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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Nov 3, 1978

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Array Federal cutbacks recalled
OTTAWA (CUP) — The federal government has cancelled plans to cut its funding
for post-secondary education and health,
finance minister Jean Chretien announced
Thursday.
Speaking at the end of a finance ministers'
conference here, Chretien said the federal
government was forced to cancel the cuts
after the provinces would not allow them.
The cuts would have come from the
Established Programs Financing Agreement,
under which the federal government makes
unconditional payments to the provinces for
health and post-secondary education.
The payments are partially in cash and
partially in tax points and are expected to
amount to $4.5 billion this year.
Chretien had proposed cutting $164.5
million from next year's payments.
The agreement will run until 1982, and the
federal government has agreed not to change
it until then without the consent of the
provinces. Since the provinces refused their
Education, health funds spared
consent, Chretien said, the federal government could not go ahead with its proposed
cuts.
The provinces did recognize the need to
moderate spending and did agree the federal
government would have to cut transfer
payments to the provinces to do so, he said.
"But no one wants to be affected."
Chretien said the federal government
"won't force" the cutbacks on the
provinces, but would take the money from
other areas. He mentioned the department of
health and welfare as one area, but was not
specific.
The government will also postpone the
introduction of a bill to change the method
of transferring special service funding to the
provinces, because no decision was reached
on EPF changes, he said.
The bill would have changed the present
cost-shared social service program to an
unconditional payment similar to the
program financing agreement.
Pat Gibson, National Union of Students
executive secretary, said she was encouraged
by the cancellation.
"Obviously, we're pleased that the
provinces took a stand that favored at least
the retention of not only post-secondary
education but health priorities as well."
She said the announcement would not
have a large effect on the anti-cutbacks
campaign being waged by NUS, which was
heavily based on opposing federal cutbacks.
Gibson said NUS had already been opposed to EPF even before the cuts were
announced in September, because it does not
encourage provincial governments to fund
education and health.
The  agreement  encourages  cutbacks  in
social service funding because it is an unconditional rather than a shared-cost
program, she said. The provinces do not
have to spend the money they receive under
EPF on education and health, but can
cutback those programs to use the funds in
other areas, she added.
"The immediate threat is gone, but that
won't solve the problem at the federal level."
The EPF cuts were first announced Sept. 8
as part of the federal government's restraint
program. Under the proposal Chretien
presented to the provinces, their rate of
increase would have been reduced to 14.1 per
cent from a projected 17.8 per cent for next
year.
Chretien said the provinces agreed to
reduce the increase in equalization payments
to have-not provinces to 10 per cent next year
by removing energy and resource revenues
from the calculations. If these had not been
removed, he said, Ontario would have
shortly qualified for equalization payments.
THE UBYSSEY
Vcl. LXI, No. 23 VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1978
228-2301
Feds, Bennett
butting heads
By GEOF WHEELWRIGHT
The federal government is
making unilateral decisions in
matters of provincial concern and
causing problems in provincial
resource management, B.C.
premier Bill Bennett said Thursday.
Bennett, who recently returned
from the federal-provincial first
ministers conference in Ottawa,
told about 300 people at a resource
management conference that
federal intervention has caused
problems in developing a coordinated resource policy towards
B.C.'s fishing industry.
"The new fisheries act is oriented
to a single resource and is out of
step with multiple resource use
essential to the development of a
healthy economy in British
Columbia," he said.
"When all factors have been
considered in the provincial interest
and a balanced approach adopted,
we face intervention at the federal
level," he added.
Bennett,     speaking    at    the
Bayshore Inn, said there is an
overlapping of provincial and
federal fishery regulations and he
hopes to end duplication of services
in the industry. Both the federal
and provincial governments are
trying to do a good job independently of one another, he
said.
Bennett said a general resource
management policy is needed to
provide jobs, ecreation and
preserve the environment.
He added that the government
will eliminate eleborate referral
systems where they are not needed,
eliminate the need for Victoria's
approval on some land-use permits
and re-examine the whole resource
management procedure.
Bennett cited the development of
the northwest coal area as an
examply of his new resource
management policies' effectiveness.
"Development will proceed in
this region with full and careful
attention being given to all aspects
of public interest," he said.
Work programs
get student jobs
—peter menyasz photo
ANIMAL HOUSE ESCAPEE tries to call for help and return to reality after brush with fantasy world of
Sigma Poo-Poo Dilly Wah Umma Gumma Do Wop fraternity. Victim of "silly pledge" by one of many
funny letters groups, who hold parties in sheets and use secret handshakes that resemble obscene
European street gestures, later decided that frat rats idea of good time was Greek to him and joined
frat's ladies auxiliary sorority.
By JULIE WHEELWRIGHT
Do you wake up at night in a cold
sweat, afraid of a jobless future?
If so, the new cooperative
education and internship programs
at UBC may be the answer to your
prayers.
The education program is
designed to provide summer job
placements for first year students
entering the faculties of engineering
and forestry. It helps students test
their career objectives and provides
an opportunity to learn new skills.
Designed by the Women
Students' Office, the program is
meant to encourage women to enter
Happy Hungarians burn both ends of candle
By DOUG TODD
In Hungary women are crucial
members of the working force and
equality means taking part in
production, an editor of
a Hungarian women's journal
said Thursday.
"In a socialist country the role
of the woman is very different.
We do not fight against government because they are our
strongest ally,"Anna Foldes,
^ditor  of Budapest's   Women's
Journal, told about 45 people in
Buchanan 205.
"Our goal is to be a
homemaker as well as someone
who has a part in production,"
she said. Sometimes we complain
about our dual roles but if our
candle is burning at both ends then
we are having double the pleasure
in career and family life."
Foldes said women can get 20
jobs after an hour of employment
searching in Hungary.
"There is a great shortage in the
labor   force   in   Hungary.   But
women have got the idea and the
opportunity to work. Ninety per
cent of women in Budapest are
working."
But even with most women
working in Hungary, Foldes said
the double burden causes
problems.
"In engineering, for example, a
woman has to work twice as hard
as a man to be equal. When he is
peaking his career after 10 years,
she is just starting her career
because she has had two children
to raise."
Foldes said the shortage of
people in the labor force creates
domestic problems.
"Men are not encouraged to be
homemakers because they're
needed to work."
But homemakers are supported
by the government in Hungary,
Foldes said.
"We are very proud of our
child care allowance. It is the best
in the world. Pregnant women get
five months osf work at 100 per
cent   salary. >
traditionally male dominated fields,
according to cooperative education
program coordinator Maryke
Gilmore.
"As students in engineering it's
hard to be one of four women in a
class of 1,200" she says.
The program combines study and
practical work experience and
allows students to discover their
possible future lifestyle.
"How can you know what it
means to be an engineer or a
forestor until you've had some
practical experience in that field,"
says Gilmore.
Former UBC dean of women
Margaret Fulton started the
program last year because of the
lack of women in non-traditional
fields. A federal government grant
was awarded and the pilot project
was launched after Fulton had
consulted, the deans of several
faculties.
Gilmore says the results of last
summer's program are promising.
"All the women who took part in
the program were invited back for
next summer. Out of nine women in
engineering seven remained in the
faculty, and two remained in
second year applied science" she
says. "In forestry, four returned to
the faculty and one entered land-
See page 3: JOB Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 3, 1978
'Tween classes
-¥--¥-■¥■-¥•
TODAY
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Guest speaker Marthe Page from Laval University visits, noon, International House, upper
lounge.
DEBATING SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, SUB 211.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Free disco, light show, 9 p.m., International
House.
UBC HANG-GLIDING CLUB
Meeting, slide show, noon, SUB 111.
SLAVONIC STUDIES DEPARTMENT
J. P. Himka speaks on Priests and Peasants: The
Greek Catholic Pastor and the Ukrainian National
Movement, 1867 to 1900, noon, Buchanan 2244.
CSA
Mandarin class, noon, Angus 221.
Match box
TODAY
WOMEN'S BASKETBALL
UBC vs. game, 6:30 p.m.. War Memorial Gym.
MEN'S ICE HOCKEY
'Birds meet Calgary, 7:30 p.m., winter sports
centre.
MEN'S BASKETBALL
UBC vs. Alumni, 8:30 p.m.. War Memorial Gym.
SATURDAY
FOOTBALL
Western playoff with Calgary, 1 p.m., Thunderbird Stadium.
MEN'S ICE HOCKEY
'Birds   play   Calgary,   7:X   p.m.,   Thunderbird
Stadium.
MEN'S BASKETBALL
'Birds   play   Good   Times,   8:30   p.m..    War
Memorial Gym.
SUNDAY
WOMEN'S SOCCER
Thunderettes play Edmonds, 10 a.m.
NEWMAN CLUB
Shared prayer, noon, St. Mark's College.
YOUNG ALUMNI CLUB
Happy hour, 4 p.m., Cecil Green Park.
UBC SKYDIVING CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 212.
SATURDAY
AMS ART GALLERY COMMITTEE
Student artwork for display will be judged, 10
a.m., SUB 207.
MUSSOC
Potluck pre-cabaret dinner, 7:30 p.m., SUB 215.
SUNDAY
NORMAN BETHUNE CLUB
Meeting to celebrate second anniversary of
Seventh Congress of the Party of Labor of
Albania, 7 p.m., SUB 205.
MONDAY
CUSO
CUSO field staff officer Chris Bryant from Papua
New Guinea speaks, 7:30 p.m., International
House upper lounge.
FOLKDANCERS
International dancing and instructions, 7 p.m.,
Oberthan Cultural Centre, 2nd and Trimble.
CSA
Mandarin class, noon, Angus 221.
DISTINGUISHED SPEAKERS' SERIES
Peguis School Board superintendent Bill Thomas
speaks on Teacher Education and Adult Training
Programs for the Native Indians Population,
noon, Scarfe Auditorium room 100.
NEWMAN CLUB
Bible study, noon, St. Mark's College first floor.
TUESDAY
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
Supper, Know Your Campus scavenger hunt, 6
p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
SF CLUB
Genecal meeting, noon, SUB 210.
CSA
Sports night, 7:30 p.m., Thunderbird Sports
Complex gym A.
UBC PROGRESSIVE
CONSERVATIVE CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 205.
HOCKEY
THUNDERBIRD STYLE
UBC vs CALGARY
FRI. & SAT. NOV. 3-4—7:30 P.M.
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
STUDENTS FREE ADMISSION
LAND AND PEOPLE
— with Bernard Daly
Researcher for the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops
Nov. 3—12:30, SUB 207/209
Bernard Daly—General Perspectives on Canadian Society
—7:30 P.M., Lutheran Campus Centre
open discussion (coffee available)
Nov. 4—9:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M., Lutheran Campus Centre
further presentation and discussion with Mr. Daly interest
groups
(lunch available at minimal cost)
Sponsored by:
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
CO-OPERATIVE CHRISTIAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
ST. MARK'S COLLEGE
A SPECIAL CHALLENGE
IN CHILD WELFARE
Therapeutic foster parents for
children ages 50 to 16 years required in Vancouver. These
children present a wide range of
emotional and behavioural problems. Therapeutic foster parents
should have experience and
proven skill in working 'with
children. Contracts may be for 3
months or longer depending on
child's needs. Fee for service is
$900 plus room and board and
clothing, plus.
WEDNESDAY
ALMA MATER SOCIETY
An all candidates meeting for parks board can-'
didates, noon, SUB conversation pit.
ITALO-CANADIAN STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION
Tony   Parsons   from    BCTV   speaks,    noon,
Buchanan 352.
PUBLIC
^F'Wmf
22S-6121
'Jm^MmfMmTmP*
S/L
MiUwQ
FRI. & SAT.
j&
7:30 p.m. - 9:45   p.m.
SUNDAY
^^jmM
1:00 — 3:00 p.m.
%w
STUDENTS
& CHILDREN    .75
f/A
ADULTS           ^,25
I)    I
THUNDERBIRD
V r   ■
WINTER
SPORTS CENTRE
NORRES
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DO TRANSFER LID. I-
ISTORAGE
Big or
Small Jobs
Reasonable
Rates
2060 W. 10th
Vancouver
732-9898
ALSO GARAGES.
BASEMENTS & YARDS
CLEAN-UPS
.
THUNDERBIRD
SPORTS THIS WEEK
FRIDAY — NOV. 3
* ICE HOCKEY — 7:30 p.m.
'Birds vs Un. of Calgary "Dinosaurs"
* BASKETBALL — 8:30 p.m.
'Birds vs Grads
SATURDAY — NOV. 4
* FOOTBALL — 1:00 p.m.
'Birds vs Un. of
Calgary "Dinosaurs"
W.I.F.L. PLAYOFF
* ICE HOCKEY — 7:30 p.m.
'Birds vs Un. of Calgary "Dinosaurs"
* BASKETBALL — 8:30 p.m.
'Birds vs Sr. "A" Goodtimes
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: Student - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c.
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $2.75; additional lines 50c. Additional days $2.50 and 45c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable m advance.
Deadline is 11:30a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Officer Room 241. S.U.B., UBC. Van., B.C. V6T 1W5.   :
5 — Coming Events
INTERNATIONAL
HOUSE
TONIGHT
FREE  DISCO  AND  LIGHT  SHOW
Everyone Welcome — Friday, 9 pjn.
SEMINAR
By Dr.  John-Paul Himka
University of Alberta on
"Western Ukraine On The  Eva
Of The First Emigration."
Friday, Nov. 3, 8:00 p.m.  Room 157,
Law Bldg.
The Vancouver Institute
Free Public Lecture
"JAPANESE MUSIC: TRADITIONAL
AND MODERN"
A lecture-demonstration on Japanese
music by Prof. Allen Gates, music
department head at Clark College
in Vancouver, Wash., and his wife,
Yoko. Mrs. Gates will use Japanese
musical instruments to illustrate the
talk.
Saturday, November 4, at 8:15 p.m.,
Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Building
r    SAVE MONEY  ^
ON SPEAKERS
Before you buy any other speaker drop in and
listen to our great LAB series of speakers at
unbeatable prices or for even greater savings
you can assemble them yourself with our easy
step by step instructions. We supply plans for
the home builder or choose from one of our
seven famous SPEAKERLAB KITS. 50 to 250
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SAVE MONEY ON STEREOS
Best prices on Akai. Sansui. Rotel, Dual, Ken-
wood, Sherwood, Scott, Electrovoice, Altec.
SAVE MONEY ON REPAIRS
Specializing   in   speaker   repairs,   tape
recorders, turntables, tuners and amps.
Additional discounts with student cards
Open Nightly Till 8:00 p.m.
SPEAKERLAB
1 835 WEST 4th AVE.
CORNER OF BURRARD & 4TH
734-2823 — 734-4534 i
11 — For Sale — Private
1973 COMET MAVERICK, 6 cyl. stand-
ard. 59,000. Sadials, reliable trans,
sacrifice $900 firm. Days and weekends.  669-8861.
1971 MAZDA 1200. Buns good $400.
Phone   734-3096.
85 — Typing
PROFESSIONAL TYPING — IBM Selectric. Essays, theses, etc. Standard
rates. Kits area. Phone Lynda, 732-
064ff.
TYPING — 75c per page. Fast and accurate by experienced typist. Gordon,
685-4863.
TYPING: Essays, theses, manuscripts,
reports, resumes, etc. Fast and accurate service. Bilingual. Clemy, 324-9414.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING -
IBM Selectric.   254-8365.
Correcting
FAST,     efficient
rates. 266-5053.
typing.    Reasonable
10 — For Sale — Commercial
COMMUNITY SPORTS. Excellent prices
for ice skates, hockey, soccer, jogging
and racquet sports equipment. 733-
1612, 3615 West Broadway, Vancouver,
B.C.
(at Alma) 734-501
FED UP WITH THE BUS? Try cheap,
fun tptn. Moped. 200 m.p.g. No special
licence needed. $300. 228-0310.
25 — Instruction
CLASSICAL GUITAR lessons with professional musician. Studied with A.
Lagoya, L. Brower. All levels. 261-
1427.
VIOLIN LESSONS all levels. Professional violinst trained at McGill University. Studied with Heifetz protege. 261-
1427.
35 - Lost
LOST — Gold charm bracelet between
Faculty Club and Gage, Friday afternoon. Reward offered. Phone 224-9203
evenings.
30-Jobs
DICTA TYPIST required for specialists
office in Fairmont Building. Approx.
2 hours per day. Hours and wages
negotiable.  Call 873-4142.
ACCOUNTING STUDENT for daily posting part time. Mrs. Clark, phone days,
684-3941.
65 — Scandals
LOST — MY JOCK STRAP in the back
row of SUB theatre while watching
"SLAP SHOT" last night.
TYPING of essays,  thesis, etc.   Phone,
263-8506.
99 — Miscellaneous
INSTANT
PASSPOR1
PHOTOS
S*^4f£LLTD,
*^ 4558 W 10th
224-9112 or 224-5858.
EUROPE — Camping and hotel tours
from 8 days to 9 weeks. AFRICA —
Overland Expeditions London/Nairobi
13 weeks, Lond.011 Johnnesburg le
weeks. KENYA Safaris — 2 and 3
weeks. For brochures contact Tracks
Travel, Suite 300, 562 Eglinrton Ave.
East, Toronto, Oat. M4P 1B9.
ST. MARY  LAKE  RESORT — Come to
Salt Spring Island for a relaxing study
break. Cosy fireplaces, wall to wall
carpets and a quiet restful (no TV or
telephones) atmosphere. Nearby golf
and tennis if the books become too
much. Write or phone: Sit. Mary Lake
Resort, RR No. 1 Ganges, B.C. VOS
1EO. <112)  537-2832.	
ur=ir=ir=iP=ir=ii=ir=ii=Jf=ir=ir=
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
TO SELL - BUY
INFORM
=11=11=1 r=a 1=1 r=ir=ir=Jr=sir=ii=it Friday, November 3, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Page
'Volrich places gays with pimps'
By GEOF WHEELWRIGHT
Gay people in Vancouver realize
"public sex is a no-no", but still
find themselves lumped in with
"pimps, prostitutes, and other
undesirables" by members of
Vancouver's civic government, a
gay rights spokeswoman said
Thursday.
Jan McFadden, chairwoman of
the Society for Education, Action,
Research and Counselling on
Homosexuality, said Vancouver
mayor Jack Volrich, and some
aldermen associate homosexuals
with unusual and illegal sexual
behavior.
But mayoral candidate May
Brown and aldermanic candidates
Harry Rankin, Mike Harcourt and
Darlene Marzari have supported
the gay rights movement, she told
about 25 people in SUB 212.
SEARCH has been talking to
civic election candidates to
determine their views on
homosexuality. The society supports the ward system and hopes a
gay alderman will win a post in the
future, she said.
Balloting will be held Nov. 15 for
Vancouver mayorial, aldermanic
and school and parks board
positions.
She said Harcourt, Rankin,
Marzari and Brown are overworked
in dealing with social problems and
added more socially conscious
aldermen are needed at City Hall.
Alderman   Bernice   Gerard   is
Job program
gives women
opportunity
From page 1
scape architecture at the University
of Manitoba."
The pilot project was originally a
program only for women but now
includes men. Eligible students
must be full-time students with a 70
per cent academic average who fill
requirements to enter their desired
faculty.
During the placement selection,
students' skills and interests are
scrutinized and eligible students are
selected. Each student then interviews three employers and is in
turn interviewed by perspective
bosses.
Cooperative advisors and the
program coordinator make
recommendations to the students
and employers. Students are then
selected for work placement but are
under no obligation to accept
available positions.
During their work term students
are employed in various companies
throughout B.C. Advisors visit
them twice and ask for a work
report.
The Women Students' Office
also sponsors an internship
program designed to give fourth
year students part-time practical
work experience. Students are not
paid but gain work experience in
return for their services. The internship program consists of career
counselling workshops, a panel
discussion and actual work experience.
Gilmore says the program is
designed for fourth year female
students in the faculty of arts since
these women need the greatest help
in planning their careers and
assessing their skills.
Diane Waterman, the program's
assistant coordinator, outlines the
need for programs to help women
plan their careers.
"Traditionally women haven't
been brought up to think in terms
of a career," she says.
concerned about human rights and
did not wish to be linked to the
"Anita Bryant petition," which she
signed because it mentioned child
abuse, McFadden said.
McFadden   said   Gerard   takes
exception to gay teachers who she
believes should not be allowed to
teach children about gay lifestyles.
SEARCH is also involved in
social services for the gay community, which includes consultation with police, and civic and
federal officials on gay problems,
she said.
Other gay action groups, like the
Gay Alliance Towards Equality,
prefer making demands and frown
on SEARCH'S method of reform
through  negotiation,   she   added.
"We ain't moved any mountain!,
lately, but we're chipping away at
things."
McFadden said she was also i.
member of the Society for Politica i
Action for Gay People, which
lobbies politicians on gay issues
m**
UBC RUNNING BACK Gord Penn looks for yardage in 19-2 win over
Golden Bears on the weekend. But by end of game 'Birds were already
looking ahead to Western Intercollegiate Football League playoff final
Saturday at 1 p.m. Calgary, rated fourth nationally, will send its 35 finest
—peter menyasz photc
out on the Thunderbird Stadium turf to test the third-rate 'Birds in what
looms as a classic clash. Winner hosts national Semi-Final Bowl the following Saturday. Dig it.
Brown bandying band-aid solutions
Society must endorse amendments to pornography,
prostitution, abortion and assault
laws, NDP MLA Rosemary Brown
said Wednesday.
"These changes may be band-
aids at best, but they are band-aids
we need now — band-aids to at
least stop the bleeding until the cure
can take effect," Brown told
delegates to the International
Council of Social Democratic
Women convention at the Hyatt
Regency Hotel.
Brown said pornography causes
people to commit violence against
women and is a painful and difficult issue to deal with in society.
"Women see and sense the
underlying violence and exploitation inherent in pornography," she said. "But it is
condoned and protected even by
those among us who would fight to
the death to protect the civil
liberties of racial, ethnic, religious
and other victimized groups in our
society."
Brown said pornography singles
out women and evokes deep hatred
in its presentation.
"Pornography is the language of
hate so profound that our society
no longer permits it to be used
against any other group, racial,
religious or class, only against
women and against female
children."
Brown said wife beating is
another serious problem currently
facing women. Last July, family
service agencies referred 428
women in Vancouver to Transition
House, a shelter for battered
women and their children, she said.
Western society's legal system
does not recognize spouse rape as a
crime and so in effect supports
rape, said Brown. She said
Canadian laws include abortion in
the Criminal Code, protect pornography and deal harshly with
prostitutes but leniently with their
clients.
Brown asked delegates to
recognize the need for transition
houses, daycare centres and rape
relief services.
This year's conference theme is
Violence in Society with women
delegates from socialist parties in
Western Europe, Israel, Japan and
some third-world countries.
Delegates discussed violence in the
family, among social groups and
the need for disarmament.
Norwegian 'delegate Marianne
Laxen said she thought women
should not enter the armed forces.
"The idea of women in the army
is the most insane proposal about
equality between the sexes I have
heard," she said. "We, as
socialists, work for disarmament of
men   not   for   rearmament   of
women.
The two-day conference is a
prelude to the Socialist International gathering which begins
today and runs until Sunday, with
socialist leaders from around the
world attending. The ICSDW is a
sister organization of the International Socialists and meets
every year.
Former West Gerrrlan chancellor
Willy   Brandt    is   the    curreni:
president    of   the   Socialist    In
ternational and federal NDP leader
Ed Broadbent is on the executive
'Strike talks unExpressive'
Negotiations between Pacific Press and the striking
Newspaper Guild are at a standstill, guild president
Phil Needham said Thursday.
"There's been no change in the situation," he said.
But Vancouver Sun publisher Clark Davey said he is
hopeful the strike, which has shut down the Sun and
the Province, will end soon.
Guild leaders say the main issue for them is a move
by Pacific Press, which publishes both papers, to
exclude some editorial personnel from guild membership, but Davey claimed that exclusions are not an
issue worth striking over.
"The company is flexible on the subject," he said.
The Vancouver Printing Pressman's Union is also
on strike. The pressmen are fighting the company over
the number of workers needed to man the presses as
technological changes are introduced. Four other
Pacific Press unions have been locked out in the
dispute.
Meanwhile, an unexpected flood of advertisements
has left the staff at The Express, an alternate
newspaper published by the Newspaper Guild and the
pressman's union for the duration of their strike
against Pacific Press, disorganized but happy.
"We have more ads than we anticipated," Express
advertising manager Jack Calder said Thursday.
"The response has been very encouraging."
Calder said The Express has advertising commitments for future issues from many downtown
stores. He declined to name any of them but added
that he did not initially expect these stores to advertise
in The Express.
Calder said the advertising office has only been in
operation since Wednesday and as a result they are
swamped with work.
"We cut our deadlines pretty tight," he added.
He said the advertising staff was optimistic despite
the heavy workload.
"It's a very happy crew."
The Express is publishing 100,000 copies, which will
be distributed on the North Shore and in Burnaby, ir
addition to Vancouver, said Calder.
"We want to cover as much of the Lower Mainland
as possible," he said.
He said the paper is being distributed to major
shopping areas and bus turnarounds by Express
staffers who live in the areas concerned.
Express reporter Chris Gainor said he is negotiating
with the Alma Mater Society to sell The Express at th*
SUB information kiosk. He said if the paper is not for
sale at the information kiosk today, union member;;
will sell it on campus. Pagt 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 3, 1978
Fever chills
At the beginning of this year we said the Alma Mater Society
was in serious trouble. Well things have gone from bad to
worse.
Although the society's financial picture looked bleak in
September there was still hope it could be rescued. Those hopes
were given a serious setback last week with the defeat of the fee
referendum by a coalition of professional faculties, including
law, agriculture, forestry and engineering.
Whether AMS finance director Glenn Wong will be able to
rescue a society with a death wish next term when another
referendum is introduced is debatable but the close vote last
time allows some room for optimism.
But money problems are not the only concerns of the AMS
now. It is also afflicted with a leadership that has become
thoroughly infected with constitution fever.
Since engineering undergraduate society president Brian
Short introduced a new constitution early this term AMS
politicos have talked about little else.
Several other constitutional proposals were quickly drafted
and students have been treated to a rare spectacle of proposals,
counter-proposals, compromises, charges of back-stabbing and
the most boring copy this paper has had to print in a long time.
The energies of almost everyone involved in student politics
have been drained by this intricate form of navel gazing, allowing problems of more pressing concern to go by untended.
Enough with the constitution proposals. Either solve the constitutional impasse quickly or drop the subject entirely and get
on with the business of UBC students.
Letters
'Brother Tieleman defends greed9
Mr. Bill Tieleman's freestyle
column — "Unions lose. Why?"
overlooks the central factor in the
current public backlash against the
trade union movement. By
dismissing the argument that the
public is "fed up" with service
disruptions as being "superficial"
he misses the real truth of the
situation. It is precisely because
people are "fed up" with the
arrogance and greed of unionists
that they have no objections to
seeing some action taken to curb
same.
Canadians may be ignorant of
the original role of trade unions but
they are not ignorant of the "I'm
alright, Jack" fat cat attitudes of so
many unionized workers and their
leaders. Is there anyone living in
Canada above the age of 16 who
has not heard some union worker
bragging about:
1) The little work he/she has to
do at work.
2) The sizeable amount he/she
gets for doing said little work.
3) How he/she told the boss to
fuck off because there's no way
he/she can be fired anyway.
4) How,   come   contract   time,
they (the union workers) better get
what they want — or else.
This is the picture most
Canadians have of the unionized
worker. Constant strikes, or threats
to strike, do nothing to improve
this picture. Nor does the
knowledge that the jobs being done
could, for the most part, be performed by any village idiot or well'
trained chimpanzee. Is it really any
wonder that people are "fed up?"
Mr. Tieleman is right when he
talks about the dangers of union
repression; of the denial of the
basic right to strike. However, the
answer is not to blame the public but
rather to put the blame where it
belongs: on the irresponsibility and
greed of past and present union
workers and leaders. Much has
been made of the fact that the "Big
Union" is now as entrenched an
entity as "Big   Labor"   or   "Big
Government."
But, as Mr. Tieleman knows, I'm
sure, this was not the original intention of the trade union
movement. The original intention
of the "labor" movement was to
improve the lot of those who
"labor" — not just the elite few
who are able to get whatever they
demand by withholding vital
services.
I have not, in my  life time,  seen
anyone in Canada who is starving.
This is no longer the dirty thirties.
It is high time trade unions dropped,
the pose of the I.W.W. soapboxer
and prepared themselves for the
21st century, instead of wallowing
in the rhetoric of the 19th. If this
means eating a bit of humble pie for
a while, well, that's the price of
arrogance.
Peter Stockland
Students pay backs to eat crap
What has happefted to all the
students here? In the old days
(when I was a student here) the
students were apathetic but not to
this degree.
I left UBC about two years ago
and came back for a visit today.
The prices they charge at the SUB
cafeteria are simply unbelievable.
The lunches I have in downtown
Vancouver (and other cities) are
cheaper and better. Without doing
a detailed study, I estimate that the
prices have increased by about 100
percent within two years. I had to
line up for five minutes to get
served and the students seem to
think that is the natural order of
things. Oh, the job they must have
done on the student body to achieve
that.
For the student body to have to
build their own centre and other
recreational buildings is already
unusual to say the least. For the
students to suffer through the crap
passed as food and not complain is
even more unusual. For the
students to pay such exorbitant
prices in their OWN building
without complaining is simply
incredible.
Do the students think that by
eating this crap their chances for a
job are increased? Do they think
that paying more than at downtown
will get them used to the rip-offs
that seem to happen more and
more?
For anything to happen, for any
change to occur, someone must
work hard to bring them about. If
you don't speak up on your own
behalf, no one will be there to look
after your interest for you. Get used
to doing it in school, or you are
going to get so screwed on the
outside that you won't know what
hit you.
From an ex UBCer on
the outside
Stanley Chow
THE UBYSSEY
NOVEMBER 3, 1978
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the
AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in
room 241K of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Mike Bocking
"Comrades Unite", cried out party leader Bill Tieleman at the opening of the 12th Avenue socialist
congress.
Politburo chiefs Tom Hawthorn and Heather Conn were busy trying to figure out why they couldn't
control their means of production as Glen Schaefer and Chris Bocking organized the Blue army into a
mellow frenzy. "Get mellow, Tovarich" shouted Schaefer at the shocked proletariat mass of Greg
Strong, John Woudzia and Wendy Hunt. Party hardliners Holly Nathan, Rob Jordan and Peter
Menyasz condemned the display of bourgeois laziness and depravity. Mike Bocking led the good-time
funky faction of the party to the podium. Faction members Doug Todd, Kevin McGee and Mayo
Moran yelled "Get groovy" at the shocked delegates as they carried Bocking to the podium. Suddenly
storm troopers Geof Wheelwright, Julie Wheelwright,. Paul Hodgins and Kerry Regter burst into the
room followed by a hooded man. "I am president of the neo-fascist right wing socialist party and you
shad all disperse" aid Verne McDonald as he gunned down aH the delegates.
Smut readers exploitive
There has been much discussion
lately in city council and in the
media about pornography and
prostitution, mostly against these
things.
Pornography and prostitution
are supported by people, mostly
men, who either have a contempt
for women or who capitalize on
those who do. Contempt in this
case (being in general an attitude
which focuses the attention on the
negative aspects of anything) being
for the sex drive of women. These
individuals must be shown a
balanced viewpoint in these
matters; sexuality must be
presented and looked upon in a
healthy way if this is to be.
The major force holding back a
healthy expression of sexuality is
the deeply rooted attitude that all
human immorality and corruption
can be blamed on the sex differences   in   mankind,    and,   in
particular, the sex drive of women.
At the root of this attitude is the
orthodox Christian church and its
bible.
Let us believe everything we read
verbatim; words are just the often
imperfect    expression    of    ideas.
Bruce Wozny
Science 4
Reprint draws anger
The cartoon appearing in
Thursday's Ubyssey infuriates me,
both as a Christian and a Roman
Catholic. The Ubyssey failed
miserably in displaying any
professional tact or sensitivity
towards Roman Catholic students.
The cartoon crudely but effectively
reveals the cartoonist's biased
conception of the celibate religious
life.
Let me elaborate, the Christian
chooses the celibate life in order to
devote oneself completely to the
one they love, their Lord. This is
not a foreign concept, for ascetics
of all faiths such as the Saints of
orthodoxy and the Holy men of
India often have done the same.
Even in the intellectual community,
there are examples of men who
have remained celibate in order to
be able to devote themselves totally
to their profession.
This commitment of the
religious has nursed and loved the
rejected throughout the centuries
since Christ's death, and even today
in the person of Mother Teresa,
reaches the discarded in the streets
of the world's most impoverished
cities.
Patrick Coleman
engineering 1 r
r
PAGE FRIDAY
>v
* PAGE    FRIDAY *
OCT.31-NOV.3
appearing
on the sixth
of
seven days
'**"- >*fr   -*...!.';
/NS/DE PAGE FRIDAY
• HALLOWEEN PHOTOS — history of the festival and a photo essay
• THE SHADOW BOX — o sober look at an old phenomena
• VSO — the orchestra in a new spot
• MIDTOWN ACES — a gutsy new play from Winnipeg
• GIRLFRIENDS - fhof low budget feature
V. r
SHERIFF AND DEPUTY . . . whooping it up at the Commodore
FRANKENSTEIN . . . just another pretty face
Halloween begins a
but enthusiastic rev
By PAUL HODGINS
Ever wondered as you dig your witches'
hat out of mothballs again and borrow the
family broom, just how all this
ridiculousness got started? Who's to blame
for this day of ludicrous customs, costumes,
and whimsy?
Would you believe the Roman Empire?
That's right. The origins of All Hallows'
Eve can be traced back over two thousand
years to the time of the ancient Romans, they
celebrated a ceremony called the Feralia, a
time of sacrfice and prayer in honour of the
dead. It occurred on the twenty-first of
February.
The Roman Catholic Church adopted the
festival in the seventh century, with
alterations of course, and transferred it to
November to make it coincide with certain
rituals practiced by the pagan Celts
throughout northern Europe. Before the
coming of Christianity the Celts held two
great annual festivals.
Beltane marked the beginning of spring on
the eve of May 1st and Samhain the
beginning of winter on the eve of November
1st. Samhain literally means "the Feast of
Sun." It also signified the beginning of the
Celtic New Year.
The pagans celebrated the event in
typically pagan fashion, building huge fires
encircled by trenches to "give strength to the
sun" and practicing many forms of fortune
telling.
The church wisely decided to legitimize
this widespread revelry rather than suppress
it and desgnated November 1st, All Saints'
Day, a time of commemoration for
Christianity's numerous saints and martyrs.
This worked out splendidly for the Celts, for
their Samhain was also a festival of the dead.
In "The Golden Bough," James Frazer
notes that the Celts considered Samhain to be
"the time of year when the souls of the
departed were supposee to. revisit their old
homes in order to warm themselves by the
fire and to comfort themselves with the good
cheer provided for them by their affectionate
kinfolk."
"Perhaps, it was a natural thought that the
approach of winter should drive the poor
shivering hungry ghosts from the bare fields
and the leafless woodlands to the shelter of
the cottage with its familiar fireside."
Offerings of food and drink were often
placed on doorsteps for the hungry spirits.
But few doors were left open. Many believed
the spirits to be evil, and terrifying folk tales
abound.
One old irish story concerns a young man
Photos by Pel
PLUMMAGE OF A PEACOCK
CELLOPHANE MAN
LADY SKUNK
RETURN OF THE FROGS
CONEHEADS ... in conference and disc
Page Fridays 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 3, 1978 classical tradition,
krspickup antics
o foolishly stayed out late on Hallowe'en,
met a band of fairies who plied him with
ie and gold. After much dancing and
nking he suddenly recognized the fairies as
ghbors who had died.
ie tried to escape but they tugged at his
ns and legs, forcing him once more into
ir frenzied dance. He awoke the next
rning inside a circle of stones, his limbs
?ered with tiny bruises.
Scotsmen took their Hallowe'ens just as
iously. One desribed Hallowe'en in
)tland as a time when Satanic Majesty is
>posed to have great latitude allowed him .
in common with that malignant class of
ngs known as witches, some of whom, it is
d, may be seen cleaving the air on
>omstricks, in a manner wondrous to
lold. Others again, less earially disposed,
> comfortably along over by-road and
ith, seated on the back of such sleek tabby
s as have kindly allowed themselves to be
nsformed into coal-black steeds for their
:ommodation."
Nature itself was believed to possess strong
i mysterious powers on Hallowe'en,
rtain rituals were guaranteed to produce
jphetic visions or signs. One of the most
nous is called Eating the Apple at the
ass.
\t exactly midnight next All Hallows' eve,
cut an apple into small pieces. Throw one
piece over your left shoulder and advance
toward a mirror while eating the rest. As you
finish eating the face of the person you will
marry appears over your left shoulder.
Not plausible enough for you? Well, how
about Eating the Herring? Just before bed
eat a raw salted herring. In your dreams your
future partner will come to you and
thoughtfully offer a glass of water.
Hopefully, he or she won't kiss you.
Surprisingly, many of the older
Hallowe'en customs have survived to the
present day. In England bonfires are still
burned on country hills, though this custom
is more closely connected with the
celebration of Guy Fawkes Day and the
witch burnings of the seventeenth century
than with the older Celtic fires.
Masks and costumes, of course, are
representations of the ghosts, goblins, and
other lost souls of old. Trick or treating is a
contemporary parallel to the food offerings
once left for the dead.
Hallowe'en pranks are a curious reminder
of the mischevious destructiveness once
attributed to imps, spirits, and things that
went bump in the Celtic night.
Decided not to go to that Hallowe'en party
after all? Oh well. It was probably a good
night to stay at home anyway.
Menyasz
"FRANKEN-FAG'
for some style is a way of life
SKULL MAN ... a night on the town and a ride on the bike
DOG IN PANTS
GUIDE AND MISS AMERICA
Best dressed men in town
luclear warheads and table manners
SIREN OF THE SEA
MY PHOTO FOR A VOTE
Friday, November 3, 1978
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 Death casts sombre shadow on trio
By KERRY REGIER
Three dying people face the inevitable fact of their own imminent
doom and discover independent
solutions to deal with the one
immutable fact.
The Arts Club is presenting The
Shadow Box, a deeply thoughtful
play concerned with the end of a
life. It deals with the crises of that
realization.
All the action in the play takes
place in three small cottages on the
grounds of a California hospital.
Three terminally ill people have
come there to live out what short
life they have left and they bring
their closest friends or relatives with
them.
The three patients are living out
totally independent lives, unaware
of each other's existance. The
action in the drama takes place on
one stage set and thus lends
dramatic unity to the three plot
threads.-
Each major character is interviewed from time to time by a calm,
impersonal voice, presumably that
of a doctor in the hospital. The
interviewer draws out the otherwise
concealed secrets and unifies the
three lives with a common baseline.
"The Shadow Box"
By Michael Cristofer
Directed by Bill Millerd
Until Nov.   18 at the Arts Club
Theatre
The first patient, Joe, is played
by Guy Bannerman. A blue-collar
worker, he has retreated here alone
and at the opening of the play he is
followed by his wife and son. Joe is
helping his wife accept his death.
In this way, the central figure
becomes Maggie, Joe's wife, played
by Janet Wright. She finds that the
centre of her life, her husband, is
being suddenly and forever
removed and that this is unacceptable. She cannot face this fact.
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In a powerful and deeply felt
speech, she puts forth her devotion
to her husband, and desperately
tries to deny his death.
She screams and cries that her
place in life is beside her husband
and with no husband, she is
nothing. She wildly tries to persuade Joe to return home.
Ultimately, Joe forces her into
realization and acceptance.
The second cottage is occupied by
Brian and his lover Mark. Brian's
method of coping involves constant
distraction. As he says, he has only
a few moments remaining to use
and he is going to use them all up,
every last one.
An interruption is provided when
Brian's whorish ex-wife Beverly
clatters drunkenly in, driving Mark
to the brink of a nervous
breakdown.
On the other, hand, Brian is
driven into ecstasy by Beverly's
foolishness, because it affords him
a good chance to escape from
himself. However, ultimately, his
disease reminds him of his position,
he collapses and retreats to the
bedroom, leaving Beverly and
Mark to work out their differences.
In the third cottage we find an
elderly woman, Felicity, and her
spinster daughter, Agnes, who
looks after her. Felicity keeps
herself alive by believing that her
other daughter, who died years
before, is still alive. Agnes sees it as
a duty to perpetuate this, and she
fakes letters to show Felicity that
her daughter is still alive.
The result is -that Agnes is
perpetually tied to Felicity through
a lie. As the interviewer forces her
to admit, Agnes keeps Felicity in
perpetual torment, by sustaining
her belief in the only thing that will
keep her alive. After this, Agnes
tries^ to explain to Felicity that her
sister is dead, but fails through her
cowardice.
So Felicity lives on in senile
decrepitude, and Agnes continues
to sustain her torment. Hope is all
that is left to Felicity.
There is a quote by E. Kubler-
Ross, MD, which prefaces the program for the play.
"There are five different stages
that a person will go through when
he faces the fact of his own death:
denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance . . . but the
only thing that usually persists
through all these stages is hope."    -
All of these stages are at one time
or another examined through the
characters in Shadow Box.
In a powerful exposition at the
close of the play, all the characters
join in a skein of flashing symbols,
words, phrases, and ultimate
thoughts. The nonlinear structure
of the three vignettes, threads and
weaves into a tight mesh of hope
against the ultimate.
The whole play is grippingly portrayed in Bill Millerd's imaginative
staging. The immense difficulties
presented by three separate and independent activities taking place on
the same stage are brilliantly resolved through a subtle use of light and
shade and a multilevel set.
The parts  were all  convincing
except for Alan Gray's portrayal of
Brian.  Lillian Carlson's decrepit,
old   Felicity   was   remarkable   in
particular for her blazing intensity
and    alternation    between    senile
fogginess and false lucidity.
•It must not be taken the wrong
way when the entire play is summed
up by a brief quote from Mark at
the end of Act I: "It'll all be over in
a  minute,   it  just seems  to  take
forever."
CUSO INFORMATION NIGHT
Monday, November 6th, 1978
CHRIS BRYANT
CUSO Field Staff Officer from Papua New Guinea
will be in attendance.
Chris will show slides, and have Recruitment information on
New Guinea. This evening will also focus on
AGRICULTURE, ENGINEERING and BUSINESS.
7:30, Upper Lounge, International House, U.B.C.
 EVERYONE WELCOME	
Representative
UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
to be on campus
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 14
Graduate study information - all fields of
Letters, Arts & Sciences
Contact
Student Services Office
Ponderosa Annex "F"
"THE FuNN|EST
NEW COMEDY OF THE YEAR."
>
-Vernon Scott, UNITED PRESS
SLAP SHOT
k /     R UNIVERSAL PICTURE » TECHNICOLOR® [ggj?
Y> Thurs, Sun 7:00 $1.00
Fri, Sat 7:00 & 9:30       SUB theatre
JANET WRIGHT AND GUY BANNERMAN . . waiting for the end
"ONE OF THE BEST MOVIES
IN THE LAST TEN YEARS"
Bona Barrett, ABC-TV
THE MOST IMPORTANT
FILM OF THE DECADE"
Village Voice, New York
'A film of unrelenting
power, fury
...and hope."
— Gene Shalif, NBC-TV
"MIDNIGHT EXPRESS
is the bloodiest, most provocative film
experience of the year.
G. ANTHONY
Tor. Sun
f^Z*f*
An ALAN PARKER Film MIDNIGHT EXPRESS
,™ p,„ou«, PETER GUBERs «,», OLIVER STONE »,«,«„, ALAN MARSHALL
«DAVID PUTTNAM:, «D,ALAN PARKER.,,,..:««„GIORGIO M0R0DER
i..   WARNING: Frequent violence,
coarse language. —B.C. Dir.
voquE
918 GRANVILLE
(IS-3434
SHOW TIMES: 12:15, 2:35, 5:00
7:25,'9:55
SUNDAY 2:35, 5:00
7:25, 9:55
Page Friday. 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 3, 1978 Body an breathes life in midtown street
By HOLLY NATHAN
Jesse Bodyan, Winnipeg
ditchdigger-turned-playwright, catches the raw flavour of his
hometown's streetlife and embodies
it in his second play, 'Midtown
Aces', which debuted in Spratt's
Ark Theatre last weekend.
The story centres on Charlie
McEvoy, a tough but perceptive
philosophizing dockworker. He is
completely dissatisfied with his
position in life and the hypocritical
societal role he must play to get out
of it. So he skips the three-piece suit
routine and turns to crime.
The connecting thread behind the
story is an occasional reference to
Gary Gilmore, the convicted
murderer who preferred execution
to a life in jail. It's a bit foggy what
this has to do with Charlie; Gilmore
is more remembered for his death
wish than his desire to climb out of
the ditch.	
"Midtown Aces" by Jesse Bodyan
Directed by Paul Reynolds
Showing at Spratt's Ark
Until Oct. 28 — Nov. 18
Perhaps the analogy is that life
has imprisoned poor old Charlie,
and it's either live it behind bars or
follow the path of self-destruction.
Right from the start, one can't help
feeling he's a loser condemned by
his attitude.
Then he signs his own death warrant by trying the stupidly impossi-
JON BRYDEN, DAVID COLLINS AND ALEX DIAKUN . . . together in an inept bank  robbery
ble, an almost spontaneous bank-
robbery as the means to a happy
end. Naturally, the play's extraordinarily abrupt ending comes as no
surprise. Yeah,yeah — so the loser
loses.
Certainly, 'Midtown Aces' is not
the creation of your average dit-
chdigger.    Thanks   to    Bodyan,
Charlie's got such a slough of col-
,ourful phrases that it's too bad he
Woman enters industry
with movie Girlfriends
By GRAY KYLES
Whenever you see a low-budget
feature like Claudia Wiells'
Girlfriends you immediately want
to make excuses for it. You try to
explain to people how it's almost
impossible to make a film for
$100,000 and what a good job the
director has done with such a
meagre amount of money.
But most filmgoers aren't interested in the problems facing a
young director who's trying to get
started. They want to see a well produced and entertaining movie, and
at $3.75 a shot who can blame
them?
Girlfriends
Directed by Claudia Wiell
At the Denman Place Theatre
Not me, and that's why I
wouldn't blame people for feeling a
little cheated after seeing
Girlfriends. The picture is not particularly entertaining, nor is it really
that well produced. Quite frankly
Claudia Wiell wasn't ready to make
this film.
The two major problems with
Girlfriends are the weak script and
the acting of almost everyone but
Melanie Mayron and Eli Wallach.
Weill and screenwriter Vicki
Polon have created a film which is
disjointed and uneven much of the
time. There are a lot of good little
films in Girlfriends but not one big
film. In fact Girlfriends started off
as six separate vignettes which Wiell
decided to rearrange and adapt into
a feature.
Polon's story about a young
photographer who takes pictures at
Bar Mitzvahs but is really a struggling artist has many good moments.
But as is so often the case with first
scripts there are too many good
scenes cut short and weak scenes
dragged out.
The central theme of the story is
the loneliness and jealousy two
good friends feel after they become
separated. When one marries, the
other feels betrayed. She also envies
the companionship and security
that marriage brings. On the other
hand the married friend envies the
others freedom.
Both are of course mistaken.
Each has their problems, one coping with the restrictions of marriage, the other with the loneliness.
Wiell touches on many important
moments in both girls' lives but she
always withdraws in a hurry and
moves on to something else without
fully exploring those moments.
It's this reluctance to scratch
beneath the surface which weakens
both the script and the film. In the
end Girlfriends is a shallow film
that could have been so much more.
The one bright spot is the performance of Melanie Mayron as the
young photographer. She is a
talented young actress who has
previously been seen in the TV film
Hustling and Paul Mazursky's
Harry and Tonto.
Girlfriends is her first starring
role and the attention she is getting
should lead to better roles in the
future. She has an innocent yet wise
way about her and she draws the
audience into the picture. Unfortunately she is the only person who
can do that in the film.
It is perhaps unfortunate that
Girlfriends has been receiving so
much attention in the past two
months. Warner Brothers has picked it up for North American
distribution and it is receiving a
general commerical release.
It has been chosen as the big
womens' film for this year. For
many it will be the first film they
have ever seen which was directed
by a woman. And for many I think
the reaction will be negative.
Unfortunately the film industry is
still at the stage where films made
by women are a rarity. Each one
takes on an importance greater than
it should have to. When a picture
cannot support the hype, as is the
case with Girlfriends, the result can
be a real setback for women filmmakers.
Producers may decide, irrationally, that if Girlfriends is the best
women can do then they don't want
to become involved with productions directed by women.
That would be a shame because
there are so many filmmakers, such
as Martha Coolidge, Barbara Kop-
ple and Joan Micklin Silver, who
have proven that they can direct
features and deserve the backing of
the major studios.
Claudia Wiell shows promise too,
although at the moment her
documentaries are far better than
her weak fictional effort. It is unfair
to expect her to be the great
standard-bearer for women filmmakers. But that is what is happening.
Warners have signed her to a two
picture contract. It is to be hoped
that with more money, a better cast
and a tighter, more developed
screenplay she can create a better
picture next time.
It is also to be hoped that audiences won't respond to
Girlfriends in the same way they did
to many of the weaker Canadian
pictures of the past with an "if
that's the best they can do" attitude.
Women directors are still in a
similar position to Canadian
counterparts, they have to prove
themselves to a skeptical audience.
That may be unfair and unrealistic
but that's still the way it is.
Girlfriends won't convince many,
and lots of peoople who want to
like it will make excuses for it. But
in the long run it is a seriously flawed film with a limited potential.
Yet despite the fact that
Girlfriends is a disappointment I
look forward to Wiell's next film.
And I look forward to the day when
she and other women filmmakers
don't have to prove anything to
anybody.
never thought of joining the ranks
of bill bissett, instead of becoming a
candidate at Cropo Funeral Home.
Bodyan also counterplays
McEvoy's intense, short-tempered
and surly character with his friend
Lonnie's happy-go-lucky, boyish
nature.
Perhaps they are a little too obviously the antithesis of each other.
But that combination of character,
fast-paced dialogue and fine acting
produced an almost endearing first
act, with the audience warming to
their boyish antics and young
dreams.
The   intimacy  of  Spratt's   Ark
ineatre reauy nas potential to
foster a bond between actors and
audience as seemed evident in the
first act. But that atmosphere suddenly fizzled out in Act Two.
The problem was, nothing happened. Charlie is still a vernacular
philosopher who wants to be prince
of the city. He is still a dreamer with
seventy-seven dreams, one of which
is to drive a big car with a piano in
the back with, a piano player playing
it.
We can skip the other seventy-six
and we still have a chronic
depressive who believes there are a
possible four happy hours out of 60
years of mundane existence.
Because he never sees beyond the
suit and tie, Charlie begins to grate
on one's nerves. His tight-lipped
snapping criticisms become predictable to the point of occuring every
time he opens his mouth. Of course,
it creates a tension between the
characters, but it does something to
the audience too.
We begin to lose empathy for
him, he is static. In fact, none of the
characters   undergo   any   change.
There is no dramatic curve to the
play, no climax in the usual sense.
We start off with what we end up
with. If this is an experiment in a
new play structure, then the effect is
a curious monotone.
However, director Paul Reynolds
shows perception in his decision to
air the first production of Bodyan's
play. Winnipeg's warehouse district
breathes life through clear, full acting performances by John Bryden
as Charlie, and David Collins as
Lonnie, and a simple but effective
set by designer Judith Lee.
The play comes off as a cohesive,
interesting whole, proving that if
Winnipeg has not yet gained a full-
fledged playwright, at least it's not
wasting him as a ditchdigger.
THE DRIVER
RYAN O'NEAL - BRUCE DON • ISABELLE AHAM
SHOW TIMES: 12:15, 2:00, 4:00, 6:00,
8:00, 10:00 — Sunday 2:00, 4:00, 6:00, 8:00,10:00
WARNING:
Frequent Violence—B.C. Olr.
odEON
88!  GRANVILLE
682-7468
NATIONAL
UMPMN'a
4MIMAL IWU9K,
SHOW TIMES: 12:10, 2:05, 4:05, '
6:05, 8:05, 10:05
SUNDAY: 2:05, 4:05, 6:05, 8:05, 10:05
CORONET 1
851  GRANVILLE
685-6828
BIT BY BIT...BY BIT HE CARVED A NIGHTMARE! SHOWS:
— .=—■■» Door—12:20,4:00,
»TW
JTOffffffff .•--j:
7:45
Box—2:15, 5:55,
9:40
Sunday from 2:15
WARNING: Scenes of brutal violence. Occasional coarse
_language. _ —B.C. Dir._
851   GRANVILLE
685-6828
Richard Direyfuss
BtjfHx
Warning: Occasional Violence,
 B.C. Director	
SHOWTIMES
7:10 9:15
DROACl WAV 1
70 7   W. BROADWAY |
874-1927
_ _ utality and
:y and sex.
SHOW TIMES:
7:00, 9:20
DROAdwAV 21
70 7 W. BROADWAY
/ 87^1927
THE WIZ! THE STARS! THE MUSIC! WOW!
Matinees Saturday & Sunday 2 p.m.
Evenings 7:00, 9:30
DARK
CAMBIE at 18th
876-2747
In French
English Subtitles
Showtimes 7:30, 9:30
starring
ISABELLE HUPPERT
WARNING:
Occasional nudity.—B.C. Dir.
VARSITy
224-3730
4375 W. 10th
Friday, November 3, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 5 VSO redeemes itself
By ROBERT JORDAN
The most recent Vancouver
Symphony Orchestra Main Series
programme was really quite a
success. Guests, violinist Kyung-
Wha Chung and conductor John
Pritchard were mainly responsible
'for this success although the fine
playing of the orchestra is not to be
discredited.
Stravinsky's Fireworks, Opus 4,
opened the programme. It is a
rather noisy two or three minutes of
nothing particularly consequential.
Had Stravinsky not become a Very
Famous Composer later in life,
Fireworks would undoubtedly rest
in utter oblivion by now.
The orchestra breezed through it
competently enough. Even if not
overtly whiz-bang, at least the
performance did not fizzle. The
piece is so short it ends before it
could possibly get on one's nerves
anyway.
Korean violinist Kyung-Wha
Chung is a passionate player if
nothing else. Her interpretation of
Beethoven's Violin Concerto was
absolutely wonderful to hear. Her
marvellous technique and the sheer
intensity of her playing could not
have failed to enthrall even the
most discerning of audiences.
The accompanying VSO was
perhaps a little too sober and
restrained in the first movement,
sounding rather stodgy behind the
vibrancy of Chung's playing.
Soloist and orchestra welded in
great empathy for the gentleness of
the second movement. It is a lovely
movement anyway and one could
quite justifiably wax rhapsodic over
how beautifully it was rendered last
Monday night.
A perfectly paced, light and
capriciously   humorous   rondo
concluded the concerto. It brought
Chung, Pritchard and the VSO
well-earned applause, with many in
the audience on their feet.
Brahms' Symphony No. 4
concluded the programme. Prit-
chard's bearing as he walked to the
podium to conduct, was rather
sober and dignified. A little too
much of this dignified sobriety
pervaded much of the opening
ovement of the Brahms as it had in
the first movement of the
Beethoven.
It was shed during the lovely
second movement. We were treated
to some extremely fine orchestral
playing and Brahms interpretation
from then on.
The good humored elation of the
third movement and the powerful
majesty of the monumental
chaconne finale were met head on
and handled superbly by the orchestra. A special mention to the
trombones for the part they played,
coming in so well after three
completely idle movements.
Pritchard is a sound musician
and a consummate craftsman at his
trade. He misses real greatness by
only the slenderest of margins. One
left the Orpheum feeling aurally
sated but not spiritually elated or
uplifted. It had been great music
well played. Not being quite a
magician is hardly a fault.
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
OPTIC
ZONE
Student Discounts
ARBUTUS VILLAGE
733-1722
LSAT Weekend Review Seminars
expertly given by the
LAW BOARD REVIEW CENTRE
v^t'^/vjeave it to chance or luck!
Suite 330, 1152 Mainland Street. Vancouver, B.C. V6B 2T9
phone toll free (24hrs.) 800-663-3381
WESTERN COLLEGIATE FOOTBALL CHAMPIONSHIP
Expel those winter blues. Experience the wonderful world of
live dance featuring Montreal's
Paul Gaulin and 'Dancemakers'. A
marvellous opportunity to see two
hours of contemporary dance and
movement in a rare Vancouver
performance. Playing at the
Presentation House on November
10.
The Gallery in the Student Union
Building presents their second
group show of Painting and Print
Making. The show presents a rare
opportunity for any and all
students interested in displaying
their art work. Paintings and prints
to be submitted to room 207-209
(SUB) between 10:00 and 12:00 on
Saturday, November 4. The display
runs from the 14 through to the 24.
UBC THUNDERBIRDS
vs
University of Calgary
DINOSAURS
at
THUNDERBIRD STADIUM
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 4th at lp.m.
ALLPASSES
INVALID FOR THIS
PLAYOFF GAME
NOTE EARLY GAME TIME
GENERALADMISSION   $4.00
U.B.C* HIGH
SCHOOL STUDENTS    12.00
SPEAKERLAB 4th * *»"*'<>
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•Plus  a  pair of  3 way  air
suspension    speakers   with
removeable grill fronts, massive 12"
bass driver in walnut enclosure
ONE SHOT DEAL!
3 Way Bass
Reflex Speakers
Deluxe walnut cabinet,
removeable grills, 15"
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prices or for even greater savings you can assemble them yourself with our easy step by step instructions.
Complete stock of raw speaker components for the do-it-yourself speaker builder. Choose from CTS, Quam,
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L-pads, cabinets and more, available at reduced prices. We supply plans for the home builder or choose from
one of our seven famous SPEAKERLAB KITS. 50 to 250 watts. More and more people buy original
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''For Sound A dvice And A Sound Price''
Come TO Open tills p.m. nightly
1835 West 4th Ave.,
734-2823
Page Friday, 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, November 3, 1978 THE MUSIC SYSTEM .
Tfechnics
by Panasonic
THE MUSIC
MODEL SA 200
AM/FM STEREO RECEIVER
25 watts per channel, minimum
RMS at 8 ohms from 20-20,000 Hz,
with no more than 0.04% total harmonic distortion.
ACOUSTIC SUSPENSION
8" WOOFER W CONE TWEETER
The Dedicated loudspeakers are a family with a family sound. KLH's mam goal
in the development of the Dedicated Series was to design loudspeakers for the
acoustic reproduction of music, whether the richess of the concert hall, the inescapable beat of the rock group, or the bubbly sound of champagne music. All
KLH Dedicated loudspeakers have the same characteristics: an ability to make
music that sounds as real as the original performance. We proudly present the
Dedicated Series — loudspeakers dedicated to you the listener.
KLH
331B
Tfechnics
by Panasonic
DC Servo. Speeds 33%, 45 rpm Wow & flutter 0.045%
WRMS S/N ratio 70 dB DIN B. Dimensions 12.6 (H) x 43
(W) x 37.5 (D) CM    . . .. complete with cartridge and
dustcover.
RHODES PACKAGE $,
PRICE
SEMI-AUTOMATIC TURTABLE SL 220
648
oo
Gerry    Rafferty
— City      to
City/UA-LA 840.
Linda   Ronstadt
— Living  in the
U.S.A./6E-155.
Joe Walsh — But Seriously
Folks/6E-141.
Little River Band — Sleeper
Catcher/SW-11783.
Rolling Stones
— Some
Girls/COC 39108.
Boney M. —
Nightflight to
Venus/KSD
50498.
Meatloaf    -    Bat   Out   of
Hell/PE 34974.
Billy       Joel       -       The
Stranger/PC 34987.
STEREO CENTRE
2699 W. Broadway
733-5914
RHODES
THE FINEST FOR LESS
RECORD CENTRE
"*k^    2671 W. Broadway
733-2215
RED LEAF   ^
RESTAURANT
Luncheon Smorgasbord
Authentic Chinese Cuisine
in the West at a
Reasonable Price
FREE DELIVERY
from 4:30 p.m.
10% Discount on all
cash pick-up orders
2142 Western Parkway
U.E.L. Vancouver. B.C.
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOOD
HONG KONG KITCHEN
1*
5732 UNIVERSITY BLVD.
Eat in &  Take oul
OPEN  EVERY DAY
4:30 P.M. TO 10:00 P.M.
I'HO!NE 224-6121
tit
{^Bk\ihacC
OWASSA
sJLJmw KITWN
LUNCH
11:30-3:00 Mon. • Sat.
DINNER
5:00- 1:00 Mon. - Sat
5:00- 11:00 Sunday
H7*w.I0th.An«.
DINNER
FOR TWO
UNDER
$10.00
ELEPHANT & CASTLE
PACIFIC CFMTRF    	
112 for 11
OFFER!
95C   SUNDAE
Buy one, get the second one FREE
Offer good on Oct. 28 & 29
BIG SCOOP
4401 W. 10th at Trimble
Just 4 blocks from the gates.
RENOS
Pancake House & Restaurant
FULLY LICENSED
Breakfast Special
2 eggs, pancakes
with bacon or sausage
$1.90
Chargex Accepted
Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9:00-11:00
Sun. & Holidays 9:00-8:00
2741 q&S&W"""
WHITE TOWER PIZZA &
SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD.
KITS- DUNBAR - PT. GREY
Open For Lunch
Open Till 2:30 Weekdays
3:30 Weekends
12:30 Sundays
7389520        I   DOWNTOWN
or 738-1113      I   13S9 Robson
3618 w. Broadway |        688-5491
Dining Lounge - Full Facilities •
Take Out or Home Delivery
Late delivery call >/2 hour before closing.
WbfwjMe   Z$a
•^PPi
Salad Bar * Caesar Salad
Charbroiled Steaks * Seafood
Licansed Lounge
PIZZA
Free Delivery
Open Daily from 11 a.m.
SUNDAY from 4 p.m.
4450 W. 10th Ave.
224-3434 224-6336
^P^prrJr=^rdr^r^r^f^r^pJr=lr^fdr^Blf^r^f=Jr^r=]
JWEWV,
SPECIALIZING IN
GREEK CUISINE
& PIZZA
FREE FAST DELIVERY
228-9513
4510 W. 10th Ave.
liaidfdr^isWf^r^rai^f^far^t^t^t^riat^i^icJa^
■CAFFE ESPRESSO1
LA BOCA BAR
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
ALL DAY TILL MIDNIGHT
3625 W 4th at Collingwood
2.904. "W."4*K AVE.    733-3713
'An eating experience not to be under
estimated as one of the best mexican restaurants north of California.' Thats what
it is all about!
OPEN TUES.-SUN.
TAKE OUT ORDERS WELCOME!
LICENSED
Tender, thick
& juicy.
The only steak
we serve.
GRANVILLE ISLAND - 685-4735
Friday, November 3, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 7 VB^B^^ Vfft^B _^ especially to those who car
^Chaiice
Due to the unusually heavy response to last
week's ad, we were unable to get around to
assist everyone. We regret this inconvenience,
especially to those who came in from out of
town. Therefore,
we are going to
extend the sale
while stocks last
until closing
Nov. 4th.
RECEI
w&
JVC • JRS61 • 18 WATTS RMS PER
Channel with less than 0.8% distor- $o-jq.95
tion. Walnut sleeves included. ^ I If
JVC • JRS81 • 35 WATTS
Channel with less than 0.5% distortion. Walnut sleeves included.
RMS PER
$29995
SONY e STRV2 • 25 WATTS PER Channel
with less than 0.3% distortion. FM $<-)/!Q.95
muting and loudness switch.
$249
$199
• 2216 • Why settle for just any receiver when
you can have a Marantz? Especially for this low
price! 16 watts per channel with
less   than    0.5%    distortion.   $^qq95
Walnut sleeve optional. iuu-
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• 2238B 38 Watts per channel with less than
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Phase linear has always had the reputation
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PREAMPS. Check out these prices:
MODEL 2000 preamp    $359.95
MODEL 200B power amp   $489.95
MODEL 400 power amp    $699.95
MODEL 5000 tuner     $499.95
MODEL 1000 auto correlator . . $399.95
WALNUT CABINETS     $ 39.95
.arjj]r=M=)
35 watts per channel with only
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SONY • PST1 • Semi automatic direct
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SONY. • PST20
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YAMAHA
• YP 211 • Top value in semi-automatic belt
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YAMAHA • YPD6 0 Auto return direct drive
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bo°opkra,ed *99-95
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552 Seymour St.
(RIGHT NEXT DOOR TO OUR RECORD STORE)
'jy^pOA
VIVALDI: FOUR SEASONS
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MEET wea's "STREETHEART," SUNDAY, NOV. 5,2 P.M.
(OPEN SUNDAY,
NOV. 5,10 to 5:30)
THE HOME OF HIGH FIDELITY
OPEN UNTIL 9
556 SEYMOUR ST., DOWNTOWN       THURSDAY & FRIDAY    682-6144
Page Friday, 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 3, 1978

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