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The Ubyssey Jan 15, 1993

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Array Gulf War
January 16,1991
•350,000 Palestinians deported from
Kuwait
•300,000 Iraqi
soldiers maimed
•250,000 Irani
children died
•100,000 Irani
soldiers died
•22,000 Kurds died
•26,000 Iraqi
civilians died
•479 U.S.
soldiers wounded
•144 U.S.
soldiers died
•28 Kuwaiti
civilians died
•2 Israeli
civilians died
•Contrary to the perception created by
military briefers, 7%
of U.S. bombimg was
precision bombing.
•Of the bombs
dropped, 70% missed
their targets.
•Forty Third World
countries suffered as
a consequence of the
Gulf War.
•Pollution by burning
oil resulted from Iraqi
intentional bombing
and U.S. bombing of
'Iraqi tanks'.
The war itself was such
a shock, an earthquake
that changed people's
society of religion.
Sudan: Al-Turabi
•The western media
likened Saddam
Hussein to a 'modern
Hitler'. But for years
he has been sponsored
by the West and the
Gulf state allies in the
war against Iran.
•Politicians and the
media sold us an image of the Gulf war as
the cleanest most
sanitized war ever.
And we bought it.
This is a one-power
council       and
subjegated UN. But the
worst thing is, nobody
cares.
Yemeni Ambassador
Al-Ashtal at UN
vote.
We had no idea we
were at war. Somebody turned on the T. V.
and there it was.
Canadian envoy
with 15 security
Council diplomats.
the Ubyssey
VOLUME 75, NUMBER 27
FRIDAY, JANUARY 15,1993
An Iraqi speaks out
by Nadf ne Araji
The following Is an interview
with a Canadian-Iraqi UBCstudent
who grew up in Kuwait and came to
Vancouver in 1984. He discontinued his studies at the outbreak of
the war.
I conducted this interview because I felt it was necessary to
understand how an Iraqi felt about
the Gulf War.
Why was there a Gulf War?
I personally believe that as far
as the Iraqi regime was concerned— fn intent and action—from
start to end, there really was no
war. For the western powers there
had to be a war, so they waged a
war.
The Iraqi regime, the west's
strongest ally during the last decade, was armed to the teeth, financially supported ($5 billion US
in loan guarantees two months before the invasion) and given the
green light by the US to enter Kuwait (April Glaspy, US ambassador
to Iraq, stated weeks before the
irwasionthatthe US has no opinion
on Arab-Arab conflicts and surprisingly took a vacation leave).
Did you condemn or condone
the Iraqi Invasion of Kuwait?
I am tor Arab unity, a dream
that has not materialized thanks to
Arab dictatorships. Furthermore, I
have no remfcrse for the fate of the
Kuwaiti royalty. But I have great
sympathy for the Kuwaiti people,
knowing the dismal human rights
record of the Iraqi regime. So my
answer is yes, (condoned the invasion, but t condemned the occupation.
We know that most Arab countries condemned Iraq. Did Arabs
support the United States during
the Gulf War?
It was Arab regimes, not the
people, who passed this condemnation—someofwhom were bribed
(Egypt $4 billion, Syria $2 billion, et
cetera)
During the war, Iraq fired missiles at Israel. Why did ft when
Israel was not involved In this
war?
I think Israel had a lot to do with
the Gulf War, maybe not militarily,
but that's not the only way you can
wage a war.
Then how was it Involved?
Israel supplied the allies with
its own Intelligence Information
about Iraqi targets. In the US, Israel
and its agents, AIP AC, lobbied and
fought hard to psyche up the Americans aboutawar against Iraq. When
Congress motioned to declare war
on Iraq, it was called the Saulafs
motion; who is known to be a good
friend to Israel.
How could Israel benefit from a
war against Iraq?
The destruction of Iraq's military is in Israel's interest. Without
moving a plane, and without spending a penny, Israel could have one
of the strongest powers In the Arab
world destroyed not just militarily,
but industrially, and economically.
So you approve of Iraq's bombing of Israeli civilians?
I definitely disaipprove of civilian bombing whether It's by Iraq,
the US or any other country. Anyway, the bombings were not always
accurate. When Jraq destroyed the
Saudi Ministry of Defense, it was
kept quiet and reported as civilian
bombing. And the same applied to
Israel.
Why does the Iraqi public continue to support a dictator?
So why don't the Iraqi people
overthrow him?
It's much more complex than that.
The president has had many assassination attempts. There is a
strong underground rebellious
movement which is continuously
crushed by the leading party. Not
only do the members of the resistance suffer, but their families as
well.
We forget that 16 of Iraq's 19
provinces fell to the rebels after the
war and the world watched—including the American forces—as
the rebellion was crushed.
Why didnt the world help these
rebels, although the United
States called on them to overthrow their leader?
ifs in the interest of the United
Statesandsome Arab regimes such
as Egypt, Saudi Arabia and Kuwait,
to preserve Saddam Hussein.
Because fear does amazing
things. This is not unique to just Why Is that?
Iraq, it exists in every dictatorial
regime. What you see on TV of
people glorifying him is mainly orchestrated. I'm surprised why we
westerners find it shocking that it is
orchestrated.
What do you mean by orchestrated?
Meani ng that they are told what
to chant. In many cases students
are interrupted from schools and
rounded up to rallies and are given
banners that they've never seen in
their lives.
Because it stabilizes the region. Powers such as Syria and
Iran always wanted to topple the
Iraqi regime and they did do so by
supplying the Shittes and Kurds with
ammunition. But this Iraqi dictator-
shipcreates a balance and controls
the spread of Islamic fundamentalism, especially since the Iraqi regime is secular and progressive.
Americans and Canadians understood that they were fighting
a dictatorship. What do you
think?
Do we realty believe that
American forces were in Kuwait to
fight for democracy? Was the
reinstitution of the Kuwaiti royal
family part of the American doctrine? Was the arms supply and
support for eight years from the
Reagan administration to Iraq during the Iran-Iraq war a support of
democracy? Was the vetoing of a
motion to put sanctions on Iraq by
Reagan in Congress when the Iraqi
regime gassed Kurds and Iranians
In 1983 a fight against dictatorship?
What about the present?
Sanctions are still employed and
the people of Iraq are suffering. So
what is the president doing by getting involved in another conflict?
I think that the Iraqi regime has
proved time and time again that it is
insensitive to the needsof its people.
This embargo by the way does
not affect in any way the president
and his loyal followers. They still
enjoy their wealth, and politically
they are getting stronger by the
day. I want to point out that
unauthentic American show of force
(bombing) actually makes the Iraqi
dictator mom popular in the middle
east because he is seen as an
underdog deifying a superpower.
If a future war In the middle east
breaks out, what do you think we
Canadians can do differently?
Knowledge and awareness is
crucial—not Just during a war but
before the war actually begins.
We should be aware of geographical and other information
about the middle eastto avoid swallowing just what the media gives us.
Misinformation about
war still being propagated
by Lucho van Isschot
The most recent American
bombing raids on southern Iraq
serve as a grim reminder that the
US-led war against Iraq has not
yet ended.
It has been two years to the
day that the Gulf War began, and
the kilting continues.
According to an independent
study published by a Belgian doctors' organization, more than
100,000 Iraqi children have died
since the war's official end—most
as a result of malnutrition.
Political analyst Mordecai Briemberg said he believes economic
sanctions against Iraq are to blame
for these deaths.
The sanctions, which have
been in place since August of
1990, are blocking the passage of
food and medical supplies necessary for the reconstruction of Iraq,
Briemberg said.
Meanwhile, the meningitis
rate amongst Iraqi children has
quadrupled, the tetanus rate has
tripled   and   the diptheria rate
has doubled.
Fifty per cent of Iraq's water
supply is badly polluted, and most
hospitals are operating at less than
3® per cent capacity.
Briemberg said it is ironfctiat
while the US government continues to support the sanctions, they
are claiming to be on a mission of
peace in Somalia.
•At the same time that the US
is supporting the sanctions, they
want us to believe that they are in
Somalia for humanitarian reasons," Briemberg observed.
"And no one is even reporting
about the sanctions against Iraq,"
tie said.
Briemberg is also critical of
the way in which the US and Canadian media has covered the
most recent bombing raids.
He points out that the Kuwaiti
ambassador to the US, who has
been discredited for manufacturing evidence about alleged Iraqi
human rights violations,, recently
appeared on national television
to give "expert commentary" on
the raids.
"The media is asking us to
take the words of a man who has
been exposed as a charlatan and
a political propagandist,"
Briemberg said.
"We are seeing the reaffirmation of the myths about the war that
had worn thin over the past two
years, rather than serious Investigative journalism."
"After admitting that they were
sucked in, and did wrong, the media are repeating the most banal
theme songs of the Bush war," he
said.
One of the myths being
propagated by the media, according to Briemberg, is that the so-
called "no-fly zone" over southern
Iraq is a UN-sponsored stipulation.
It tart.
The US government is simply saying: we can bomb who we
want, where we want, whenever
we want. Ifs an exercise in
power with out moral or legal consideration,* he said. Jbyssey's 75th Anniversary Hop Fest
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2/THE UBYSSEY
January 15,1993 T
^^/■■■•■"NT!ErW''S •••/-"-F'^E"A"T U R E
UBC siphons money off students' fees
by France* Foran
UBC has misappropriated
students' money to pay off its own
debts, according to AMS director
of finance Bill Dobie.
While the AMS has not
charged the university with fraud,
Dobie said that student fees have
been inappropriately "withheld in
case of bad debts."
Financial Services has been
retaining five per cent ofthe AMS'
money for two years to pay for any
debts the society might incur.
According to Dobie, five percent is "way too high" an estimate
of the student society's debts to
the university. The money held
back from AMS fees this year alone
amounts to $93,674. However, financial services has calculated
A brief history of the
tuition crisis at UBC
by Martin Chester
When I first arrived at this
university in 1986, a $1500 scholarship covered tuition fees and left
money to pay for books. The same
scholarship next year would leave
you over $600 short without even
considering books.
It is even more frightening to
look back to the 1980-81 school
year when tuition fees were $630 a
year for an Arts student (The
Ubyssey, January 10,1990). Next
year Arts students will be paying
$2180 a year—that is a 246 per
cent increase over 13 years.
Meanwhile, the salary of the
president of UBC has increased
from $82,750 (plus $1,352.01 for
expenses) to $195 375 (plus $23
757 in expenses) in 1990-91.
Now compare that with a 190
per cent overall increase since
1980-81 in BC—three times the
Consumer Price Index (Jean Karlinski; CFS Resource Documents,
"Defending the Freeze on Fees,"
Canadian Federation of Students,
August 1992, p.9).
The picture is bleaker for UBC
students in programs like Engineering which require students to
take more than five full-year
courses.
Starting in September, there
will no longer be a cap on the
number of credits students will
have to pay for. Some Engineering
programs will cost $3700 next year;
that is up from $792 in 1980 (The
Ubyssey, February 2,1988).
And the current increase is
just part of a three-year policy—
proposed by UBC president David
Strangway late in 1990 and passed
in January of 1991 by the board of
governors—to increase tuition fees
by 4.5 per cent above inflation.
This year's increase is to make up
for last year's government fees
freeze, for which the NDP government waived their right to control
future tuition fee increases at UBC
in order to achieve.
Students have a responsibility
to fight fee increases now, before
they get even further out of reach
of all but the wealthiest students.
Should the planned increases go
ahead again the following year by
9 per cent (4.5 per cent above inflation conservatively estimated at
4.5 per cent) fees for the 1994-95
school year would be $2376 for a
full time arts student—over $4000
for engineers. And all this comes
on the heels of 10 per cent and 5
per cent increases in the two previous years.
Both the provincial government and the UBC administration
have claimed they are interested
in accessibility. Yet, a 1989 BC
Research Corporation study shows
that the cost of education was the
strongest factor discouraging participation of BC highschool
graduates in post secondary education (Karlinski, p.2).
According to the study, "Of
the factors which influenced a
student's decision not to pursue
advanced education, the primary
reason cited was that he or she was
"not able or prepared to carry the
financial burden"* (Karlinski, p.3).
The costs of privatization
The basic program of those
involved in the post secondary
education industry, institution
administrators and ministry bureaucrats, is to privatize universities and colleges in BC.
Alarge part of this program is
fund-raising for buildings (the
president's World of Opportunity
campaign, which has the double
purpose of increasing links with
the international community, the
World Bank, and the Internati onal
Monetary Fund) and soliciting
funds from corporations for research. But these do not cover the
costs of educating those who will
serve the research needs and bring
recognition to the university, and
with it still more funds. Students
will be forced to pay for an increasing portion of the education
bill.
In a job market which is highly
competitive and requires more
education for relatively unskilled
jobs than ever before, education is
increasingly important. Those who
do not come from a wealthy economic background will fall further
and further from the economic and
social advantages which come with
the privilege of post secondary
education. This further entrenches
the Brazilification (or Americanization) of Canadian society. The
middle class is quickly being absorbed by what will soon be the
two opposing economic blocks: the
economic elite and those who are
forced to serve them. The program
of making education more and
more inaccessible only quickens
this process.
Governmental inaction
The current government, despite
its election promises, has not acted
to stop this slide away from the
idea—though certainly not fact—
of universal education.
An ad for the election of Tom
Perry, now the post secondary
education minister, in The Ubyssey
on February 28, 1989 reads: "You
are paying too much for your tuition.
"As a member ofthe Faculty of
Medicine, I talk with students everyday. You're being shortchanged
by the Vander Zalm government.
As your New Democrat MLA 111
fight for lower fees and better
student aid. Education must be
financially accessible. Our future
depends on it."
An ad could now read: "You
are paying even more for you education ..."
The Confederation of University Faculty Associations of BC has
come out in favour of freezing fees,
a stand much stronger than the
AMS has supported. Then association president Marg Csapo (a
special education professor at
UBC) said two years ago "we support a freeze to tuition fees until
the state of post secondary education is fully examined" (The
Ubyssey, February 1,1991).
It i s now up to students to take
a strong stand to stop the rise in
tuition fees and to create the political climate which will allow or
force the government to find the
money necessary for proper funding of post secondary education in
this province. It is not just about
current students, and we're no
longer talking about "saving education for our children." It is about
making sure those currently in first
year can afford to stay in school to
finish their degrees; to ensure that
those currently in highschool are
not financially restricted from going to university.
It is about not letting university education become even more
the domain ofthe privileged.
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Randy Romero, ElectionsCommissioner,
Grant Rhodes, Chief Returning Officer, or
Michael Maher, Deputy Returning Officer
in SUB 246, 822-2361
ElectioN
UBC's write-offs for any singleyear
to be just $7,000. The AMS' outstanding debts over the past ten
years are only $29,000.
"Financial services is trying
to expedite writing offbad debts,"
and the student fees is the first
source of revenue the university
turns to," according to Dobie.
"Basically the AMS is paying
other departments' debts, and any
bad debts there might be," Dobie
said.
But the dispute over the
handling of student fees may be
heading for a resolution. AMS
representatives and UBC financial
services met to settle the dispute
over the student fees yesterday.
"Negotiations are preceding in
a good direction," said Dobie, and a
remittance for the withheldmoney
is a possibility, he said.
The AMS also claims they have
been charged interest on their own
funds. A m emo from AMS general
manager Charles Redden states
that the university withheld the
transfer ofthe Athletics portion of
student fees and then charged the
AMS $8,590 interest for delaying
the fee transfer to the Athletics
department.
Dobie said the university io
guilty of taking advantage of the
student fee payments—which are
collected earlier than the
university's—and "bad planning."
University officials were unavailable for comment.
Hairy times at council
Council briefs, January 13
by Frances Foran
Rest assured, little cabbages, your representatives on
student council may not be the
brightestbeaconsin this stormy
educational climate. But they
have great hair.
Council chambersrumbled
with contained approval after a
moment of stunned silence
when grad society representative Michael Hughes entered
the meetingstrategically tardy.
A new glossy bob is just right
for the candi date to the board of
governors, The Ubyssey's style
panel thinks.
Anke Hauser was selected
to the president's Advisory
Committee on Women and
Gender Relations, "which will
review all aspects of campus
life which impact on the abilities of women to achieve their
maximum potential as employees and students."
Arts rep Sunshine Hanan's
new sporty 'do reveals two ears
peeking out from her full and
crinkly curls. Our panel finds it
suits her tremendously; it's
perky and bubbly just like Sunshine herself.
Student council reps from
all constituencies are gearing
up for next week's protest ofthe
18 per cent tuition fee hike. It
appears that UBC students are
opting for cautious methods to
demonstrate the fee hike and
the removal ofthe limits on the
number of credits students can
be charged, to pay for. The pending fee hike is an indirect result
of last year's fee freeze (for domestic students) which the UBC
board of governors agreed to on
the condition they retain the
power to set tuition fees from
1993 onward. Be at the south
end of SUB next Thursday at
noon for the rally which will proceed to the administration
building.
Coordinator of external affairs Marya Mcvicar reported she
is encountering difficulties in the
mass-distribution of the film
about date rape produced last
September. According to
McVicar, the lead actor of "A
Perpetual State of Consent" will
not cede artistic claims to allow
distribution ofthe film.
Social Work rep Maria
Milrad rejwrted that the school
of social work has moved into a
new building, but the administration has not offered to furnish
it. "They won't even give us any
furniture," she said. Their deco-
ratingpartyistoday—bringyour
own supplies.
Arts rep Liz van Assum was
grunge-groovy with a very happening centre-part in her
unapologetically false-coloured
hair.
Special recognition goes to
Martin Ertl for his consistently
wind resistant yet touchable
hair.
GRAD
PARTY?
Fabulous
Food!
Great
Location!
Call ljs for details and relax
You've worked hard all
year... let us look after
your graduation
dinner.
UNIVERSITY GOLF CLUB
5185 University Blvd. • Free Parking
Sales & Catering
224-7 799
Prices subject to I 5'% grjtuity .ind jclrtition.il Ux
January 15,1993
THE UBYSSEY/3 Cohen takes
fewer risks
in new album
by Mark Nielsen
UBC Aggies Present:
Friday, January 15th
SUB Ballroom
Tix $8.00 at SUB Box Office
Community Sports
Hockey Sale
regular prices of all hockey
sticks, pads, pants and gloves
NOW!!
# # #
# # #
Easton Pro Balance Aluminum Sticks
REG. $79.95       SALE $59.95
Bauer 3050 or 3060 Aluminum Sticks
REG. $59.95      SALE $39.95
Christian 2020 Sticks
REG. $34.95       SALE $24.95
\ Sherwood 7000 Sticks
REG. $29.95       SALE $19.95
Titan 2020 Olcyck or Turgeon Sticks
REG. $29.95      SALE $14.95
RESOURCE iBt^YflNDiVM
.CD
This week at U D O
MUSIC
Wednesday
Wednesday Noon Hour
Barbara Pritchard, piano
12:30 pm Recital Hall $2
Thursday
Magic Flute in the Wind
School of Music and
Film Department
12:30/8:00 pm Recital Hall
Friday
Magic Flute in the Wind
School of Music and
Film Department
8:00 pm Recital Hall
Next Wednesday
Wednesday Noon Hour
Terence Dawson, piano
Camille Churchfield, flute
Victor Costanzi, violin
William Jenken, clarinet
Andrew Pearce, cello
12:30 pm Recital Hall $2
Next Thursday
UBC Symphony Orchestra
12:30 pm Old Auditorium
Distinguished Artists
Robert Davidovici, violin
Rena Sharon, piano
8:00 pm Recital Hall $14/7
For information call 822-5574
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WOMEN
WE
Come join us f
Bicultural Women
Mature Women Stude
Assertiveness Trainin
Making Peace with F
Career Planning
Self-Esteem
For further info
3 Fridays, 12:30 - 2:C
facilitat<
Inequity in the Classi
Still Killing Us Softly
Not a Love Story
Brock Hall Room 20;
FEMINIST COUNSELLING GROU
4/THE UBYSSEY
January 15,1993 Small things in the big pit
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by Ian Lloyd and Jeff Grimshire
Sticks and stones
stuns, stupefies...
James Reaney's
play Sticks and Stones
proves that Canadian
history contains not only
neglected episodes of
dramatic conflict, but of
genuine heroism.
Sticks and Stones
Freddy Wood Theatre
until January 23
The history of the
Donnelly family who immigrated in the mid-
lSOOs from Ireland to
Biddulph, Ontario is presented aB a frontier epic
in which the family's
struggle to find peace in a
new country is continually aborted by old-world
feuds that refuse to die.
The relentless victimization and eventual de-
BtructionoftheDonnellys
is transformed into a
tragedy full of tension and
fine rhetoric
The members ofthe
UBC Theatre and Film
department manage to
maintain your interestin
this long drama through
generally strong performances and a fluid visual
stage scape.
Really groovy sets
and lighting propel the
m
audience throagfa a fragmented timeline towards
a grand and moving conclusion.
Throughout the per-
formance, the chorus
serves to echo the past
and future, give voices to
theDonnelly children and
also provide audio-visual
accompaniment to the
central action in the play.
They shift beautifully
from one role to the next,
often using religious catechism and imagery to
parallel the themes being
discussed.
The play's moral
universe is dominated by
the matriarchal power of
Judith Donnelly, in a
stellar performance by
Rachel Cronin.
Her strength in the
face of increasing violence
around and within her
own family is a convincing reaffirmation of
-family valux" and proletarian pride.
In a fresh and innovative way, director
Sandhano Schultze allows the audience to
examine the meaning
of national identity and
survival in the midst
of prejudice.
FEMlNIStCOUNSELLING
3J
m
en
O
WC AWARDS
nts
STUDENTS' OFFICE
O'ER TERM GROUPS
)r support, discussion and information.
January 21 - March 11
January 6 - March 31
February 10, 17, 24
sod January 21 & 28, February 4 & 11
February 1, 8, 15, 22
February 9, 16, 23
rmation and registration for groups, call
822-2415
FILM SERIES
0 pm, in the Women Students' Lounge, with
id discussion and free popcorn!
oom January 29
February 26
March 26
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to
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Open: 9:00 am - 4:30 pm.  ==
ISWORKSHOPSiNDIVlDUALADVOCACY RESOURCE LIBRARY
Have You Picked Up Your B.C. Student
Loan or Equalization Payment?
Students who applied last summer and fall for aid through the B.C. Student Assistance Program
and qualified for B.C. Student Loans are reminded that their loan documents (Certificates I) are
available for pick up in the lobby of the General Services Administration Building outside the
Awards Office (Room 101) on weekdays between 8:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Schedules 2 for the
second disbursement of Canada Student Loans are available at the same location. Picture I.D.
must be presented. Loan recipients are urged to claim their Certificates I as soon as possible.
These documents mustlbe taken to the bank for negotiation, a process which can require
several days.
Students who qualified for Equalization Payments should report to the Awards faction of the
Department of Financial Services in Room 101 of the General Services Administra tion Building
to claim their cheques. Photo I.D. will be required.
BSCAP applicants are also reminded to complete their Statements of Personal Responsibility
and return them to the Ministry of Advanced Education promptly. Failure to do :>o by the end
of the term could disqualify applicants for Loan Remission after graduation.
Second term tuition was due by January 7,1993. UBC awards for the second term (such as
bursaries, scholarships, and fellowships) were applied to fees on the night of January 4. If there
are any funds remaining after fees are fully paid, cheques for the balance will be available for
pick-up in Room 101 after January 15.
The Awards Office has made every attempt to defer the payment date for second-term tuition
fees until February 7 for students who have loan disbursements in January. Individuals can
confirm this by calling TELEREG, signing on as directed in the TELEREG Guide, and using the
M# command. The deferment should give all borrowers ample time to claim their loan
documents, cash them, and remit the full amount of second term tuition. All loan recipients
have signed a declaration stating that the first use of their loans/EP will be to pay tuition fees
owing to the educational institution.
January 15,1993
THE UBYSSEY/5 Wjf, i '      's,''d''%'''*'■
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The never-ending story
Two years ago today the world was waiting with bated breath for
the outbreak of massacre in the Middle East.The deadline set by the
United States for Iraq to withdraw from Kuwait was awaited with
anxiety for several weeks. It took the US-led "allies" less than 24 hours
after the expiry ofthe deadline to attack. The outcome was as invisible
to our CNN-nourished minds as it was nightmarish to thousands of
Iraqis—60 percent of whom are less than twenty years old.
Carefully edited US Army and CNN footage presented us with an
image of a surgical triumph for democracy and Kuwaiti sovereignity.
Meanwhile, civilian casualties and property damage, whose true
extent the West may never know, rocked Iraq "back to the pre-
industrial age", according to UN observers. Poverty, disease, and a
nearly annihilated infrastructure created problems of "near-apocalyptic" proportions.
Today, Saddam Hussein is still in power and still has expansionist ambitions. The US prepares to launch yet another distant, inconclusive campaign in an area little known to Americans except as an oil
resource area and home to an "alien" race that so we are told holds
life less dear than Americans do and subscribes to an oppressive,
enigmatic religion. One is forced to ask WHY????????
Experts around the world and even in the US are predicting that
raids on Iraq in response to Iraq's incursions into Kuwait will have
little effect. Just what are their true aims? Is the American military
machine really incapable of terminating Saddam Hussein's rule? Or
can the White House really not justify such an extention of force to the
American public?
Not if centuries of manifest destiny and foreign invasions are
anything to go by. So just what is keeping the US from effectively
carrying out its professed objectives? The trouble with disentagling
whatever hidden agenda the US might have in Iraq is that it is hard
to find out exactly who's fighting who, and whose interests they're
fighting for in the Middle East from day to day.
N. Korea
v  tm&y
c«*l»
CI?
Help^eorge Decide
Letters
|The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any Issue. Letters must be typed and are not to exceed 300 words In length. Content which Is Judged to be libelous, homophobic, sexist, racist or factually Incorrect
will not be published. Please be concise. Letters may be edited for brevity, but It Is standarxJUbysseypolk-yrHXtoedlttett-*^ for spelllrig(xgrammmical mistakes. Please bring them, with Identification,
> SUB 241k. Letters must Include name, faculty, and signature.
...and all for
less than 2
cents an issue!
University kids are getting stupid.
No, UBC students don't
need a wooden ruler across
their butts.
But a dose of common
sense is in order. The UBC
Young Conservative's petition to block funding for The
Ubyssey is absurd. We did
not realize they believe in
impeding the freedom ofthe
press—censoring it by closing it down.
Hey, promote the state
if you want; live and breathe
capitalism if that's your
flavour. But trying to get rid
of a small, independent,
student-run newspaper,
which merely tries to bring
news or information different from almost every other
tired publication in the
world, is like selling your
dog because he would rather
run into the ocean than fetch
your stupid, tossed sticks.
"But The Ubyssey
doesn't write what we want
to hear!"
And The Vancouver
Sun does? Read The Province then. Read The Georgia
Straight. Read everything
and suspect it all. Consume
news from the left, the right,
and the Society of
Lawncutters International.
Isn't diversity one of the
sweet things about a free
society? People are served
dishes of information from a
variety of tables, If you don't
like one, go directly to another. If you don't like The
Ubyssey, dont read it—or
better, join it and help shape
it. Don't try to close the shop.
If we grow up and leave
school, we'll miss the good
times and essentially irresponsible student lifestyle.
Yes, we might all get serious someday, but for now,
lefs not get stupid.
Support your student
press.
Alisa Smith, co-editor
The Martlet
University of Victoria
theUbyssey
January 15,1993
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays and Fridays by the Alma
Mater Society ofthe Universityof British Columbia. Editorial
opinions are those ofthe staff and not necessarily those of
the university administration, or of the sponsor. The editorial office is room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial Department, phone 822-2301; advertising, 822-
3977; FAX 822-9279.
Ihe Ubyssey is a founding mtmbtr of
Canadian. University !Press
With considerable angst Mark Nielsen considered seeing Doug and the Slugs' but Omar Kassis shivered
because slugs give him the creeps. Ted Young Ing and
Nadene Araji cultivate them in a farm while Tarda
Trepanier and Martin Chester got hungry with visions
of buttered escargots. Miranda Alldritt dug slugs for
bait and Denise Woodley likes them salted. Rick
Hiebert found them too slimy, Frances Foran too green
and Sam Greer! too long. Yukie Kurahashi, Ian Lloyd
and Lucho Van Isshot both extolled their enviro' virtues
but Paula Foran was heard to exclaim, "Yuck". Elizabeth Van Assum thinks slugs portray weltschmertz,
Stan Paul felt they are the essence of existentialism
and Jim Griffiths and Jeff Grimshaw took a flashlight
and plate to find more.
Editors
Paula Wellings  • Lucho van Isschot • Yukio Kurahashi
Sam Groan  • Frances Foran
Ever popular
with the crew
September 23, 5:00 am
Royal Vancouver Yacht Club
"C'mon guys, cut the
yawning! Let's do some
stretches before the coach
gets here! By the way, my
name is Jason Saunderson."
Oh great. I knew that the
UBC rowing team was going
to be a lot of work, but nobody told me that I was going to be rowing with Richard Simmons. In retrospect,
I guess he knew what he was
doing. He really managed to
unify the team, though instead of it being "Jason and
the Argonauts" it was more
like "Jason and the Mutinous Argonauts." Unity (key
to a successful rowing team)
was built daily. We felt like a
team as we sat around and
exchanged "Jason Jokes,"
And played such games as
"Kick Jason's Shoes Off of
theDock."Sacrificingselffor
the team—what a guy! he
was always there for the
team. If you happened to
pass by coal harbour at sunrise last year I'm sure that
Jason's image is still firmly
fixed in your mind. He was
the one with the UBC logo
cowboy hat, hands firmly
gripping the oar, teeth
clenched, muscles straining,
showting: "Just a few more
strokes and we'll be there!"
Stroke on, Jason.
My fondest memories of
Jason Saunderson were to
come a month later during a
regatta in Victoria. On the
first day we managed to side
swipe the "Royal Rhodes'"
scull and pull a Valdez into
the river bank. Later that
night the team drowned out
thoughts oflost Olympic glory
in the lounge of our motel.
After a few rounds (sans
Jason) we decided that since
we were mathematically
eliminated from everything
(including the busride home)
we thought we should end
the two-day event just like
Bill Murray used to in his
summer camp movies (pretend that we weren't trying
to win). If Exxon had a drunk
captain, we might as well
have an entire drunk crew.
Plans were set for a dusk to
dawn drinking fest. Just as
team morale had hit rock
bottom Jason entered the
lounge. True to form, he tried
his best to talk us out of our
depression. He attempted to
rally us with lots of "C'mon
guys!" (isnt that what little
kids say when they are getting beaten up on the playground?), but at that point
we were more interested in
Johnny Walker and the
motel's Frank Sinatra impersonator. That night we
locked Jason out of our motel room. He slept in the
hallway. I hope he didn't
strangle anybody or anything.
I guess what Fm trying
to say is that in some countries they shoot people who
are enthusiastic at 5:00 in
the morning. The best way
to avoid turning this country into one of those would
be to yank Jason Saunderson
from the vice-president position and make him president of the Young Conservatives. I'm sure he could
figure out a way to sideswipe
the party into a snow drift or
something. Tm not placing
myself on one side or the
other, I just don't want Jason to hurt himself.
Aaron Orlando
Arts 2
Tyranny and
despotism
denounced
It has come to my attention that there i s a character
called Jason Saunderson
who wants to close down The
Ubyssey because he doesnt
feel it reflects campus news.
He's even gotten signatures
on a petition to that effect.
As an alumni, Td like to know
what it is that he and his
fellows consider campus
news and why it is that they
would wish to close down the
paper rather than join it and
make it what they believe it
should be.
Maybe ifs news, but everyone on campus (exceptfor
foreign students) are and
have been heavily subsi dized
by their fellow citizens
throughout their school career.
For this reason, the
country expects university
grads to be more than self-
serving technocrats but,
rather, good and responsible
citizens. They expect them
to be more than textbook
idiot-savants who can do the
job but little else. They expect
them to be well-informed
about issues on and off campus and to be leaders into
the next millenium. They
also expect them to be de
fenders of democracy and the
free press, not its
dismantlers.
If these signators want
changes, let them put in the
work and energy and join
The Ubyssey, write the stories, field the response; but,
to shut it down is an act of
tyranny and despotism and
not to be tolerated on a Canadian campus. True journalism is responsible for
delivering the important issues of the day to people
prepared to THINKand ACT
responsibly and democratically.
As the privileged few,
your responsibility is to become thoroughly informed
about issues beyond your
academic speciality, to act
according to your advantage
on behalf of all those who
have helped you get where
you are - your fellow citizens-
and to know even that which
may be painfull to your biases. You are either part of
the problem or a part ofthe
solution. There is no middle
ground in times like these. It
is odious to me what
Saunderson is. The questions whether students at
UBC are arrogant 61itists or
good citizens in support of
freedom of speech. Tm in-
- terested to know. So are we
all.
RXXiOrd
T.HE UBYSSEY presents:
Jazzberry Ram
Another one of our totally legendary, radically fun,
expansively wow-inspiring beer gardens! You know
all those cool, beautiful, socially aware and hip people
you see wandering about campus? All those folks you've
been dying to meet? Well. THIS happening hop fest is
where most of them (and you?) will gather.
cheap! beer and cider
Let the celebrations begin at 4:00 pm in SUB 207/209
6/THE UBYSSEY
January 15,1993 s
Sarawak Native's battle
continues from Vancouver
by Mark Nielsen
"Endangered peoples" may be
the latest catch-phrase among the
environmentally conscious, but it
also describes a situation that
people like Anderson Urud Mutang
have come to know all too well.
That is because he is a member of the Kelabit tribe from the
island of Borneo in Malaysia—one
of a number of tribes (known collectively as the Dayak peoples) who
have been fighting to save what's
left ofthe Sarawak rainforest.
Not only is the Sarawak one of
the world's oldest rainforests, but
it has been home to these people
for countless generations, particularly the neighbouring Penan
tribe—one of the last hunter-
gatherer peoples on earth.
"One ofthe last nomadic cultures—in the Penan—is living in
the forest and loggers move into
the area without respect for their
life, their culture and without asking permission from them,"he said.
The thing is that the authorities have designed laws before,
saying that all primary forests belong to the crown government
without letting the people understand that law."
"And now people are fighting
to save this land that they have
been living on for thousands of
years.*'
For a number of years Mutang
has organized blockades and acted
as a spokesperson for the Penan
and the other peoples involved in
the struggle. Such actions have
already meant time in jail, in-
cluding a 28-day stint that included
ten days in solitary confinement.
The Malaysian government
currently has a warrant out for
Mutants arrest under its Internal
Securities Act (ISA), originally intended to detain communists but
now used against a wider range of
political foes, including environmentalists.
Facing up to two years in jail
without trial under the ISA, he has
left his country for Vancouver,
where he feels he can best continue
the fight for his home. And after
winning a student visa in October,
he has entered his first year at
UBC.
"Rather than serving up to a
two-year sentence, it would be better for me to spend my time here
where I can get an education and
learn the kinds of things that will
help my people to fight their cause,"
he said.
But more than that, Mutang
says he wants to come back with
the kinds of ideas that will lead to
an alternative that will be acceptable to both sides ofthe conflict.
"I would certainly resume
what I've been doing before, but
with more professionalism in the
work that I do ... Maybe through
studying I can try to analyze [what
is happening] because I would like
to find a solution to the problem,"
he said.
But for the moment, at least,
Mutang has spent as much time
campaigning for his cause as
studying. With support from the
Vancouver-based Sarawak Peoples
Campaign, he has travelled to destinations throughout the worldand
has spoken to the United Nations
General Assembly when it declared
1993 the International Year of In-
UBC student - Anderson
Urud Mutang
digenous Peoples.
That said, there may not be
much left to struggle over by the
time Mutang returns to Malaysia.
The words used to describe the rate
that loggers have cut down trees in
the Sarawak have ranged from
plunder to ransack to destruction.
Using spotlights to log 24-
hours-a-day is common and much
ofthe logging is illegal and uncontrolled, thus escalating the pace at
which the forest is cleared. And
corruption amongst logging corporations is so rampant that forestry
regulations are ineffective anyway.
But just as important, it is
high-quality hardwood that is being logged—better suited for fine
furniture than for what it is currently turned into. According to
The New Yorker magazine, 50 per
cent of those trees go to Japan, and
three out of four of those logs are
turned into plywood—usually to
build forms for pouring concrete at
construction sites. And once that
concrete sets, the plywood is torn
off and burned.
Relations between the government and the Dayaks, meanwhile, are confrontational. Malaysian Prime Minister Datuk Seri
Mahathir Mohamad wants the
country to be fully industrialized
by the year 2020 and has accused
environmentalists of denying the
Penan a better life.
So far, that has largely meant
mass relocations, along with hunger, disease and alcoholism as
many—although not all—the
Penan have had trouble adjusting
to their new fives.
But in a story in the New
Scientist, Jewin Lehnan, chair of
the Sarawak Penan Association,
said it is wrong to say his people
are against development.
"But by development we don't
mean timber companies invading
our land. We want the right to live
here, and use our land without
disturbance. Then we want development in terms of schooling
for our children and clinics to treat
illnesses. But all these things we
can get only when the 1 ogging stops
and our rights are recognized."
PACIFIC SPIRIT CHILD AND
FAMILY SERVICES
presents.-
ALLIES IN HEALING
(a six-week support group for partners of child
sexual abuse survivors)
Starting Date: Thursday, January 28*. 1993
Time: 7:00PM - 9:00PM
Location: Lower Level of School of Social
Work, 208O West Mall
If you are male, in an intimate relationship with a
woman who was sexually abused as a child, and would
like to meet others like you to get some support, call
Mireille LeClaire at 822-4824 to register or for more
information. This service is free of charge.
LSAT GMAT | PUBLIC SPEAKING COMPETITION
GRE
Test Preparation
Next Seminars:
GRE: Jan. 22 - 24
LSAT: Jan. 30-31
GMAT:      March 5 - 7
Call: 222-8272
Spectrum Seminars™
Professionals in Test Preparation since 1984
Part of UBC Arts Fest '93
Open to all UBC students
Topic:       "The Rites of Spring"
$150 - First Place
$100 - Second Place
$50 - Third Place
Thursday, February 11 and
Friday, February 12
Prizes:
Dates:
If you are interested, please leave your name, student number,
telephone number and other particulars c/o Auson Carvalho at
the English D&artmbct Office (3rd Floor Buchanan Tower).
Contest Application Deadline: Friday, February 5, 1993
CAREER TRAINING FOR THE
HEALTH SCIENCES
BCIT will offer an information session on four important career
programs, in the new year.
Biomedical Engineering Technology
The technologist is responsihle for ensuring the highest
standard of performance in a wide range of technical
equipment and instrumentation for medicine and biology'.
Technologists work with health care professionals in hospitals,
clinics and research labs, as well as for medical equipment
companies.
Medical Laboratory Technology
Building on first-year university science courses, BCIT's
technologist program consists of 10 months of academic
studies at BCIT followed by a 12-month training period in one
of the clinical facilities affiliated with the program. A new
program is planned, which would replace the first year of
university with a technology-specific first year at BCIT,
allowing high school graduates direct access to the program.
Occupational Health and Safety
This science-oriented program is a combination of studies in
health, engineering and business. It prepares graduates with
the knowledge and leadership necessary for the development
of health and safety programs for industry. BCIT1 offers a part-
time studies certificate program and a 2-year diploma
program.
Environmental Management of Real Estate Assets
This certificate program is available throughout B.C. via
guided independent study. It addresses the requirements of the
Canadian Environmental Pollution Act and will be of interest
to anyone involved in real estate assets and transactions:
appraiser, banker, developer, lawyer, notary, and those
interested in "green" issues.
Find out more about these career programs as follows:
Time:  6:30-8:30 pm
Date:    Monday February 1
Place:   Boardroom, Administration Building, BCIT
3700 Willingdon Avenue, Burnaby, B.C.
Phone: 432-8573    Fax: 433-1184
BRITISH COLUMBIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
The University of British Columbia
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
James Reaney's
-rerm
'
the story of the Donnelly massacre
Directed by Sandhano Schultze
JANUARY 13-23    8pm
2 for 1 Preview: Wednesday Jan. 13
Thursday Matinee: Jan. 21    12:30pm
RESERVATIONS: 822-2678
_       Support Your Campus Theatre
Are you interested in a career in
ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY?
When you've finished your studies, you may wish to enhance your
skills. Find out what BCIT can do for you. Come to the next School
of Engineering Technology Information session on:
Monday, January 25 at 6:30 pm in the Boardroom
BCIT Administration Building, 3700 Willingdon Avenue
Burnaby, B.C. (Canada Way & Willingdon)
Programs related to manufacturing will be presented:
Plastics
Wood Products Manufacturing
Mining
Petroleum
Chemical Sciences
Faculty and staff will tell you everything you need to know to get into
BCIT's Engineering Technology programs.
To preregister for information session.
call 432-88b2.
BRITISH COLUMBIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
January 15,1993
THE UBYSSEY/7 ~WW    -"Vi*/" ./KpunU-a/ioiy    •-#•*•»(«?
BIG TIME BEARS
FF.K GUIDE 10 YOUR BABY'S    FIRST YKAR
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The Step-By-Step Approach
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AMCKiCAN NATURE C
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AGING IN GOOD HEALTH    mark h kb* m d
A COMPLETE. ESSENTIAL MEDICAL GUIDE FOR    and STEPHEN K. USICE. PUD, J.D.
OLDER MEN AND WOMEN AND THEIR FAMILIES 	
HANDBOOK
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HAPPY TIME PRESCHOOL WORKBOOK     preschool PRESS
UZZLE COLLECTION  SUPREME SEARCH & HMO
PUZZLE
COLLECTION  INCREDIBLE SEARCH & FIND
THOUSANDS OF TITLE
AT 30-85% SAVINGS
PUBLISHERS PRICES'
Choose from Fiction, Non Fictio
Paperbacks, Textbooks, Cookbo
Childrens Books and much mo
Selection and titles may vary frail
store to store.
Tremendous Selection
Top Quality!
...Truly Amazing Savings
m   Prices in effect until -January 24,
c     No sales to dealers! No rainche
Limited quantities.
JOANBAEZ
AND AVOICE TD SING WITH
Nobody does it
CIRCUIT
I ANALYSI
iv-;si
iCLgall       SHEARER WEST
WE'VE GOT THE
RECYCLING BUG!
Your clean, used plastic shopping
bags can be recycled into useful
materials. All London Drugs
stores now have a'RECYCLING
BUG' bin where you can deposit
your used bags
21 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS - OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
VANCOUVER • East Hastings & Penticton
• Granville Mall - • 42nd & East Boulevard
north ot Dunsmuir • Robson & Bute
• West Broadway & Heather       • Kingsway & Wessex
BURNABY • 4970 Kingsway Plaza (just east of Metrotown)
NORTH VANCOUVER « 20th & Lonsdale <^jijwit reiiovatedI       /*-
WEST VANCOUVER • 875 Park Royal NorthiP* bwi skcm,™, c.X <M0
LADNER • 5237 48th Ave - Trenant Park Mall v
NEW WESTMINSTER • 10th & Carnarvon
RICHMOND • No. 3 Road & Cook
NOW OPEN!
COQUITLAM • North Road south of Lougheed
PORT COQUITLAM • Lougheed Hwy & Westwood Ave
SURREY • King George Hwy & 104th
• Guildford Town Centre-150th St. entrance
• Penninsula Village -100-15355 24th Ave
DELTA • Scott Road & 72nd
LANGLEY* Fraser Hwy. at Willowbrook Way
CLEARBROOK • West Oaks Mall, S. Fraser Way
CHILLI WACK' Cottonwood Mall - 45585 Luckakuck Way
Monday to Saturday: 9:00 am -10:00 pm
GRANVILLE STREET MALL: Mon.- Wed. 8 am - 6 pm;
Thurs. - Fri. 8 am - 9 pm; Sat. 9 an) - B pm.
PARK ROYAL NORTH 9 am - 9 pm
Open Sundays: 10:00 am - 8:00 pm
GRANVILLE ST. MALL 11 am - 6 pm.
WEST BROADWAY 10 am -10 pm.
ROBSON STREET 10 am -10 pm.
PARK ROYAL NORTH 10 am - 6 pm.
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED
Your satisfaction is guaranteed at LONDON DRUGS. If any purchase isn't to your complete
satisfaction, return it to any London Drugs store within 15 days in the original packaged
condition with proof of purchase for a complete refund, exchange or adjustment to your
satisfaction.
Acceols .:a:cs if trie 'cHc^ra
ROYALBANK
CashCounter
Available at all locations excojjl
• GRANVILLE STREET lnola«ai!'tilFl
• SCOTT ROAD fraawalih
• GUILDFORD inol available
We reserve the right to limit quantities.
No rainchecks on flyer merchandise.
No phone, mail or C.O.D. orders.
Not all items available at all locations.
PRINTED IN CANADA
VISA
■:.  PLEASE RECYCLE
8/THE UBYSSEY
January 15,1993

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