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The Ubyssey Oct 10, 1968

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Array THE UBYSSEY
is semply
alarming
Vol. L, No. 14
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1968
228-3505
Semple, Munton
Ferguson, Rush
election victors
— lan lindsay photo
FIERCE FORESTER forcefully flings axe far afield for forestry
week's axe-throwing frolicking Wednesday. Fun and festivities continue far into Saturday morning.
Loggers issue challenger
presidents due to swim
Foresters have challenged all undergraduate society presidents to a log birling contest in the library pool at noon today.
This event is just one of the many organized for forestry
week.
An axe throwing contest Wednesday noon was won by Al
Nikkle, and Dave Parsons won a chokerman's race.
Following the log birling contest today, the nurses will
compete against home ec. girls in a broomstick race.
Undergrad societies have been invited to enter a rowing
team in a boat race on main mall, at noon Friday.
Friday night the festivities culminate in "Undercut '68" from
8 p.m. to 1 a.m. in SUB with Hank and the Hobos.
Observers say there will be a general sleep-in Saturday
morning but informed sources close to the forestry president
would not elaborate.
By JAMES CONCHIE
A landslide three to one vote Wednesday
swept Isobel Semple, nursing 3, to a landslide
victory over opponent Stan Persky, arts 4, in
the race for AMS secretariat.
The final vote was: Semple 3864, Persky
1324, spoiled 41.
Winners of the senate race were Munton,
Ferguson and Rush.
Miss Semple told The Ubyssey in an interview late Wednesday night she was "delighted"
with the election results.
She said she intended to use the secretary's
office to gain concrete victories in student affairs. "The secretary is in a position to get
responsible action on student problems," she
said.
"I am in favor of change through normal
channels," Miss Semple said. "If that fails, then
perhaps we can try more radical methods, but
not until all else fails."
When asked if she thought council had not
been responsible this year she said, "let's just
say they haven't been working up to par."
Miss Semple said she found her opponent's
campaign "Very interesting. He must have
thought he was god's gift to the campus ... or
else he just didn't care if he was elected. Or
perhaps he thought I was incompetent and
decided he had no worries. He wouldn't come
out and debate with me, he didn't campaign at
all."
Persky, who campaigned as a "communist,
bi-sexual, dope-smoking, Jewish, hippie, poet,
human being" could not be reached for comment at press time.
Incumbent senator Don Munton, when asked
to comment on the secretarial election said, "I
sense the overwhelming feeling among students
of this campus that they prefer their secretaries
to be unisexual ... I don't know about Miss
Semple."
Munton, with Bill Ferguson, law 2, was
elected to a two year term on senate. The one
year term seat went to Stuart Rush, law 2, who
campaigned for a separate student senate.
None of the winners could be reached for
comment before  The Ubyssey's  deadline.
Final senate results were:
Munton  3310
Ferguson  2420
Rush  2387
Smith  1463
Howe   1440
Richard      457
spoiled    524
Most of the spoiled ballots were deliberately
spoiled with comments such as: Fascist, elections are an irrelevant farce, no choice, and
Friar Hound forever.
In a meeting before ballot counting started,
the election committee heard a complaint that
posters for Ron Smith, commerce 3, were still
displayed on election day. The committee decided since there was illegal advertising displayed for all candidates, none would be disqualified.
All candidates in future elections will be
strictly warned against advertising on election
day.
Returning officer Brian Staple also announced that a recount on the senate ballots
will be held today because of the small number
of votes separating Ferguson and Rush. The
difference between a one and two year term
hangs in the balance.
Faculty unions
inundate McGill
MONTREAL (CUP) — McGill students have
begun to organize at the department level for
participation in decision-making processes.
The first move came when the Historical
Society renamed itself the History Students Association and demanded changes in departmental
structures allowing them a voice in curriculum
and teaching techniques.
Thursday's McGill Daily carried notices for
sociology students to found a Sociology Students'
Association, French students to found a Le Com-
ite d'Action pour la participation des Etudiants
de Francais, and for graduate English students
to meet.
AMS digs deep at last,
Cool-aid given grant
By ALEX VOLKOFF
Ubyssey Council Reporter
Cool-aid is coming to UBC — with a little
financial help from the student council.
Officially known as the Greater Vancouver
Youth Communications Center Society, Cool-
aid is primarily a social agency trying to pro-
' vide guidance services, health care, shelter and
food to young persons who are in desperate
need of such assistance, and are either unable
or unwilling to get it from existing social
agencies.
In one of their few unanimous votes, the
AMS council agreed to donate one-half of the
proceeds from the Oct. 31 tea-cup game to the
agency. (Last year the game raised approximately $1500, all of which went to the crippled
^children's fund).
Vancouver   lawyer   Mike   Harcourt,  repre
sentative for the society, spoke to student council Monday to secure permission to hold a fund
drive heTe next week.
"We see an average of 30 kids per day, or
1,000 kids per month. We have more volunteer
staff than all the other social agencies put together. The irony is, we're broke."
Some members felt the tea-cup donation
wasn't enough.
"We should give something ourselves to
show how we really feel, not just promise
money from an event that is already set aside
for charities," said external affairs officer Tobin
Robbins.
In recognition of this, the AMS voted to
give Cool-aid $500 from AMS funds.
And individually, the 28 council members
and more than 30 observers dug into their
pockets and came up with an additional $55.
Meet blasts pub-ins
but upholds booze
Students at an Alma Mater Society mini-general meeting Tuesday passed a resolution condemning the two pub-ins
of earlier this term.
The meeting, with approximately 1000 students in
attendance, was held in the Memorial Gym
Shaun Sullivan, former AMS president, introduced a
motion that called for students to condemn pub-ins in their
attempt to obtain a liquor licence for SUB.
Steve Garrod, arts 4, then introduced an amendment
which would have instructed the AMS to forbid all student clubs and agencies from having liquor at their events.
This amendment was defeated.
Garrod then attempted to challenge the quorum, but
AMS president Zirnhelt ruled that the question had been
called and asked for a vote.
The quorum required to make the meeting legitimate
is 2,000 students.
Michel Lalain, arts 4, charged Zirnhelt with ignoring
him when he tried to speak against the motion. "Zirnhelt
had to give Ms OK before the mike could be turned on,
he wouldn't do it," Lalain said.
-       .  * .« * ^'-.^c*'****.^*^^*^*:***     ./***' " ■* *"■.•** Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday,  October   10,   1968
THE UBYSSEY'S QUEEN CANDIDATE for Homecoming is a
sure bet to win. Our candiate is so beautiful, in fact, that
we're not releasing any names.
Department's
actions
condemned
The first meeting of the
fledgling A n t h r o pology and
Sociology student's union Wednesday condemned recent actions of the department's promotions and tenure committee.
The committee has told six
professors to complete their
Ph.D's by July 1, 1969, or they
will be fired.
However, the committee tabled a resolution to censure the
administration for its actions
on the Ph.D. issue until the
union is better organized.
The meeting was addressed
by department head Cyril Belshaw.
He said that the administration welcomed student participation in department affairs.
"We have always welcomed
student advice. In fact, we have
made provision for the inclusion of members of this organization on faculty committees,"
he said.
The meeting elected an 11-
man organizational steering
committee chaired by Steve
Garrod, Arts 4. Commenting on
Belshaw's speech Garrod said
"the administration has given
us representation on a number
of committees, but not on any
body that has real power."
Activist students get it
where it hurts, in the can
WASHINGTON (CUPI) — University administrators would do well to cut off activist
students' bathroom privileges, according to a
Federal Bureau of Investigation report released
Tuesday.
The FBI's annual report says the new left
was "talking sabotage, violence and forcible
destruction of key facilities" such as plumbing,
communications systems and draft board
offices.
Part of the FBI's concern with plumbing lies
in the Youth International Party's threat to
put LSD into city water supplies.
The report was critical of Students for a
Democratic Society — "a forerunner of this
nihilistic movement — leading the new left
from passive dissent to active resistance in
student uprisings at Columbia University and
elsewhere."
Conservatives charge 'stifling',
Robbins charges filibustering
Students from the Conservative club objecting to Canadian Union of Students policy have
charged AMS external affairs officer Tobin
Robbins with stifling elections for chairman of
the CUS sub-commission.
Fifteen students, most of them from the UBC
Conservative club, were at a Wednesday noon
meeting that bogged down in debate over qualifications for chairman of the sub-commission.
The sub-commission was set up by the AMS
to make CUS relevant to UBC and to implement CUS resolutions and directives on campus.
Stuart Clark, arts 3, a Conservative club
member said, "Certain individuals, including
Tobin Robbins, AMS external affairs officer,
were able to stymie election for four meetings.
"Now, in the fourth meeting Tobin comes
up with the statement that he's not opposing
democracy, but the person who's elected chairman must be someone he can work with.
"That is, someone who supports the CUS
resolutions and is prepared to work for their
implementation and acceptance."
Jim Russell, B.C. field worker for CUS, was
to have spoken at the meeting but didn't get
the chance.
Most of the meeting was taken up by debate
on whether or not candidates for chairman of
the sub-commission should agree with resolutions passed at the recent CUS congress.
Geoff Flack, ed. 3, a Conservative club
member, said, "We (students) were given the
power to choose the chairman whatever his
. views.
"All students were invited to join the commission, but those who disagree with the resolutions have been stifled," he said.
Robbins said that because he was elected in
campus-wide election on a pro-CUS platform,
he must see that the chairman agrees with the
CUS resolutions.
"The sub-commission was a distinct effort
to create new attitudes in terms of the way the
students could work together for the betterment of the university and for societal change.
"It became clear there were several people
at the meeting who were practitioners of the
old school of politics which involves packing
meetings and filibustering in order to get one's
way," Robbins said.
"They are simply anti the resolutions and
are intent on screwing up the works."
George Gibault, second vice-president of the
Conservative club, said, "The Conservative club
has no official policy towards CUS, but we
would like to see it become a vehicle for different varieties of thought."
He said CUS hasn't represented any consensus of opinion.
No chairman has been elected.
"Things are in a state of flux," said Robbins.
AMS sends telegram,
gives FULL support
A telegram condemning the Mexican government for its
tactics against demonstrating students has been sent to high
officials in Mexico by the Alma Mater Society.
One copy was sent to Mexican president Diaz Ordaz, another
went to student council president at the University of Mexico.
The AMS passed a unanimous resolution to send the telegram
at  the council  meeting  Monday.
The text of the telegram is: "The students of the University
of British Columbia condemn the Mexican government for its
brutal and reactionary tactics against Mexican students.
"We throw our unanimous support behind the students and*
all other progressive citizens in their fight for academic and
social reforms."
GEORG BUCHNER'S
WOYZECK
(M.A. Thesis Production)
Oct. 16 -19     8:30 p.m.
Reservations — 228-2678
Dorothy Somerset Studio
Mother Tuckers
Yellow Duck
Sat., Oct. 72 — War Memorial Gym
9 - 7       Maids 75c       Makers $1.00
NOTICE TO '69 GRADS
Your FREE Grad Photos
Now Being Taken
Mobile Studio Location
OCT. 7 to 22
Behind Brock (South)
Arts Students Anytime
Hours — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Don't Delay — No Appointment Needed — No Cost
(This Service is Covered by Your GRAD FEE)
CAMPBELL STUDIO
10th & Burrard
736-0261
DROP IN AT
. . . and we'll make you look your best
for the Thanksgiving Week-end
2740 Western Parkway
at the Village Square Thursday, October 10, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
SUBHUMANS LESSEN
CORPORATE CORPULENCE, SUB mastermind Peter R. Braund gazes far off into the golden sun,
sinking below the great salt sea. In the background is the massive wood, glass and concrete
clam where UBC students will relax, bowl, hassle and bicker for the next 50 years.
Perry Mason rides again
— student problems solved
By CAREY LINDE
Linde, Alma Mater Society vice-president, is
a second-year law student.
I have a luxurious office up in the Alma
Mater Society quarter of SUB.
Being one who thinks students own the
building and should get meaningful benefit out
of it, I've organized a free legal advisory panel
with the co-operation of some fellow law students.
Starting Wednesday and continuing every
Monday, Wednesday and Friday noon in my
office (SUB 258) students can come up and get
help with any of the following matters:
• landlord-tenant relationships
• motor-vehicle and traffic offenses (not
from the UBC traffic office)
• insurance
• income tax
• drugs
• family (marriage and divorce)
• citizenship and immigration
• consumer protection
• any other bitches you might have.
If enough of you have legal problems to
warrant opening the service up to five noon
hours per week — fine. There will be at least
two law students in the room each noon hour.
If your problems escapes us, we'll take it ourselves to a member of the law faculty. Hopefully we'll find the right advice there.
We can't give legal counsel or actually take
any cases to court. We can merely try to help
you understand your legal rights and your legal
channels for operation.
Some of us are involved with legal aid
downtown, and perhaps on rare occasions we
may be able to hook you up with permanent
help. But we make no promises.
Today there isn't much that a citizen can do
that doesn't have legal implications. So if you
are in a legal bind, or merely curious, I hope
you will take advantage of our service.
For instance, if your landlord is giving you
a rough time, come and rap about it with us.
Or if you wonder what can happen to you
in this province if you drive without proper
insurance — again, come and rap.
Then maybe my offices won't go to waste
after all.
City march to coincide
with 'Frisco war demo'
A Vancouver anti-war group plans to march Saturday to
demonstrate against Canadian support of the United States in
Vietnam.
At the same time, anti-war GIs will be marching uniformed
in San Francisco demonstrating their opposition to the Vietnam
war.
The Co-ordinating Committee to End the War in Vietnam
has called for the parallel demonstration to show solidarity with
this action.
The march, starting at 1 p.m., will go from the courthouse
to the U.S. Consulate.
The speaker will be a wife of a GI now in Vietnam.
The Oct. 12 demonstration is part of the Vancouver build-up
to the Oct. 26 International Day of Protest.
The Co-ordinating Committee has established headquarters
at 525 West Pender, Suite 1, to build the mobilization.
orientation
in Library
Know any aging dropouts having trouble dropping back in?
The UBC extension
department is offering a
special one-day orientation program for adult
students attending post-
secondary institutions
Oct. 26 at the Vancouver
Public Library.
Applications are avail-   §
able at the Extension De-   1
Is
partment office. The fee  §
is $2. I
Student council will dissolve
the SUB management committee Oct. 22 and is asking for
students to fill the nine empty
seats.
The move came after council
voted Monday to reduce the
number of people on the committee from eleven to nine.
Dave Gibson, arts 3, now on
the committee, says the reduction will make the committee
more efficient.
Another reason given for the
change is that there will be
less work for the committee to
do after October.
Council has not yet decided
whether the new members will
be elected or appointed.
CUS drops scholarship
'no time and no money
By BJORN STAURUM
The four-year-old Interregional Scholarship Exchange Plan
is operating this year for the last time.
The decision to cancel the plan was made at the Canadian
Union of Students Congress this summer.
Daphne Kelgard, ISEP co-ordinator and writer of the ISEP
evaluation study, said the plan was taking up an inordinate
amount of administrative time and money, although it was a
low priority item on the CUS program."
The scholarship provided travel and tuition expenses of
undergraduates to any of 28 participating universities across
Canada.
According to the evaluation study presented to the congress,
the plan "is inefficient, costly in time and money, caters to upper
and middle class students to the exclusion of others, and runs
counter to the expressed policies of the union."
Miss Kelgard said because the plan did not cover living
expenses, only travel and tuition costs, many students were not
in a position to receive the scholarship and to move across the
country.
"Only those students whose parents were affluent, wound
up applying and finally going.
"In this sense, CUS felt that ISEP was not fulfilling the
union's universal accessibility policy, and decided to scrap it."
Miss Kelgard said there was no way to save the program
which was "getting too cumbersome and unwieldy".
"This year, there are 40 students on the program across
Canada out of a total of 128 possible scholarships. Eight are
here at UBC."
Toby Robbins, AMS external vice-president, felt "other CUS
items were less administratively demanding".
"ISEP students would often apply half-heartedly during the
academic year, and then cancel during the summer break.
"This meant conference, long-distance calls and general
administrative tie-ups.
"The ISEP allotment could not longer tolerate the strain of
expenditures and inconveniences," he said.
The CUS budget, currently at $130,000, allotted $12,500
last year to ISEP.
Meaningful dialogue
strikes at lunchtime
A new group has been formed to open new lines of communication between opposing factions on campus.
The Ad Hoc Committee for a University Community, will
have its first meeting next Wednesday, "October 16, at noon in
SUB 205.
The club's founder, Peter Bell, hopes the series of lunch-
time dialogue will make UBC a real community by providing
a link between the diverse groups on campus.
The first discussion will concern radical student action and
the need for university reform.
Among future themes are: Genocide: Biafra, Vietnam;
Boredom and the Alienation Bag; and Maoism. Page 4
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday,  October   10,   1968
THS UBYSSEY        Indians rally for rights
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university years
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 224-3916. Other
calls, 224-3242 editor, local 25; photo. Page Friday, local 24; sports, local
23; advertising, local 26. Telex 04-5843.
OCTOBER 10, 1968
Praise day
Council, for once, can be commended.
Briefly, Monday night, they twice showed they do
have the ability to rise above the mundane and irrelevent
and deal in a, meaningful, humane way with some real
issues.
Council's gift of $500 to Cool-Aid, saved that organization from economic strangulation.
Councillors knew this, and decided that perhaps
they could do without a few extras to enable Cool-
Aid, which deals with more children and juveniles than
all the condescending authoritarian 'established' agencies
put togther, to keep up its lonely battle.
The emotions that saw the engineering, forestry,
nursing, and home economics reps combine to offer
Cool-Aid half of the proceeds from the Teacup game
Oct. 31, should be just as highly commended.
The other unanimous motion, in support of the student revolt in Mexico, showed that perhaps Friday's
editorial was right when it said the technical faculties
will join with the radicals when Canada's anti-colonial
revolution  comes.
Engineering president Fraser Hodge's support of
the motion undoubtedly played a big part in securing
its passage.
Hodge's sister, he said, was in Mexico and had
writtgn him letters about what was happening.
It's unfortunate that the Cameron witch-hunt had
to happen at the same meeting, however to spoil a council
session that was, for once, bearable.
Who says The Ubyssey can't be nice.
EDITOR: Al Birnie sten's   rapping.    Mike    Reister   ran   in
vain   for   his   pay-cheque   and   Hanson
City Desk    Paul  Knox      Lau    ran   errands.    Erik    Brynjolfsson
News   John Twlgg       worked. Dale  Wik returned and Nader
_•__-_,__ Mi**-.   ■_.._,_       Mirhady tiptoed after infiltrators. Mike
M,n*-9ln9  MIke *,essen Jesson stormed out, Dorrance Wood-
Photo .... Fred Cawsey, Powell Hai-grave      ward   wandered    in.   Daphne   Kelgard
Wire   Peter Ladner       typed   up.   Elaine   Tarzwell   sat   down.
Page Friday   Andrew Horvat      MuItle\   MuscoWtched   herself.   Conchie
quoted   dizzy   Izzy.   Rik   Nyland   was   a
Sports   •,im Maddin      goo_    sport   but    Lawrence    Wooddn't
joke  when   Fred   spoke   so   Fred  fled.
More  and more  people  did less  and      John Frizell and Dick Button dialogued
less.   Two   quit,   even.   What   a   mess.      meaningfully in the darkroom.
Volkoff cruel world muttered Alex po- Candid-dates   Irving   Fetish   and   Ann
litely. Irene Wasilenikowsikovsky Arky embrace with passion in public
smiled sweetly; Bret Smiley too. Frank for the first time Friday noon at the
Flynn finked out and Michel Lalain overhaul meating. Be there, all and
brooded revolutionarily in spite of Kir-      sundry.
The white man has pushed the Indian, original inhabitant of this land, to the brink of
extinction.
By breaking treaties, stealing land, destroying a culture, and isolating remaining Indians
in ghetto reservations, the white man's genocide
is almost complete.
Now, in Canada as well as the U.S., governments are seeking to take away from the Indian
one of the last remaining rights he has —
aboriginal rights to engage in traditional ways
of earning a living — on the West Coast, that
is fishing and hunting.
The governments say the Indian no longer
has any rights at all in the new society —
substantial proof that racial minority groups
are not going to receive justice in a rascist
society.
NOT IMPORTANT
Methods the governments use are not really
important — in Canada the Indian Act guaranteeing aboriginal rights is often superceded
by municipal bylaws prohibiting the Indians
from carrying out their livlihood.
The result, however, is the final total
destruction of their way of life.
Racial minority groups, Indians, black and
chicanos, are organizing to protect their way of
life and fight the racist society.
And as often as possible, one example being
this weekend at Olympia, Washington, they are
uniting to bring as much pressure as possible
to bear on specific instances of racial oppression.
NISQUALLY BAND
Delegations from the Vancouver Native Alliance for Red Power and the Seattle Black
Panther .Party will join members of the Nis-
qually Indian band in an attempt to firmly
establish the bands' right to fish in their traditional manner.
The band welcomes support from any interested  groups  or individuals  who will join
them on the weekend in their demonstration.
WHAT IS INVOLVED?
What are the issues involved in this case ?
We quote from a leaflet distributed by the
band:
"In 1854 the Medicine Creek Treaty was
signed by the Southern Puget Sound Indians
and the United States government. In part, it
reads that the right of the Indians to fish in
their "usual and accustomed places" is perpetuated. This treaty has never been legally abrogated, and therefore, by Article VI of the Constitution of the United States, is the supreme
law of the land, superseding all contradictory
State and Federal laws in these matters.
"The State of Washington is presently engaged in the illegal and unconstitutional act of
breaking this treat by denying the Indians their
traditional fishing rights. Indians have been
subjected to beatings and arrests at the hands
of the State Fish and Game Department, and
fines and imprisonment at the hands of the
State courts; they have had their fishing gear
destroyed and consficated . . . All for attempting to exercise their right to fish in their usual
and accustomed places. The effect of the State's
actions is to deny the more than 4,000 Indian
fishermen in this state their only source of livelihood.
"The Indians need your support in their
struggle against oppression by the State. Financially, money is needed for (1) the legal defense of those arrested in the act of attempting
to secure the Indians' traditional fishing rights
(at least 17 persons have been arrested since
September 4th), and (2) replacing the gear
consficated by the State so that the fishing
might continue (every net taken by the Fish
and Game Department costs the Indians $60-
$80). Your presence is needed at a Rally at
Frank's Landing on the Nisqually River on
October 13th to support the Indians' exercise
of their legal fishing rights and to protest the
State's brutal treatment."
DESPITE   HARASSMENT
The Nisqually Indians have continued fishing over the past two months despite police
and government harassment.
They will continue fishing this weekend
and feel their demands for justice will be more
successful if they can organize a large rally in
support of their actions.
They will welcome your presence anytime
Friday, Saturday, or for the major rally Sunday, at Frank's Landing. Follow freeway Interstate 5 through Seattle to Old Nisqually Road
exit (just south of Fort Lewis), and signs will
point out the way from there.
The rally on Sunday is in downtown Olympia.
Further details can be obtained from NARP
at 732-5720.
" PROPERTY RGKB
AND HUMAN RIGHTS
ARE INSEPARABLE..."
KBBB«
CLARIFICATION
BY JILL CENSURED
Issue: 'I have no job left at which to be competent'
My name is Jill Cameron.
I've been running for AMS coordinator since you elected me
last March. Some of the people
I've been running against are
Peter Braund, Dave Zirnhelt
and Graeme Vance. Their support has consistently come
from your council. The issue
has been, who will do the coordinator's job.
When I was elected, the coordinator was chairman of the
Brock management committee,
controlled all bookings, made
policy on building security, and
was responsible for handing
out special parking stickers,
keys, and building passes. Not
one of these duties is now part
of the co-ordinator's job.
Constitutionally, the coordinator is chairman of the
Brock management committee.
Since Brock has been replaced
by SUB, it seems reasonable
that the co-ordinator would become chairman of the SUB
management committee.
The reasons why this should
be so seems, to me, obvious.
The person who is responsible
for running SUB should be
elected by, and responsible to,
the campus-at-large. Both campaigns for co-ordinator last
year were based on policies for
SUB (for example, I proposed
a twenty-four hour policy at
that time). This issue should
have been settled by a simple
constitutional change at last
year's general meeting. Unfortunately Shaun Sullivan's
authoritarian tactics caused a
walkout.
And so the problem of choosing a SUB management chairman fell into council's lap.
They neatly passed the buck
by appointing an eleven-man
committee, which would appoint its own chairman. Peter
Braund was chosen and the
issues of how the building
would be run were buried in
so-called business. Which is the
chief reason why this building
operates like a downtown office building.
With Peter effectively controlling SUB, council didn't
find it necessary to deal with
my job again until late in the
summer. At that time I informed them of my policy for handing out parking stickers. Traditionally, some fifty faculty
and AMS stickers were given
out to AMS bureaucrats. I explained to them that, from
what I'd seen of their work
over the summer, I didn't think
that they deserved such privileges. I also pointed out that
people often forgot about problems if they don't experience
them, and that since it was
council's job to deal with problems such as parking, that they
should continue to go through
the same problems as other
students. And so, I proposed
that a raffle be held on Sept.
9 in front of the library, at
which fifty names would be
drawn. These people would receive special parking stickers.
A truly impartial way of dealing  with   the   problem.   Your
council, the recipients of the
stickers under the old system,
very impartially voted to suspend my right to distribute
them.
Building security policy and
authorization for keys and
building passes have always
been the co-ordinator's jobs.
Donn Aven, without the knowledge of council, hired Graham
Vance to prepare a policy for
distributing keys and general
building security. Council approved a policy which allows
building manager Dave Cooper
to hand out keys and which
gives the SUB chairman veto
over the co-ordinator in handing out building passes.
Co-ordinators have always
been responsible for allocating
offices for clubs and committees. I chose to de-centralize
that kind of control in SUB by
allowing UCC to allocate offices in the club area and the
committee chairman to allocate
the offices in the committees'
area.   Peter  Braund   chose   to
ignore their new responsibilities by publishing a list of
room allocations in the committee area in the special SUB
tabloid.
Finally, the last job left for
the co-ordinator, the job of
bookings stated in the constitution, has also been usurped.
Anyone coming into the office will find at least four
people who will be very happy to approve their bookings.
Again unknown to council, a
booking clerk was hired — one
who does not require my approval on bookings that she
makes. The date for clubs day
was changed without even
notifying me, causing a great
deal of trouble for commerce
undergrad soc. And the SUB
committee has made policies on
blanket bookings and priorities.
With no job left other than
to vote on council, council's
motion of non-confidence based
on my incompetence was a red
herring. I have no job left at
which to be competent. Thursday, October 10, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
Economics of the Jungle:
THE BATTLE FOR BIAFRA
By ROBERT LAMBOTTE
La Marseillaise
(Liberation News Services)
Radio, press, and TV have recently given much
coverage to Nigeria. The human drama now being
played out undoubtedly merits such an interest: after
battles in which no prisoners were taken, famine is
now decimating the two million men and women of
southern origin who were forced to flee the hostile
North, leaving everything behind and glad to escape
with their fives.
A few months ago almost no attention was focused on this ex-British colony which, with 56 million inhabitants, is the giant of the African continent.
We were told that the main point was that the North
of Nigeria was inhabited by people of the Hausa race.
They despised the Ibos in the South, who in turn
reciprocated the same feelings. From this, all the evil
was supposed to have derived.
Such an argument is incomplete. There are about
250 ethnic groups in Nigeria, of which about 20 are
important. Also, the argument is hardly new. Ever
since colonialism existed, the governor-in-residence,
whether French, British, Belgian, or Portuguese, has
always aimed at dividing peoples into opposing regions, to make it easier to merge them in the same
repression.
This was facilitated, of course, by the fact that
most colonial possessions — now independent states
— were then, and remain now, artificial creations of
geography, designed to suit the interests of the occupying power rather than the affinities of the population.
National   Dis-unity
It cannot be denied that the differences between
North and South are real. The country — formed by
a federation of four provinces, plus the territory of
Lagos — has, since national independence, found it
hard to achieve national unity. Great Britain, fully
understanding these problems, administered the
northern and southern protectorates separately. This
tactic had the consequence, among others, of accentuating the differences that already existed between
the two population groups, as much on the religious
and cultural level as on the economic and social. It
is thus that the northern region — the largest and
most heavily popuated, with 30 million largely Moslem inhabitants — can be considered the most conservative. Largely agricultural, it has remained
under the effective domination of traditional chiefs
who are true local potentates making the laws in
their own fiefs.
One only needs to see a collection of these petty
sultans and emirs arriving in Lagos in their air-conditioned Rolls Royces to measure the power of these
men. Even if their official privileges have been
eroded somewhat in the past few years, they still retain nothing less than real feudal control over large
sections of the northern population whom they maintain in ignorance. And these petty kings, who play a
not inconsiderable role in the political setup, are
absolutely opposed to any real Nigerian unity, which
would put an end to what they consider to be their
rights.
The evolution of the South, especially of the former Eastern Region with its 14 million inhabitants,
including eight million Ibos, has been quite different.
More rapid industrialization permitted the formation of numerous cadres of technicians and organized
workers. It was the South that supplied the majority
of traders, officials, and employees throughout Nigeria.
It was also there that the Nigerian trade unions
were born. One remembers the great transport strike
of 1952 and, above all, the victorious General Strike
of 1964 which brought together 800,000 workers and
employees. And it was the South, moreover, that
gave birth to the Socialist Party of the workers and
peasants. This is a Marxist party, now under ban,
whose immediate aim is to unite the progressive elements in the different regions in a struggle for the
economic liberation of a united Nigeria.
It would be idle to deny the disparities between
the two regions. But considered on their own, these
explain neither the massacre of 30,000 Ibos in the
North in May, 1966 nor the present war itself, which
sometimes has the appearance of a drive to exterminate the civilian population of the South. At the time
of the first Ibo pogroms, a journalist writing in the
London Observer remarked, with false naivete, that
everything had happened "as though someone had
organized the troubles: Who is this someone?
Oil in Biafra
We need to search the realms of international
finance to answer that question. For the problem of
Biafra and Nigeria is neither one of territory nor
one of ethnic and religious groups — it is neither
one of excessive size nor one of reconciling different
races. Rather it is a question of who is going to control the economic resources of this country, given
its demographic importance within the continent of
Africa.
Nigeria is a rich country. Before the present war
started it was already the biggest producer of cocoa,
palm oil, and groundnuts. It furnished 90 per cent of
the world's production of columbite, a strategic precious metal of high importance in aviation. Tin, copper, rubber, leather, and soya beans were other important exports.
Most important, over the past few years Nigeria
has become a major oil producer. Production rose
from 252,000 tons per annum in 1958 to 20 million
tons in 1966. The forecasts for 1967 were 30 million
tons. Reserves are estimated at one-and-a-half billion tons.
Two points are important to note. First, four-
fifths of the production of oil, and the most important
reserves, are to be found in the eastern province (now
Biafra). Second, the antagonism between North and
South did not begin to manifest itself violently until
the importance of the oil riches of Biafra were confirmed, at which time it became clear that within a
few years this part of Nigeria would become one of
the ten biggest oil producers in the world.
THEN IN WHOSE INTERESTS WAS IT TO
PROVOKE THE BREAKUP OF NIGERIA, AND
ABOVE ALL TO CONTROL LITTLE BIAFRA
WITH ITS GREAT WEALTH?
Before the unleashing of the present war, on the
pretext of an unequal distribution of oil revenues
between the provinces, Great Britain controlled —
and still does — the greater part of the Nigerian
economy through the agency of United Africa Company, a subsidiary of Unilever. Internal trade and
both imports and exports are under its domination.
Barclays Bank and the Bank of West Africa dominate financial life. In the oil business, 85 per cent of
the extraction, transport, and refining are in the
hands of Shell-BP, made up of British Petroleum
and Anglo-Dutch Shell. Major Gowon, the successor
to General Ironsi (assassinated in July, 1966), and
present head of the Nigerian military Government
who came to power with the support of the fuedal
North, tried to free himself a little from this crushing
patronage, first by drawing up new agreements with
the companies (the French and Americans refused)
and then by approaching Russia and the socialist
countries with whom he wished to trade.
Since then the Americans have set out to break
the British monopoly, after having successfully bro
ken the Belg ■ *n monopoly in the Congo to their immense profit. It is in this sense that we can speak of
Katanga as a precedent for Biafra. Six American
companies are now operating in Biafra where they
have invested 150 million dollars. Until the last few
months, Nigeria was one of those "privileged" countries to whom Washington extends her aid to the tune
of 225 million dollars between 1962 and 1968. And
the American "experts" in Biafra are too numerous
to be counted.
French   Interests
The French companies are represented in Biafra
by SAFRED which controls five per cent of production, and it was when the French wells were shut
down last July that the Gaullist regime began to
make its policy clear. It must be added that West
Germany, Israel, and Portugal are also scrambling
for a share of the cake. And London's interests are,
of course, too extensive for the British Government
not to support the Federal Government of Major
Gowon. We have even had the spectacle of oil companies devoting themselves to the supply of arms!
The American position has for a long time been
covert but is now more and more openly affirmed:
recently there has been talk of the "intervention of
a Great Power", meaning Washington. As for the
Gaullist regime, it has already begun to operate
through intermediaries. The Ivory Coast and Gabon,
whose presidents have close links with the Elysee
Palace, were the first to recognize the regime of
Colonel Ojukwu, at a time when the heads of other
African states, notably Mali, were condemning the
trends towards the "Balkanization" of Africa.
Recently De Gaulle has given personal encouragement to Colonel. Ojukwu. It is possible that he
may go further and officially recognize Biafra. Despite all the denials, it is now established that agreements have already been reached between Ojukwu
and the Rothschild Bank, thus assuring large-scale
French participation in the exploitation of oil.
International   Finance
Is it impossible that some may not have hoped to
go even further? Biafra is adjacent to Cameroun, a
country friendly to France. Is a union out of the question? Already, the operation of absorbing the English-speaking part of Cameroun into the French-
speaking part has been successfully accomplished.
It is in these realms of international finance that
the real causes of the present tragedy must be sought.
Those who stood to gain from the break-up of Nigeria
found sympathetic elements among the bourgeoisie
of the eastern province of Biafra. But it is almost impossible for the latter now to avail themselves of
the people's natural right to self-determination and
use this as justification for secession, just as it is almost impossible for them to present their action as
revolutionary.
It is unlikely that these elements in Biafra will
be followed by more radical forces: the latter are
firmly implanted in the country as a whole but cannot show themselves at this time. And anyway, how
can one possibly talk of the Biafran struggle as "radical" or "progressive" when, after the Congo, the
French mercenaries of Bob Denard are now in the
service of Ojukwu, American mercenaries are maintaining an airlink from Lisbon organized by the Portuguese government, and even racist South Africa is
campaigning for partition.
To be sure, at the moment the Nigerian problem
presents itself in terms other than those I have discussed here — terms that are primarily humanitarian, religious, ethnic, and cultural in nature. But the
real causes are not there. The struggle of economic
and social classes that has developed in recent years,
together with the foreign intervention, constitutes
the true basis of the Nigerian question. Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday,  October   10,   1968
ZAP:
will the
tortoise win?
Poor Dr. Hare. Speculation about his whereabouts continues to spread, and all sorts of wild
rumors are gaining circulation.
The likeliest one seems to be that poor Dr.
Hare is on the verge of some sort of breakdown,
caused by worry and genuine terror over the
spectre of student unrest.
It all started during his very first appearance on campus. He was seen to turn faintly
green as student wits near the speaker's platform muttered "String 'im up. String 'im up."
And he's still taking us too seriously.
We think it was expressed not too badly in
Tom Rossiter's article recently in the University of Western Ontario's paper, commenting
on some radio loudmouth.
The radio man said first, that student activists are the same old rebellious flaming youth
that has always existed: then, that we have no
right to do anything until we're all hardworking taxpayers (as if we're not hardworking taxpayers right now) and then, that we'll never
make it and we can't change the world.
"Well, sonofagun," says Rossiter. "This
guy's uptight about student revolution and then
he tells me I can't make a dent. What's he worried about if he really believes that?"
Rossiter also discovers in the radio man's
thinking the classical liberal posture: "I sympathize with your motives but I can't agree
with your tactics," Says Rossiter: "He's implying here that you want to kill or maim anybody
who resists."
Well, Hare started off here with a remarkably good press and a student body predisposed
in favor of him. We read the interviews and
they sounded good. "He's got good ideas," we
said, and accepted him with open arms.
The Ubyssey scarcely troubled to conceal
its glee at finding a president who thought administration were relatively unimportant servants of the learning process.
But somewhere between then and now, we
have pushed our president to the wall and shattered his gung-ho spirit and enthusiasm. What
have we done?
Actually, nothing. We've made a few demands. By simply observing the lessons of
Berkeley, Columbia and Nanterre, Hare could
easily prevent the administration stupidity and
injustice that provokes violent confrontations:
he could deal with the demands qucikly and
quietly if he wanted to.
Unfortunately, Hare vacillates too much. He
keeps trying to please everybody: Cece Bennett,
the board of governors, faculty, students, the
community. It can't be done. He thinks if he
keeps talking he will be able to fend off the
day when he'll have to actually do something.
Hence silly tactics like the patronizing open
letter to "dear Dave," saying life at UBC isn't
all that bad.
Well, of course it's fantastically better than
nothing, but just saying so isn't going to make
the bad things go away.
If Hare is truly terrified of student activism,
and genuinely interested in "keeping the lid
on" he knows what to do.
Anyone who can read knows what mistakes
to avoid when dealing with student movements.
So all Hare has to do, if he ever comes back
to us, is to take some sort of concrete action
to prove he really wants to fix it all up.
Once he stops meeting student efforts with
a giant marshmallow of unmoving benevolence,
we might get somewhere.
Grape group formed fo air
fermenting workers gripes
A committee to support the
California grape boycott has
been organized by UBC students.
Farm workers in California
have been striking grape growers for union recognition and
better working conditions since
September, 1965.
At a meeting Monday noon in
the SUB courtyard, 10 members of the committee discussed
plans to boycott the sale of
grapes in Vancouver supermarkets with Tony Mendez, a farm
worker, and Janice Peterson, a
student   organizer  from   Cali
fornia.
A spokesman for the boycott
group said they also hope no
grapes will be sold on campus.
"We understood the AMS
had made an agreement with
the SUB cafeteria that no California grapes would be bought,
but apparently they reneged on
this agreement," the spokesman
said.
Said Miss Peterson: "We are
in Vancouver on an economic
consumer education issue. The
growers won't respond to humanitarian arguments, so we
are  hitting   them   in   a   place
they understand — the pocket-
book."
Mendez said the farm workers issue is the third most important issue in the U.S. presidential campaign.
"The mayors of many large
cities have asked that no grapes
be sold in their cities," he said.
"We are pressing for decent
living conditions," he said
"I've seen stables that are better than the shacks we have
to live in.
"We have no unemployment
insurance, health benefits or
minimum wage."
'Administration  culprit
in Columbia riot report
NEW YORK (CUP) A commission, set up by the faculty
to study last spring's Columbia University revolt, has lashed out
at the university administration and New York police force in its
report released Saturday.
The administration, the report said, "Conveyed an attitude
of authoritarianism and invited mistrust."
Police action was of "excessive force" which "engaged in
acts of individual and group brutality causing violence on a harrowing scale," according to the commission.
The commssion headed by Archibald Cox, a professor at
Harvard law school and former U.S. soliciter general, cited instances of student provocation of police, but stressed it was "in
no way commensurate with the brutality of the police."
Student rebels were also condemned for their "disruptive tac-
tice. The report warned: "The survival of the free university
depends on the entire community's active rejection of disruptive
demonstration."
The commission also concluded that:
• Widespread support of the demonstration was present
from the beginning and did not develop after police action.
• The violence resulted from administration and police
"miscalculations'" of the number of students occupying the buildings and the mistaken belief that police would meet no resistance
from students outside the buildings.
• The revolt was fed by inconsistent administration actions
on what sort of demonstration was acceptable on campus.
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OFFICIAL NOTICES
Alma  Mater  Society
Student Assembly on the University
This Study Group has been organized to analyze and report on certain problematic areas in student-university relations. Through public discussion the Commission hopes to
promote greater student participation in and knowledgeable
comment on the politics of education.
The areas under most intensive study on which separate
reports will be written are:
1) academic curriculum;
2) student participation in governing bodies at the
university;
3) student and faculty attitudes (surveys);
4) financing of education (for the student and for
the university);
'5) teaching, research and promotion;
6) student housing and university physical planning;
7) dropping-out.
Anyone interested contact:
Fred Grauer, Chairman, 266-2133
or
AMS Office, 224-3242
Student Library Committee
Applications are now open for four positions on the
Library Committee. This committee is advisory to the
head of the service and may make suggestions or
recommendations concerning developments or changes
in the library which may affect students. Anyone interested please contact Jennifer Johnston, Acting Secretary,
AMS box 55.
ipipe tobacco
mellowed with
rum & wine Thursday, October 10,  1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
SUKKAH HOUSERS look heavenward for help.
^ fowl frixon photo
Contact
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Pub-ins were banned, but...
wine-ins are back at Sukkah
It's in the southwest corner
of SUB and it's a Sukkah.
It's a hut—built by members
of Hillel House to commemorate Succoth, the eight-day
Jewish Thanksgiving,   Oct.   7-
14-
It represents the type of
dwelling the Jews built during their wanderings in the
desert after escape from Egypt.
The roof is made of branches
because of their openings to
nature and the elements.
A   campus-wide   celebration
takes place today, and all students are invited to eat their
lunch around the Sukkah.
At 8 p.m. Rabbi Hier and
Cantor Nixon from Vancouver
will give a short explanation
of the holiday.
The Jewish organization,
B'Nai Birth women, will supply
wine and traditional honey
cakes.
For entertainment there
will be Hebrew folk dancing
and a tape by Shlomo Carle-
bach from Los Angeles, the
rabbi who sang in Brock hall
last year.
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McGill newspaper snafu
leads to poor quality
MONTREAL (CUP) — The McGill administration's latest
attempt to bridge the communications gap with its students hasn't
turned out to be as sturdy a link as administrators would like it
to be.
Originally named the Phoenix, the administration's weekly
newspaper with a yearly budget of $86,000 adopted the name of
"McGill Reporter" when administrators felt the meaning of
Phoenix — rising from the ashes — was too radical.
The Reporter appeared Sept. 25 and again Sept. 30 containing complete minutes of the McGill senate, elaborate promos on
campus activities and reports of committees.
The paper has more than its share of troubles.
Student leaders have called the effort a collosal waste. They
think the money can be better spent elsewhere, particularly in
face of McGill's desperate need for money aggravated by the Quebec government's priority for French-speaking universities.
The paper is directed by the university information office
and was initiated after a report by a communications committee
trying to set in perspective last year's dispute with the McGill
Daily.
The committee proposed a weekly paper to, among other
things, "list all items of information relevant to the university."
It reasoned the Daily was unsuited to the task.
Content ranged from the hum-drum to the unreadable — including a lengthy piece containing "radical suggestions for the
future" and the complete text of the principal's welcome to
freshmen.
The paper has hired a full-time cartoonist lured away from
the Reader's Digest and a slew of people from the Columbia
school of journalism.
Meanwhile, the University of Waterloo administration has
quietly shelved their plans for an administration paper, and
adopted a "wait and see" attitude according to Information Services director Jack Adams.
The paper was proposed by a secret committee discovered
by the Chevron, student paper at Waterloo. The committee proposed the admininews because the Chevron "is no longer a newspaper. Its primary purpose is to present the viewpoint of the
editors."
Administrators seem mollified by the Chevron's plans to publish twice-weekly. Much of their surface complaints concerned
alleged insufficient coverage and promotion of athletic and entertainment events.
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THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, October  10,  1968
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Woodd Thursday, October 10, 1968
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
Vs£
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SUB on a rainy Tuesday,
rather ifs the people
in SUB, not the Fort.
SUB is a huge block ot
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But when people live there
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the Fort comes alive,
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Under New  Management Page 10
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, October  10,  1968
_» m m M zm&p
By  JIM  MADDIN
Ubyssey Sports Editor
*?L^*^**'ii ~
FILM SOCIETY PRESENTS
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Ice-hockey
Braves
open season
RIK NYLAND
Ubyssey Hockey Writer
The UBC Junior Varsity ice
hockey   team  opens   its   1968
season (Monday, Oct. 14 when
^SM?0F         U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
8§|felj/        WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
W*<r*                  SKAfING SCHEDULE 1968-69
Effective September 28, 1968 to April 13, 1969
TUESDAYS —          12:45 to 2:45 p.m.
WEDNESDAYS —      2:00 to 3:30 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
FRIDAYS —                3:00 to 5:00 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.*
SATURDAYS —        3:00 to 5:00 p.m.*
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
SUNDAYS —            12:45 to 2:45 pjn.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
* Except when Hockey Games scheduled:
November 1, 2, 15, 16, 29, 30
January 10, 11, 24, 25
February 14, 15
Admission: Afternoons—Students 35c. Adults 60c
Evenings—Students 50c. Adults 75c.
Skate Rental - 35c a pair. - Skate Sharpening - 35c a pair
For further information call 228-3197 or 224-3205
they tdke on the Vancouver
Hornets at the Winter Sports
centre.
Last year the Hornets nosed
out the UBC Braves in the
play-offs rafter the Braves had
won the league title.
The league is comprised of
six teams this year with the
new addition being White
Rock.
The Brayes play a total of
16 games ai home, all of which
may be attended free of charge
by presenting an AMS card.
Coach Andy Bakogeorge was
optimistic about this year's
team as they appear to have
more depth than last year's
team.
Even    with   the   loss    of
FRANCO
RESTAURANT
OFFERS
STUDENT MEAL PASSES
5 Day Week - 10.00
7 Day Week -14.00
These Passes include 3 meals daily
Pick them up today at
2136 Western Parkway — in the University Plaza
Dwayne Biagioni, Mike Darn-
brough, Don Cram and Ernie
Lawson, who may all be playing Varsity, the Braves will be
stronger in all positions.
With many good new players
attending training camp some
of last years returnees may
have to fight to regain their
positions, others may not even
make it.
The club will be entirely
new from last year, with the
accent on youth and speed.
Other teams in the league have
also picked up many younger
players.
This should greatly improve
Intermediate   league.
With four goalies turning out
there should be more than
enough flayers. Bakogeorge
will provide a strong team capable of winning games.
The Braves take to the ice
Oct. 14 at 7:30 p.m. Be there
for tbe season's opener.
19681969                  DIRECTORY
Now Available
ONLY   # -DC   (on campus)
PUBLICATIONS OFFICE - ROOM 241   S.U.B.
BOOKSTORE
AMS BUSINESS OFFICE - BROCK HALL
Redeem  Pre-Sale Tickets At Publications Office Only
— dick button photo
DON   FIDDLER,  from  the   hockey Thunderbirds   shows  his
form stickFiandling, in preparation for the hockey season
which is just around the corner.
UBC BRAVES' HOME GAMES
Winter Sports Centre
GAME TIME — 7:30 (Exceptions Noted)
Date Visitor
Monday, Oct. 14 Hornets
Monday, Oct. 28 Ladner
Monday, Nov.   4 Richmond
Monday, Nov. 11 Nor-Can Caps Jr. B. exhib. game
Monday, Nov. 18 RCMP
Monday, Nov. 25 ^Kerrisdale Jr. B exhib. game
Monday, Dec.    2 White Rock
— dick button photo
DON CROMPTON, kicker for the rugby Thunderbirds puts Thursday, October 10, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page  11
Athletic apathy — a reality at UBC.
Athletes•--■as^well as students seem to be succumbing to the
disease this year, ^ot only is game attendance pitifully low, but
some game results afex terrible.
Although in team sports this university is not recruiting
the best athletes in the district, athletes themselves are not
turning out to represent the uhfvsrsiy.
If not even athletes will turn oui^iqr teams, then how can
we expect to have good teams? *- h _
If existing facilities for practice and games "were better
here than up the hill, then at least we would stand a chance
of attracting some local high school stars.
Improvement along these lines would improve the teams
we put on the field and if the teams were better, more support
would follow and more money would come in.
Facilities, as well as being not entirely suitable for intercollegiate athletics are not big enough for the recreational
demands of the student body.
Scheduling is so tight here that usually there is more than
One event starting at one time.
The number of fans who turn out to support the soccer
and rugby teams in the new stadium has yet to more than half
fill  it.
This is a good measure of the athletic apathy; people here
do not attend sports which do well any more than they go to
games were the team is likely to be defeated. Playing in front
of that meagre an audience, no team could be expected to play
its   absolute  best.
Athletics here are certainly not going to improve overnight—
but as students we have a right to ask that they improve.
Intramural results
Softball -—• Leaders up to Wednesday. One week to go.
Division I
League A Union College
League B Commerce and
P.E.
League C Engineering
and iBeta Theta Pi
League D Law
Division II
League A P.E. II
League B P.E. Ill and
Agriculture
Division III
Division A P.E. Ill
Division I and II Championship finals will be played on the
Memorial Gym field Oct. 18 at noon.
Sports which are operating now, are finished or are about
to start are:
curling badminton
softball golf
swimming tennis
ice hockey flag football
Soccer is changed to second term. Registration date for
Basketball is Oct. 22. Registration date for Diving is Oct. 15.
Total registration to date has been 1,051.
If you want to play intramural sports contact your faculty
or club sports rep. or check with the Men's intramural sports
office, room 308, War Memorial Gym.
— dick button photo
his talented toe to the ball. The Birds will need lots of his
talent this Saturday when they meet Kats in Thunderbird
Stadium at 2:30 p.m.
— dkk button photo
ANNE COVELL, P.E. I is now down in Mexico   representing Canada at the Olympic games.
She vtfll be running in the sprint events.
%&$M@3&M%M
Women's
sports
Practise times are posted in the Womens Gym
for the following women's
intercollegiate sports.
Badminton, basketball,
curling, field hockey, figure skating, golf, gymnastics, skiing, speed swimming, synchronized swimming, tennis, track and
field and volleyball.
Women students • interested in playing on a
team should turn out to
the next team practise or
inquire at the office of
the Women's AthelticDir-
ector — office number 2
— Womens' Gym.
Note: women students
who wish to play for a
non-university team must
apply for an athletic release form from the Women's Athletic Director.
Cross country team
jogs to second place
The UBC cross country team
ran to second place in the annual three and five-eighth mile
Hamptons Handicaps at Stanley Park on Saturday.
Jack Burnet had the second
fastest overall time breaking
the old course record but was
Dave Wighton of the Vancou-
just beaten at the finish by
ver Olympic Club.
Second on corrected time
was the Birds' Eric Papsdorf
who improved appreciably.
Tom Howard and Bob Tapping came sixth and seventh
overall to all more points to
the Bird score.
U.B.C. BEAUTY SALON
in the Village
Reasonable Rates in
Hair Coloring — Styling — Cutting 	
CALL MISS DIANE or MISS MARGARET T^g0
(No Appointment Necessary)
5736 University Blvd. 228-8942
INTERCOLLEGIATE   FOOTBALL
2ND ANNUAL SHRUM BOWL GAME
UBC "THUNDERBIRDS''
vs
wr
S.F.U. "CLANSMEN
MONDAY-OCTOBER 21st AT EMPIRE STADIUM
at 8:00 p.m.
SPECIAL STUDENT PRICE
$1.00 for a $2.50 or $2.00 Reserved Seat
(Advance Sale Only) on presentation of A.M.S, Card
Organized student groups may purchase blocks of tickets
from Athletic > Office
STUDENT TICKETS AVAILABLE ONLY AT MEMORIAL
GYMNASIUM AND STUDENT UNION BUILDING
UP TO AND INCLUDING NOON FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18th Page  12
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, October  10,  1968
'TWEEN CLASSES ...
Blow-up explodes
in color, even
FILM SOCIETY
"Blow-up" will be shown in
old auditorium today and
Friday, noon, 3:30, 6, 8:30
p.m. Admission: 50 cents.
FORESTRY U.S.
"Undercut '68" to open in
SUB Friday 8 p.m. to 1 a.m.
with Hank and the Hobos.
Dress: hard times. Tickets
from AMS or at Forestry
stunts this week.
CLASSICS CLUB
Meeting today 8 p.m. 4495 W.
7th. Speaker: Dr. G. M. Vol-
koff. "An Innocent Abroad".
VOC
Regular meetings Wednesday
noon Ang. 104. Hike this
weekend. Tickets $9 on sale
in clubroom and at meeting.
Today 5:30 p.m. last chance
for old member applications.
LITERARY UNION
SYMPOSIUM COMMITTEE
Meeting noon today Bu. 223.
ENGLISH LITERARY UNION
Meeting to elect student to
English department. Student
Affairs committee noon Friday Bu. 106.
SCIENCE U.S.
Meeting today noon Hen. 200.
Election candidates to speak.
PARLIMENTARY COUNCIL
Executive meeting today
noon Room  211  SUB. Each
club  should  send president
and one.
FULL GOSPEL STUDENTS
ing today Ang. 410 noon,
today Ang. 410 noon.
ANARCHO-SYNDICALISTS
Meeting 8 p.m. T.V. room.
I.W.W. Free University. General program.
PRE-DENTAL SOC
Dental  Building tour  today
noon.
NAVIGATORS
Meeting   tonight   8:30   p.m.
Salish Lounge, Totem Park.
YOUTH RESOURCES
SOCIETY
Dr. Wong and associates to
speak   at  noon   in   Bu.   106
today.
Economist
to speak
in Angus
Well-known Marxist economist Ernest Mandel, will speak
in Ang. 104 Friday.
Mandel, editor of the Belgian socialist weekly La
Gauche recently spoke to the
Socialist Scholars Conference
in  New Brunswick,  Me.
In the words of National
Guardian staffer Carl Davidson in his report on the conference: "The Socialist Scholars Conference might have
been a total flop were it not
for the presence of Belgian
Marxist economist Ernest Man-
del."
Mandel,* whose Treatise On
Marxist Economics has gone
through three editions in
French and will soon be appearing in English, is now on
world tour. While in Vancouver he will speak at Simon
Fraser University Thursday.
SCIENCE U.S.
Election Friday and Tuesday.
Nominations close today. Details from Ma. Annex 1119.
CYCLING TEAM
Sign up for training and
racing today, room 211 War
Memorial Gym, 12:45 p.m.
GRAPE BOYCOTT
COMMITTEE
Important meeting today
noon in SUB courtyard.
CAMPUS CRUSADE
Teach-in Thursday noon, Ed.
201,  hear  Ross Carey from
Long Beach.
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
General  meet   today   noon,
SUB 'K'.
AAC
Bruce Yorke of Vancouver
Tenants organization speaks
on how tenant dwellers can
protect their rights and fight
rent increases, Thursday
noon, Hebb.
SIMS
Student's International Meditation Soc. meets Thursday,
7:30 p.m., SUB 205; mediations every day, 4-5:30 p.m.,
SUB 213; exec meeting Friday, 2:30 p.m.
SKY DIVING CLUB
Meeting today noon, Bu.
219.
SPORTS CAR CLUB
Rally    school    today    noon,
Chem. 250.
VARSITY ROD AND GUN
Meeting noon today, SUB
'A'. Executive elections.
HISPANIC AND
ITALIAN STUDIES
Prof. A. A. Parker, head of
University of Edinburgh Hispanic Studies, and Andrew
Mellon, visiting prof, in University of Pittsburgh, will
speak on 'the concept of love
in Spanish 17 C. literature
today noon, Bu. 100.
HAMSOC
General meet today noon,
SUB 'G'.
SCM
Study group: Educating
scientists, SUB 'H' today.
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
SQUARE DANCE CLUB
Dancing starts today, noon to
2:30. Beginners welcome.
SUB L and M.
AD HOC COMMITTEE
Demonstration at Mexican
Consulate, Georgia and Burrard, 5 p.m. today. Bring
picket signs.
YOUNG SOCIALIST CLUB
Gisela Mandel speaks on
European student movement
today, Ang. 110 at noon.
UBC LIBERALS
First meeting today in SUB
F at noon.
AQUA SOC
Meeting today noon Bu. 204.
FOLK SONG SOCIETY
Meeting today noon Bu. 100.
All welcome. 1968-69 Hangout Mu. 410B.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office: STUDENT UNION BLDG., UNIVERSITY OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
FORESTRY'S "UNDERCUT '68" FRL
day, Oct. 11. Hard-Times stomp in
SUB. Tickets early next week in
SUB.
DANCE SATURDAY — MOTHER
Tucker's Yellow Duck October 12,
9-1 War Memorial Gym. Female
75c,   male  11.00.
Greetings
12
HAPPY  20th TO  THE   "CAT"  WITH
119 lives, love Vanier's Zoo & "Me**.
Lost & Found 13
FOUND PEARL NECKLACE ON
silver chain in Bio Science Bldg.
Monday  morning.  Phone  731-1432.
FOUND PAIR OF PRESC. GLASSES
in Brock Hall about 2 weeks ago.
Come to Publications Office,  S.U.B.
LOST NAVY MEN'S SWEATER
between Gym and C-lot. Phone
Chuck, 733-3432, and leave message.
Reward.
LOST BLUE SKI JACKET TOTEM
Park, Friday. Help, I need the keys.
Phone   224-4921,   Rick.
Rides & Car Pools
14
WANTED ONE DRIVER FOR CEN-
tral West Van. carpool. Phone Sally
926-1590.
RIDE WANTED FOR 8:30's FIRST
and  Commercial.   Larry,   253-0042.
RIDERS WANTED FROM OAK
along  16th.  Call Peg,   732-7557.
RIDE WANTED TO UBC FROM
23rd and Inglewood, West Van.
922-4081.
NELSON — SPACE FOR 2 RIDERS.
Leaving Friday, Oct. 11, afternoon.
Phone  988-2467.
Special Notices
15
THE GRIN BIN HAS POSTERS,
Jokes, Cards, Gifts and a Post
Office. You'll find it across from
the Liquor Store at 3209 West
Broadway.
REDUCE THE COST OF YOUR IN-
surance by as much as 20%. All
risks insured and no cancellations.
Motor bikes also. Phone Ted Elliott
299-9422.
THE NEW YORK LIFE AGENT ON
your campus is a good man to know.
"UNDERCUT '68" IS THE OFFICIAL
SUB opening Friday, Oct. 11. First
dance  with  Hank and  the Hobos.
MALE MODELS REQUIRED FOR
hair styling course — for information call Mr. Terry Skeates at the
U.B.C.  Barber Shop.  Eves.  874-7473.
BLOW YOUR MINDS. SEE BLOW-
up in old Aud. Four shows Thurs-
day and Friday.  Adm.  50c.	
SMILE YOU '69 GRADS! YOUR
Grad pictures are being taken behind (South) Brock in the Mobile
Unit until October 22nd. You've already paid for this service in your
Grad fee so hurry before it's too
late! This is the only time pictures
will   be   taken   this   year.
PLAYHOUSE THEATRE HAS A
few student tickets for Tuesday
nights available. Special price, 7
plays   $10.   560   Cambie,   684-5361.
LIFE INSURANCE
Students, age 23 — $20,000 (commuted amount). Reducing Term.
Includes 3 options. Premium $42.50.
Also New Fidelity Inflation Fighter
policy; first in Canada. Call George
Kaiway, Fidelity Life Assurance
Co. — 681-7496.
CONTRACT PROBLEM HAS FORCED cancellation of Jose Feliciano
Concert, scheduled for Oct. 24,
1968,   in   S.U.B.	
Travel Opportunities
16
RIDERS WANTED TO NELSON . . .
Leave Fri., return Mon. Phone Mike
7-11   p.m.,   224-9269.	
Wanted Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'57 VOLKS. A-l CONDITION. $500
cash. 261-3633 between 6-8, ask for
Denny.    	
1960 ZEPHYR, FAIR CONDITION,
priced for quick sale, $275. 263-8021
after 6 p.m.,  at 3271 W.  35th.
SACRIFICE OFFER MUST SELL
1963 Chev. 4-door 6-cyl. auto. $950
or best offer. Don 733-1760 Eve.
USED IMPORTS — PRICED FROM
$200 to $2,000 — ten to choose from:
Grand Prix Motors — 1162 Seymour.
682-7185.  Open   'till  8  p.m.
G.T. AND SPITFIRES IN STOCK AT
Grand Prix Motors — 1162 Seymour
682-7185.  Open  'till  8 p.m.
'64 FALCON, BEAUTIFUL CONDI-
tion. Excellent body, and motor.
Family's 2nd car. Must sell quickly.
228-8341.
1959 RENAULT, RUNS GOOD, NEW
interior, radio, radial tires, $250.
936-9445.
1960 PONTIAC, GOOD CONDITION,
new tires, battery, generator. Must
sell.   $445.00  or  best  offer,   926-4009.
'5B MORRIS GOOD CONDITION, '66
motor, good rubber, new brakes.
Phone 266-4369 after 5 p.m.  $225.00.
Auto. For Sale (Cont.)
21
S3 VOLVO, P1800, CANDY-APPLE
red. Immaculate cond. Pirellis radio.,
$1900, or offers or will trade for
'65 Mustang,   731-3706.
Automobile—Parts,
23
TR3, 4, 4A, MOUNTED SNOW TIRES.
Also TR4A Tonneau cover. Offers.
Alan,   RE 8-9032.
Automobile—Repairs
24
Motorcycles
26
'67 KAWASAKI — 4,000 miles — Excellent condition. Grand Prix Motors
—1162 Seymour — 682-7185. Open
'till  8  p.m.	
FOR SALE 1965 B.S.A. LIGHTNING
rebuilt engine, $650, or offers. Ph.
733-3852.
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
Miscellaneous
33
NOW WITH APPOINTMENT SER-
vice, Upper Tenth Barber Hair
Stylists, 4574 West 10th Avenue,
224-6622.
Repairing—AH Kinds
35
Scandals
37
DAISY-MAE, WHERE ARE YOU?
] haven't seen you since "Undercut
'67",  meat you at  "Undercut '68".
SCIENCE ELECTIONS — NOMINA-
tions now open for President, Vice-
President, A.M.S. Rep., Publications
Officer, Public Relations Officer. —
Details from Math Annex 1119.
Nominations  close Tuesday.
YES IT'S FOR REAL THIS TIME.
Blow-Up in Old Aud. Thurs. and
Friday.	
HER SCIENCEMAN LOVER CAME
yesterday and today, tomorrow, too.
Freddy Wood,  noon  for only 25c.
BICYCLE WANTED: PREFERABLY
10 speed, 569 Haida House, Totem
Park Residence, or 224-9818 after
6 p.m.	
UNIVERSITY CAB CO. — TRIPPING
out in the Point Grey area. Call
224-5025.
Typing
40
TYPING SERVICE
Mrs.  Gail Symons — 224-
3885 W.  12th Ave.
6435
EXP.   TYPIST.  738-7881.
GOOD     EXPERIENCED     TYPIST
available   for   home   typing.   Please
call 277-5640.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
Help Wanted—Male
52
Male or Female
53
SKI INSTRUCTORS WANTED. NO
teaching experience necessary.
Training course begins at Whistler
Mt. on Oct. 13 at 9 a.m. and continues for six consecutive Sundays.
Fee $20. Apply to Mr. Jim McConkey, Garibaldi Ski School, Alta
Lake,  B.C.   932-5422.
Work Wanted
54
RESPONSIBLE MARRIED COUPLE
wish to earn extra money—Will
baby-sit in your home evenings or
days on weekends, do domestic
work or home repairs. Reasonable
rates. Phone  733-1375.
INSTRUCTION
Tutoring
64
ENGLISH, FRENCH, HISTORY,
Russian lessons given privately by
B.A., M.A., B.L.S. (McGill). Phone
736-6923.
FIRST YEAR MATHEMATICS, PHY-
sics, Chemistry lessons given by
excellent tutors. Phone 736-6923.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BUSY "B" BOOKS — USED UNI-
versity texts bought and sold. 146
W. Hastings, opposite Woodwards.
681-4931.
FOR SALE: 2 SNOW TIRES, TUBE-
less, 6.50x14 and 1 wheel for same
$35. Phone 922-5198.	
1   PAIR   METAL   SKIS   $30.   926-4789.
Fisher 205's Wedel Kings.	
FENDER   JAZZMASTER   GUITAR   &
amp. Phone 224-9054. Ken, room 401.
HAND KNIT ARAN SWEATER —
Pullover, ladies size 10. Phone 738-
0667.
FOR SALE. NEW TRACK DRAFT -
ing machine with scales $145., was
$207.50. Call Jack, 224-5214, Rm. No.
422,  Union  College.
BIRD CALLS
NOW
AVAILABLE
On Campus, only 75c
Misc. For Sale (Cont.)
71
MUST SELL FULL LENGTH RED
/*■' ladies   suede  coat,   size   12.   Leaving
for tropics, 733-1831 after 6:00 p.m.
SINGLE  CHANNEL  PULSE  PROPO.
R/C,   complete  with  Nicad  battery,
as  new,  $85.00.  327-5508.
1963, 1964 and 1965
TOTEMS
(The UBC Yearbook)
25c — To Clear — 25c
Publications, Room 241 SUB
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
FURNISHED ROOM. MALE ONLY.
Kitchen privileges, private entrance,
other    advantages   $60.   Phone   733-
8702.
ROOMS ON CAMPUS $40.00 (M.) 2250
Wesbrook, kitchen priv., TV lounge,
on campus parking.  224-9662.	
LARGE FURNISHED ROOMS IN
student's house, 12th & Highbury,
kitchen facilities, washer, separate
entrance, $45 mth. Call: day,291-3141;
evening  228-9597.
LARGE BASEMENT ROOM FOR 15th
October. 224-0531.     	
FURNISHED ROOM FOR MALE
students near 16th and Arbutus.
Phone   after   6   p.m.   733-5255.	
SLEEPING ROOMS, AVAILABLE
Nov. 1, male. Well furnished, priv.
bath, entrance, 4546 W. 8th. $45.
Ph. 224-9340.	
MALE STUDENT, 2ND TO 4TH
year, comfortable single room, kitchen privil., sharing bathroom and
fridge, non-smoker, reasonable. 733-
8778.
Room & Board
82
ROOM & BOARD AVAILABLE, MALE
students over twenty-one. Single
room $90. Shared room $75. Phone
228-9258 after 5:30. Apply evenings
after 5:30 at 4493 Sasamat.
LIVE ON CAMPUS AT THE DELTA
Upsilon Fraternity House, good food,
short "walk to classes, quiet hours
enforced for study. Phone 228-9389
or 224-9841.
DELUXE ACCOMMODATION NEAR
UBC for female student in exchange
for light housekeeping duties. Should
have limited class time. Call 682-1249.
ROOM & BOARD FOR STUDENT.
Quiet, warm, priv. home. Near UBC.
Phone 224-4823.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
GIRL PREF. OVER 21 TO SHARE
apt. near Broadway and Burrard
with German girl. $60.00 incl. phone
Gretel,   732-6756.	
STUDENTS, 2, TO SHARE HOUSE
with same, vicinity Cambie & 20th.
Available now. Glen Dave Normand
or Dennis,  3655 Ash.
3-ROOM SUITE, UPSTAIRS, FUR-
nished, 1 or 2 quiet senior students.
$70 per month. 1942 W. 3rd. Phone
733-6726.
INTELLIGENT MAN, STUDENT, 32,
has furnished English Bay apartment to share, $60 including TV,
linen.  Phone evenings 733-6954.
STUDENTS, 2, TO SHARE HOUSE
with 2 others. 7th and Highbury.
Private rooms. Immediate occupancy.   224-3035.
APARTMENT DWELLERS. BRUCE
Yorke will speak on how you can
protect your rights and keep rents
reasonable. Thurs. noon, Hebb
Theatre.
FURNI. BSMT APT., SUIT 2 MALE
students. W. 17th nr. Dunbar. Avail.
Oct.   15.  224-0989.
WANTED MALE GRAD STUDENT
to share two bedroom Kits, suite.
732-5932  or Hut B-6, 33.	
WANTED SENIOR STUDENT TO
share waterfront suite with grad.
student.  Near UBC.  Alan 733-7660.
FURNISHED BASEMENT SUITE
available now for one male student.
Phone  731-1629.	
NEAT, RESPONSIBLE FEMALE
student to share furnished home (5
min. from UBC) with two of same.
Own bedroom.   $85  mo.  228-9105.
BUY — SELL — RENT
USE
UBYSSEY CLASSIFIED
UBYSSEY ADVERTISING
OFFICE
Now Located In
ROOM 241 — S.U.B.

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