UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Nov 4, 2010

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0126934.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126934.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0126934-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0126934-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126934-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0126934-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0126934-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0126934-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0126934-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0126934.ris

Full Text

Array Hanging out in Justin's mom's basement SINCE 1918
WE PEER
INTO THE
OUR MEDIA
DEMOCRACY
SUPPLEMENT
PAGE 5
REOOJT
3BS**5
*
rtfC5
J
WHAT'S IN THE BOX? TINY PARTIES ON
PAGE 6
B.                                                                  -t                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   -m                                                         -m                                                                                                                                                                                                                I
NOVEMBER 04,2010
• VOLUME 92, NUMBER XV333
• ROOM 24, STUDENT UN30N BUTLD3NG
• PUBL3SHED MONDAY AND THURSDAY
• FEEDBACK@UBYSSEY.CA
h.       mt
H
-.mi
EU
BYSS
EY
Cnterin^ a M a z <z
Why it's difficult to reach the AMS
Resource Groups. PAGE 4 2/UBYSSEY.CA/E VENTS/2010.11.04
NOVEMBER 04, 2010
VOLUME XCII,  N° XVIII
EDITORIAL
COORDINATING EDITOR
Justin McElroy: coordinating@uhyney.ca
NEWS EDITOR
ArshyMann: news@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE NEWS EDITOR
Sally Crampton : associate.news@ubysseyca
CULTURE EDITORS
Jonny Wakefield & Bryce Warnes:
culture@ubyssey ca
ASSOCIATE CULTURE EDITOR
Anna Zoria: associate.culture@ubyssey.ca
SPORTS EDITOR
Vacant
FEATURES EDITOR
Trevor Record :features@ubyssey ca
PHOTO EDITOR
Geoff Lister: photos@ubysseyca
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Virginie Menard: production@ubysseyca
COPY EDITOR
Kai Green: copy@ubysseyca
MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Tara Martellaro: multimedia@ubysseyca
ASSOCIATE MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Stephanie Warren:
associate.multimedia@ubysseyca
VIDEO EDITOR
David Marino: video@ubysseyca
WEBMASTER
Jeff Blake: webmaster@ubysseyca
Room 24, Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Boulevard
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1
tel: 604.822.2301
web: www.ubyssey.ca
e-mail: feedback@ubysseyca
BUSINESS
Room 23, Student Union Building
print advertising: 604-822-1654
business office: 604.822.6681
web advertising: 604-822-1658
e-mail: advertising@ubysseyca
BUSINESS MANAGER
FerniePereira: business@ubysseyca
PRINT AD SALES
Kathy Yan Li: advertising@ubysseyca
WEB AD SALES
Paul Bucci: webads@ubysseyca
ACCOUNTS
AlexHoopes: accounts@ubysseyca
CONTRIBUTORS
Elise Grieg
Mandy Ng
Paul Bucci
Andrew Maclsaac
Karina Palmitesta
Kalyeena Makortoff
Jenica Chuahiock
Miranda Martini
Kait Bolongaro
Nina Kiridzija
Henry Yu
LEGAL
Austin Holm
Kasha Chang
Indiana Joel
Erika Ram
Matt Naylor
Komail Naqui
Joe Pickles
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of
the University of British Columbia. It is published
every Monday and Thursday by The Ubyssey Publications Society. We are an autonomous, democratically run student organization, and all students are
encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the Ubyssey staff. They are the expressed opinion of the
staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views of
The Ubyssey Publications Society or the University of British Columbia. All editorial content appear-
ng in The Ubyssey is the property of The Ubyssey
Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs
and artwork contained herein cannot be reproduced
without the expressed, written permission of The
Ubyssey Publications Society.
The Ubyssey is a founding member of Canadian
University Press (CUP) and adheres to CUP's guiding principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 words
Please include your phone number, student number
and signature (not for publication) as well as your
year and faculty with all submissions. ID will be
checked when submissions are dropped off at the
editorial office of The Ubyssey; otherwise verification will be done by phone. "Perspectives" are opinion pieces over 300 words but under 750 words and
are run according to space. "Freestyles" are opinion
pieces written by Ubyssey staff members. Priority
will be given to letters and perspectives over free-
styles unless the latter is time sensitive. Opinion
pieces will not be run until the identity of the writer has been verified. The Ubyssey reserves the right
to edit submissions for length and clarity. All letters
must be received by 12 noon the day before intended publication. Letters received after this point wil
be published in the following issue unless there is
an urgent time restriction or other matter deemed
relevant by the Ubyssey staff.
Itisagreed byall persons placing display or classified advertising that if the Ubyssey Publications
Society fails to publish an advertisement or if an
error in the ad occurs the liability of the UPS wil
not be greater than the price paid for the ad. The
UPS shall not be responsible for slight changes or
typographical errors that do not lessen the value or
the impact of the ad
5£
University
Press
Canada Post Sales
Agreement
Number 0040878022
pnintsa onj[0.0%
reevcjedjDaaer
EVENTS
FRIDAY, NOV. 5
CITR BEARD GARDEN
CiTR 101.9 FM presents BEARD GARDEN!
(It's like a beer garden... but with beards.)
Grow out your beard or get crafty! Prizes
will be awarded for most creative homemade facial hair and wackiest homegrown
facial hair. There will be music, dancing,
mingling and, of course, beer. DJs include
Bryce Dunn, Brad and Spencer John and
Roy E Biv. • 8pm, SUB room 214.
SATURDAY, NOV. 6
UBC FILM SOCIETY SCREENING: DESPICABLE ME
The UBC Film Society will be showing
Despicable Me, featuring the voices of
Steve Carrell and Julie Andrews. When a
criminal mastermind uses a trio of orphan
girls as pawns for a grand scheme, he
finds himself profoundly changed by the
growing love between them. • Runs until
Oct. 7 7-9pm, Norm Theatre, SUB, $2.50
members, $5 non-members.
SUNDAY, NOV. 7
KRISTALLNACHT COMMEMORATIVE LECTURE
Every year, a commemorative Kristall-
nacht lecture is held at the Beth Israel
synagogue. This day is prepared by the
Vancouver Holocaust Education Centre's
Kristallnacht Committee. This year's keynote speaker, Dr Reva Adler, will be talking about the root causes of genocide,
ranging from the Holocaust to Rwanda
and Darfur. • 7:30pm, Beth Israel Synagogue, 4350 Oak Street.
MONDAY, NOV. 8
DUSK LANDSCAPE PAINTING
Robert Singley, a DMA student in music
composition, will present a concert event
of organ sounds and sunset images. Bob
will create music to accompany several films he is creating, all based on the
concept of "dusk landscape painting." •
8-9pm, Coach House, Green College, 6201
Cecil Green Park Road, free event, contact
gc.events@ubc.ca for more information.
Teach English
Abroad
Events! Send
us some. There's
lots of stuff
happening in
this city and on
campus and by
gum, we will find
out what it is!
events@ubyssey.ca
tlTHEUBYSSEYca
jf^MRth.
^W!   '9* j ]%w#$
TESOL/TESL Teacher Training
Certification Courses
* Intensive 60-Hour Program
* Classroom Management Techniques
* Detailed Lesson Planning
* ESL Skills Development
■ Comprehensive Teaching Materials
■ Interactive Teaching Practicum
* Internationally Recognized Certificate
* Teacher Placement Service
* Money-Back Guarantee Included
* Thousands of Satisfied Students
OXFORD SEMINARS
604-683-3430/1-800-269-6719
www.oxfoidse3iiinars.ca
INFLUENZA VACCINE CLINIC
The influenza vaccine is recommended
to all British Columbians. It is provided
free of charge to those at high risk of influenza-related complications. The nurses at the vaccine clinics will be able to
help you determine if you are high-risk or
not. Low-risk persons can purchase the
vaccine for $20. Payment can be made
in cash at the time of the vaccine or paid
in advance at Student Health with credit
or debit. • 8:30am-4pm, UBC Hospital, Bernstein Conference Room, Room
M460.
SPINAL CHORD GALA FUNDRAISER
ICORD and the Vancouver Cantata Singers
are joining forces to present their second
annual interdisciplinary gala. This unique
event will feature live classical & jazz music in the architecturally inspired atrium of
the beautiful Blusson Spinal Cord Centre,
with hors d'oeuvres and a silent auction.
Funds raised at this event will benefit both
organizations. • 8-10pm, Blusson Spinal
Cord Centre, 818 West 10th Ave., e-mail
niamath@icord.org for more information.
BUIKA AND LILA DOWNS
Two of world music's hottest stars, Buika
and Lila Downs, are making Vancouver
one of their only three North American
tour stops (and only Canadian stop) on
Nov. 7, 2010. Enjoy as they pay homage
to legendary ranchera vocalist Chavela
Vargas in an evening that interweaves interpretations of flamenco, funk, jazz, soul,
boleros and Latin music. • 8pm, Chan
Centre for the Performing Arts, $47-$63,
buy tickets at ticketmaster.ca.
TERRY GLOBAL SPEAKER SERIES:
MOYO
DAMBISA
Debunking the current model of international aid promoted by both Hollywood
celebrities and policy makers, Dr Moyo
offers a bold new road map for financing
development of the world's poorest countries that guarantees economic growth
and a significant decline in poverty—without reliance on foreign aid or aid-related
assistance. A question and answer period
will follow. Copies of Dead Aid: Why aid
is not working and how there is a better
way for Africa will be sold at the event.
• 12-1:30pm, Chan Centre, ticket info at
terry.ubc.ca.
INTRODUCTION TO ADOBE INDESIGN
In this course, you get the opportunity to
design a print project of your own, with
hands-on instruction in the use of this
powerful layout program. At the completion of this course, you will have gained
an understanding of the basics of colour
management, font usage and print production, as well as a working knowledge
of the layout and design tools available in
In Design. • Nov. 4-Dec. 9, 6:30pm, UBC
Robson Square, go to tech.ubc.ca for
more information. 2010.11.04/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/3
NEWS
EDITOR ARSHY MANN»news@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE SALLY CRAMPTON»associate.news@ubyssey.ca
Quantum institute comes to campus
UBC avoids using "big bang"
pun during announcement
ELISE GRIEG
egrieg@ubyssey.ca
When the next generation of
quantum gadgets are born, UBC
may play a major role in their
development.
UBC has recently formalized
a partnership with Germany's
Max Planck Society to create
the Max Planck-UBC Centre for
Quantum Materials. The centre
will cooperate with top scientists and facilities in Germany,
which will help further the research on quantum materials.
UBC is already at the forefront
of quantum research, and the
Max Planck Society is one ofthe
foremost research institutions
in Germany and has received
32 Nobel Prizes.
"[The Max Planck Society] recognizing UBC as one ofthe few
places that they want to interact with is of course a great honour for UBC and it should create
quite a bit of visibility," said Professor George Sawatzky, interim
director ofthe Quantum Matter
Institute. He also said that this
sort of recognition could attract
more funding from donors.
The international cooperation makes it possible for researchers to make use of new
facilities at other universities.
Researchers, faculty members,
graduate students and even some
undergraduate students to go on
exchanges to visit these facilities.
"There are about seven institutes in Germany, large ones,
that are very much involved in
quantum matter research or
quantum materials research...
and they have some really
top facilities that we do not
have, that we don't even
have in Canada, that we
now have complete access
to, " Sawatzky said.
The research could po
tentially lead to new discoveries, as quantum materials
researchers are able to create
new materials with completely new properties.
"You can pretty well make almost whatever you want...doing things which are simply not
heard of in natural-like or chemical-like environments. We feel
that this could very well be the
new platform replacing silicone
technology in the whole industry
of devices," he said. "So there is
the chance that it will be big."
The devices, however, will not
be very large. "[This] is all on an
atomic scale, so that means that
the length scale, the size of these
devices you could make with
these new kinds of materials...
are things on the order of one
angstrom, which means that is
picometres rather than nanometres scale devices."
Sawatzky explained
that they are able to create
these new materials by building layers of different kinds of
atoms.
"We find that when you put
these lego blocks together... it actually turns out thatyou created
a new material at the interface
which has even more exciting
properties than either of those
two do," he said. As they are able
to "put the atoms exactly in the
right position and place.. .andyou
have all these different elements
thatyou can play with, it's a huge,
huge area of possible new properties thatyou can make."
In a press release, UBC President Stephen Toope said that "the
knowledge and discoveries generated from these collaborations
will profoundly change the lives of
present and future generations." tl
Akomas a textbook study in perseverance
SALLY CRAMPTON
associate, news® ubyssey.ca
When the Living Library was organized at UBC in mid-September, The Ubyssey sat down with
Andrew Chima Akomas, who goes
by Chima, a third-year Commerce
student from Canada who was
raised in Nigeria. He was one of
the living books' that was being
rented out by Irving K. Barber for
the event.
Chima has Marfan syndrome,
a connective tissue disorder that
affects eyesight, spinal tissue,
lung tissue and a whole variety
of other bodily functions. Chima is blind.
Event organizers were keen
to get Chima involved in the Living Library so he could share his
story with others. One of the organizers "saw me in the hallway
and thought I looked like a good
book," he said.
"I had a curved spine progressively getting worse, so they had to
fuse my spine when I came over
[to Canada]," he said.
"My eyesight was getting worse,
I' d already lost the sight of one eye
in Nigeria. I had heart surgery,
lung surgery. It's been one thing
after the other. The medical care
I received here saved my life. My
Andrew Chima Akomas. GEOFF LISTER PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
spine was completely fused—they
put rods and staples along my
spine, that stopped the fusion
progressing. My sight is now at
zero. I can't see anything at all."
Both of Chima's parents were
students at the University of Manitoba when he was born. Being a
Canadian citizen, "I thought it
would be more beneficial for me
to come back here and seek medical help," he said.
Despite his health problems,
Chima doesn't feel being blind
hinders his studies or ability to
get around campus. "I've been
[completely] blind for three years
now and I can now get around and
navigate. I'm sureyou could even
walk with a white cane with your
eyes closed!"
As for taking notes in lectures,
"luckily there's been really great
technology for blindpeople. Ihave
a screen reader that reads back
to me what's on my screen. So
with keyboard shortcuts on my
laptop I can take notes on Word
documents."
"People often ask me, 'how do
you do schoolwork? How do you
get around?' Life being blind
is not as bad as it seems, it's
not as hard as it seems to be.
Also, I want to show people that
I don't bite!
"People are often apprehensive, they don't know how to act.
Really, there's no right or wrong.
Just act how you want to. I want
people to get to know that people with disabilities are just normal people."
Next year, Chima is looking to
take an exchange year in Denmark. "I hear they have good facilities for disabled people."
After university, "I think I'd
like to work for the government,
business or commerce. I really
like international business and
trade. Import and export kinda
stuff. Even something that connects between here and Nigeria
would be great.
"I'd like to travel, meet and
help people," he said.
When it comes to meeting people on campus, "I've really had
to develop my voice recognition
skills. I have to pick up voices,
accents, expressions...and sometimes smell. If I shake your hand,
then maybe I can remember what
your hand feels like.
"It's a mixture of things that I
rely on. The best and easiest wa
is to just introduce yourself. "
NEWS BRIEFS
3000 PEOPLE PRESSURE METRO
VAN FOR UBC RAPID TRANSIT
The AMS is planning on presenting their formal response
to Metro Vancouver's Regional
Planning Committee on November 5 with regards to their campaign to pressure Metro Vancouver into placing a higher priority
on rapid transit to UBC.
Since the AMS launched
the campaign around two and
half weeks ago, their website,
ubclinenow.com, had 7500
unique visitors. More than
3000 people used the website to email Metro Vancouver
and over 1100 people joined
the Facebook group.
UNIVERSITY OF WESTERN
ONTARIO STRIKE AVERTED
LONDON (CUP)—The potential strike at the University of
Western Ontario may have been
averted with a tentative agreement reached between administration and faculty in the early
morning on Wednesday.
Both sides bargained past the
strike deadline of 12:01 a.m.,
the Western News reports. The
deal still needs to be ratified by
the union.
The main issue at stake was
a series of proposals put forth
by the university that would centralize the faculty review process and compromise academic freedom.
MOA RECEIVES $1 MILLION
DONATION
The Michael O'Brian Family Foundation donated $1 million to UBC's Museum of
Anthropology.
The money is intended to
go towards renovating one of
MOA's largest galleries as well
as supporting undetermined future projects. What is currently
known as Gallery Three will be
renamed the O'Brian Gallery in
honour of the gift.
MATH PROF EMBROILED IN
COURT BATTLE WITH UNIVERSITY OF MANITOBA
WINNIPEG (CUP)—A math professor who was suspended for
three months at the University of Manitoba is currently embroiled in a legal battle with the
university.
Gabor Lukacs is taking legal
action against what he believes
was an unfair decision to award
a student his PhD without fulfilling all the necessary requirements, after attempting to resolve the matter within university channels.
The dispute began after the
student failed a comprehensive
PhD candidacy exam for the second time, requiring him to withdraw from the program, according to U of M regulations.
The student successfully appealed the requirement to with-
drawl to Dean of Graduate Studies Jay Doering, who in late September 2009 announced his decision to waive the PhD candidacy examination requirement for
the student, after the Graduate
Studies Committee requested
otherwise. A court hearing is
set for Nov. 30. 4/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/2010.11.04
AMS resource groups off to slow start
Lack of planning before September leaves some groups unprepared
KALYEENA MAKORTOFF
kmakortoff@ubyssey.ca
There are six resource groups
(RGs) in the AMS: the Socialjus-
tice Centre (SJC), the Women's
Centre, the Student Environment Centre (SEC), Pride UBC,
Colour Connected Against Racism and Allies at UBC. All six
groups are currently volunteer-
run and receive direct funding
from the AMS. And many have
had a shaky start to the year,
with obstacles to accessing general information and contact
details.
The RGs were collectively
funded $57,300 for the 2010-
2011 year, according to AMS
President Bijan Ahmadian. They
are required to submit a budget
and a list of their executives to
the AMS, but all other internal
matters are left to the individual groups.
Despite repeated attempts,
Pride UBC, the SEC, and Coloured Connected could not be
reached for comment, and Allies declined comment. However, those that were willing to
speak suggested that there may
be motive for change.
"THIS MONTH, YOUR
COORDINATOR IS..."
Jillian MacBride, resource coordinator for the Women's Centre,
began her position in late October after transferring from Langara College, where she worked
with their student union's Women's Centre.
"I feel like there could be
greater accountability, because I'm having trouble answering questions. Therefore I
assume that students would also
have trouble getting answers. I
haven't been officially told who
my supervisor is and that's a bit
of a problem," she said.
Over the past two years, the
RGs chose to hire a coordinator through Work Learn. This
year, they were informed by
the AMS that this was technically not allowed, because the
RGs are not their own legal entity. The RGs held an emergency meeting in early September
to discuss the fate of the coordinating position.
"We started thinking, Is this
a position we needed anyway?'
because it was going to cost us
$ 10,000, which we thought could
be better spent," explained Katie Fitzpatrick, the president of
the Social Justice Centre.
They decided that volunteers
from each RG will serve as a rotating coordinator on a monthly basis throughout the 2010-
2011 year. However, MacBride
sees some advantage in having
a year-long, paid placement for a
resource group coordinator for
continuity and the benefit of new
members and executives alike.
"That's the position I think
would be really helpful, because
it could be someone that I could
go to, to answer questions....it
could be the missing link, especially between us and the administrative-type people as well,"
she said.
Fitzpatrick, who is the acting
resource group coordinator for
November, expressed similar
sentiments, but defended the
choice for rotation. "I think that
there's a possibility that a hired
coordinator is a better option,
but we felt this was something
worth trying this year and if it
doesn't work out, we're willing
to discuss other options of how it
should be run, because I do see
the concerns [regarding] which
is the best way to organize."
CATCH EM IF YOU CAN
Contacting individual RGs is
presently a challenge, although
some improvements have been
made. The Women's Centre only
recently began posting office
hours and individual executive email information. Fitzpatrick has also now posted contact information on the RG Library door as November's RG
coordinator.
Group offices like Colour Connected provide a paper list on
their door where interested individuals can post their own
emails to receive further information, but there is no email or
telephone contact for the group.
The AMS website provides
links to the comprehensive and
up-to-date site of Pride UBC and
the Student Justice Centre, but
there is no working link for Colour
The offices of the AMS resource groups, located on the top floor of the SUB. GEOFF LISTERPH0T0/THE UBYSSEY
Connected, the Student Environment Centre or the Women's Centre, and the Allies blog is password-protected. However, general RG emails and phone numbers
can be found on lie AMS website
sidebar and many do have updated Facebook groups.
"In terms of the individual
groups, I mean, [they] always
take differing amounts of time
to get organized, and some
groups will spend a whole year
not really getting organized because they have a low membership and some will be really
organized, based on momentum from the year before," said
Fitzpatrick.
In addition, the doling out
of RG funds is annually reevaluated based on their activity
from the previous year, making an immense difference in
how much money each RG receives. For example, this year
Pride UBC received $10,314,
while Colours and Allies only
received $2865 each.
AMS Code does not require
RGs to have office hours. Fitzpatrick also informed The Ubyssey
that the RG constitution, called
Points of Unity, also does not
require executive office hours.
"That's actually a good idea of
having office hours and availability," she said.
"We do have weekly meetings which we try to make public...but having office hours is a
good idea too, so people could
come by and talk to us when
they wanted."
When asked if RG information, constitutions and regulations are accessible, Fitzpatrick
said that the fact that students
don't know is "a matter of it not
getting circulated."
"Constitutions and those
things do exist, but as it stands
right now, we don't have the online stuff that we should. We
don't have the website going and
we don't have proper list-serve
communication between the
different resource groups that
make sure everything is being
communicated effectively," she
explained.
"It's something that needs to
be addressed and it suggests us
possibly looking into having one
ofthe resource group coordinators or a couple of them during
their time look into changing
the structure for next year."
POSSIBILITY FOR CHANGE
Fitzpatrick says planning ahead
will most likely solve coordination and organization problems.
"I think we need to be a bit
more clear about making sure
that happens in advance so that
we're not scrambling in September, because then you're looking
at new members andyou're getting started for the year, it's hard
to get everything going right
away. And it's really important
to have consensus—we're not
the kind of group that wants to
make executive decisions without consulting people properly,
and that makes it hard."
Fitzpatrick said that she has
recommended that all the resource groups add in their constitutions a requirement that
structural plans for the next year
be decided in April.
"It will be good for us at the
resource groups to talk about
putting in a better structure for
next year to get going with a little more momentum." va
Mark Boulos, Comrade Teteng, 2010. C print Courtesy of the artist.
Video installation work by artist-filmmaker Mark Boulos
For more information visit www.belkin.ubc.ca
MORRIS AND HELEN BELKIN ART GALLERY
THE UNIVERSITY  OF BRITISH COLUMBIA W^
1825 Main Mall, Vancouver BC, Canada Vc" I 1Z2 I Open 3 D-5 Tue-Fn, 12-5 Sat-Sun, Closed Monda/s & Holidays
pbofie: +3 [604) 822-2759 I lax: ^1 (504) 822-56891 web: hltp://www.belkin ubc.ca I e-mail: belkin.gatlery^ubc.ca
LSAT MCAT
GMAT GRE
Preparation Seminars
• Complete 30-Hour Seminars
• Convenient Weekend Schedule
• Proven Test-Taking Strategies
• Experienced Course Instructors
• Comprehensive Study Materials
• Simulated Practice Exams
• Limited Class Size
• Free Repeat Policy
• Personal Tutoring Available
• Thousands of Satisfied Students
OXFORD SEMINARS
604-683-3430
1-800-269-6719
www.oxfordseminars.ca
Interested in hardhitting j ournalism?
Come write for news!
arshy mann | news@ubysseyca
tlTHEUBYSSEYca 2010.11.04/UBYSSEY.CA/MEDI A/5
MEDIA DEMOCRACY
EDITOR TREVOR RECORD»features@ubyssey.ca
GUEST EDITOR ANDREW MACISAAC»amacisaac@ubyssey.ca
GEOFF LISTER PHOTO
/THEUBYSSEY
RECYCLED NEWS
ANDREW MACISAAC
Guest Editor
Over the past decade, the way
in which news is written and
m rnw '    Pfflt disseminated has changed
,^^wi considerably. As cliched as it
(4 1 ,      seems to say, the rapid prolif-
S   .' H      eration of technology and the
increasing ease of access to
A K the internet has revolution-
■ ized the way news is made
C 4 and consumed.
The easiest way to get news
used to be through buying a paper or tuning into a news channel for an hour or so. Now these
formats seem slow and inefficient. You can get your information on demand, be it by reading a newspaper via an
always accessible phone app, or following whatever Twitter accounts catch your eye. And visiting a news aggregation site can ensure you don't just get up-to-date coverage, but exactly the sort of content you want.
While all of this has an amazing upside by allowing
people to be immediately informed and connected to the
world we live in, it also has a downside. What we're looking at in this Media Democracy issue is something we ca
"news recycling."
The increase in outlets for news and information has
outpaced the sources of content for them, leading to an
increasing trend of recycled content throughout the entire
spectrum. The mainstream media is doing less on-the-
ground journalism and more commentary on secondary
sources. Aggregators like The Huffington Post and Drudge
Report merely collect and post already published content.
On Twitter, re-tweets operate as one of the world's largest
rumour mills. And all of this takes place within the context
of increased access of information for all. This Ubyssey
Media and Democracy supplement explores the issue of
news recycling, for better and for worse, tl
INDIANA JOEL ILLUSTRATION/THE UBYSSEY
Twitter-related inaccuracies: "a little (blue) bird told me"
NINA KIRIDZIJA
Contributor
Imagine sitting down to read the daily newspaper, only to find a story about
your own death gracing the cover. On
September 18, 2010, former NHL coach
Pat Burns found himself refuting news
stories about his apparent death, and he
has Twitter to thank for that.
After TSN tweeted that Burns had died,
other media outlets pounced on the news,
and within less than an hour, hundreds
of tweets and retweets claimed that the
former coach was dead. It wasn't until
Pat himself spoke to TSN that the story
was set straight, and all reports on his
death were replaced with apologies for
the misinformation.
"The basic tenets of
journalism—especially
source attribution—hold
whether you're living in
the Twitter age or not."
ALANACOATES
ASSISTANT DIGITAL EDITOR
THE MONTREAL GAZETTE
Katherine Sedgwick, assistant managing editor at The Montreal Gazette, a
newspaper pulled into the entire Pat
Burns death fiasco, described the story as "a lesson learned for many media
outlets." Jamie Pitblado from The Vancouver Sun agreed, saying that Twitter is
an unreliable source because it has "no
checks and balances," as opposed to traditional journalism.
User-generated content has become the
new face ofjournalism, and helpful as it
may be in sharing information at warp
speed, the Twitter birdie simply can't always be trusted. Pat Burns's story is one
of many when it comes to people tweeting false information. Countless fake celebrity accounts claim to be legitimate,
resulting in misinformation because the
source is not who users believe it to be.
Ed Miliband knows how it feels to have
false information sent around about him:
the former British energy minister and
opposition leader fell victim to a Twitter
scam when embarrassing messages about
his sex life were sent out via the information network in February of this year.
Problems with Twitter may seem to have
a pretty straightforward solution if we're
the ones in control of what we read and
who we follow; it's an obvious answer to
just be careful of who you're following and
what information you're choosing to believe. But the real issues arise when reliable news sources take notes from unreliable tweets. News has always been depended on when it comes to current events. After all, it is the job of a journalist to report
stories from accurate sources. Yet in Pat
Burns's case, not only did those following
Twitter get it wrong, so did any person who
read or reported the false death in a legitimate newspaper.
TWITTER KOMAIL NAQUI PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
Twitter is an obvious risk, but Alana
Coates, assistant digital editor at The Montreal Gazette, said that, "In any breaking news situation, whether it's for online/print/TV/radio/etc, the initial information regarding the incident is always pretty sketchy; there's no getting
around that." So maybe we shouldn't
be putting all the blame on that cute
bird. Sedgwick praised Twitter for being a "valuable tool that helps journalists monitor the news."
In any case, the bottom line when it
comes to news seems to be intact.
"The basic tenets of journalism—especially source attribution—hold whether
you're living in the Twitter age or not,"
said Coates. tl 6/UBYSSEY.CA/MEDI A/2010.11.04
Commuter News increasing readership
The Toronto Transit Commission has complained of the litter "daily rags" have been creating. HENRY YU PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
JONNY WAKEFIELD
culture@ubyssey.ca
For some, they're trash. For others, they're
their only source of news. The past five years
have seen an explosion in commuter newspapers worldwide.
Commuter papers like 24 Hours and Metro have been the only growing newspaper
market worldwide. Usually hawked at transit nodes and left as litter, many deride them
as "daily rags." This has become a problem
in cities like Toronto, where the Toronto
Transit Commission (TTC) banned the distribution of these papers on their property according to a report in the Toronto Star.
"It's our hope that if people actually have
to go to a box and select the paper they want,
that means they really wanted it," said TTC
general manager Vince Rodo. "And they'll
take it out ofthe subway system with them."
Transit riders in Vancouver are very familiar with these papers. 24 Hours entered the
Vancouver media market in 2005, according to Elena Dunn, the paper's local director of sales. The papers are owned by Sun
Media Corporation and operate editions in
metropolitan areas around Canada, including Toronto, Ottawa, and a French language
edition in Montreal.
Since 2005, 24 Hours and other commuter papers have taken a sizeable chunk out
ofthe readership ofthe larger dailies. The
Province has lost some 45,000 daily readers
since 2005, according to Dunn. While this
is undoubtedly due to a number of competing factors, 24 Hours takes credit for part
of this hit.
"The Province and The Vancouver Sun
[have] never recovered their levels from
before we entered the market," she said.
This is partly because 24 Hours targets
a different, more advertising-attractive demographic than these papers.
"The 24 Hours are geared much younger,
18-49 is our primary demographic, and we
also target women. It's a demographic that
isn't easily reached with other media."
The format and the content commuter
papers provide is part of the reason for
their success among younger demographics, said Dunn.
"The intent of the 24 Hours is that it
should be readable within 20-24 minutes.
The stories are shorter.... People don't need
the 1000 word editorials in a traditional daily newspaper, they can get that anywhere."
While 24 Hours has taken a chunk out of
the readership of those papers, their five-
day readership of those papers is still considerably higher: the Vancouver 24 Hours
has a readership of around 535,600, whereas The Province still has around 804,400.
Papers like the 24 Hours are filling a void,
says Mary Lynn Young, director of the UBC
School ofjournalism.
"They wouldn't be in business if they
weren't filling a market need," said Young.
"They're...easy access, short daily news hits
for commuters."
While Young does not dismiss these papers out of hand, she stresses that they are
a part of a balanced media diet.
"Ifyou're going to be reading the commuter paper on the way to school, that's good, but
supplement it with The New York Times and
The Guardian and the BBC and other kinds of
media to make sure thatyou're knowledgeable about a wide range of issues across different ideological and media platforms." tl
Canwest sells The Province & The Vancouver Sun
ANDREW MACISAAC
Guest Editor
Earlier this year, Canwest Global Communications owned Global TV as well as
a plethora of newspapers across the country including the National Post, The Vancouver Sun and The Province. However,
having declared bankruptcy Canwest was
forced to sell its assets.
This originally sparked speculation that
perhaps there would be a change in the
face of the Canadian newspaper business,
with a move to more independently-owned
print media. Yet this change did not occur, as Canwest sold the entire newspaper
arm of its business to the newly formed
Postmedia Network.
According to Postmedia, their broad
scope provides them with an advantage:
"Collaboration from the Postmedia Network of daily newspapers gives Postmedia
News unique strengths in quickly developing and disseminating relevant content."
However, Christopher Waddell, associate professor and director ofthe Carleton
School ofjournalism and Communication,
said this is not always the case.
"For almost a decade now the media world
has been caught up in convergence—the belief that the same material can be produced
by a small number of journalists for distribution across the television, print and Internet operations all owned by the same company. That's proven to be an almost complete
disaster for everyone involved, to the point
where it is impossible to identify any benefits that came from convergence."
In a survey of issues of The Vancouver
Sun and The Province, there are many
instances where the two papers share
common stories. This is particularly
INDIANA JOEL ILLUSTRATION/THE UBYSSEY
visible on their websites, where many of
the same articles by the same journalists are featured in each paper's "current
headlines" crawl at the same time. According to Waddell, this is a bad thing:
"Readers see less and less of what is distinctive about their community in their
newspapers or newscasts and that has led
to declines in audience and readership."
However, the viewership of the Post-
media Network's websites has been high.
ComScore Ine, who released data on the
popularity ofthe news company's sites,
recorded 4.4 million Canadian visitors
in August, a value 37 per cent higher
than any of Postmedia's competitors, tl
WHAT IS A
TREVOR RECORD
features@ubyssey.ca
Have you ever seen an article in a n
be you've seen an article in The Ut
the story didn't come from that pa
News agencies, also sometime:
tions which provide content to me<
ries and photographs, to video and
Some of these organizations, lik
operatives in which media organize
an University Press (CUP), the win
is a service of this type.
News agencies could be considei
we are calling "news recycling." D<
the internet today, news agencies
out of a need for stories of internati
ted quickly at a time when "quick" <
The oldest of these services clc
Agence Havas, itwas renamed Ag«
headquarters was liberated from r
sistance. For North America, The ,
formed, coming together in 1848 £
orating on the Mexican War. CUP c
them the oldest student-run news
THE CANADIAN PRESS MAY
ERIKA RAM ILLUSTRATION/THE UBYSSE\
Originally appearing in 1910 to
The Associated Press (AP) via m<
coverage, starting in 1917 during ^
Canada's most powerful news ag
with news stories, photographs,'
the sole distributor of AP content
related to pension, Candian medic
separated from the service in rec 2010.11.04/UBYSSEY.CA/MEDIA/7
WIRE STORY?
JOE PICKLES ILLUSTRATION/THE UBYSSEY
ewspaper that has an (AP) or (CP) in it? May-
)yssey that has (CUP) in it. Those mean that
oer.
; referred to as wire services, are organiza-
i\a outlets. This can range from written sto-
other multimedia content.
:e Reuters, sell this content. Others are coitions pool their resources centrally: Canadi-
3 service that The Ubyssey is a member of,
ed the original organizations putting out what
sspite generally distributing content through
have existed for over a century. They arose
onal and national importance to be transmit-
;ould be a week after an event had occurred,
jims it dates back to 1835; originally called
snce France-Presse in 1944 after its Parisian
Jazi control by journalists in the French Re-
^ssociated Press was the first wire service
is the result of five New York papers collab-
iates back to 1938, which they claim makes
wire, til
CHANGE TO A FOR-PROFIT MODEL
/tf
TREVOR RECORD
features@ubyssey.ca
In an ironic case of The Ubyssey
being forced to recycle content,
The Canadian Press (CP) is currently in the process of changing
from a not-for-profit cooperative
to a for-profit model, multiple
media sources have reported.
CTVglobemedia, Torstar Corp
and Gesca Ltee, currently the largest members of the cooperative,
t will become the largest sharehold-
i ers if the deal goes through, Re-
? \/\,     uters reports. In exchange, they
^ 11 will be giving several million to pay
off a pension-related deficit at the
service. "Special regulations" for
their pension plans had been approved by the Governor General,
according to a memo cited by The
Vancouver Sun last week.
. . Postmedia News reports that
LI the organization will be called Ca
nadian Press Enterprises once the
\ ' r restructuring is completed. It is
f\ \ currently uncertain in what ways
\S the operation of the news agen
cy will be affected. The Ubyssey
was unable to reach Scott White,
the editor in chief of The Canadian Press, for comment,
provide Canadian papers with news from
Drse code, they began providing their own
A/orld War I. Ninety-three years later, CP is
ency, providing hundreds of media outlets
\/ideo and audio content. They also remain
in Canada. In addition to funding problems
i giants Canwest and Sun Media have both
ent years. tl
^V^"^
PERSPECTIVES: REFLECTIONS ON THE RALLY TO RESTORE SANITY
MATTHEW NAYLOR
Contributor
I'm somewhere over the continental United States as I write this. My Rally to Restore Sanity vacation/nerd pilgrimage is
over, much to my liver's relief. The Rally
was enormous, making headlines across
the continent. But I was also there for
election night, so I had a front row seat
to another clash in the sane-versus-not
battle raging south of our border. The
rally might have been a turning point,
but sanity is far from restored.
The crowd was far more diverse than
I'd expected. I assumed that the majority ofthe attendees were going to be coming from, in Stewart's words, his show's
"small but demographically valuable"
audience, but I'd be hard-pressed to say
even that the majority of the ralliers
were in that 18 to 24 group. They were
people from every walk of life who felt
that reason and respect had been displaced by fear.
They wanted to be Sandra Bullock in
Speed—a madman had taken control of
a bus within which they were trapped,
and they wanted to seize the wheel and
get things back on track.
They were also well-informed. While
most that I talked to said that The Daily
Show and The Colbert Report were the infotainment they most regularly watched,
everyone said that they took at least a
perfunctory glance at other media to get
the real story. I think they appreciate
the lens—the perspective offered by the
Comedy Central nighttime news hour is
unique, so who really cares whether or
not the whole thing is laden with comedic invective.
For all the pretences to non-partisanship, the rally was overwhelmingly Democratic and left-leaning. This was to be expected; if the rally was really a response
to any kind of insanity it's the insanity
that finds its expression in the Tea Party
Express, Freedom Works, and Glenn Beck.
The comparisons to the Glenn Beck
Rally of last August were inevitable. Every report on the rally that I got my hands
on mentioned at least the disparity in the
number of attendees (at 215,000 or so,
Stewart's more than doubled the Beck-
stravaganza). Many went deeper, with
right wingers seeking solace in the fact
that while the Stewart crowd was larger,
Beck's was much, much angrier, and in
doing so rather proved the point of all
those who showed up at the later rally.
They have a point: just three days later
the voting public (about half of the actual public) refudiated the crap out of
the Democratic Party.
The forces of insanity are more politically organized than those that oppose
them, and this rally didn't do much to
change that. The acts were funny and everyone there had a blast, but they didn't
say what the people who were upset needed to do to affect that elusive 'return to
normalcy' I know that this is an impossibly high bar to set, but after the Gettysburg Address, attendee Gary Will said that
"the crowd departed with a new thing in
its ideological luggage, that new constitution Lincoln had substituted for the one
they brought there with them. They walked
off.... under a changed sky into a different America." We, by contrast, picked up
our garbage and wandered off for a Halloween night out. Things were still crazy
in America, vl
Paul Bucci and Matthew Naylor attended the Rally to Restore Sanity in Washington DC this weekend. KEEGAN BURSAW PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
PAUL BUCCI
Contributor
Last week's Rally to Restore Sanity has
come and gone, and the midterm elections are over. The Democrats lost seats,
and Sean Hannity is screaming about the
fundamental and inexorable strength of
Republicanism.
Great. Perfect. Amazing.
Obama was on Jon Stewart's show last
week, and Jon firmly took him apart.
People were worried that any criticism
of the President's first 18 months in
office would hurt the Democrats, and
should therefore be avoided. I disagree.
It was beautiful to see Stewart engage
in a real dialogue with Obama over
his actions. It showed what a democracy looks like.
A functioning media in a functioning democracy criticizes the government constantly. No bill is ever good
enough, and no government is working hard enough. You need good criticism to progress.
I know it's hard to remember, but very
recently we were being told that journalists couldn't and wouldn't ask certain
questions of George W. Bush. It was either not allowed, or they quietly allowed
themselves to be pressured into staying
silent. Can you imagine anyone throwing a shoe at Obama?
In fact, all of the abuses of the last
eight years could have been mitigated
by a careful and engaged media. I won't
say that they would have been stopped,
but at least there would have been some
accountability enforced. That's our job.
People seem to forget that the reason
news media entertains is so that we can
also inform.
During the rally Stewart made the
claim that, "If we amplify everything,
we hear nothing."
Keith Olbermann of MSNBC reacted
to this by discontinuing his "Worst Person in the World" segment of his show.
He admitted that the anger expressed
in the segment had become institutionalized and was therefore more divisive
than useful. He also spent a good deal of
time criticizing Fox by drawing lines in
the sand, but old habits die hard, I guess.
As Stewart said, I don't think that we
can really know exactly what this rally
was about, but at the least it was a significant cry out against an overwhelming
powerlessness in the political sphere, vl 8/UBYSSEY.CA/MEDI A/2010.11.04
The blogger-journalist: objective or subjective?
Guess which of these three is blogging about land use issues at UBC. GEOFF LISTER PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
KAIT B0L0NGAR0
Contributor
In the past, bloggers and professional
journalists occupied two different reporting spheres, with bloggers basing
posts on personal interpretation and professional journalists sticking to the parameters set by editors. However, these
two entities have now become synonymous with one another, often blurring
the line between self-expression and objective reporting.
"That's the point of blogs [to be more
subjective]," said Frances Bula, a freelance blogger for The Globe and Mail.
"Readers look for something more personal. There's no need to be super opinionated, but the writer needs to indicate
a bit of one."
Joe Cutbirth, an associate professor at
the UBC School ofjournalism, said blogs
are not a new phenomenon.
"Blogs have existed for centuries; they
just haven't been on the internet," said
Cutbirth. "From columnists in newspapers to pamphleteers, this is the same
spirit of the blog [for the expression of]
an individual's voice and fast stream of
consciousness."
While blogs do become a vehicle for the
journalist's self expression, when these
opinions and news are blended into one
voice, do the readers know where the distinction is?
"It can become biased," said Kanaiya
Mutua, a UBC student and blog follower.
"I think it leaves the reader to make the
same conclusion as the writer at times.
The reader isn't given an impartial stand
on the situation.
"Having said that, as a reader a blog is
more personal, because it is written by
one voice," Mutua said. "The writers become more humanized."
Bula said she also prefers blogging as
she receives more feedback on her work
than from her written pieces. "Blogs connect me better with readers and they feel
more of a personal connection."
Fiona Andersen, business editor for
multimedia with The Vancouver Sun, further supports this need for dialogue with
readers.
"Blogs are a great way of getting short
news blurbs out there to get dialogue
and comments [from readers]," said
Andersen. "That way it's a conversation to get the community involved
[with the blog]."
This need for connection certainly
seems to be the overall sentiment of blog-
ger-journalists. Ofthe eight featured blogs
on The Vancouver Sun website, six were
op-ed based and two were regurgitated
news without any personal interjections.
In fact, these two writers used their blogs
to promote their works published by the
newspaper, using the blog as more of a
platform for personal promotion.
However, does a journalist's need for
self-expression and connection with their
readers supersede the public's right to
objective journalism?
"Bloggers' work isn't laid out like other news reports," explained Cutbirth.
"In the newspaper, the stories from
the first to the last page read the same.
All the paragraphs are basic and the
same. Commercial journalism tries to
be consistent in what it presents to the
readers. Readers want to read it quickly. There's a reason blogs and journalism aren't side by side. They do have a
little more leeway to be informal and
to experiment with voice, when traditional news stories try to be sanitized."
This brings into question the position
ofthe editor. "I don't pre-approve the blog
posts," said Andersen. "The contributors
send me a copy after it's posted, and I
look over it."
Being that blogs and traditional journalism have different forms, perhaps
major newspapers shouldn't use blogs
connected to their website without more
editorial oversight to monitor their content. However, blogging seems to be the
path down which online journalism is
heading.
"Blogs are here to stay" said Bula, "but
they will evolve and the periphery will be
pushed out, and it'll be harder to break
in as a newbie."
If this is the case, then what is the future of print journalism and how will it
be affected by this trend? Cutbirth says
this is part of the history of media which
is constantly evolving.
"Blog is short for weblog," said Cutbirth. "We have had people like that for
centuries and as long as people want to
express themselves they will use the technology of the day to do so." tl
VFM HAS BECOME CONTINUOUS
NOW LET'S SEE SOME BLOGS THAT
AREN'T ABOUT STUDENT GOVERNMENT
JUSTIN MCELROY
coordinating@ubyssey.ca
For the last four years now, a cornucopia
of blogs have sprung out ofthe ether every January to report on the AMS elections. Some are incisive, some are silly,
some are forgettable and all are in the
running to get a bit of money for their
work from students who vote in favour
of their coverage in a separate election.
This is known as Voter Funded Media
(VFM), and it livens up campus politics
and keeps candidates accountable.
Unfortunately elections end, the monetary incentive dries up, and none too surprisingly so do the VFM blogs. Sites once
populated with comments become as barren as this campus on a Sunday morning.
And The Ubyssey is once again the only
news source on campus. Mwahahaha!
We rhetorically laugh, but this isn't an
ideal system. Alternative media is needed in any society; it provides other viewpoints on issues and keeps the mainstream groups on their toes. I've always
loved the combination of entertainment
and reporting done by the various blogs
on campus, and think that VFM is without a doubt a good thing.
But there have been problems in its
implementation. For one, the month-to-
month grind of student issues and politics didn't get due attention under the old
system. Elections are by nature the glitziest part of the political process, but elected leaders reveal themselves to be effective or incompetent during their terms,
not their campaigns.
Also, because the old system only
gave financial compensation in one
big splurge, it favoured ex-student politicians with plenty of experience and
opinions. They would enter the competition for a month, blog a little during
the elections, collect a few hundred dollars, and depart.
But these problems have been rectified, and the AMS has made VFM year-
round. Giving credit where credit is
due, they realized that the current system wasn't ideal and made the necessary changes. Small miracles can occur.
That being said, should a year-round
system entice new VFM blogs to spring
up—and we hope there are many—it would
be nice if they focused on things other
than our student union. VFM blogs can
be a great way to get people talking about
the student experience in new and interesting ways. This is a giant campus with
interesting things happening in research,
academics and student life—areas that
VFM blogs rarely cover.
Those that like seeing ambitious and
egotistical students play pretend government like it a lot. But student government
is not the be-all and end-all of this campus. This may come as a shock to some
in the AMS, who tend to think that if everyone only knew all the awesome stuff
they were doing they would totally agree,
but our student union is but one ingredient in the pizza that is this campus. And
not everyone likes sardines, vl
fred at night presents
K.        ,
1cl£loON
-AT
robot chicken      the dating guy     archer
I Opm et/pt 10:30pm et/pt       11 pm et/pt
the pilot project
I 1:30pm et/pt        teletoonatnight.com 2010.11.04/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/9
CULTURE
EDITORS BRYCE WARNES & JONNY WAKEFIELD »culture@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE ANNA ZORIA»associate.culture@ubyssey.ca
Tiny Parties fulfills sloppy, sexy expectations
MIRANDA MARTINI
Contributor
On the evening of November 1,
students and art enthusiasts
shake off the rain to attend
the opening of a new exhibit at
the AMS Art Gallery. Entering
the gallery the attendees show
ID and pay $3 for drink vouchers at the door. It might be any
beer garden, except that the
"garden" consists of an eight
foot-by-eight foot wooden cube
with a curtain partitioning it
from the blank, sterile cleanliness of the gallery space. It
looks like a party thrown by
Polly Pocket, or a gala funded
by IKEA to promote minimalist housing.
In fact, it is Brendan Alba-
no's Tiny Parties, an experiment in spatial reimagining
and architectural potential.
It's also a unique opportunity for Albano to throw a sick
party for all his friends.
Inside the cube, roughly
eight people jostle politely
to loud dance music, elbows
tucked firmly at their sides.
A "bartender" pours beer
from a keg that is attached
to the makeout closet, an even
smaller area designed to give
amorous partiers a semblance
of privacy. The DJ is pinned
behind the turntables in the
corner; in order for him or
her to leave the space, the
party must be briefly shut
down while the entire space
Party in a box. GEOFF LISTER PHOTO /THE UBYSSEY
is dismantled. This occurs a
few times during the evening
so that a new DJ can take up
the position and so the speakers can be swapped for louder
ones. While this goes on, the
dancers amble around with
their drinks and chat, once
again taking on the role of
decorous gallery spectators.
Albano's other works, which
include using the characteristic Facebook symbol to "like"
another artist's gallery show
and spearheading a guerrilla campaign teaching public transit users how to start
conversations on the bus, revolve around the intensely self-
aware culture of twentysome-
things. This exhibit seems to
be a continuation of this theme
within the youth-centric context of the dance party.
"I'm a youth," he responds
to this suggestion. "So, yeah,
I'm interested in youth culture." However, he goes on to
say Tiny Parties has more to do
with his interest in how society
interacts with different environments. University students
are expected to wear the various hats of partier, scholar,
professional, child and so on,
depending on their surroundings. Albano seeks to unpack
this chameleon aesthetic by
forcing spaces and identities
unnaturally together—the neutral gallery space juxtaposed
against, as Albano terms it,
"the sexy sloppy expectations
of the dance party."
That's something to keep in
mind the next time you're part
of an anonymous jostling mass
on Wednesday night at the Pit,
perhaps asking yourself ifyou
might be having a better time
in an eight-foot cube, tl
Tiny Parties runs November 1-5.
Don Giovanni heats up the old auditorium
On stage with the eternal libertine in Mozart's classic
JENICA CHAUKIOCK
jchaukiock@ubyssey.ca
After two years of renovations,
UBC's old auditorium is finally set to re-open with the UBC
Opera Ensemble and UBC Symphony Orchestra's production
of Mozart's Don Giovanni. The
show promises a number of
surprises.
"For this particular opera,
we were able to obtain the sets
from Prague, where Mozart premiered the opera," said Nancy
Hermiston, founder ofthe UBC
Opera Ensemble and director of
the show. "These sets, the costumes, the wigs, the shoes, [and]
the props are all from the production of [the Mozart Theatre]
at Prague."
Written in 1787, the Italian
opera Don Giovanni tells the
story ofthe libertine Don, also
known as Don Juan in Spanish,
whose insatiable lust and ego
eventually condemns him to
hell. As a nobleman, lover and
murderer, Don Giovanni possesses a debonair style that is
as alluring to audiences in the
present day as it was when it
was written.
"Don Giovanni is totally the
ladies' man [and] he is good-
looking," said Jose R Anton, one
ofthe performers to play the titular character. "He knows how
to allure women, and how to use
Don Giovanni seduces a maiden PHOTO COURTESY RICHARD EPP
the power of his words and of
his wealth to move the world."
Anton is thrilled to have the
part of Don Giovanni, but to
play an iconic womanizer demands more than just stage
acting. "When you step into
a character like Don Giovanni, you have to forget all your
colleagues, about your sense
of honour [and everything]
that makes you a human being. You have to completely
erase anything that will interfere with Don Giovanni's
mentality [because] there is
only [one] main purpose for
him: to satisfy his needs as
a man," said Anton. "He followed liberty freedom and,
more than anything, his sexual desire, to the point that
he was dragged to hell."
There is a universal appeal
to Don Giovanni, not only for
the tale but also because of
the response it solicits from
audiences. "Don Giovanni is
[like] the Don Juan or the Casanova story" said Hermiston.
"So there's an eternal theme of
love, power and lust."
"Even if the audience cannot understand [the story]," said
Anton, "they can still relate to
it and say 'At one point, I met
[someone like] Don Giovanni.
I met the guy with an intense
look in his face, [who] literally undressed me right there.'"
There is only
[one] main
purpose for Don
Giovanni: to
satisfy his needs
as a man.
But above all, Don Giovanni
is an immortalized opera. Its
aesthetic form is just as important as its story. "Opera has everything," said Hermiston. "Opera has the beautiful sets and
the beautiful costumes, so there's
plenty for the eye. It has the orchestra, it has the singing and,
frequently dance. It is a culmination of so many different art
forms." til
Don Giovanni will be performed in
Italian with English surtitles. Tickets for the November 4-7 show
are available online or in person
at the Old Auditorium box office.
FOOD WITH
KAITBOLONGARO
GET FULL WITH FOOD SOCIETY
-Wi.
I
■a
At only five years
old, the Food Society is one ofthe
younger clubs on
campus. Despite
1 its age, member-
l| ship has quickly
A grown to 400 peo-
I pie and counting.
It was originally started by
a small group of Land and Food
Systems students who wanted to
create a club related to their major. However, the goal wasn't to
focus on the dietary aspect but
on the experience of food itself.
The club started giving cooking
workshops, and that's where it
all began.
Nowadays, the club hosts
cooking workshops for beginner
and advanced cooks. They also
have dine out nights to new and
interesting restaurants around
Vancouver for those who are
more interested in eating food
than fabricating it.
Food Soc is
divided into
groups often
or fewer people
who have similar
interests such
as baking, wine
tasting or cooking.
The President ofthe Food Society Ryan Chang, is ajapanese
restaurant enthusiast. He said
the best place for sushi in Vancouver is Shiro Sushi at 3096
Cambie Street. "It looks really
crappy on the outside but the sushi chefs there are all Japanese. I
would recommend the Chirashi
Don, which is basically sashimi
on a rice bowl. It's cheaper and
gives you a good variety."
Aware of its relatively large
size for a food related club, the
executives have introduced the
concept of mini-societies. These
are small groups of ten or fewer people who have similar food
interests such as baking, wine
tasting or advanced cooking.
This allows the club to maintain the personal connections
which are attached to the food
experience. The mini clubs are
voted on by the members and
they choose the most popular
ones. Since food is such a broad
interest, this allows for more
people to become connected to
the Food Society.
Students are known for their
unhealthy eating tendencies. "For
some students, there is the health
aspect of take-out and it shouldn't
be your main diet. For me, eating
can be just about feeding yourself, or it can be an experience,"
Chang stated. "On campus, it's
very mass-produced and choices are limited." tl
The Food Society office is located in SUB HID. For more information, check out their website
at www.ubcfoodsociety.com. 10/U BYSSEY. CA/G AMES/2010.11.04
GAMES & COMICS
CROSSWORD
11
2
»
4
'
I
'
7
«
•
l
"
11
12
"
r
"
'*
- 11
P
,,
iio
27
■
i'J
JO
1
J 4
Jli
"
■
'
if
"
■
a
li
it
^Rj
40
■ 44
"
42
52
45
■
1
"
47
48
49
"
■
"
SS
SS
57
SS
i-J
1
£0
"
l
"
61
"
"
66
"
68
ACROSS
51. Dr. of rap
21. Agnus
1. Wooden shoe
52. Sonorous
23. Network of nerves
6. Cheek
54. Unprincipled
25. More
10. A single time
59. Gumbo veggie
27. Entreaty
14. Device with 88 keys
60. Frozen treats
28. Trompe I'
15. Off-Broadway theatre award
62. Circumvent
29. All there
16. Glass ornament
63. Lecherous look
30. NFL scores
17. Freud contemporary
64. American space agency
34. Bottom line?
18. Hue
65. One of the Leeward Islands
35. Swift
19. Queue
66. Corm ofthe taro
36. Configuration
20. Hinder
67. Secluded spot
37. "The Time Machine" race
22. Quadrangle
68. Country singer Travis
38. DEA agent
24. Shoebox letters
40. Instructions
26. Boil
DOWN
41. Bikini top
27. Suffix
1. Box
43. Raced
31. Hwy.
2. Adjutant
44. Rudimentary component
32. Dull
3. Latvian, e.g.
45. Rogue
33. Trio
4. Draft classification
47. Madrid Mrs.
36. Marsh
5. Roast
48.Jabbed
39. Half of zwei
6. Scribble (down)
49. Broadcast
40. Baked dough
7. Passing notice
50. Noble, in a way
41. Gaucho's weapon
8. Fermented grape juices
52. Meadow mouse
42. Bass, e.g.
9. Literate
53. majeste
43. Chaplin persona
10. Flattened at the poles
55. Above
44. Diamond flaw?
11. Sound of a horse
56. Sitarist Shankar
45. Hawaiian food
12. Boat often made of birch-
57. Mine entrance
46. Mohammedan
bark, canvas, or fiberglass
58. For fear that
48. Twinned
13. Biblical garden
61. Japanese honorific
PUZZLES PROVIDED BY BESTCR0SSW0RDS.COM. USED WITH PERMISSION.
C0MICMASTER, BY MARIA CIRSTEA
SOLUTION
OOrtBJ**...
^/ou REAltf KNOW
y\ow) To BRJldG
Out TWE BCAST
IH ME.' j
1
l
1
*
*.
t
1
i
*
1
°
(J
o V
i
i
.'.
!
"
"
i
*
*.
'
3
1 I
3
c.
V
\
1
'
3
i
1.
*
H
" <?,
!
*
1
q
A
••■■_
«i
J
J
J
I
0   fl,
g j
T
j
u
I
j
1
n
V
1
i_i
■ i
0
■
a
i:
•s
a
!.
■
H|V    11
■
1 t,
V
i
]
U     i
a
V
3 | H    l__ •>
N
1 1
3
3
"
H\\.__i a
V
3 I
|3
I
"M
x| i
1 J.
V
9, *.,
1
H
1
1
3
L-
i h
!■
s
c
1
V
■'
i
3
i.M<).
■d
V
i
' H
1
r.
1
1
l
1
■J
i
i,
H
3
3
a v
t
3r
]
*
'
1
«
q
HJ
N
r
i  4.
'■
*
N
°
\
»■
0
r
'-
°.
'.
*, s,
Submit your comics
to our website at
ubyssey. cal volunteer I
submit-a-comic.
VIRGINIE MENARD |
production@ubyssey.ca
tlTHEUBYSSEYca
SUSC0MIC.COM, BY MIKE BROUND
CORPUS CHRISTI, BY ROBERT E. LEE (Y0URC0RPUSCHRISTI.BL0GSP0T.COM]
Hey Lyall, check out my new single-speed bike! J
[/ [   Oh that's cool Halparin, is it cheaper?     ]
Umm, no J I Hmm, well is it more versatile?l\|
I Umm, no. * s\l
Hmm, well is it faster?
If you're going to be such an
then just forget about it
iter?J
TU
Where is your degree
taking you?
UNUMIT |
YOURSELF 2010.11.04/UBYSSEY.CA/OPINIONS/ll
OPINIONS
DO YOU CARE? WRITE US A LETTER»feedback@ubyssey.ca
EDITORIAL
GOODBYE, GOOD LUCK AND GOOD RIDDANCE
In the last issue of our paper, you have may noticed a back-page advertisement by Gordon Campbell, a message directly to students.
This was ironic for two reasons. The first is the
obvious fact that he has now abruptly announced
his resignation. The other is that the relationship
between our soon-to-be-ex-premier and university students has never been exactly cordial.
To most, the tuition hikes of his first term are
Campbell's lasting legacy. They doubled the cost
of a degree in this province, resulted in hundreds
of students laying siege to the Old Administration
Building overnight (really it happened), and created an ideological split between student unions
and leaders that continues to this day (excepting
certain current AMS presidents).
Given the fiscal state of the province and the
impact a seven-year tuition freeze had on universities, it was in many ways an inevitability. But
itwas marked by an arrogance, suddenness and
refusal to compromise that became a hallmark
with this administration. For many the HST was
the last straw. But students? Well, students turned
their back on this government long ago.
If it wasn't over tuition, maybe it was the government's secretive decision to fire the Okanagan
University College board and change it to UBC-O.
Or maybe it was the last-second cuts to universities in 2008 (UBC received $15.8 million less).
Or maybe it was the $16 million cut in aid programs in 2009.
This premier did some good, especially on the
economic and First Nations fronts. His decision
to enact a carbon tax was also a bold, potentially
visionary move. But his best-before date passed
years ago, and the only thing that can be said for
his decision is 'better late than never.'
Now, Campbell is free to leave the grueling task
of public life, one that he has devoted three decades of his life to, and enjoy more time at home—
which just happens to be an apartment at UBC.
Perhaps now he'll be able to connect with students more than he ever has before, va
HALLOWEEN COSTUMES NO CHILD'S GAME
Halloween is a cathartic experience for some
people, and a lot of it has to do with costumes. But
the mixture of fluid identities and unidentified fluids can make for a ribald night out as far removed
from innocent trick-or-treating as Jack Skellington
is from Santa Claus.
But what about damage that goes beyond the
physical? Many see dressing up in a costume as
an opportunity to express themselves. Sometimes,
though, this kind of roleplay can take a nasty turn.
Two years ago, four UBC students attended parties in rez and the Pit in blackface. This wasn't the
blackface of minstrel shows—straw hat, red lips, et
cetera—but a modern, updated version. They wore
what one might loosely term 'hip-hop' attire, and
in the photos we've seen they are grimacing, striking threatening poses and throwing up gang signs
whilst drinking Malt Liquor. It doesn't matter whether their costumes were meant to summarize African-American males as a whole or one specific subculture. Four white men painting themselves to look
black and acting like buffoons isn't just tasteless, it's
wrong—on Halloween or any other day.
This Halloween, three Vancouver men dressed as
'bashed' gays. Their outfits included Hannah Montana andjustin Beiber t-shirts, rainbow wristbands,
and signs originally reading "It gets better" altered
to say "It doesn't get better." Oh, and the injuries-
fake gashes, blood and black eyes.
A quick Twitter-snooping of some of the individuals involved reveals an interest in HIV awareness
campaigns and youth outreach groups. There is a
good chance their costumes were meant as ironic
social commentary from people within the LGBT
community—but does that make them okay?
Would either of these groups have dressed this
way on any day other than Halloween? We're betting they wouldn't.
Here's a tip for nextyear, folks: stick to the basics.
The holiday was originally about cheap costumes
kids could wear—clowns and devils and ghosts.
As an adult celebrating a child's holiday you may
be tempted to add a layer of complexity. Ifyou do,
watch your step. There's a thin line between being
satirical and being an asshole, tl
BRYCE WARNES GRAPHIC/THE UBYSSEY
TOO SEXY
HEY EVERYONE,
The Too Sexy team firmly believes that
condoms (as vexatious as they can be)
are absolutely necessary. We wantyou
to believe it too. That's why this week,
our column focuses on condom troubleshooting and FAQ. So let's dive right
in, shall we?
CAN YOU USE TWO CONDOMS AT THE
SAME TIME?
No.
"Double-bagging" is a strict no-no, as
the two condoms rub against one another and cause tearing. This means
greater risk of STIs and/or pregnancy. Most people know this from sex ed
class or TV, but we thought we'd mention it anyway.
DOES THE EXPIRY DATE ON THE
CONDOM MATTER?
Yes.
All condoms have an expiry date printed on the wrapper. An expiry date, not
a best before. Rubber does become brittle as it ages. As well, don't store condoms in your wallet or back pocket,
and don't carry around condoms you
intend to use for any extended period
of time. Heat compromises the integrity ofthe condom, and constant bending and jostling may cause pinholes.
CAN YOU USE FLAVOURED CONDOMS
FOR VAGINAL/ANAL SEX AS WELL AS
ORAL SEX?
No.
Flavoured condoms, while a great option for spicing up oral sex, contain sugar as a flavour agent. Sugar + pussy/ass
= yeast infection. Also, you should ALWAYS change condoms when switching sex locations. For example, don't
transition from anal sex to vaginal sex
with the same condom, or vice-versa.
This puts additional wear and tear on
the condom.
CAN UNCIRCUMCISED MEN USE
CONDOMS?
Fes. Please, yes.
The procedure of putting a condom on
is slightly different because ofthe foreskin, but don't let that discourage you.
Before you begin, put a small drop of
WATER-BASED LUBRICANT on the inside of the condom tip.
Next, pull back the foreskin, pinch
the tip ofthe condom and unroll it down
the penis. Hold onto the base and push
up gently at the middle of the shaft so
the the foreskin returns to its normal
erect position. Also, some uncircum-
cised men find that buying a slightly longer than necessary condom is
helpful, as this gives extra space for
the foreskin to move and prevents the
condom from riding up if it gets under
the foreskin.
WHAT'S THE DEAL WITH FEMALE
CONDOMS?
Well, they're great for group sex involving one male and more than one
female. They are latex sheaths that fit
inside the vagina instead of over the
penis. Ifyou're using a female condom, don't use a male condom at the
same time (see: 'double-bagging'). Female condoms are more expensive than
male condoms, slightly less prone to
breakage but more prone to slippage.
I CAN'T FIND A CONDOM BIG ENOUGH
FORME.
Bullshit. If I can wear a condom like
a hat, it can fit over your dick. Otherwise, see a doctor. Ifyour ego demands
satisfaction, try large sized condoms,
proceed and be less of a nincompoop
next time.
WHAT DO I DO IF I LOSE MY ERECTION
WHILE HAVING SEX WITH A CONDOM
ON?
Stop having intercourse. Ifyou continue, the condom will slip off. Do something else for awhile. If/when you have
an erection again, put a new condom
on to resume sex ifyou feel like it. "21
LETTERS
THE PIT'S INAPPROPRIATE ATTITUDE
The Pit annoys me big time. What does
it think, why is it so arrogant?
My first experience with the Pit was
during the Gala introduction week for
international students last summer.
Being European and never forced to
wait to go to a club, the first line-up in
my life was fun. I saw it as a cultural
experience. When we walked in, after
being lined up for over half an hour,
the Pit was empty..Weird.
Last week, on Halloween Wednesday
I was going to try the Pit again. But after standing half an hour in a judge
line-up, with the guys at the door doing nothing, I walked away. This is not
how I want to be treated as a customer.
Knowing that the Pit has a monopoly
when it comes to clubbing on campus,
and can therefore do what it wants,
I still think that it should change its
attitude.
It should change from being arrogant with unnecessary line-ups towards
a more friendly and laidback "by students for students" attitude. Screw that
wannabe fancy club attitude and act
normal!
Pit goers should not accept standing
in line-ups for so long, just because it
is their only option. We should complain more and be able to go clubbing
without unnecessary haughty and annoying delays.
Melle Nikkels
Send us your poor,
your tired, your huddled
masses/thoughts/letters.
We take em all. Unless
they're over 300 words.
In any case, to have a
letter in here, send us an
email At feedback®
ubyssey.ca.
U THEUBYSSEYca 12/UBYSSEY.CA/OURCAMPUS/2010.11.04
Yarn bombing is a type of street
art that doesn't permanently alter the objects or buildings on
which it is mounted. It takes
knitting from the practical
realm of hats and scarves and
turns it into something more
abstract—while maintaining its
cozifying purpose. While paint,
stickers and wheatpaste are expressive forms of graffiti, yarn
bombing functions primarily as
an act of reclamation, bringing
warmth to unhospitable or sterile urban environments. Given
the low cost of yarn and needles
from thrift stores and rummage
sales, it is an extraordinarily
cheap and accessible form of
public art. Lately yarn bombs
have been popping up around
Kitsilano and Point Grey. This
one was spotted on UBC Campus,
at the intersection of East Mall
and University Boulevard, vl
i— ■
--   -n
* *
'__;  1
"       "-
\w
TO REACH
STUDENTS?
Advertise online at:
UBYSSEY.CA
We do FREE ad design!
CALL PAU L AT
604-822-2301
OR E-MAIL HI MAT
WEBADS@ UBYSSEY.CA
MAKE
BUSINESS.
BUSINESS AND MEDIA AT BCIT
Get more out of your education, faster
than you ever thought possible. Learn
about our industry connected full-time
and part-time programs and enter to
win a laptop and more.*
* No purchase necessary. See website
for contest rules.
bcit.ca/business
It's your career.
Get it right.
Want to take sweet photos like the one above for us? Come to The Ubyssey!
geofflister| photos@ubyssey.ca CI IItIjlI/IJJl>IOOjlI/Ix

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0126934/manifest

Comment

Related Items