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The Ubyssey Nov 29, 1979

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 Constitution vote slated for Friday
UBC students will go to the polls
tomorrow to begin voting on a constitutional referendum, amidst a
massive controversy over the document's validity and a morass of
disorganization surrounding the
voting.
The student representative
assembly voted Wednesday night to
hold the referendum, effectively
overturning last week's move to
cancel it.
Advance polls in the law building
and residences will open tomorrow
to vote on a constitutional amend
ment which reduces allocation of
student representation of SRA,
establish at-large elections for executive members and centralize the
AMS power structure.
But law representative Arlene
Francis charged that law students
will not be available to vote in the
advance poll because they have few
or no classes Friday.
"I have serious reservations
about holding a referendum when
students are going to be off campus," she said.
And   graduate   representative
Don Thompson still questions the
validity of the decision to hold the
referendum this week. AMS president Brian Short presented a letter
from the provincial registrar of
companies and societies at the
meeting which he claimed upheld
the legality of the constitution.
But Thompson said that since the
letter was dated Oct. 20, 1978, it
was not sufficient to satisfy an SRA
motion of Nov. 15, 1979, requiring
a legal opinion on the constitutional
amendments to be submitted before
the referendum could be held.
And Francis told Short: "as our
officer, you have violated your duty
(by not getting a written legal opinion)."
But Short said he feared that
failure to hold the referendum was
in contravention of the Societies
Act and could lead to charges being
laid against the AMS.
The referendum proposes that:
• the representation of students
by faculty be reduced to no more
than one SRA member for every
2,000 students;
• the executive be reduced to
Five members, all of whom will be
elected in general elections rather
than being selected by the SRA as
they are now;
• the president's power be increased so that he acts as head of
the AMS and public relations officer for the society, in addition to
fulfilling the role of member of the
executive and chairman of the SRA;
and,
• that the representation of student senators be reduced from 17 to
two.
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXII, No. 33
Vancouver, B.C. Thursday, November 29,1979
Students jeer
split McGeer
DAYDREAMING STUDENT walks unsuspectingly into well-disguised
hyperspace vortex near Sedgewick library. Vortex is thought to be connected with small black hole in space which occasionally captures UBC
students. Physical plant has been asked to solve vortex problem and a
— curtis long photo
number of suggestions are under consideration. University administration
wants vortex for research park. Park's opponents want vortex moved to
6328 Memorial Road.
Kenny's academic mission impossible
UBC's administration president
might be too optimistic in expecting
balanced increases in university
funding in the future, some UBC
department heads charged Wednesday.
"The guts of any university are
the faculties of the arts and sciences
and that is the area that might not
be stressed  by the government,"
said zoology head Geoffery Scud-
der. "I'm not quite as optimistic as
he (Kenny) is."
In a report released earlier this
week entitled The Mission of the
University of B.C., Kenny claimed
some of UBC's most pressing problems are poor government funding
and a need to maintain balanced
academic growth.
Scudder agreed that "one's got
to watch the funding so the university won't become unbalanced."
But he charged that the provincial government has a tendency to
favor job training areas of the
university and that is "not what arts
and sciences are all about."
"The main thing the government
hasn't realized is the difference bet-
Tickets ffor sale or rent
You get a lot of tickets in a limousine. Parking and
speeding tickets, that is.
But it isn't often you get tickets from a limousine.
Concert tickets, that is. And for half the usual price.
Noted local jazz musician Dale Jacobs sat in a shiny,
black limo outside SUB Tuesday and attempted to sell
tickets for his concert in the Commodore ballroom
that evening.
Jacobs did not dirty his hands with the actual transactions, said an unidentified onlooker. Jacobs allowed
his promoter to handle the sales while he was entertained by two companions in the limousine.
Poverty-stricken students had the opportunity to
purchase the $6 tickets for only $3. But not many took
Jacobs up on his offer. The concert attracted only 280
jazz fans who did their best to make the 1,000-seat
Commodore look full.
Jacobs said he was forced to resort to this form of
ticket sales because his promoters had been unable to
adequately cover the university market.
ween training and education."
And student board of governors
member Glenn Wong said the arts
and science faculties are not equally
funded by the provincial government.
"If that (balanced funding) is
their goal arts and sciences have a
lot of catching up to do," Wong
said.
And philosophy department head
James Dybikowski said it will be
vital for the university to maintain
its growth in the faculty of the arts.
"It would be essential for the
faculty of the arts to remain strong
because on its shoulders rests the
possibility of a real liberal education," he said.
"It's one thing for the universities to make the argument we
need increased funding and it's
another thing for the provincial
government to dictate where the
money is allocated."
By ERICA LEIREN
Student politicians are unhappy
with a recent two-way division of
•the province's education ministry,
and the allocation of the universities section of the portfolio to
Point Grey MLA Pat McGeer.
"We must make sure that the
universities don't get lost in the
portfolio that has been created for
McGeer," British Columbia Students' Federation spokesman John
Doherty said Wednesday.
"There are a lot of unanswered
questions with the recent cabinet
shuffle, especially regarding universities. This is the first time such a
split between the colleges and universities has occurred."
Last week's Social Credit cabinet
•shuffle resulted in a two-way division of the education ministry, with
universities, science and communications going to McGeer, and colleges and vocational institutes going
to Brian Smith (SC-Oak Bay).
Doherty said he is concerned
B.C. colleges will become primarily
technical and vocational institutes,
while dropping university transfer
programs.
SFU student society external relations officer Doug Fleming said:
"It's a bad division which is going
to cut colleges and high schools off
from universities. It's an artificial
split."
UBC's Alma Mater Society external affairs officer said she
doesn't think McGeer's appointment is going to greatly affect UBC
students.
But Valgeet Johl said she believes
it will reaffirm a change in educational emphasis from the humanities and liberal education to a very
technical and applied education
situation.
"I don't approve of having McGeer as minister of universities because I don't think he has ever paid
enough attention to any of his portfolios. He doesn't have the best interests of the universities at heart."
She charged that university cutbacks, underfunding and the recent
rise of tuition fees over the past
couple of years were examples of
his incompetence.
The present educational trend in
universities to emphasize science
and technology at the expense of
the liberal arts would continue under McGeer, Doherty said.
"I'm sure he (McGeer) is going to
feel that projects such as doing research for discovery park constitute
working for the university, when it
is actually only a small aspect of the
job," Doherty said.
"There are elements within the
portfolio that can take his attention
away from the universities, such as
communications, science, and technology."
SFSS public relations secretary
Susan Mullans said: "His (McGeer's) baby has always been research. You're not going to find
any labs in the research parks dealing with sociology." Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 29, 1979
UBC gets shah gall
"'^?*M'
The head of UBC's radiology department performed a recent gallstone operation on the shah of Iran
in New York.
Dr. Joachim Burhenne removed
a gallstone from the deposed shah
Monday, using an operation he invented.
The operation involves the insertion of a slender, ball-point pen size
basket through a tube in the bile
duct. The physician then follows
the progress of the basket on an
x-ray screen and uses the basket to
grasp and extract the stone.
Medicine faculty representatives
say they are unable to contact Burhenne before his return to Vancouver Friday for security reasons.
They say there is concern for the
doctor's safety from irate Iranian
activists.	
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) — Wait
Damnyou announced her thirty-
first birthday today, 10 years before
the fateful event is to take place.
"I'm only trying to live up to my
name," she said. "And by then I'll
have control of those silly hairy
puce blorgs."
AMS CONCERTS PRESENTS
SOMEONE SPECIAL
FOR A
SPECIAL SOMEONE
BCITs Psychiatric Nursing program provides the training for an exciting and rewarding career In the mental
health care field.
Here, in the Psychiatric Nursing program, men and
women prepare for a wide range of career opportunities in day care centres, on community mental health
teams and in hospitals.
It's a 22-month program which offers instruction in
classrooms, laboratories and clinical agencies preparing the graduate for Immediate, good-paying employment.
If you are interested In a challenging career in psychiatric nursing, call or write today to Mrs. Margaret Ney-
lan, Department Head, Psychiatric Nursing Department, British Columbia Institute of Technology, 3700
Willingdon Avenue, Burnaby, B.C. V5G 3H2, 434-
5734, local 310.
Apply now for classes beginning in January 1980.
BRITISH COLUMBIA
INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
3700 WILLINGDON AVENUE, BURNABY, B.C., V5G 3H2
IN CONCERT
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7
8:00 p.m. S.U.B. Ballroom, U.B.C
Also Appearing
TICKETS: STUDENTS $3.50
GENERAL $4.50
AMS BUSINESS OFFICE
QUINTESSENCE RECORDS
FREUD WOULD HAVE JOINED
•if he had been a Psych T.A.
LEIBNITZ WOULD HAVE JOINED
... if he had been a AAath marker
EINSTEIN WOULD HAVE JOINED
... if he had been Physics tutor
WOLLSTONECRAFT WOULD HAVE JOINED
... if she had taught English 100
MARKERS, TEACHING ASSISTANTS, TUTORS,
JOIN THE TEACHING ASSISTANTS UNION NOW!
Come to the office in the Grad Centre or call 228-4883
We apply for certification TOMORROW! Thursday, November 29,1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
—jim steel photo
MAGAZINE BROTHERS amaze and amuse conservative-minded students in SUB ballroom Wednesday.
MacLean and MacLean (that's McLean2 for physics students) provided usual mixture of lyrics, laughs and lunacy
in X-rated performance. In exclusive interview, The Ubyssey learned that both brothers are considering entering
race for university's presidency if Pat McGeer doesn't get the job.
'Middle East peace a possibility'
By VERNE McDONALD
The peaceful coexistence between
Arabs and Jews in Jerusalem proves
that peace is possible in the Middle
East, the head of Israel-Radio's
English program said Wednesday.
Sara Manobla said Jerusalem has
existed since 1967 as a city of cooperation. There is less tension than
when the city was temporarily
divided into a western Jewish quarter and an eastern Arab quarter in
1948, she told 40 people at UBC's
Hillel House.
She said in terms of racial tensions, Jerusalem has a better record
since 1967 than either South Africa
or the U.S.
"Given all the pressure of the
outside, from the Arab states, from
the superpowers and from the oil
companies, 20 years of coexistence
among Jews, Arabs and Christians
in Jerusalem has been remarkable,"
Manobla said.
She said Jerusalem divided was a
strange, poorly maintained and
rundown city, with roads that led
nowhere and mine fields along the
demarcation line. "It did not have
the vitality it has today."
Manobla said the current administration of Jerusalem, under mayor
Teddy Kolleck, is studying means
of handing over administrative
powers to-Arab boroughs in the ci-
Students aid scabs
SASKATOON (CUP) —
Students at two Saskatchewan technical schools crossed picket lines
Monday and will stage a protest before the legislature today to advocate a return to classes.
About 300 of 2,000 students at
one school, Kelsey, have crossed
picket lines of the Saskatchewan
Government Employees Association, which represents both faculty
and maintenance staff, said Kelsey
students' association president
Grant McCurdy.
He said that students attended an
informational meeting in the
school's auditorium. "I'm quite
pleased with the turnout," he said,
adding that more students might
have attended but have left town
because of the strike.
The union has been on strike at
all three Saskatchewan technical institutes since Nov. 16. Students say
they're worried that an extended
strike could make them lose an academic year or force them to graduate too late to be eligible for job
competition next spring.
Negotiations between the union
and the government remain deadlocked. The union is seeking wage
increases to compensate for past
losses and to protect against future
inflation.
Some Kelsey students have supported the union and joined the
picket line.
Meanwhile, others held a meeting
encouraging classmates to phone
their MLAs and pressure them to
help end the strike quickly. Class
presidents were in charge of phoning faculty members to encourage
them to cross the line so classes
could resume.
Only about 10 out of nearly 300
faculty members have crossed lines
so far at the institute. Only a few
classes are in session and library is
the only building open on the
grounds.
"The majority of the instructors
will stay out," says faculty spokeswoman Jeaninne Bouvier. She added that strikebreakers face financial
penalties and loss of union cards.
The fle4gling Saskatchewan federation of students has supported
the three technical schools which
are federation members. The federation is calling on the government
and union for a "swift resolution"
of their differences. The organization also says it supports "attempts
by technical institute students to
reach an agreement with the union
about interim measures to protect
their education."
But federation representative
Brett Fairbairn said the organization will not support any strikebreaking attempts.
Student presidents from the three
schools met last week with Allan
Guy, deputy continuing education
minister, to discuss methods of ensuring that the strike does not harm
students too badly. Guy recommended that students condense
course material, extend the term or
take up part of the spring break.
ty. She said complete municipal
self-government for Arab sections
will follow, but only as far as possible given the problems of security.
"Security is paramount," Manobla said. "This is indisputable."
She stressed that there has been a
continuous population of Jews in
Jerusalem since Biblical times and
they have formed the largest segment of the city's population since
the mid-1800s.
Manobla said the unusually large
numbers of journalists stationed in
Jerusalem because of the continual
tension in the Middle East have also
caused exaggeration of difficulties
there.
"I think I can say without being
contradicted that Jerusalem has
more journalists per capita than
anywhere else in the world. This has
caused incidents to be magnified.
"As a journalist, I have grown
cynical about my profession. Good
news is no news and bad news is
good news for a journalist," said
Manobla. "I'm sure there are people living normal lives in Saigon,
but that's not news."
Collins says
keep it white
By GLEN SANFORD
By the turn of the century
"whites" will be a minority in major Canadian cities, newspaper columnist Doug Collins claimed Tuesday.
The increasing percentage of
Third World immigrants will
destroy English Canada, he told 100
students in Law 101.
"By the turn of the century the
percentage of Third World immigrants in this country will be 20
per cent. In the cities the ratio will
be even higher. In Toronto or Vancouver whites will be the minority,"
Collins said.
He said the issue of immigration
is not taken seriously enough by
Canadians.
"Immigration is shoved under
the rug," he said. "It's not dealt
with honestly but it's of fundamental importance to the future of
this country."
Immigration is a serious issue
because race tension is unavoidable
and an influx of non-whites will
weaken our culture, he said.
But he added he is not promoting
racial discrimination. "When I talk
about immigration I am not suggesting, nor have I ever suggested,
that one race is superior to
another," he said.
Collins expressed concern that
immigration from Europe and the
United Kingdom was decreasing,
and said former prime minister
Pierre Trudeau was responsible for
opening Canada's doors to immigrants from around the world.
He said that in 1976, 53 per cent
of Canadian immigrants were from
Third World countries and has increased now to 60 per cent. That
figure will rise to 70 per cent in the
1980s, Collins predicted.
He said the situation will lead to
serious race troubles, and pointed
out that race tension is taking place
all over the world. Europe is
already withdrawing the welcome
mat for third world immigrants,
said Collins.
He also said, "It should not be
thought that race tension exists only
in white countries." Collins said the
persecution of Chinese in Vietnam
and the expulsion of East Indians
from Uganda.
"Hatred is a human phenomena
which exists and will continue to exist," he said.
"Why is it that the blacks are trying to throw the whites out in
Rhodesia? It's because they bloody
well don't want them."
Collins said he supports the right
of blacks to overthrow the white
regime in South Africa.
Collins said the biggest mistake
North American Indians made was
to allow European immigration into
this continent.
"The argument about Indians
supports my case because, as you
know, they shouldn't have let us
in," he said.
Asbestos rain falls
from Bishop's roof
LENNOXVILLE (CUP) — Falling asbestos in the Bishop's university arena has been confirmed as a
health hazard but the building will
not be closed down.
The provincial Environmental
Protection Service has completed its
study of the arena roof and made
recommendations to the university.
Paul Belanger, director of the service's industrial pollution division,
said there is definitely a health
hazard.
"It's like carbon monoxide — it's
a hazard if you breathe it," he said.
The university does not intend to
take immediate action. Officials
claim the report from the service
mentions no specific danger to
health.
The   report   recommends   that
Bishop's take action to repair the
arena. "We feel there are grounds
for proceeding with work to fix in
.place insulating materials -not containing asbestos." The report asks
the university to prepare a work
schedule for repairs and submit it to
the service by Dec. 30.
Athletics director Bruce Colter
said he is not worried by the report
and the athletic department will not
be curtailing any services because of
it.
"The bottom line is that there is
no problem ... all they've done is
ask us what our plans are, and have
given us two months to act upon
it."
Colter said he was surprised by
the report results. "I expected much
worse than what we got."
— kevin finnegan photo
LIKE A CONCRETE COWBOY, construction worker holsters tools to steel himself for work. With bunker-like extended care unit in background, hard-hatted hammerslinger concentrates on rebar structure. Unidentified laborer
is suspected to have been world champion Meccano/Leggo builder in childhood, and likely has Ph.D. in metaphysical psychodynamics. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 29,1979
Don't miss
park forum
You will get a chance to voice your views on
Pat McGeer's industrial playland today.
Don't blow it.
When UBC administration president Doug
Kenny and provincial spokesman Don Larsen
leave an open forum on the subject in SUB
gallery today, they will decide whether or not
students care about UBC's proposed 58 acre
research park.
So far, most attempts to get student input into
plans for the park have been tossed aside with
remarks like: "For most students it (the research
park) is not an issue that interests them greatly."
That comment came from Erich Vogt, UBC vice-
president of faculty and student affairs.
A poor turnout at today's open forum will only
serve to confirm Vogt's smug attitude about the
research park. No one is going to deny that high-
technology research in B.C. is underdeveloped
or that  companies should  be  encouraged  to
move away from resource extractive industry.
But there is no reason why governments
should locate research facilities on university
land with only minimal consultation with the
university community, students, or even the provincial legislature.
There are a lot of questions to be asked about
UBC's research park and if students don't ask
them, no one will.
We should make damn sure we pin down the
park's policy makers on what exactly they are
promising us. Such promises are amazingly
useful to examine years after they are made; they
should be carefully noted and documented.
Then if the promises are broken, we've got 'em.
So if you have any concern at all for how
university land is used, how the government is
manipulating the direction of the university or
how little students have had to say about the
project, show up at the forum today at noon, no
matter what you think of the park itself..
Killer Bs sting B.C.
THE DEVELOPMENT OF
THE MIDDLE CLASS
It was the war of the killer Bs. It started with
B.C. Hydro.
Bob Bonner didn't mind being head of the
power corporation. The name alone sent shivers
down his spine. But transit he didn't like. So he
ran things in such a way that the power corporation got more power and money while transit
was ripped off and neglected.
Bill Bennett started hearing that transit was
becoming a delicate issue. Another Bill, Vander
Zalm by name, proposed an Urban Transit
Authority to take transit over. And the war
began.
Bob opposed the two Bills who wanted to eat
into his power. The fight went on in the back
rooms for months. But it was finally resolved.
Then big Bill shuffled his cabinet. While the
press rushed around covering that, an order-in-
council gave Bob a 41 per cent raise, a small
thank you for Bob's long public service, especially to Bill's party.
Now everyone is happy, except the NDP who
don't get to question the raise. The taxpayers, of
course, haven't got a complaint. Not the way Bill
runs things. They're not offered the chance to
complain.
After all, what's $23,300 between friends.
L6ww6r5
mtmWKmW     ^IHW ~Vm\W ^F^ ^P^      W ^^mW^
TA union will preserve quality of education
Tomorrow the teaching assistants' union will make its application for certification to the Labor
Relations Board of B.C. Over the
past few months many arguments
have been raised, both for and
against unionization.
An issue perhaps misunderstood
is the impact of the Teaching Assistants' Union on the quality of education at UBC. The union is seen by
some to be motivated by a self-interested group of people who do
not take their duties as teaching as-'
sistants seriously. This is hardly the
case. The union, as a full partici-
We know who we are, but do you?
Noel Coward once said, "I could
learn from Gielgud, from Olivier,
from the public. Never from the
critics."
I read with disdain and disgust
the article Lifespring turns hacks'
heads. I am compelled to disagree
furiously. Does either Glenn Wong,
Heather Conn, Tom Hawthorn or
Peter Menyasz, even know what
Lifespring is all about? Glenn
Wong must be fhe proverbial small
voice which fretfully cries, "All the
army is out of step but me."
The energy generating throughout the campus this year is phenomenal. This is because people, student hacks, like Brian Short, Shirley
Waters, Bruce Armstrong and Len
Clarke, (all of which have taken the
Lifespring course) have devoted
themselves and their time to making
the AMS "work for you."
It is people like Glenn Wong,
who raise false issues, that give The
Ubyssey and student hacks a bad
name. Brian Short, Shirley Waters,
Bruce Armstrong and Len Clarke
deserve an apology and proper
coverage.
By the way, UBC students know
of Shirley Waters, Brian Short,
Bruce Armstrong and Len Clarke
but tell me, please, who in the world
are Heather Conn, Tom Hawthorn
and Peter Menyasz?
Cynthia Southard
first year student
P.S. Since The Ubyssey is so interested in knowing exactly what
UBC students are spending their
money on, please note that my next
$350 will pay the starting fee for
Lifespring's basic training course!
Hope to see you there Glenn!
pant in the university community,
wants to maintain and improve the
standards of teaching by creating
the conditions that make good
teaching possible.
The university is a community of
adults whose purpose here is learning. Because of the existing and future cutbacks threatened by the
ministry of education such a community is undermined in many
ways. The slow erosion of the number of TA positions over the last
few years has resulted in fewer TAs
trying to do the same work.
Any further erosion will have disastrous effects: larger class sizes,
more papers to mark, and less time
to spend with individual students.
When TAs are overworked their
students are cheated. In achieving a
better deal for TAs, the teaching assistants' union will be taking a major step to preserve the quality of
education for students.
Some have asked why a union is
even necessary. Why, in a community of scholars, can't such problems
be resolved in another fashion —
perhaps by means of a teaching assistants' association? Indeed, there
has been an association of teaching
assistants in the past — and it was
only after several years of limited
success in dealing with the university that a decision to form a union
was made.
A union provides a legal structure
that obligates teaching assistants
and the university to come to grips
with matters of mutual concern.
That obligation is not present with
an association. The teaching assistants' union hopes to maintain the
present number of TA positions,
and to formulate a job description
to ensure that adequate time is
available to carry out a TA's job effectively.
In the face of economic decisions
which bear on education at UBC,
teaching assistants are acting in a responsible manner by insisting that
their input be heard.
In order to obtain certification,
however, the union must demonstrate to the Labor Relations Board
that it has a broad base of support.
Since the B.C. Labor Code requires
that at least 45 per cent of the potential membership belongs to the
union for the certification application to be considered, the union is
currently attempting to sign up as
many members as possible. If the 45
per cent figure is attained, a vote
will be held in which all the union
members and potential members
will decide whether or not they wish
to be represented by the union.
Now, at the end of the certification drive, it is evident that TAs
want a union. But because the UBC
is so decentralized, there are still
potential members whom the union
has not been able to contact directly. This is particularly true for undergraduate markers in some departments, who may not know they
are eligible to join the union. All
markers, tutors and teaching assistants who are concerned about the
quality of education at UBC should
join the union now.
Judith Mosoff
Glen Porter
graduate studies
Rape talk set for Vanier residence
Tonight at 7 p.m. in the Shrum
lounge at Place Vanier residence,
there will be an open discussion and
film presentation on rape and women's security on campus and in the
residences.
Speakers from the RCMP, Vancouver Rape Relief and other informed speakers will be on hand to
talk openly about this issue and sug
gest ways with which sexual assault
can be dealt.
Everyone, men included, is invited to attend. This is an important
issue of which every student should
be aware.
Patrick T. Buchannon
assistant residence coordinator
student affairs (programming)
THE UBYSSEY
November 29, 1979
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year by the Alma Mater
Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS or
the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in room 241K of the
Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
Co-Editors: Heather Conn and Tom Hawthorn
"So you want a fuckin' obscene, fuckin' masthead," said Geof Wheelwright to his fucking asshole editor Tom Hawthorn. Hawthorn said, "No, I want fucking
Gary Brookfield and Verne McDonald to quit shitting around with my goddam layout fuckin' paper." But Heather Conn and Julie Wheelwright agreed it would
be a shitty, fucking useless, childish and putrid way to write a masthead. Kevin Finnegan and Peter Fuckin' Menyasz got so turned on by the idea that they
almost scared new staffers Erica Leiren and Janet Comin out of the office. Glen Sanford was just fucking confused. It was Steve "The Bitch" McClure who
finally settled the question when he told Curtis (very) Long and Terry Asseltine the deed had to be done. And it fuckin' was, so eat it up you assholes, and show
up for a fucking punk staff photo Monday at 3:30 p.m. Thursday, November 29,1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
-'       * i^ **      *   * "        *Sr> '*"
Letters
^1
'Bow to your superiors, straights'
In   response   to   the   recent     some uninformed people seem to    experience and knowledge. Unfor-
downgrading of the gay people in
your letters column, I would like to
give a gay point of view. First of all,
one must have an understanding of
how the gay's mind functions. Second, "straights" must understand
the privileges that are entitled to us
as a right. Third, it must be realized
that we are far superior in intellect
and most other functions both
physical and mental than the so-
called "normal" population.
The gay's mind functions differently from that of a heterosexual's mind. One must understand
that a gay is born differently, it
does not just happen. The
phenomenon of homosexuality is a
gift to the individual, the gift of
superiority. Not only is the
homosexual mind superior, but his
sexual preferences are superior as
well. The preference of some sex
relationships is not a blasphemy as
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We waz wong
In the Nov. 20 article entitled
Here Come the Wazzes, there are a
number of major errors. The bride
did not wear red. In fact she made a
considerable effort to procure a
dress of the proper shade of
burgundy. And the groom had a
yellow boutonniere, not -red. The
bride does not use the Pill. The furniture was borrowed by force, not
stolen. And Mrs. Brown is consulting her lawyers to sue for
defamation of character.
So much for honest journalism.
Cheryl and Peter Menyasz
think, but more of a higher level of
social interaction. The homosexual
lifestyle is a highly developed one,
years ahead of that of a-heterosexual. In other words, homosexuality
is a higher phase of life. It is what
heterosexuality will some day develop into.
Because of this superiority, gays
have a right to special privileges. It
would be to the heterosexual's advantage to use us to help them
grow, develop. We could guide
them to an enlightened life with our
tunately, as history always dictates,
the masses are too ignorant to even
recognize their ignorance, let alone
to try to improve themselves and
rise above their meagre existence.
The point of my argument is that
homosexuals are not all demented,
sex-crazed perverts. We are human
beings with -an extremely sensitive
set of emotions and a higher level
of mental capacity. I feel we should
be treated with respect and fear
rather then rejection and ridicule.
name withheld upon request
HAVING TROUBLE PUTTING TOGETHER A RESUME?
or PREPARING FOR THE JOB INTERVIEW?
Employment Strategy Workshop
for the graduating student
*Will help you effectively design your own Resume
•Will reveal to you the mysteries of JOB INTERVIEW technique
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1979
9 AM - 12 NOON
at the
HOLIDAY INN
BROADWAY & HEATHER
VANCOUVER, B.C.
'Registration fee $20.00
Invest now! Enrollment limited to 25! Early Registration advised!
*Send your cheque or money order with  your name,  address,
telephone number, year and faculty to:
EMPLOYMENT STRATEGY
H. MAR Et ASSOCIATES LTD
104-1037 W. BROADWAY
VANCOUVER. B.C.
V6H 1E3
INFORMATION 732-6722 or 261-5969
VC&rm&Dry
  $84.00
Polarguard^ insulated clothing by M.E.I,
available exclusively at your outdoor specialists:
?4 PACK & BOOTS SHOP
L*-^ 3425West Broadway.^fancouver 738-3128
Xerox of Canada Limited
will be on campus Friday,
November 30th between the
hours of 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
to meet with candidates from all faculties
who are interested in being interviewed
for careers in sales.
For Friday registration times, please consult your
Canada Employment Centre on campus
who have full details
Xerox of Canada Limited
XEROX Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 29, 1979
Tween classes
TODAY
CSA
Chinese painting class, noon to 2 p.m., SUB
113.
ENGLISH STUDENTS'
PUBLICATION ASSOCIATION
General membership meeting, 2:30 p.m., BuTo
fifth-floor lounge.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Lesbian drop-in, 1:30 p.m., SUB 130.
GAY PEOPLE OF UBC
Grace from Passaglia bookstore discusses latest
literature from gay community, noon, SUB 212.
Hot
flashes
Truth stranger
than fiction
If you've ever wondered why industrial researchers need a university park to work in or whether Pat
McGeer has a fetish for researchers, then come to the SUB art
gallery at noon today.
UBC administration president
Doug Kenny and provincial government spokesman Don Larsen will
describe the methods to their
madness and try to convince you
that they are only thinking of your
best interests.
But of course, only you know the
truth. . . .
Dock walking
Poets Al Grierson, Kirsten
Emmott, Zoe Landale and David
Conn will be featured in the
presentation for poetry buffs to
be held at noon today in the Buchanan lounge.
COALITION FOR A SAFE CAMPUS
RCMP talk on safety and rape, 7 p.m., Place
Vanier residence, Shrum lounge.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
General meeting, noon, International House
lounge.
IVCF
Dr. Ian Rennie discusses his Christian biography,
noon, Chem. 250.
LSM
Ross Datars speaks on Faith, Science and the
Future, noon, Lutheran campus centre.
MY JONG KUNG FU
Practice, 7:30 to 9:30 p.m., SUB 125.
AMS ART GALLERY
General meeting, noon, SUB 230.
YAC
Relaxing live music and bar, 8 p.m. to midnight,
Cecil Green park.
AWARDS OFFICE
Keith Gilbert gives information on student aid,
noon to 2:30 p.m., Speakeasy in SUB.
POETRY READING
Poets Al Grierson, Kirsten Emmott, Zoe Landaie
and David Conn read works with slide presentation, noon, Buch. 102.
AMS
Open forum on discovery park with UBC administration president Doug Kenny, provincial government spokesman Don Larsen, noon, SUB art
gallery.
PHOTOSOC
§     Social  organization and field  trip,  7:30  p.m.,
SUB 212.
LSA FILM COMMITTEE
Fantastic animation festival, noon. Law 101/2.
YOUNG PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVES
Final meeting for model parliament seating,
noon, SUB 115.
LSLAP
Free legal advice, noon to 2 p.m., SUB 111.
FRIDAY
CSA
Mandarin class, noon, Scarfe 200.
Guitar class, noon, SUB 235.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Subcommittee meeting, noon, SU8 130.
IYS
General meeting, noon, SUB 111.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
General   meeting,   noon,   International   House
lounge.
DEBATING SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CENTRE
T.G.I.F. Christmas card addressing, after 4:30,
St. Mark's College.
BAZAAR
Woodland's Christmas bazaar, 6:30 p.m., 9 E.
Columbia, New West.
SATURDAY
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Guitar class, 12 p.m., SUB 235.
SUNDAY
MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY
Haida artist Robert Davidson speaks, 3 p.m..
Museum of Anthropology.
MONDAY
SUB ART GALLERY
Year of the Child exhibition, 9:30 a.m. to 3:30
p.m., SUB art gallery.
TUESDAY
COALITION FOR A SAFE CAMPUS
General meeting, 1:30 p.m., SUB 130.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, SUB 130.
MY JONG KUNG FU
Practice, 7:30 p.m., SUB 125.
WEDNESDAY
HUMAN RIGHTS IN CHILE
Talk with Chilean woman, noon, SUB 209.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Fat is a feminist issue discussion,  noon,  SUB
115.
HAIR STYLING
FOR MEN & WOMEN
70% DISCOUNT on services
by Terry or Suzanne
offer good until Dec. 22, 1979
ken hippert
hair company ltd.
THURS. OPEN TILL 9 p.m.
For Appointment   |HHHB 5736 University Blvi
Call CHARGEX   (next to the Lucky Dollar
228-1471 ■■■■ in the village)
Two more super stereo buys
that you would expect to find at
-B Commercial Electronics
The ROTEL RX-603
AM/FM Stereo
Receiver
XT
The Cerwin-Vega
R-12 Receiver Saver
two-way (12" woofer) speaker
system beautifully finished in
genuine walnut.
0 0
o o 0
i
50 watts per channel, min. RMS both
channels driven into 8 ohms from 20 to
20,000 Hz with no more than 0.1%
total harmonic distortion.
Just $399
Only a few left
so hurry.
• high efficiency 1 watt will
give you 114 decibels at 1 metre
but will handle 50 watts RMS.
A truly exciting loud speaker
that sounds as good with
classical music as with jazz, big
band or ROCK
A great value at only $499 the pair
WTiile they last
BONUS—save $30—buy
the RX-603 and the R- 12s as a package
and pay only $868
when you bring this ad with you
-I* Commercial Electronics ltd
"Since 1957 only qualify stereo and service"
1305 Burrard St., Vancouver, B.C. tel: 669-5525
As all old Latinos say, "sic transit gloria mundi." Or, all
good things must come to an end. But then again, so must The
Ubyssey. We'll be heading off for exciting fun in the sun (probably under the Burrard Street bridge) after we put out our special Christmas magazine Dec. 7, which just happens to be Pearl
Harbor Day. Look for it.
But in the meantime, tomorrow's paper is the last regular one
of the year. So get your 'tween classes submissions in before
noon today. If you fail in your mission, we won't listen when
y©u;yeir«rt.»s.;\
RIBS    STEAKS    SEAFOODS    RIBS    STEAKS
1 st ANNIVERSARY
IN GASTOWN . . . LEO'S FOB 16 YEARS E;
AW? NOVEMBER SPECIAL    I
SALMON
WHOLE SOLE
STEAK
DINNER
DINNER
DINNER
FOR TWO
FOR TWO
FOR TWO
9-95
9-95
13 95
OPEN 11:30 AM    1 PM SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
PLAN YOUR XMAS CELEBRATION NOW
170 WATER ST., GASTOWN      682-1235
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: Campus - 3 lines, 1 day 91.60; additional lines 35c.
Commercial — 3 tines. 1 day $3.00; additional lines
50c. Additional days $2.75 and 46c.
Classified ads are not accepted try telephone and are payable in advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day Mora publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, SMB., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T 1W5
5 — Coming Events
70 — Services
10 — For Sale — Commercial
FLOWER POWER HONEY here again.
Stop along University Blvd. Get your supply
today. 263-7080.
WORLD'S LARGEST CEDAR? Supernatur-
al Windy Bay posters - $2.00 - Gift Shop
— Museum of Anthropology — Help Support South Moresby Wilderness Preservation.
COMMUNITY SPORTS. Excellent prices for
ice skates, hockey, soccer, jogging and racquet sports equipment. 733-1612. 3615
West Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.
POSTERS, reproductions, photo blowups,
largest selection. The Grin Bin. 3209 West
Broadway, Van. 738-2311. Opposite Super
Valu.
11 — For Sale — Private
FREE large desk to anyone who'll move it.
Phone 228-0714
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER (IBM model D).
Excellent condition. $280.00. Phone evenings 733-9581.
80 — Tutoring
15 — Found
20 — Housing
LEAVING TOWN for Christmas? I would like
to sublet room, suite or apartment in Vancouver for 10-14 days beginning Dec. 22.
Full References. Please write Mark Goetze,
c/o Faculty of Law, University of Victoria,
Victoria, B.C.
25 — Instruction
B.A.    HONS    GRAD    (Cambridgel    offers
private tuition in Med History. Ring Charlie
874-0395
FRENCH SPANISH all levels experienced
tutor beginning January 9, 1980.
Reasonable rates. Phone 261-7853.
DREADING CHRISTMAS EXAMS? Come
find a tutor at Speakeasy's Tutorial Centre.
Located at Speakeasy in SUB. Open Mon-
Fri, 11:30-11:30
85 — Typing
ASSIGNMENTS, reports and theses typed.
Phone Marianne 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. at
430-2314 or after 6:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. at
438-3314.
TYPING IBM selectric corrector. 7 years experience with university papers, theses,
equations, technical etc. 874-6364.
CONFUSED by choosing? Come browse
through Speakeasy's free typing centre
listing most typists on campus. Speakeasy
SUB Mon-Fri 11:30-11:30
READING, EDITING, typing services.
Books, theses, essays, reports, etc. Expert
assistance offerred at reasonable rates.
733-2627.
TYPING SOc per page. Fast and accurate.
Experienced typist. Phone Gordon,
873-8032.
TYPING. Essays, theses, manuscripts,
including technical, equational, reports, letters, resumes. Fast accurate. Bilingual.
Clemy 324-9414.
30 - Jobs
FAST    EFFICIENT
rates. 266-5053.
typing.    Reasonable
35 - Lost
LOST   LADIE'S   gold   bracelet.
Ph. 263-4241 after 6 p.m.
40 — Messages
AGGIE WOMEN — you may be number two
in soccer — but, you are number one to us.
Love Ravers
50 — Rentals
65 - Scandals
HEY GUYS, you should see what Sue looks
like in the morning. Yecch! —Sport
PEARSE, LOVER you can sit on my face any
time. Sorko. P.S. So it's your birthday.
Who cares?  "The Gang"
Reward,     go _ Wanted
99 — Miscellaneous
INSTANT
PASSPORT
PHOTOS
yiCt^'^CAMERAS Ltd.
4538 W. 10th
224-9112 or 224-5858
FALLING SNOW MEANS "SKI TIME"
Check Out The Following Package
TRAK FISH SCALE X-Cross skiisReg.    85.98
MUNARIX-Crossboot Reg.    39.98
VILLOM X-Cross binding Reg.      9.98
BAMBOO X-Cross pole Reg.      7.98
&P 228-0414
SQEES
143.92
Pkg. Price 114.98
LOWER MALL (mounting extra)
STUDENT UNION BUILDING
"Across from the Pit" Thursday, November 29,1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
TODAY
Men's rugby
UBC vs. UVic,
12:30 p.m., stadium
Men's ice hockey
UBC vs. Delta, 8 p.m..
Sun God arena
FRIDAY
Women's basketball
Thunderette invitational,
3 p.m. on, mem gym
UBC vs. Eastern Washington,
9 p.m.
Men's basketball
UBC at UVic invitational
Women's volleyball
UBC at BCVA tournament,
all day, Simon Fraser
SATURDAY
Swimming
UBC at UVic, 7 p.m.
Women's basketball
Thunderette invitational,
3 p.m. on, mem gym
Women's volleyball
UBC at BCVA tournament,
all day, Simon Fraser
Women's gymnastics
UBC vs. Seattle and Idaho,
Gym G, 1 p.m.
Women's field hockey
UBC vs. Lomas, 2:30 p.m.,
Tisdall park
Men's basketball
UBC at UVic tournament,    •
JV's at Trinity Western
SUNDAY
Women's soccer
UBC vs. Richmond, 10 a.m.,
Maclnnes field
Women's ice hockey
UBC vs. Burnaby "A,"
4:45 p.m., winter sports centre
Women's basketball
Thunderette invitational
8:30 a.m. on, mem gym
And in udder
norts spews
That's it for the fall term, folks,
as the sports department crawls off
to Buchanan tower to beg
forgiveness and extensions from
various and sundry profs.
However, there will still be plenty
of sports activity for your enjoyment while you suffer through exams.
«
Two games should highlight your
holiday season, both just before
you come back for another horrible
four months. The Thunderbird
basketball team will meet Simon
Fraser on January 5 at the Simon
Fraser gymnasium in what promises
to be an exciting game. On the same
night a combined squad from the
UBC and Saskatchewan ice hockey
team will meet the Canadian Olympic team at the winter sports centre.
Game time is 8 p.m.
CLOTHING BOUGHT
OR SOLD
ON CONSIGNMENT
• clothes   for   college   and   other
casion
• "Retto" styles a specialty
• Emphasis on natural fabrics
"Vour Campus Clothing Centre
1pm - 6pm Closed Monday
PENNY PINCHERS
2621 Alma 224-7115
Upcoming
Men's wrestling
UBC at Olympia
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 5
Men's ice hockey
UBC at Kamloops
THURSDAY, DECEMBERS
Men's ice hockey
UBC at Quesnel
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7
UBC at Prince George
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 21
Men's basketball
UBC vs. Lewis and Clark,
8:30 p.m., mem gym
Men's ice hockey
UBC at Kamloops
SATURDAY. DECEMBER 22
Men's basketball
UBC vs. Lewis and Clark,
8:30 p.m., mem gym
Men's ice hockey
UBC at Kamloops
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 27
Men's basketball
UBC at Wesmen classic,
Winnipeg
SATURDAY, JANUARY 5
Men's basketball
UBC vs. Simon Fraser
8 p.m., SFU gym
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
6882481
m) optic
ZONE
Student Discounts
ARBUTUS VILLAGE
733-1722
N0RRES
** MOVING AND feE
SI TRANSFER LTD. J—
"STORAGE
Big or
Small Jobs?
Reasonable
Rates
2060 W. lOthi
Vancouver
734-5535
Eve. and Holidays 732-9898
Also Garages. Basements. Yards
CLEAN-UPS
RECREATION U.B.C. CLASSES
Class                                                 Day                                      Time                                  Place
1980
Starting Date
Social Dancing
-learn the new steps
and the old jive steps
Thurs.
7:00-8:30 p.m.
Gym E
January 10
Modern Dance
Mon.
Tues. & Thurs.
Wed.
5:00- 7:00 p.m.
1:30-3:00 p.m.
7:00-9:00 p.m.
Room 208
Armoury
January 7
Jazz Dance
Thurs.
12:30- 1:30 p.m.
Gym E
January 10
Dyna-Fit
-exercise to popular music
Mon. Wed. & Fri.
6:30 - 7:30 p.m.
Gym B
January 14
Gymnastics
Mon. Wed. Fri
& Sun
7:00 - 9:00 p.m.
Gym G
January 7
Karate
Thurs.
Sun.
7:00 - 9:00 p.m.
10:30 -12:30 p.m.
Gym E
January 10
Faculty and Staff
Exercise Class
Mon. Wed. & Fri.
12:30-1:05 p.m.
Gym E
January 14
Women's Self Defence
Tues.
7:00 - 9:00 p.m.
Gym E
January 8
Yoga
•      Mon. & Wed.
4:30- 6:00 p.m.
Room 211-213
January 14
Tennis
-for beginners and
intermediate players
Mon. Tues.
Wed. & Fri.
12:30-1:15
Armoury
January 14
For Advanced Players
Mon. Tues. & Thurs.
8:30 - 10:30 p.m.
Armoury
January 14
Badminton
-for beginners
Mon. & Thurs.
11:30 a.m. -12:15
War Memorial Gym
January 14
Ice Skating
-basic and elementary
figure skating
Tues. Wed. & Fri.
11:45 am-12:30 pm
Winter Sports
Centre - Main
Rink
January 15
Fitness and Weight
Training
Mon. Wed. & Fri.
3:30 - 5:30 p.m.
Weight Room
War Memorial
Gym
January 7
Registration commences December 3, 1979 at Room
in the Fall classes must register again for the above
203, War Memorial Gymnasium. Those presently registered
INTRODUCING...
Spumante
Bambino
Light,white, just right!
Try this delicious wine served
well chilled as champagne.
You'll like it!
50 YEARS OF FINE WINES Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 29,1979
Facing the threat of a paper chase
By HELEN Z1LLE
JOHANNESBURG — Most South
African newspapers carry a regular column on Saturday mornings — a list of
the books, films, posters, pamphlets,
and magazines banned that week.
The number of titles on the list almost
always is in double figures. The banned
works are a jumble of literary and
academic books, pornography, art,
political tracts, and — almost invariably
— a student publication.
Norman Manoim, president of the
student representative council at the
University of the Witwatersrand and immediate past editor of the campus
newspaper, the Wits Student, believes
that, despite its sharp criticism of the
government, the English-language commercial press has remained within the
official limits on debate.
"The commerical press has always left
a gap, a void of facts, information, and
analysis," Manoim said in an interview.
"In the student press, we have found
that when we begin to fill that gap or
move into the void of sensitive areas, we
have encountered resistance."
The student press has taken a leading
role in political debate in South Africa
and has often defined issues long before
they surfaced in the society at large or in
the commerical press. Yet students deny
that their press is at the forefront of
change in South Africa.
"Nothing is farther from the truth,"
said Manoim. "Our publications stop at
a level of providing a critical analysis of
the South African political economy and
of confronting issues as they arise.
"Our aim is to encourage our readers
to think rigorously and analytically, and
this is threatening to the aims of the ruling class."
But the crackdown on the student
press did not begin with political issues.
The campaign began in 1972 when the
government acted against Mark
Douglas-Home, then editor of the Wits
Student. Douglas-Home, a nephew of
the former British prime minister Sir
Alexander Douglas-Home, published a
photograph of a small child peering into
a lavatory saying, "Excuse me, are you
our prime minister?"
A public outcry followed, and the
matter was debated in the South African
parliament. Douglas-Home, a .British
subject, was denied a renewal of his
residence permit and ordered to leave
the country.
With the.passage of the Publications
Act, the banning of student publications
increased, primarily because they were
moving into "undesirable" political territory.
Students were the first group of whites
in South Africa to come to terms with
the philosophy of black consciousness
and to redefine their role as whites in opposition. Many turned their backs on
liberalism and the politics of protest,
and accept the notion that blacks would
take over the leading role in opposing
the government.
The student press operating at South
Africa's five English-language universities has been one of the major targets
of the country's all embracing censorship law, the Publications Act.
Since the act took effect in 1975, 235
student publications have been banned,
134 of them in the last two years.
A ban may be ordered by any one of
the committees in the country-wide network that forms the base of South
Africa's censorship system. These committees act on "complaints" from
anonymous members of the public and
decide whether the publication is
"undesirable."
Their yardstick is a far-ranging list of
vaguely defined "crimes" that include
blasphemy, indecency, obscenity, and
endangering the safety of the state. A
committee has the power to ban a
publication in any of three ways:
•    It    can    simply    declare    it
"undesirable", prohibiting its distribution. Since 1975, 167 student publications have been found undesirable.
• It can find it "strongly objectionable" and forbid people to possess
it. The law requires any person owning a
copy of the publication to destroy it or
face criminal charges. Since 1975, 60
student publications have been banned
under this provision.
• It can ban a publication permanently, a step known euphemistically
as "banning for all future editions."
The law empowers a committee to take
this step if "in its opinion, every subsequent edition is likely to be
undesirable." Eight student publications
— more than any other kind — have met
this fate.
Until recently, permanent banning
was used only to eradicate publications
of small campus political societies or
labor organizations. But in May of this
year the permanent ban was invoked to
shut down two official student publications — Varsity, the student newspaper
at the University of Cape Town, and National Student, an inter-campus publication of the National Union of South
African Students.
The final Varsity issue: banned for listing war deaths
The student publishers of the
newspapers could not appeal to South
Africa's supreme court, but only to a
publications-appeal board, an organization boycotted by most opponents of
censorship.
Journalists and students agree that of
all the media in South Africa, the student press has suffered most from
government censorship.
Many students concluded that there
would be no fundamental change so
long as South Africa remained a
capitalist economy, which they said
would entrench and protect white
privilege.
The student press also became the
forum for debate on conscientious objection to the draft and boycotts of
South Africa by overseas companies —
two of the most contentious issues in
South Africa. The commercial press has
avoided those topics because it is against
the law to advocate either.
After 1975, magazines sprang up on
English-language campuses to debate
such ideas. All were permanently banned.
But the real jolt to student leaders
came with last spring's banning of the
Varsity at the University of Cape Town.
The action came after the paper published a list of South African soldiers who
had died fighting in the guerrilla war on
the border between Namibia and
Angola.
Vernon Matzopolous, editor of the
paper at the time it was banned,
predicted that the student press would
continue to face harassment. "There is
no way the student voice will be silenced.
We will just bring out new publications
to fill the void," he said.
Another student leader at Cape Town
said: "We will continue to explore alternatives because we view it as our right to
do so. Until the government crushes us
completely, we will continue to exercise
that right."
At this stage students have not planned a long-term strategy to deal with the
threat of censorship.
"It is important that student editors
work out something in order to maintain
their commitment to social, political and
economic justice," said Norman
Manoim of Witwatersrand. "If they
don't, it will be easy to slide into the
escapism of the counterculture."
Helen Ville wrdte this article for the
Chronicle of Higher Education, and it
has been distributed by Canadian
University Press, the national
cooperative of 60 student newspapers.

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