free — until we are free so that makes our fight their fight really. The
imperialists and the bourgeois bureaucratic capitalistic system would not
give them individual freedom whilst they keep a whole group of people
based upon color oppressed as a group. How can they expect to get individual freedom when the imperialists oppress whole nations of people?
Until we gain liberation as a group they won't gain any liberation as an
individual person. So this makes our fight the same, andt we must keep
this in perspective, and always see the similarities and the differences in it.
There's a tremendous amount of difference in it, and there's a due
amount of similarities between the two cases. Both are striving for freedom, and both are striving for liberation of their people^ only one is advanced to a degree higher than the other. The anarchists are advanced
a step higher, but only in theory. As far as actuality of conditions, they
shouldn't be advanced higher because they should see the necessity of
wiping out the imperialistic structure by organized groups just as we must
be organized. Page 6
THE      U BYSSEY
Tuesday, February 11, 1969
Send for it today!
The most dynamic budget
for Canada's most
dynamic province!
t-RITlSH COtUMaiA
BUDGET
SPEECH
%*.<,&■-<  -=■-•*
P*«*t(«r  tutd  Matter Rf F,rt*»ht:«
A balanced budget with increased
benefits for all British Columbia citizens
but no increase in taxes!
When a business is run successfully and keeps growing, the shareholders can look forward to increased
dividends. The British Columbia Government believes in this principle of free enterprise, and it passes on
the benefits of British Columbia's dynamic growth in the form of increased services or "dividends" to
British Columbia's people.
The 1969/1970 British Columbia budget — the first billion-dollar budget in British Columbia's
history — provides a blueprint for the province's future expansion and details how and where British
Columbians will benefit in the new fiscal year.
The budget shows that everyone in British Columbia benefits from British Columbia's 17 years of
continuous Government experience with its dynamic development, its long-range planning and pay-
as-you-go, debt-free management.
If you would like to keep up-to-date on the plans and potentialities of this great province, write
for your complimentary copy ofthe 1969 Budget Speech today.
THE GOVERNMENT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Hon. W. A. C. Bennett, P.C, Premier and Minister of Finance
i 1
Mail this coupon for your free copy:
G. S. Bryson,
Deputy Minister of Finance,
Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, British Columbia.
Please send me a copy ofthe 1969
British Columbia Budget Speech.
(Please indicate ifyou require
more than one copy.)
Name	
Address_ Tuesday, February 11, 1969
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
^sd^fe
•(p"**"!*-*^
'*$>
***«:
lohn frizell photo
A  BRISK MORNING  plunge, with  emphasis on brisk, is taken at Spanish Banks by unknown
resident. Well known bathing spa is just hop,   skip and brisk plunge from Fort Camp.
Gunfight at the OK sandbox;
Brock Boys buck darkred horse
By CAREY LINDE
Here is my revised and still unabridged
Guide to the AMS Elections, a saucy and inexpensive little book on the Who's Who in
the current elections. There is also an intimate
look at those behind the puppets. It even gives
advice on who to vote for, if you happen to
be so inclined and feel the urge.
Every election has its brave unsung hero —
the "fall guy." These are the guys who get
nominated for office, and who often actually
get their campaign into swing. Then the Big
Boys, who are backing another guy, come on
man, or else that nasty third candidate will
with "won't you step down in favor of our
win when we split our votes?" This sucker is
out on his ear before the bell sounds for the
first round.
Two years ago, for instance, there were
originally three runners in the race for president. Fank Flynn, Bob Cruise, and Shaun Sullivan. That year it was Frank Flynn who took
the dive in favor of the boss's candidate, Shaun
Sullivan. With the center and right all to himself, Sullivan beat Cruise.
And remember last year? There were originally four people- in the race that finally
ended up between Stan Persky and Brian Abraham. There were TWO fall guys in that one,
Harry Claire and Russ Grierson. While Stan
was going about his way trying to sell the
idea of Human Government, the other three
made some rather incredible deals, with one
guy threatening to remain in unless the other
guy backed out as well in favor of Abraham.
Well, Abraham and Persky ran against each
other last year, and for the first time in at
least four years the Brock Boys didn't have
a man of their liking in the race. Abraham's
candidacy was originally hatched over coffee
by some misguided first-year law students.
Not liking either candidate, the AMS went
through a hell of a mess last year and student
court disqualified Persky, and nullified the
election. A second election was held for president, where the candidates were more pleasing to the bosses.
This year . . . well this year is really unbelievable. Les Horswill, an artsman, president of the campus conservative club —
that's right, he's a Tory — stuck his finger up
in the air to test the wind of student opinion.
He then set up the Reform Union to correct
his Conservative image. Now he is their candidate for president, and his manager is, of all
people . . . try and guess . . . Shaun Sullivan
of yesteryear. (And Sullivan is a Liberal. At
least he says he is.)
Kelvin Beckett is this year's fall boy. He
announced his intention to run months ago,
before Horswill ever stuck his finger up to
threaten the skies. Beckett is also a member of
the campus Liberal club, of which Sullivan is
a past president.
The race was supposed to be between these
two Bobbsie Twins until a dark red horse
jumped into the sand box and demanded the
right to play. Fraser Hodge, presently on council as president of the engineering undergraduate society, entered the race on the day nominations closed.
It became immediately obvious to the managers of Horswill that here indeed was mean
competition. Beckett's potential for taking
Horswill votes became a liability. Low and
behold . . . Beckett dropped out and pledged
his votes to Horswill, almost as if on cue. An
act of God (or was it an Irishman) saved the
Reform Union.
If you relish shafting the bosses of Brock
who now live in SUB, come on out and vote
for Fraser Hodge. Lets play high political
camp and screw the back room boys by putting a dark red horse on the plastic throne.
Headline  unrelated to article
By AUNTIE BODY
Ubyssey Love and Motherhood Reporter
A random Ubyssey survey late Monday night
showed   unprecedented   excitations   in   anticipation of Valentine's Day, 1969.
Cupid's folly's drew bursts of glee from
Helen Damnation, religious sutdies 4. "The
devil be damned, I'm gonna find myself a lover
on Friday,"  she said.
Hart Saphire, a member of the campus fire
department, phoned The Ubyssey in righteous
indignation because the red hearts he had
painted on his firetruck wouldn't show. "I
painted real hearts all afternoon, only to find
the colors go together too well. Ah well..."
Plotting and scheming Al Over had concocted a vicious plan to trap unsuspecting potential lovers, and Campus twit Yves Drop
said he had heard the engineers were going
to do something nasty too, but what it was he
would not divulge except for monetary gain.
FREE   EVERYTHING
AT  ROCHDALE
Countdown
May   1 8-3 1
a free-university symposium in Toronto
Candidates apply by Feb. 14, to
World University Services, Rm. 220, SUB
Send a 'Classified' Valentine
IN FRIDAY'S
UBYSSEY
Fill  in above form  and bring  to
PUBLICATIONS OFFICE-SUB
Before 11  a.m. Thursday — Only 75c
Where are the leaders?
Anyone will tell you that the Leaders are enjoying the advantages of military training and
university subsidization through the Regular
Officer Training Plan (ROTP).
If you are a full time male undergraduate
student with a successful academic record you
should know about the opportunities that the
Canadian Armed Forces can offer you as an
ROTP cadet. You will continue your civilian
studies towards a degree at your University.
Enquiries are invited to:
CANADIAN FORCES
RECRUITING CENTRE
545 SEYMOUR ST.
The Regular Officer Training Plan
For University Undergraduates. Page  8
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 11, 1969 Tuesday, February  11,  1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
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THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 11, 1969
AMERICAN SCHOOLS TERMED GRIM, JOYLESS'
NEW YORK (CUP) — A
U.S. educational researcher
says American schools and
colleges are "the most grim,
joyless places on the face of
the earth."
Charles Silberman, Fortune
magazine editor who has been
working on a Carnegie Corporation study of U.S. education,
says 2->-2 years of reasearch
have shown him that public
schools, for example, are "destructive of human beings."
"They are needlessly authoritarian and repressive — not
because teachers and principals
are stupid or venal, but because
nobody ever asks why: why the
rules, or why the curriculum ?''
Silberman charged in a recent interview that modern educational   institutions   do  not
educate.
"What's wrong has much
less to do with technique or
substance than with the mind-
lessness of the whole enterprise.
Nobody's encouraged to think
about the purpose of his work,
why he's doing what he does.
"No one is liberally educated unless he's forced to think
about the nature of education.
In large part this is what our
student rebels are complaining
about: This God-awful word
'relevance.' The university has
Education — P.E. Formal
SUB BALLROOM
Fri. Feb. 14- 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.
music by
The Stafford Allison  Quintet
Tickets: $4.50 couple in Ed. Bldg.
Graduates-Arts & Commerce
Consider a challenging career in life insurance selling with
the Mutual Life of Canada. The Company's most successful
agency is located here in Vancouver and it wants to stay
on top. It has openings for several ambitious young men
who will service the city's largest market—the 20-30 age
group. You may become interested in management — look
at our "Management Training" program. All our managers
were salesmen for the Company  at one time.
CAMPUS INTERVIEWS will be held on FEBRUARY
13th from 9 - 5 — consult the Placement Office.
The Mutual Life
ASSURANCE COMPANY OF CANADA
JEWESSES MUSICALES
Present
-MONTSERRAT ALAVEDRA, SOPRANO
TUES., FEB.  11, 12:30 - SUB AUDITORIUM
-VANCOUVER SYMPHONY CHAMBER PLAYERS
MARCH  26,  12:30 —  SUB  BALLROOM
-VANCOUVER SYMPHONY CONCERT
APRIL 13, 2:30 p.m. — Queen  Elizabeth Theatre
TICKETS ON SALE AT AMS OFFICE
Combined ticket sales — $1.00
Tickets at door for SUB Concerts 50c
Sportsored by  Performing Arts
SMILE!
Have your teeth cleaned, polished and fluoridated by dental
hygiene students at the Faculty of Dentistry on campus at
a modest cost. At the same time you will be instructed in
the proper care of your teeth.
Because of limited facilities it may be necessary to
restrict ihe number of patients accepted for this treatment. If you are interested, please telephone for a
screening appointment at:
228-3623
or see Miss J. Faulafer in Room 122, John Barfoot McDonald
Building, Faculty of Dentistry.
separated   mind   from   feeling
and mind from action."
Silberman, 43-year-old
author of the best-selling Crisis
in Black and White, broadened
his study to examine the role
of other "teachers" such as
press and TV journalists', cler
gymen and museum directors.
"If our concern is with education," he said, "we cannot restrict our attention to the
schools, for education is not
synonymous with schooling,
and teachers are not the only
educators."
Results of Silberman's survey are to be published in book
form this fall. The study was
originally prompted by university presidents calling the Carnegie Corporation for advice on
handling their schools of education.
I DIG READING
DO YOU?
My name is Bilbo and Evelyn Wood Reading
any of my kind has ever been known to re
one lesson. Sure, some cats in the class be
determination, I persevered and my compre
the right track and not barking up the wro
Reading Dynamics class left those felines far
if you can't join'em, lick'em. A dog's is the o
Dynamics. If you want more information, w
be  glad to  answer  any  of  your questions.
Dynamics taught me to read far faster than
ad. I tripled my beginning speed after just
at me at that first lesson, but with dogged
hension is now unbelievable. By staying on
ng tree my performance in that Evelyn Wood
behind in the status race. As they say in class,
nly life for me, thanks to Evelyn Wood Reading
hy don't you contact one of my friends. They'll
Letha MacLachlan
Arts 2, lower mall
224-9704
Patrick Maguire
Arts 2
224-0844
James Quon
Science 1
879-4025
Peter Smylski
Law  1
224-3121
John Hobbs
Arts 4
224-5484
Ken Burgar
Arts 2, Totem Park
224-9813
Perry Seidelman
Arts 2
261-1809
or
ATTEND  A  FREE  PRESENTATION
on the campus
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13th
12:30 - Room 202 - Buchanan Bldg.
or
TUESDAY,  FEBRUARY   11,  8:00
- ROYAL TOWERS - CORONET ROOM
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 8:00
- HOLIDAY INN-COLUMBIA ROOM
THURSDAY,  FEBRUARY  13,  7:00
- HOLIDAY INN-CAPILANO ROOM
9:00
- FRANK BAKERS - CRYSTAL ROOM
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY  15, 7:00
- 1900 WEST BROADWAY
9:00
- 1900 WEST BROADWAY
Gwmn Woou
READING DYNAMICS OF B.C. LIMITED
1900 W. BROADWAY, VANCOUVER 9, B.C.
TELEPHONE 732-7696 Tuesday, February 11,  1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page  11
First slate election statements
PRESIDENT
HODGE
Fellow Students,
Ultimately, the problem is
in the classroom It's true the
yearly issues exist, like book
prices, crappy food, parking,
but over-shadowing them all is
the problem we each face in
the classroom. Three to four
hundred students; a prof so
damn lousy he isn't worth
% listening to; or a great prof who
is going to be fired.
For humanists and social
scientists the problem is the
ever-widening gulf between the
theory taught in class and the
facts of life outside the classroom. For students in the professional and technical schools
it's the increasingly apparent
- dilemma of society's technical
and business needs being divorced from social and cultural
needs.
The problems of the univer-
»       sity and society cannot be regarded separately, but must be
attacked    together.    We    must
act now. IT IS UP TO YOU.
Fraser Hodge.
Fraser is now finishing a
year on the AMS. He is a mem*
, ber of the finance committee,
sits on a Senate committee, and
has been a delegate to both
the CUS congress and the anti-
CUS meeting over Christmas.
As a member of an undergrad society executive he
knows the problems faced at
that level also.
~* With Bennett about to pull
an election, we need a president with an ability to organize, who can step immediately
into the office, and Fraser can
do it best.
Donn Aven
seconder
HORSWILL
f Let's stop fooling ourselves.
Simple answers haven't and
won't solve UBC's problems.
Neither wishing Bennett out of
existense nor occupying buildings will impress governments
or taxpayers.
Our financial problems will
only be solved when -we have
clearly explained to the people
of B.C. the benefits of investment in education; then the
problems of irrelevant curriculum,  poor  teaching staff,  and
overcrowded classrooms can be
successfully attacked. As president I'll work for a united
council so we can get our message across and get results. I
ask for your support.
Les Horswill
I know this university has
problems. I've sat on the UBC
senate and have seen the frustration of President Hare, professors, and students. We need
strong and reasonable student
leadership to create favorable
public attitudes. Les Horswill
has political judgment, and he's
tough. I've seen him operate
in student government and he
gets results. This is the kind of
man we need to lead us. No one
has instant or total answers to
our problems, but Les Horswill
knows this campus and gets the
word across effectively.
Mark Waldman
seconder
COORDINATOR
ORAHAME
Tomorrow you will elect a
co-ordinator of activities to coordinate campus bookings, sit
on SUB management committee and provide leadership for
you next year.
If elected I will work to reduce the bureaucracy of bookings, improve SUB maintenance and above all get the new
coffee-house-beer garden expansion area operational by September.
I will emphasize decentralization of the AMS by encouraging the creation of departmental unions (i.e. Chemistry
Students Union) so that students can take part directly in
effecting decisions of immediate importance to them.
For experience, initiative and
progressive   ideas   elect   Dave
Grahame for Co-ordinator.
Dave Grahame
A co-ordinator must have
organizational competence to
co-ordinate the activities of the
myriad of AMS groups on
campus. Dave has that competence. He knows the ins and
outs of the AMS bureaucracy
and can function within it.
However a co-ordinator must
be able to deal with people.
Dave has that capacity and he
realizes that the system must
Available at
UNIVERSITY
PHARMACY
5754 University Blvd.
In The Village — l!*i blocks
from Memorial Gym
serve the people, not the students the system. Finally the
co-ordinator as an executive
person must be able to propose
and help set creative policy for
students. Dave can and will do
it!
Bob Sewell
Seconder
LAU
Here is what I would do if
I were Activities Co-ordinator:
• Develop the SUB basement expansion area into a
coffee house.
• Organize a course consulting and general information
service run by students during
registration  week.
• Set up a text book co-op
in SUB for September.
• Assist the janitors by
planting foam-rubber fire hydrants at strategic corners in
SUB to service St. Bernards.
Hanson  Lau
Hanson Lau displays great
creative and organizational
talent, an enormous amount of
zest in problem-solving and a
genuine interest in students.
He also drives a car, wears a
Chinese gown to class and does
card tricks.
Anything  else?
Helmut Landrish
Seconder
INTERNAL
AFFAIRS
COLLIER
(No statement from Collier)
The   university   apart  from
society has ceased to exist.
Students as scholars and citi
zens are developing new initiatives to meet crises caused by
traditional thinking, cautious
action. Ken Collier, as an experienced radical political
activist is committed to approach the problems of university in society from the fresh
and responsible perspective of
a socialist of 15 years. The
office of internal affairs officer,
like all others, requires courageous action. Vote COLLIER,
Student Action Front.
Everett Northup
Seconder
GIBSON
The internal affairs officer
has two responsibilities: academic reform and public relations.
While the burden of academic reform falls logically
upon the undergraduate society,
the AMS must support such
reform. The best method of
curriculum revision is through
student-faculty discussions.
Public relations must involve
on and off-campus communication. Besides improving student news services, the AMS
must campaign to convince the
people of the province of the
economic and social value of
higher education. We must put
our case for better university
financing to the people. What
is needed is a change in government policy or a change in
government.
Dave Gibson
(No seconder  statement)
MOSSOP
I believe that students, and
the AMS, should play a wider,
more active role in developing
the university environment.
The  AMS   should  expand   its
role in three main areas. These
proposals are examples in each
category.
ACADEMIC—
• Establish lecture-seminars
in SUB on topics of interest to
students.
• Acquire video-tape machine to tape, for future reference, events of interest to students.
SERVICES—
• Run Xerox at cost for
students.
• Protect student rights eg.
check  unlawful  impoundment
by Traffic Patrol.
GOVERNMENT—
• Establish President's Advisory Council of 50% students
and 50% administration and
faculty.
• Demand equal student
representation on all departmental committees.
David Mossop
David Mossop brings a fresh
approach to the problem of
how best to advance the
quality of education at UBC.
Mossop looks ahead to the increasing use of technology in
education, and envisages the
possibilities this opens to the
AMS to use the new methods
available and to take the initiative in restructuring outmoded educational concepts.
Mossop has the perseverance
and practicality to move effectively toward the implementation of his program.
Larry Page
Seconder
SECRETARY
JACOBS
(Ann   Jacobs   elected   secretary by acclamation).
(poAfohminq fildApMMnlA
REAL JAZZ!
the Elmer Gill Trio
Thursday, Feb. 13, 12:30 - 2:30
50c SUB BALLROOM
FILMSOC PRESENTS
WARRENDALE
Thursday, Friday & Saturday-Feb. 13,14,15
THURS. 3:30, 6:30, 9:00
FRI. 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:00
SAT. 7:00, 9:00
SUB THEATRE - 50c Page  12
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 11,1969
LOOKS DIFFERENT, doesn't it? ". . . . and it isn't just the season and it isn't just the temperature . . ." But it helps.
Brock Hall art collection
to be displayed on SUB walls
By CHARLIE HULTON
The Brock Hall art collection, removed from
Brock three weeks ago because of alleged
student mishandling, will be up on SUB walls
this month, says Fred Flores, Alma Mater Society Cultural supervisor.
The collection of Canadian art, valued near
$80,000 was removed from Brock after SUB
art gallery curator Christos Dikeako complained of many canvasses having "been
marked, dirtied and a few damaged."
Removal was also propmted by the recent
theft of a privately-owned $600 sculpture from
the SUB gallery. The sculpture was later returned and no action was taken.
"Whoever took it decided he didn't really
want it or had an attack of conscience," said
Flores.
He said not all 51 paintings in the collection
will be hung in SUB at the same time because
of a lack of space. The Brock art collection
represents a nearly unique experiment at UBC;
students bought all the paintings themselves.
Shortly after Brock Hall opened in i940,
Huntec Lewis, an English professor, persuaded
the AMS to buy paintings to decorate the
walls, with the idea of making them the nucleus of a collection students could add to.
The  first   painting,   Abandoned  Village by
E. J. Hughes, was purchased in 1948 with
funds donated by the graduating class. It was
not util 1955, however, that the AMS made a
sizeable grant.
The Brock art committee was formed to administer the collection and a similar grant was
made the next year.
Then, largely because of the efforts of AMS
vice president J. R. Longstaffe and B.C. Binning, head of the fine arts department, council
in 1956 passed a bylaw giving the Brock art
committee permanent life with an annual grant
of 10 cents per student.
In 1958 Maclean's magazine invoted several
west coast to interpret British Columbia in the
province's centennial year. The results would
be published and the paintings donated to a
gallery.
Binning wrote to Maclean's telling them of
the student collection, Maclean's donated the
pictures and the eight canvasses became the
nucleus of the present UBC collection.
A new committee of five students is chosen
each year with the fine arts head acting as
non-voting chairman to keep the collection
up to date with Canadian trends in art.
The collection includes works by Binning,
Jack Shadbolt, Jacques de Tonnancour and
others.
Watch for it soon, live, on the walls of SUB.
WHY WAIT...
RESPOND
FEBRUARY 11-18
An Attitude Survey — Students' Assembly
Scholarship and Bursary Awards
Cheques now available at Cashiers Wicket in the Accounting
Office.
Students are requested to call at the Accounting Office to
collect their cheques, or to endorse their cheques to apply
against unpaid fees.
FILMSOC  presents
For Three Men
The Civil War Wasn't Hell.
It Was Practice!
CONT Mi
LEEVpiCLEEF
EUWALLACH
THE GOOD,
THEBADS
THE UGLY"
m ihe role of Tu>
Sciempaitr,    I Uireciedbi I   Musi:bytWHOKOfiwCONf
iwiworn M-K i      H Nr U" 1■•<«*.•■»f»c     "•=—■
imsiRcniH-il lULIlulU LLUIlL        iss-wie «cm
TECHNISCOPE TECHNICOLOR -iij;
TUESDAY,  FEBRUARY   11th
3:00 - 6:00 - 9:00
SUB THEATRE
50c
^?\
DINNER
DANCE
Motel Vancouver
7  p.m.   -   1   n.m.
TICKETS   55.00  EACH   AT
INTERNATIONAL  HOUSE
BRING A VALENTINE
S&&
T£B^
TRAVEL
ON A SHOE STRING
The youth hostel organization is well established in
40 countries. Youth hostels exist in Asia, Europe, North
and South America and Africa. In all 4000 well equipped youth hostels are ready and at your disposal when
travelling. Travel the economic hostel way. An information   desk  Will  be  open:
DATE: Every Wednesday
WHERE: Opposite Information Desk in Students Union Building
TIME: 12:30 to 1:30 P.M.
Drop In And Meet Your Youth Hostel
Representative
WITH THE
YOUTH HOSTELS
1406 West Broadway, Vancouver 9, B.C.  Telephone 738-9838
UBC MUSSOC Presents
Cole Porter's infamous musical
CAN
CAN
student- perf. Wed. 8:30
Thurs. noon
ofd Aud. 75c Tuesday, February  11,  1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page  13
Fee hike backed    saf backs
by Reform Union
A speech from the student
council throne, a $3 AMS fee
increase and a French residential college are some of the promises of the Reform Union if
its members get elected.
The union is backing three
candidates in Wednesday's first
slate elections: Les Horswill
(AMS president), Ann Jacobs,
(secretary by acclamation), and
Dave Gibson (internal affairs).
Some of the major resolutions of the Reform Union's
policy statement are:
• Implementation of the
commission structure in the
AMS.
• No more AMS exchange
scholarship programs.
• Contribution to BCUS of
at least 20 cents per student.
• Establishment of a student
council organ of communication; e.g. a regular insert in
The Ubyssey.
• A beefed-up orientation
program for freshmen, including an expanded "Tuum Est",
a week-long symposium, teach-
ins,   and   a   "Throne   Speech"
from student council.
• AMS fee increase of $3
per student.
• Endorsement in principle
of the AMS brief "To the people
of the province," including
more extra-curricular seminars
and continuation and expansion of Arts I and II program.
• The establishment of satellite campuses on the present
endowment lands and elsewhere in greater Vancouver.
• The establishment of a
French residential college.
• An extensive campaign
during the next provincial election to make the public aware
of the problems facing higher
education.
• Support for a national
union of students as an instrument of communication and
combined research between universities.
• Universal accessibility to
higher education.
• Less overcrowding without raising entrance requirements.
socialist
candidal
The Student Act!
Front is supporting three
candidates in the elections: Ken Collier for Internal Affairs, Bob McKee
for External Affairs, and
Karen Kopperud for Ombudsman.
All three candidates are
socialists, although only
McKee is a member of
the Young Socialist Club
They are standing on a
four-point program:—
• Defend the 114 students involved in the Simon
Fraser University occupation.
• Universal accessibility and unlimited enrolment: more universities.
• Student-faculty control over the election of
university administration
president.
• Student-worker alliance in the fight for a
better social system in
B.C.
ARTS  I SUCCESSFUL
From Page One
students in this year's Arts I program met to
continue Arts II for 1969-70.
An interesting result of the Clark report
has to do with how students decide whether
they're learning anything. In the Clark survey
regular arts students emphasized the instructor's classroom delivery, his course organization and preparation.
By contrast Arts I students placed more
emphasis on teacher-student relations and the
program structure itself.
The significance of this finding is that it
tends to support the claim made by the head
Joseph Tussman, head of Berkley's Experimental College, will speak Thursday noon in
Hebb Theatre. He will also conduct a Thursday evening seminar for the Teach-in study
groups in the Blue Room of the Arts I building at 8 p.m.
of Berkeley's Experimental College (the program on which Arts I is modelled), Joseph
Tussman, about "colleagial teaching":
Tussman suggests that "the shift from the
course to the program has a revolutionary effect on the teaching situation. A single professor! can teach a course; he cannot teach a program. 'What should I do with my students?'
gives way to 'What should we do with ours?'
Unless structural reform entails the substitution of the latter question for the former, it
will have only minor effects on the quality of
education. We must move from individualistic
to colleagial teaching. That is a drastic move,
indeed; 'revolutionary' is not an exaggeration."
Apparently Arts I students agree.
The most controversial finding in the Clark
report says Arts I costs too much. Arts dean
John Young reports that the 9-unit Arts I program cost, in teaching salaries, $336 per student, while the corresponding expense for a
regular arts students was about $130 (e.g.
english 100 $73, history 100 $37, psychology
100 $20).
Informed sources in the program offer a
different interpretation. They say the figures
don't show Arts I costs far more than regular
courses as much as they show the imbalance
of university spending in favor of upper division and grad students.
One Arts I professor said, "Academics
have consistantly given the short end of the
stick to those that need it most, first and
second year students. In effect, lower division
students subsidize upper division and grad
students."
The Clark report praises the first year of
the program highly: "We believe that in 1967-
68 Arts I was most successful in arousing enthusiasm among many student for discussing
ideas, in stimulating their sense of trusting
each other to the point of talking and writing
freely, in encouraging them to think for themselves and creatively about human problems."
Further, "a large measure of success was
achieved in creating a sense of community."
A major section of the Clark report tried
to answer such questions as, "Did Arts I prove
a worthwhile education experience in itself?"
"Was it a valuable alternative to existing
courses?" "Was it relevant to the life of students and faculty involved in it?"
While the evaluation answers all these questions affirmatively, the most fundamental -was
finding ties to the non-disciplinary approach of
Arts I and similar programs: "What we are
are trying is a different way of handling the
first two years. Stated negatively, our problem
is to provide an alternative to the system of
sampling introductions to the academic disciplines as the organizing principle of the first
two years. We are not disciplinary; nor are we
interdisciplinary. We are non-disciplinary or
subdisciplinary. Our position is that lower
dvision education need not, should not, be conceived in terms of academic professions." (Tussman, Experiment at Berkeley). The Clark committee found "in the course of our enquiries
we have come to see that a non-disciplinary
approach to knowledge has a valid place in our
university."
The report concludes with a go-ahead recommendation: "We are in full agreement as
to the desirability of continuing the Arts I
experiment." The report recommends that the
size of the program for 1969-70 be maintained
at this year's level of 18 faculty and 360 students, advising against expansion; money is
more urgently1 needed to prevent overcrowding in first and second year arts courses.
The endorsement of an educational experiment by an evaluation group not noted for
radicialism (consisting of professors Conway,
Landauer, Shirran, Steinberg and Smiley, in
addition to chairman Clark) will likely ensure
that Arts I continues and, expands.
Valentine's Massacre
With a cast of thousands
A car rally with a difference.  Start SUB  loop  12:30—
Sign up begins 11:30.
Entry fee  75c—50c  if  Educ.  or  P.E.   student.
ANOTHER FINE PRODUCT OF  ED.  P.E. WEEK
2 week think tank
rot your mind at Rochdale
May 18-31
countdown to 2000 A.D.
(assuming, of course . . .)
apply to
world university service, sub 220
#w>Mi      DINNER
' Ax,     DANCE
Hotel Vancouver
If 7  p.m.   -   I   a.m
*—•■*-' TICKETS  $5.00 EACH  AT
INTERNATIONAL   HOUSE
Moonlighter's    Steelband
BRING A VALENTINE
>TIOAi
£B ^
PHARMACY
A CAREER IN
U
HEALTH SCIENCES
Speaker and 16 mm sound-color film
Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences
ROOM 171 - 12:30 - 1:30 P.M.
Friday, February 14th, 1969
at George Cunningham Building
Coffee and doughnuts will be served following
Ihe presentation
rr
V-bu keep flunking
your best subject?
Think it over, over coffee.
TheThink Drink.
For your own Think Drink Mug, send 75C and your name and address to:
Think Drink Mug, Dept. N, P.O. Box 1000, Willowdale, Ontario. Tho International Coffee Organization. Page  14
THE      U BYSSEY
Tuesday, February 11, 1969
Birds win
volleyball
tournament
UBC has a winning team.
By the second date of
three, the mens volleyball
team has already won the
1968 Can-Am trophy.
In a home and home series against teams from Universities of Washington and
Victoria UBC has a two win
record against no losses, and
with one series left, the
team can't possibly be dislodged from first place.
Over the weekend the
Birds played the second part
of the series at the University of Washington and even
though they were missing
the services of veterans
Mike Rockwell and Meredith Spike, they won both
of their games easily, against
U of W 15-5, 15-4 and against
UVic, 15-12 and 15-9.
Replacing the missing veterans were Wayne Desjardins and Mark Bell who
played extremely well according to Al Tanachuk, the
team manager who pointed
especially to their spiking as
being good.
Next Friday the team will
go to Regina to play in the
Western Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Association
Championships.
0C
UBC's Neil Williscroft missed
this shot. Although he was
a game high scorer, tied
with Bob Barrazuol he was
hit by the shooting jeebies
and ended up scoring only
ten points.
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Alma  Mater Society
Order of Elections
SLATE 1 — Nominations for President, Internal Affairs
Officer,  Secretary  and  Co-ordinator  have  closed.
Election is Tomorrow, February 12.
SLATE II — Nominations opened Feb. 5; nominations
close at noon Feb. 13; election will be Wednesday, Feb.
19.
1. Vice President — who shall have successfully completed his second year or its equivalent and who has
attended the University of British Columbia for at least
two years.
2. Treasurer — who shall have successfully completed
bis second year or its equivalent.
3. External Affairs Officer — who shall have successfully completed his first year or its equivalent.
4. Ombudsman—who shall have successfully completed
his first year or its equivalent.
Nomination and eligibility forms and election rules and
procedures can be obtained from the AMS offices in
SUB and are to be returned to the Secretary's Office,
Room 248, SUB, before 12 noon on days of closing of
nomination*.
All Candidates Meeting
Monday, Feb. 17, 12:30 in SUB Auditorium.
Come and hear the candidates speak.
Elections are your business!
Grad Class General Meeting
Wednesday, February 12, 1969,12:30 noon, Henry Angus
104. Agenda will include:
—selection of grad class gift or gifts
—selection of honorary positions
—Treasurer's Report
—Social Report
The Grad Class Council urges all grads to attend.
SPOR TS
First game report-
Birds bombed badly
The UBC Thunderbirds lost the first battle
in a two encounter war on Saturday at the
Pacific Coliseum; 57-50 at th© hands of the
SFU Clansmen.
A paid crowd of 5,159 watched the Simon
Fraser team use its ball control offense to
grind and manouvre for good shots, draw 17
fouls, and completely1 tie up the Birds with
their zone defense.
The Clan were led by Wayne Morgan and
Dave Murphy who each fired in 19 points and
combined for 16 rebounds.
Both players were dominating factors as
SFU managed to isolate Murphy one-on-one
against the Birds and he proceeded to drop in
8 field goals.
Morgan on the other hand, was great on the
foul line as he hit 9 for 9 and played a strong
game backing up the strong SFU defense.
For the Birds it was a woeful showing as
they shot 37% from the field, only 50% from
the foul line, and managed a scant 50 points
on the night. The main problem was their inability to penetrate the Simon Fraser zone defense, and when you can't get penetration you
must be hot from the outside to win; the Birds
were stone cold.
Neil Williscroft and Bob Barazzuol were
high with 10 points each, Neil Murray finished
with 8.
The game started very evenly as the teams
were tied 4 times in the first 6 minutes and
the first half ended in a 26-26 deadlock.
In the second half the Clan twice took early
leads and twice UBC stormed back, but each
time SFU called a key time out to stop the
Birds' momentum and regain control.
A smiling Simon Fraser Coach, John Koot-
nekoff said after the game, "Murphy and Morgan did a great job for us as we tried to isolate Murphy with anyone because when he's
hot he can score while landing on his tailbone.
I'll say one thing for UBC," he added, "they
have a tremendous ball club and I hope things
go as well for us on Monday."
Whether the Birds were a great club is a
It/
M
imn
& ^
EX-C-C-CUSE ME, says UBC's Neil Williscroft as
he rounds the corner keeping a close eye
on the Clans Wayne Morgan. SFU's Bob Wright
looks on a little miffed that he isn't getting
the   close   attention.
point very much in question as the only weapon that went well was their full court press
which forced 17 SFU turnovers.
However Monday night they will get a shot
at making up the seven points and capturing
the Buchanan Trophy for the first time.
The Jayvees saved UBC from a blank night
as they stopped the Simon Fraser JV's 65-60
in the preliminary.
Jack Hoy had 16 points and Rod Clark 11
for the winners while Don Higham was high
man with 20 for Simon Fraser.
Both Coca-Cola and Coke are registered trade marks which identify only the product of Coca-Cola Ltd.
Oh, oh.
Bet my date is
the one with
"personality"
Blind dates are a chance. But you can always depend on
refreshing Coca-Cola for the taste you never get tired of.
That's why things go better with Coke, after Coke, after Coke.
(mM
Authorized bottler of Coca-Cola under contract with Coca-Cola Ltd.
WOMETCO (B.C.) LIMITED
. 1818 CORNWALL, VANCOUVER Tuesday, February 11, 1969
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 15
Womens sports news
UBC GYMNAST Sandi Hartley displaying some
of her wealth. These have been won in various gymnastic competitions around the country. She recently added another honour as
she was named top individual athlete at the
Women's Collegiate Gymnastic Champ-
-ionships.
Led by Sandi Hartley, the U.B.C. women's
gymnastics team won the first place trophy
and the individual all-around trophy in the
Western Canada Intercollegiate Athletic Association meet held at the University of Alberta
this weekend.
Sandi gained 36.05 of U.B.C.'s total of 87.95
points, by dominating in all four events — the
uneven bars, vaulting, balance beam, and free
exercise.
Leslie Bird, a petite 21 year old fourth year
U.B.C. student placed third in individual points
with 28.15 behind Patti Sebestyen's 28.85
points.
Patti's team, the University of Saskatchewan, was second in team standing with 77.75
and University of Manitoba third with 43.70.
In Edmonton at the same time, U.B.C.'s
fiigure skating team won the Western Intercollegiate Championship with 143 points over
second place University of Alberta's 125.
Marilyn Thompson, skating for U.B.C, won
the* top individual all-around award.
Game 2 report
bad - bad - bad
The   SFU  Clan   bludgeoned
• UBC  Thunderbirds   75-65  last
night and went on to win the
Buchanan Trophy series by a
score of 132-11-5.
The Birds just couldn't hold
the Clan. After they opened
with a full court press which
caused ten Clan turnovers, they
started to tire near the end of
the first half and became in-
_ effective.
The Simon Fraser coach,
John Kootnekoff said after the
game, "I can't say enough
about these guys, they pulled
together and did a wonderful
job. We simply panicked in
the early game after we were
down, but we just hung in
there and fought an uphill
battle to win."
- For the Clan, it was Bill
Robinson, who although he
was sick with the flu during
the game, gunned in 23 points
on brilliant drives and long
outside shots.
Wayne Morgan chipped in
13 points, Gary Smith had 12
and Larry Clark was the steady
workhorse for SFU.
- The Birds were led by center
Neil Williscroft who despite
the two losses played some of
his best ball of the season.
He flipped in 16 points and
was the games top rebounder
with  10.
Co-captain Bob Barrazuol
finished with 16 points also
and Phil Langley added 12
more to the cause.
A disappointed Peter Mullins
said, "We're doing everything
right, passing, moving the ball,
but we just can't score."
It was a frustrating evening
for the Birds as they initially
forced SFU out of their slowdown offence, but the Clan
came out running and beat the
Birds at their own game.
Many times UBC was caught
up court, pressing, leaving
their basket open wide for the
long up court passes to an
uncovered  man.
They out-rebounded the Clan
38-32 but took 25 personal
fouls from the entirely inadequate officials.
The Jayvees again salvaged
a split on the night by thumping the SFU Juniors by a 69-53
score.
Gary Best with 18 points and
John Mills with 13 lead the
way.
The Birds next game is
against the UVic Vikings Saturday night in Victoria.
- #> 5 **»i^.; $■•■»• \v > *w*;*v- **•*.'* - "'
UBC DIVER Bob Menzies and
his swim team team-mate
Phil Dockerill were winners
in a losing cause as they performed well in UBC's loss to
Oregon State University on
Saturday. The previous night
the Birds lost to the University of Washington, with
team captain Jim Maddin
getting   the   only  victory.
Intramural notice
Intramural basketball semi-final and final games will
be played in War Memorial gym this week and next.
Games will be played on the full sized court and since
there were so many teams competing in the various leagues
competition still is tense.
GIMME THE BALL says UBC
captain   Bob   Barrazuol.
The   Division   I   playoffs
will be:
Feb.  12, 12:30 P.E. vs Eng.
(Union College, Acadia or
Figi's still in running.)
(Div.   I   overall   Championship).
The   Division   II   playoffs
will be;
Feb. 11, 12:30 Dekes vs P.E.
Feb. 17, 12:30 Psi U vs win-
s        *,   .
ner of Law, P.E.
Feb. 17, 12:30 winner Feb.
11 vs winner of league E.
(Education, Acadia and En-
lineering still in running.)
(Division II overall Championship.)
Feb. 17, 6:30 winners of Feb.
17 noon games.
The Division III winner is
P.E.
Birds split
puck pair
THE SKY IS
Excellent goaltending, a
couple of green kids that came
through, and an overall team
effort resulted in the best two
games of the collegiate hockey
season in Calgary over the
weekend. The Birds split a
pair of games with the University of Calgary "Dinosaurs".
Both games were practically-
identical with the same wide
open brand of hockey, but the
last five minutes in each game
resulted in one team coming
through for the win.
In Friday's encounter the
score was 4-3 in favour of Calgary after the end of period
two. Birds scorers were Jim
Fowler, Barry Wilcox and Tom
Williamson.
Going into the final period
both teams pressed hard, but
the Birds were in a position
where they had to score.
Due to this hard press Calgary broke through at the 15-
minute mark to make it 6-3.
A goal in the final minute
made it 6J3.
Saturday's game was the
same style of hockey but Coach
Bob Hindmarch had made a
few changes.
Again after two periods of
play the score was tied 4-4.
Bird goals were by Jim Fowler,
Barry Wilcox and two goals by
Wayne Schaab.
Schaab scored in the first
minute of the third period and
the Birds went ahead 5-4 and
set the same scene as the previous night.
This time with Calgary pressing hard, as they needed the
goal, the Birds came through
at the 15-minute mark as
Schaab scored his fourth goal
of the night.
Joe Petretta scored three
minutes later to make the
final score 7-4.
Dwayne Biagioni played his
best game of the season on
Saturday and played a key
part in the win as he drew
the assignment of checking
Calgary's top goal scorer, Gord
Jones, who was mainly responsible for Friday's win.
Dwayne succeeded as Jones
was held scoreless.
Good goaltending by both
teams and especially U.B.C.'s
Rick Bardal and Don Cram
made it an exciting game, as
the teams played wide open as
shown by the shots on goal.
Calgary outshot UBC 51-42 and
49-43 in both games.
UBC was again plagued by
injuries as they may have lost
the services of Jim Fowler and
Stu Gibbs bringing a total of
four lost players in four games.
A loss of 4 regulars may be
a big factor in this coming
weekend games when the Birds
take on Edmonton, the league's
and in all probability Canada's
best collegiate hockey team.
Bird's Wayne Schaab played
his usual better hockey game
and came up with four big
goals on Saturday. He is definitely the best new player in the
league and should help the
team in the next few years.
Wayne will have his job set
out for him this coming weekend when he will come against
the tough Edmonton defence
here at UBC.
■HnoMH
to 2000 A.D.
ttMH-kcur
Speaker*
Feb. 11, Tues.
Divinsky &
Stockholder
Feb. 13, Thurs.
Feb. Ii Fri.
ANGUS 110
12:30 Page  16
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 11, 1969
RELIGIOUS   STUDIES
Indian Swami speaks on "Science, Culture   and   Regilion"   in   Bu.   100,   7:00
p.m.   tonight.
POLLUTION   CONTROL
Ecology Inc. meets 8:00 p.m. Wed.,
Feb.  12, SUB  125.
FILMSOC
"The Good, the Bad and the Ugly",
Tuesday, 3:00, 6:00, 9:00 p.m. SUB
Theatre. 50 cents.
NEWMAN   CENTRE
Important general meeting noon today, St. Marks lounge.
THE   PIT
Fit memberships on sale Wed. and
Thurs. of this week. Pit open Tues.
4:30 to 11:00 and Fri. 4:30 to 12:00
P.m.
SOCIOLOGY   315
Debate team (China-class) meet tonight at 7:30 at 2233 Stephens.
SLAVONIC   CIRCLE
Meeting noon  today.  SUB  105.
SPEAKERS
Clara Culhane, nurse with Canadian
Medical Aid to Viet-Nam speaks Wed.
noon, Bu. 104.
AQUA   SOC
Sign up now on notice board for mid
term  dive,  Feb   20-21.
ONTOLOGICAL   SOC
Dr. Polack on Unmoved by the World.
Wed.  noon,  SUB   115.
'tween classes
SPEAKERS
Joseph Tussman,  philosopher,   speaks
Thurs.   noon in  Hebb  Theatre.  Free.
POETRY   READING
St.  Valentines  day  reading  of  erotic
and  amorous verse, with Jill Corner,
Seymour Mayne, and Stephen Scobie.
Friday noon, Bu. 100.
UBC FLYING CLUB
Movie   and   meeting   Thursday   noon.
Room  102,  Geology building.
ARTS UNDERGRAD SOCIETY
ELECTIONS
FEB. 28
Election for the position of President, Vice-President,
Secretary  and   Treasurer  will   be   held   on
FRIDAY, FEB. 28
Nominations  for  the  above  positions   should   be submitted
to Box 57 S.U.B.  by WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19.
6th ANNUAL SCIENCE SYMPOSIUM
VALUES and SCIENCE
At:  Walla  Walla Biological  Research
Rosario Beach, Washington
LEAVE  U.B.C. -  SUB  5:30 WED.,  FEB.  19
RETURN  BY 5:30 FRI., FEB. -21
REGISTER  NOW AT AMS OFFICE
$9 Students — $72 Faculty
Sponsored  by   Academic  Activities   Committee
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Alma  Mater Society
1.
Barn
2.
Buchanan 1
3.
Buchanan 2
4.
Bus Stop
5.
Cafeteria
6.
Education
7.
Engineering1
9. Main Library
10. Ponderosa
11. Sedgewick Library
12. SUB 1
13. SUB 2
14. War Memorial Gym
15. Woodward Library
8.   Henry Angus
Advance polls will be held on Tuesday, Feb. 11th.
1. SUB — 11:30-3:30
2. EDUCATION — 11:30-3:30
3. RESIDENCES — 5:00-7:00
ELECTIONS: Polls will be held from, 10:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
on Wednesday, Feb. 12ih.
wus
Speakers:   noon   in   Ang.   110.   Harger
today;   Wed.   —   Divinsky   and   Stockholder; Thurs.—Bond; Fri.—Hardwick.
IL   CAFFE
Meeting Wed. noon, I.H. 402.
NDP
Leadership candidate, MLA Bob Williams talk*? on "Socreds and Shady
deals".   Thurs.   noon,   Bu.   102.
FILM  SOC
Warrendale. Fri., 12.30, 3:30, 6:30, 9
p.m.; Sat. 7 and 9 p.nv SUB theatre,
50   cents.
PRE-SOCIAL   WORK
Dick Morely on Challenge in the West
End   Wed. noon, SUB 207.
CAMPUS   CAVALIERS
Square dancing Thurs. noon to 2:30.
SUB L & M.
ANTI-POLLUTION   SOC
Organizational meeting Wed., Feb. 11,
8 p.m., SUB 125.
FLYING CLUB
Air traffic lecture, Thurs.. 7 p.m.,
SUB  125.
ANTHROSOC   UNION
Ethics   in   the   social   sciences   workshop noon today, old Ubyssey office,
Brock.
HILLEL   HOUSE
Chief  rabbi  of  Italy  talks  about  the
Vatican's shadow, noon today in Hillel house behind  Brock.
DEBATING   UNION
Meeting  noon today, Bu.  217.  "International   Jewry   must   be   condemned
for    imperialistic    aggression    against
the   democratic   and   freedom   loving *
peoples  of  the  Arab  world.*'
ACADEMIC   ACTIVITIES
Symposium: Science and Values, Feb.
19-21, Rosario Beach, Walla Walla Research station, Washington State.
Student $9, Faculty $12—apply AMS
office.
PRE-MED  SOC
Watch for green posters.
NEWMAN  CLUB
Slides   and    commentary   on   What's
Happening   in    India   in   St.    Mark's
loung, Wednesday 7:30 p.m.
PERFORMING  ARTS
Jeunesse   Musicales   concert   in   SUB
auditorium,  noon today.
SCEC
Dr. Nichols on disturbed children,
Wed. noon. SUB 215 P.
CLASSIFIED
RATES:  Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 750, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publication Office: 241 STUDENT UNION BUILDING,
UNIVERSITY OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
ATTENTION ED.-P.E. STUDENTS:
Tickets for formal Feb. 14 on sale
in  Ed.   Building.   $4.50  couple.
THE CRYSTAL HORIZON IN CON-
cert in Education lounge for dance
Tues.,   Feb.   11,   12:30.
C.V.C.-N.V.C. PRESENTS CARL
Graves and The Soul Unlimited on
Friday, Feb. 14 in the SUB Caf.,
8:30-12:30.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE PRE-
sents the International Ball, Vancouver Hotel, Feb. 14. Dinner and
Dance, $5 a person. Tickets at I.H.
DANCE TO SOUND OF SPECTRES
at Pt. Grey's "Bayshore 69", Feb.
15.  Tickets:  $4.00.  BU  232  noon.
CAN-CAN CONTINUES. LAST STUD,
perfs. 8:30 Wed., noon Thursday.
Don't  miss  it.   Old   Aud.   75c.
CREATE YOUR OWN: PAINT,
Montage, Sculpture, Light Show.
Lutheran Campus Centre, Univ.
Blvd. and Wesbrook. 8 p.m., Fri.
14th,  cost 50c.
DANCE THIS FRIDAY TO "MAIN-
land Blue" at Totem Park. 9-1.
Guys  $1.25,  Girls  .75,   Couples $1.50.
SPRING   COMES   EARLY
this year. This week at Big Mothers,
catch    the   band   for   all    seasons   —
SPRING.
Valentine Greetings
12-A
BE ORIGINAL — SEND VALENTINE
Greetings to your friends with a
Classified ad in the Feb. 14 issue.
Make arrangements in the Publications office, 241 SUB. Deadline 11
a.m.  Feb.  13.
Lost   &   Found
13
LOST: TURQUOISE ENAMEL PEN-
dant between Educ. and Village.
Sentimental value. Also pearl ring
in Educ. parking lot. Please call
228-2141,   local   154,   daytime.
LOST:    GOLD    CHARM    BRACELET
sentimental   value,   reward   266-8074.
LOST: MONOGRAMED WATCH IN
SUB Bowling Alley washroom. Of
sent,   value.   Reward.   John   255-2060.
LOST — GOLD AND BLACK FOUN-
tain Pen. Friday, Feb. 8th from
Carrell on 3rd. Level stacks. Contact   Norman   Angus  266-0745.
LOST AT MARDI GRAS: PAIR OF
Prescription glasses with sunglass
clip-on   lenses.    Reward.    266-0459.
LOST NOTES IN YELLOW FOLDER
in plastic bag maybe left in hitchhikers car — Call Margo 224-7279
or  leave   in  Agriculture   Bldg.
Rides   &   Car Pools
14
RIDE NEEDED FOR 8:30's. ALSO
ride needed from I'BC approx. 9:30,
3 or 4 nights per "week. Larry,
253-0042,   First  and  Commercial.
Special  Notices
15
BATIK CLASSES START THURS.,
Feb. 13. 6 wks., 2:30-4:30 $10. Register  SUB,   Rm|   249.
THE BUBBLICS FLOW AT POOL
Capades, Fri., Feb. 14, 12:30. Empire
Pool.    Everyone   welcome.
ARE YOU STARVED FOR JAZZ?
Come hear Elmer Gill Trio, Thurs.,
Feb. lStli, 12:30 - 2:30, SUB Ballroom.   Performing   Arts.
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY
at the UBC Barber Shop & Beauty
Salon. "It pays to look your best."
5736   University   Blvd.   228-8942.
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance premium? If you are age 20
or over you may qualify. Phone
Ted   Elliott.   299-9422.
LEGEND READING CENTRE —
Speed reading experts — new
classes. Feb. 17 & 18 — Phone Mike
Kvenich,   '254-4557   (eves.)
ROOM TO SPARE?. CHILDREN'S
Aid Society needs short-term accommodation in Vancouver for
transient-teenagers, mainly boys,
arriving in the city without adequate plans. For further information, please call Homefinder, C.A.S.,
Mon.-Fri., 9-5, 733-8111 or evenings,
weekends 683-2474.
Special Notices (Cont.)
15
MALE MODELS FOR HAIRSTYLING
course. Phone Mr. Skeates at 874-
7473  after  6:30 p.m.	
CHINESE VARSITY CELEBRATES
"Year of the Rooster": February
14th, SUB. Carl Graves — Soul Unlimited. 16th—Year End "Progressive Dinner". 17th—New Year Day
Coke  Party.	
MANUSCRIPT EDITING — FORMER
Toronto Globe & Mail education
writer available for stylistic and organizational advice on articles,
theses, book-length manuscripts, etc.
Contact  Box  34,   AMS,   SUB.
TRAVEL OPPORTUNITIES    16
CARRY YOUR MIND TO ROCH-
dale for the COUNTDOWN Symposium. Apply to WUS,  SUB 220.
Wanted Misc.
18
STAMP      COLLECTION      WANTED.
Phone 263-6485  after 7 p.m.
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'67 CAMARO, 3-SPEED STICK, 327
h.p. V-8. 17,000 miles, radio, tach.
$2,600.   Ph.   434-8223 eves.
AUSTIN WESTMINSTER O.D. MUST
sell.   Best  offer  to  $900.00.  732-5642.
POWER!     470     H.P.     FORD.     MUST
sell. Best offer to $1,200.00. 732-5642.
'51   CHEV.   SEIZED   UP.   PARTS  OR
offers.    Tires    windows   etc.    Phone
 228-8614.   Any   time.
1968 MINI.   STANDARD.   3000 MILES.
Call   736-6806   after   6.
'57   DELUXE   V.W.    GOO    RUNNING
condition.   733-7109 after 6:00  p.m.
Autos  Wanted
22
Automobile—Parts
23
Miscellaneous
33
Rentals—Miscellaneous
36
Scandals
37
ST. VALENTINE'S MASSACRE: A
car rally starting at SUB loop, 12:30.
Feb.   12.
HEAR SPANISH SOPRANO MONT-
serrat Alavedra in SUB Auditorium,
Tuesday, Feb. 11 at 12:30. Admission
50c.
VENUS OF LOVE, BACCHUS OF
Wine, together at "BAYSHORE 69",
Feb. 15. Ticket: $4.00. Bu. 232, noon.
FREE EVERYTHING AT ROCH-
dale: Countdown, May 18-31, a free-
university symposium in Toronto.
Apply   to  WUS,   SUB  220.
CREATE - CREATE - CREATE
Do  Your   Thing
Friday,   Feb.   14,   8   p.m.
Lutheran   Campus   Centre
DANCE THIS FRIDAY TO "MAIN-
land Blue" at Totem Park. 9-1.
Guys   $1.25,   Girls   .75c.   Couple   $1.50.
Sewing &  Alterations
38
Typing
40
EXPERT   IBM    SELECTRIC   TYPIST
Experienced essay and  thesis typist.
Reasonable   Rates —  TR  4-9253
TYPING  —  PHONE   731-7511   —   9:00-
5:00.   After   6:00.   266-6602.
EXP. TYPING. REAS. RATES,
quick service from legible drafts.
Phone 738-6829 after 10:00 a.m. to
10:00 p.m.
Help  Wanted—Female
51
Help Wanted—Male
52
Help  Wanted—
Male or Female
53
LIFEGUARDS, CITY OF KAMLOOPS
. Dept.   of  Parks  and  Recreation,   112
Lome   Street.   Applications   due   by
March  1,   1969.
Wo*k Wanted
54
INSTRUCTION
Music
62
Special Classes
63
CLASSES     IN    WEAVING,
Spinning   and    dying.    If
call   732-5423.
WOOL
interested
Tutoring
64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR  SALE
71
BIRDCALLS
UBC    STUDENT
TELEPHONE    DIRECTORY
Publications
75C Office
241—SUB
AND   BOOKSTORE
BOOKS OF INTEREST FOR RADI-
cal thinking people include works of
Marx Engels, Lenin, Trotsky, Malcolm "X", Che Guevera, etc. and
many other stimulating books —
periodicals "New Left Review",
"M o n t h 1 y Review", "Guardian"
(U.S.), "Gramma", "Workers' Vanguard", etc. Vanguard Books 1208
Granville.
MUST SELL! BUNK BEDS, BEDRM.
suite, kitch. suite. Phone Dave,
876-2019.
S A N U I 1000A PROFESSIONAL
tuner amplifier. 100W R.M.S. turntable, speakers. $750.00 value. Must
sell. One month old. Best offer to
$500.  732-5642.
MUST SELL — SACRIFICE! SACRI-
fice! Vox professional guitar, cost
$315 new, $140 takes. Has triple
toggle tone control, triple pick-up
and St. George amplifier, cost $135
new, $85 takes or both for $200. A
steal! Man's 10-speed English racing bike $92, new, let go for $50 —
4 month old only. Electrolux $25.
Ladies' golf clubs & bag $20. Plus
others.   Call  596-1123.
SAMPLES LADIES LEATHER
coats. Sizes 10-16. Clearance $75 &
$85. Fine Imported Lambskin. Phone
224-4227  Helen.
RENTALS  &  REAL  ESTATE
Rooms
81
PRIVATE ROOM FOR UNIV. STU-
dent. Use of kitchen for breakfast
and lunch. $50 mo. 3680 W. 13th.
Call CA 8-8000.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Vicinity 6th & Cambie. Own room.
Furnished transport, most mornings.
Phone  Kris  872-2315.
REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION
available for two students. Close
UBC.   Call 224-4294.	
TWO FURN'D. SINGLE ROOMS
three blocks from gates. Immed.
poss.   4555   W.   13th.   224-4088.
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD ON CAMPUS:
$85.00. a month at Delta Upsilon
Fraternity House; Good Foods, short
walk to classes, quiet hours, Phone
228-9389  or   224-9841.
Furn.   Houses   &   Apts.
83
WANTED GIRL TO SHARE FURN-
ished home. Five minutes from
U.B.C. Own bedroom. $65 month.
228-9105.
FEMALE TO SHARE WITH WOMAN
2 bdrm. apt. in Oakridge. Private
bthrm., kitchen facilities, Pool. Call
AM 1-3900.
TWO ROOM SUITE $55. FURNISH-
ed. Available Feb. 15th. Phone 736-
7915 after  six.
BUY — SELL — RENT
WITH UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED

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