UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Jan 25, 1968

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0126906.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126906.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0126906-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0126906-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126906-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0126906-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0126906-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0126906-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0126906-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0126906.ris

Full Text

Array Hare
today
al. XLIX, No. 38
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, JANUARY 25, 196
— gearge hollo photo
COMMUNING  WITH  THE  ROARING  SURF,   biting   air  and
distant snow-covered mountains, Joe Student contemplates
nature's serenity. Brrrr.
Arts campaigns  poor,
<ill voters'  interest
The first two days of arts elections attracted few voters.
By late Wednesday, 550 of the 5,000 arts students had voted.
Arts vice-president Harley Rothstein said the executive was
isappointed over the small turnout.
"People aren't voting because of poor campaigns, lack of
lection publicity and a lack of real issues," he said.
John Churchland, arts 2, is the sole contender for arts
resident.
Arts students, however, can add any name they wish to
leir ballot.
Ralph Stanton, Dennis Hutton, and Vernon Hunchak, all arts
, are running for vice-president.
Stanton wants to continue free activities implemented by
his year's council.
Hutton says he wants more student participation in arts
ouncil.
If 1,000 students vote in the election next years arts presi-
ent will have three votes on next year'si student council, Roth-
tein said.
Today is the last voting day.
W$88IP£
Blood   donations   down,
Red Cross needs not met
The Red Cross blood drive needs you regardless of
your sleepy bloodshot eyes.
. Attendance at the blood donor clinic in the armory
has been lagging.
Chris Andersen, forestry 2, co-ordinator of the blood
drive, said Wednesday less than 50 people have come to
the clinic during the mornings.
Daily attendance has been about 300, he said.
The blood drive ends Feb. 2.
"We're disappointed in the staff turnout," said Anderson. "Only 58 staff and faculty out of a total of 3,400 have
donated blood."
Leading faculty so far is science.
AMS executives
botch Hare meet
By ALEXANDRA VOLKOFF
Alma Mater Society (first vice-president Don
Munton missed a scheduled meeting with new
UBC president Dr. Kenneth Hare Tuesday.
AMS president Shaun Sullivan made the
meeting, but kept Hare waiting more than 15
minutes.
Later Tuesday, four students got a personal
interview with Hare that lasted nearly two hours.
Munton said he was preparing for a city
council meeting and was too busy to go.
Munton said he told Arnie Myers, UBC director of information earlier he probably won't be
able to attend the meeting.
Myers said he arranged a tentative meeting
Monday between students and Hare with AMS
treasurer Dave Hoye to be at the president's
office Tuesday.
"I told Sullivan earlier I didn't think chances
of   the   meeting   were   very
good," Myers said.
Sullivan said he wasn't told
where Tuesday's meeting
would be when he learned
about it late Monday.
"I was late getting on campus
and then waited in the administration building with council
secretary Penny Cairns until
we were told the meeting was
in the faculty club," Sullivan
said.
Hoye was also at the meeting, which lasted
less than an hour.
Hare was not willing to discuss specific issues
as he is not yet president, Sullivan said.
"Munton and I met Hare last year, so I think
that the four members of council that did meet
Hare were adequate for the purpose," he said.
Although the discussion was general, Sullivan
said Hare has been doing his homework. "He is
well attuned to affairs in B.C.," he said. "You
can't help but like the guy — as a president he
will satisfy everybody."
That is also the impression of Senators Gabor
Mate and Ray Larsen, arts president Stan Persky
and Carey Linde, law 1, after their afternoon
meeting with Hare.
"1 like his style of directness. He is willing
to meet us on our own turf,'' Persky said.
The four said Hare told them there was
clearly nothing he could do on the senate crisis,
but that he would have a public opinion on it
by June 1.
SULLIVAN
They discussed the problem of external pressure on the senate. Hare said the students and
faculty should be running the university.
When Persky asked if the senate shouldn't
be open to those two but not the general public,
Hare admitted that he didn't know, but that it
was a good question.
"The essential purpose we went to talk to
him about — senate secrcy — didn't get anywhere," Mate said.
Hare is a man who understands the more
progressive element in student government, said
Linde, editor of the law undergraduate journal
Flea.
Persky agreed, "He's about 300 yards ahead
of this year's council."
"Hare demonstrated to us that he knew a lot
about student activism and that he is one administrator that reads the Berkeley literature," Larsen said.
Hare surprised Persky by telling him that he
is a pacifist.
"Hare is a very suave sort of man," Larsen
said. "He is particularly good at handling potentially embarrassing situations.
"He will be very easy to reach when problems do arise. One of the most significant things
he said was that he would speak to students at
any time, on the students' terms."
"We came early and stayed late," Linde said.
He said they talked about Hare* early life, university finances, the president's role in the university, and even Mardi Gras.
Hare is concerned with the low level of
awareness in the province
about the university, and intends to travel around B.C. to
gain support for higher education.
When Linde suggested taking
a student along, Hare liked the
idea.
"I think the new president
will be enormously liked by
students," Persky said. "His
own presence will be a change."
mass meeting of students -will
be held in Brock Tuesday noon to decide a policy
over senate secrecy. Six hundred students at a
similar meeting Jan. 9 voted to stage a sit-in at
the Feb. 14 senate meeting.
"We want to tell students what has happened
so far and decide what course of action to take,"
Mate said. "There still could be a sit-in."
HARE
Meanwhile
— george hollo photo
THUNDEROUS WAVES pile up on a pounded beach, tortured logs and loose gravel . . . what!
Isn't that a North Korean patrol boat supervising in 37th annual submarine races? Page 2
THE     U BYSSEY
Thursday, January 25, 196(
COUNCIL  DISTORTION
Student opinion ignored'
By MIKE FINLAY
Ubyssey Council Reporter
Alma Mater Society first vice-president Don
Munton speaks with forked tongue.
In response to criticism of representation in
council aired in a Ubyssey story Tuesday, Mun-
tion said student council was at least ahead of
student opinion.
Garbage. If being ahead of student opinion
means student views are represented, Munton
is a little off base.
How can student ideas be truly represented on
a council where 13 of the 26
members are present?
This was the case Monday
night and appears to be the
trend in council meetings this
year.
Now we must say efforts of
some kind are being made to
make council more democratic
by giving it representation by
population.
Munton presented a proposal        MUNTON
Monday night which would enlarge council and
the executive in order to give a greater voice
to the larger faculties.
The proposal was tabled.
The reason given was that there were not
Forces play games
PHILADELPHIA, Pa. (CUP-LNS)—Canadian
forces each year buy large numbers of American-
made war toys, according to a major U.S. manufacturer.
"The miniatures," said a manufacturer's
spokesman, "are so perfect in HO-scale that the
military men use them in top secret war games
and for training purposes."
enough people at the meeting to give an accurate
picture of student views on the reform.
In other words, UBC student council did not
represent the students of UBC Monday night.
In addition, councillors seem to have forgotten it is the students they are supposed to repre-
sent and having the students sitting right there
in front of them doesn't make them remember.
Monday night's meeting was held in the common room at Acadia Camp. Holding meetings at
various places on campus was initiated so greater
contact between council and students could be
achieved.
AMS treasurer Dave Hoye, who chaired the
meetings, appeared to have missed this point.
When the question of equalization grants for
out of town students came up, arguments for
and against came from the council members.
Groans,   mumurings   and   whisperings   were
heard  among the  25  students
watching  the meeting in  the
common room.
Hoye ignored the students.
He did not ask them to speak.
He did not even inform them
during the meeting that they
were allowed to speak.
Those students, Dave, are the
people most affected by equal-
lization grants. They live away
from home.
Since the resignation of residence representative Blaize Horner two weeks ago, those students
have had no representation on student council.
It might not have been a bad idea to have
heard what they had to say. After all, they are
the students council supposedly represents.
The question is no longer simply whether
student council at UBC is democratic and represents according to population.
The question is: Are students represented at
all?
HOYE
A World of Opportunity!
CUSO
PAN EL   DISCUSSION
NOON   THURSDAY- INTERN ATONAL HOUSE
Upper Lounge
You've Seen the Ads - Now Hear the Details
(If you already have an application — Please complete and return)
Lets  Go Skiing!
• Erbacher, Gresvig and A & T skit
• E.C.L., Tyrol and La Dolomite Boots
• E.C.L., Tyrolia and Allais Harness
• Junior Ski Sets
• After Ski Boots and Slippers
• Toques, Parkas, Hoods, and Hats
COMPLETE SKI SETS AT $33.95
SKI OUTFIT
E.C.L. Engelberg Ski
Thunderer Step-in Harness, Steel Poles — $45.95
SKI OUTFIT COMPLETE
E.C.L. Jaguar Ski
Salomon  Allais W.E.  Step-in  Harness
Steel Poles
Tyrol Krista Boots $99.95
Sweaters and Sox
Goggles and Glasses
•
Repairs and
Installations
SKI
RENTALS
North Western Sporting Goods Ltd.
10TH AVE. AT ALMA ROAD
224-5040
An M.A. Thesis Production
A SCENT
OF FLOWERS
Directed by Judith Freiman
JANUARY 31 -
FEBRUARY 3 - 8:30
Matinee   Feb.   1   —   12:30
Students  $1.00 Adults  $1.50
FREDERIC WOOD
STUDIO
STUDENTS
That have Scholarship, Bursary or Provincial Government
cheques coming, must pick
them up at the cashier's
wicket by Jan. 29.
After this date all awards will
be cancelled.
Summer Employment
for
First Year Engineering Undergraduates
First Year Engineering Undergraduates are invited to discuss
summer  employment  opportunities  with  Canada's   leading
Forest Products Company.
Interviews will be held on campus
January 29 and 30
for students planning to choose Chemical, Mechanical or
Electrical Engineering. The summer work programs are
organized to provide increasingly responsible duties and
projects at attractive rates of pay.
For additional information and appointments please contact
your Student Placement Office.
AA
MacMillan Bloedel Limited
A CLEVER AND W£U'DRAWN"
Bwfiir7
MEMf;
#$P
etV
■il**
security is -findinaa
group of Vfe-win6eo
associates.
lack of security K
finding out tmt won
are no? wanted.."
lAPlNETTC'SI
BUNNY
CLU&
FOR BUNNT|
LOVEP.S.
.. 6ut positive action
IS HhcA 6eUtrt/itm
fceKnp
neat
tare
a,free auios to ifk
identification of real
fomesi Bunnies.
lajanette skidded
to a stop, there
- was a si£n inviting
hunny iypes "to join,
a club—or at least So
ste thought-.
Jtow, our iuimy* iSxrl
Icncwswlien siie^is
wanted..
it is a little harder,
sometimes, t& Icnow
when you aren't.
•tliis club didn't want
■hex- at all. "tut I lime
all the tt£cessai»v
equipment! "She sowed.
buk the little man only
comes the camjxtsfcank
to the fescue! our
manafer explained, •mar
these clubs aren't for
?afcbite at all—just--for
frustrated duniers.. he
svu&£sted that jerhaps
she could start- lust* own
bunny club, and- even
&yva.n&d a loan to pay
fbr -posters and such/*
last we heard* the
«."^£ line-up was over a
IP™    Mock, long.
imt we suspect that*
those fellows mayhs
a hit disappointed
with the setup.
you See, Mese tunnies
are for i*eal...
1 ^...•^J*!f *"R
campusbaiik branch.
in the Hdminisb-aiion building
g.f. peirson, manager
Open. B.'ho - 5 Monday to Thursday - 93o - 6 Friday Thursday, January 25, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
— kurt hilger photo
DISTANCE STILLS the wind-tossed scenery captured by Ubyssey photo editor Kurt Hilger. White
tops foam less and trees sway less. Blue skies emerged from the clouds — could it be spring?
Vietnam confusion deliberate
By MIKE FITZGERALD
The average American citizen is being brainwashed says a U.S. psychologist.
Isidor Ziferstein told 400 students in Bu. 104
Wednesday the U.S. government uses psycho-
>gical habituation to win people over to its side
£ the Vietnam war.
"It's method is to bewilder and confound the
verage American citizen and make him feel
ncomfortable," he said.
"It involves several steps. Certain rumors of
ietnam incidents are leaked. This upsets the
eople for a time.
"Then, in a few weeks a government repre-
sntative officially denies the rumor and the
latter is dropped."
Ziferstein said the president's role in the
rainwashing is to come forth to comfort his
ibjects and convince them there is no truth to
le rumors.
"The brainwashing builds up slowly day by
ay until the people realize they are involved
in a war. This psychological habituation is very
effective."
The U.S. Information Bureau stands for the
eleventh amendment, he said.
"The eleventh amendment is the democratic
right of the people not to know."
Since the U.S. became officially involved in
Vietnam in 1947, all four presidents, Truman,
Eisenhower, Kennedy and Johnson have supported this form of mass conversion, he said.
In 1947, the U.S. gave financial aid to France
under the terms of the Marshall Plan.
When France decided to use part of the aid
to finance their military operations in Vietnam,
the U.S. did not protest, he said.
"Gradually their involvement built up into
what it is now.
"Peace marchers, sit-in demonstraters and the
like are not affected by this habituation. It is
our duty to join them and see that this brainwashing is stopped or the situation will develop
into a global war."
Bursary protest
gets fast results
QUEBEC (CUP)—More than 1,000 students Tuesday marched
in front of the education department offices here protesting slowness in processing student loan and bursary applications.
Inside, education minister Jean-Guy Cardinal promised an
acceleration of the review of loan-bursary applications.
At the end of a two-hour meeting, Cardinal said he had
asked executives of L'Union Generale des Etudiants du Quebec
(UGEQ) to co-operate with the department in establishing norms
and standards for next year's loan-bursary requests.
The protest was organized by UGEQ to dramatize the department's slowness in processing loan applications, and to protest
what student leaders termed unfair criteria for evaluation of
certain classifications of applicants.
Quebec sources say over 68,000 students submitted applications this year. Cardinal said over 33,000 applications had to be
returned because they were improperly filled out by students.
Paul Bourbeau, a UGEQ vice-president, says to date over
8,000 students have yet to receive a reply to their applications
for money. He denied a rumor, circulated by the Canadian Press,
that over 4,000 students were to be prosecuted for submitting
fraudulent applications.
Bourbeau claimed only 600 cases are under consideration
for prosecution.
Under the Quebec student loan-bursary plan, students whose
requests are denied or reduced may ask for a review of their case.
Student leaders complained if these requests were not reviewed quickly, students may have to drop out of school for this
year.
Students also renewed demands for eventual elimination
of tuition fees for all levels of education.
A hint of humor cheered the demonstrators shivering outside
in the cold. One girl carried a huge sign saying Bursaries or
Prostitution.
Another, referring to student claims that the loan-bursary
plan is unfavorable to married students, said, Johnson Favorise
le Concubinage (Johnson encouraged living in sin).
Deadline extended
on illegal suites
By STEPHEN JACKSON
Ubyssey Housing Reporter
Vancouver city council is denying needed suites to
apartment seekers, Alma Mater Society first vice-president
Don Munton said Wednesday.
He was commenting on city council's rejection Tuesday
of an AMS request that the city revise its stand on illegal
suites.
At present, areas zoned for single family dwellings may
have no more than two boarders.
Alderman accepting recommendations of the board of
administration voted against the AMS suggestion to increase
the boarders permitted.
The board based its recommendation on a report on
illegal accommodation made by the city building inspector
and the director of planning.
Council also voted to continue eliminating illegal suites.
The AMS had requested that more home owners be
allowed to install apartments and that the 2,100 illegal
suites already closed be reopened.
But council did agree with the AMS suggestion to extend for two years — until Dec. 31, 1969 — the licenses of
those homes operating suites now.
"I was surprised and completely disappointed with
council's decision. In effect, they made no moves," Munton
said.
'If our request had been granted yesterday, in a few
months there would be 5,000 more suites available. Students
would have got a fair number of them." sya^^^^VsKSf^ $--
■^■JS^sw
THEWSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 224-3916. Other
calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page Friday, loc. 24; sports, loc.
23; advertising, loc. 26. Telex 04-5224.
Final winner Southam Trophy, awarded by Canadian
University Press for general excellence. Co-winner Bracken
Trophy for editorial writing.
JANUARY 25, 1968
Shaun did it...
I Someone has finally given substance to the common, but ill-defined, charge that UBC student council
is irrelevant. That person is merely the chairman of
student council, Alma Mater Society president Shaun
Sullivan.
Sullivan did the trick with his admission that council has done next to nothing about implementing its
promise to take action on matters that concern students
as students—academic affairs. The promise was made in
a series of resolutions, passed last March, that called for,
among other things, joint AMS-faculty work on general
academic reform and annual AMS research projects
into university problems.
Now, wo do not deny that homecomings, bowling
alleys in student union buildings, and laundry facilities
at Acadia Park are parts of university life. We do not
deny that as such they deserve student council attention. What we do deny is that such matters deserve
all of council's attentign.
What chiefly concerns students during their years
at UBC are courses, classrooms, libraries, and professors.
Until such matters chiefly concern student council, the
charge of irrelevance will stick.
... Rep by pop
Teaming up with Sullivan to add force to the view
that council is irrelevant is one of his AMS executive
cohorts, co-ordinator Jim Lightfoot.
This worthy, a member of the student government
for two years, made his contribution Monday night when
he opposed a proposed constitutional reform aimed at
widening council's membership to 45. Lightfoot said he
didn't think there were 45 people on campus interested
in student government.
He was right. There are not 45 students interested
in UBC student government the way that student government operates now.
Students. are not interested because, as we mentioned above, council has failed to concern itself with
matters that concern students as students.
But there is another reason. As two political science
professors pointed out Monday, under the wierd AMS
constitution many of UBC's 18,000 students are drastically under-represented on council.
One stark example tells the sad story: There are
280 home economics students at UBC. There are 4,918
arts students. But both the home ec. and arts representative on council have one vote apiece. Which means that
the influence of one home economics student on what
happens in council is approximately 16 times the influence of one arts student.
The proposed revisions, prepared by council's constitutional revisions committee, represent only a small
move toward approximating a democratic system of
student  government. They don't go nearly far enough.
Chief fault with the committee's report is that it
fails to insist upon a system of representation by population. It suggests a maximum representation on council
cor the largest faculties of "perhaps five." But if this
naximum number of five were awarded to a large
acuity such as science (3,422 students) while home ec.
etained its one vote, rep by pop would be only slightly
advanced. The home ec. student would still have a
voice almost three times as large as that of the science
student. The inequity between the largest faculty, arts,
and the smallest, librarianship (85 students) and rehab
medicine (96 students), would be much greater.
We cannot understand the aversion of people associated with student politics .to the democratic system
of governipent. We cannot understand why, in the process of ensuring a fair voice on council for the smaller
faculties, it is necessary to make second and third class
citizens out of students who happen to be registered
in larger faculties.
Until we have a body based on the one-man, one-
/ote principle the AMS council will have no right to
he claim that it represents the students of UBC.
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Lari  sakes
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I had difficulty believing
that the pictures in last Saturday's Sun, showing fraternity
and sorority members done up
in black-face for the deep
south theme of this year's
Mardi Gras, were for real.
Fry my hide, mammy! Ain't
dem darkies cute? Lan' sakes,
a body can hardly believe
they're goin' out rioting and
all these days, when they been
having such a grand time
down in de cotton fields of ole
Mississippi.
God help us! Who needs
Governor Wallace, when we've
got students right here at UBC
still perpetrating the Negro
image as a bango-strumming,
step - 'n - fetch - it, watermelon-
eating Al Jolson?
You'd better believe it, kiddies: Stokley Carmichael is
alive and well. And he's talking to you.
MRS. OLIVE JOHNSON
2605 West Thirty-seventh
Council ignoble
Editor, The Ubyssey:
There are several comments
I would like to make in addi-
NO
COMMENT
NECESSARY
DEPT.
tion to those reported by Mike
Finlay in last Tuesday's
Ubyssey.
My previous remarks were
prompted not by any inward
revelation of a divine mission
to expound on student government — Mr. Finlay phoned me
and I answered his questions.
There is nothing wrong with
weighted voting. An excellent
system would be one in which
each student had, in voting for
his representatives, a number
of votes determined by the following formula: (student's average mark).2
Massive financial support by
the council of the various anti-
calendars would provide a
check on unscrupulous profs
seeking to give higher marks
to members of toadying interest
groups.
I agree with Don Munton's
response to my comments. The
point is that council is not far
enough ahead of student opinion.
About representation: UBC
student councils have shown
little sign of representing students as students—as members
of an academic community in
which excellence in study and
teaching is the highest goal. It
may be satisfying (and most im
pressive to one's future corporate employers) to have one's
name in brass on the SUB's
dedication plaque, but it would
have been far nobler to have
spent the SUB money on such
things as scholarships, the library, the anti-calendars, and
the bringing of great teachers
to our campus.
PAUL TENNANT
depl. of political science
Nefarious
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I wish to point out a serious
error in your editorial of Jan.
19, entitled "Nonconformists."
The incident you were writing
about happened at Waterloo
University College, part of
Waterloo Lutheran University.
No such incident occurred at
the University of Waterloo, a
completely different institution.
The University of Waterloo has
consistently discounted any
activity that occurs at Waterloo Lutheran, and you do the
university a great disservice
by linking its name with such
nefarious practices that go on
"down the road."
HAROLD ARMSTRONG
BA (65)
University of Waterloo
Mardi Gras "king" poster.
"••*-   •     A^;
James Meredith, immediately after he was shot during his march through Mississipi, June, 1966. Thursday, January 25,  1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
■■'Ttev_ >*■
— george hollo photo
WORKER SPECULATES on rear differential of near-by dump trunk as construction of new general services and administration building begins at corner of Wesbrook and University Boulevard. Building will cost $1,401,299.
Art gallery hideout for wanted
SAN FRANCISCO (UNS) —
Eleven students and a faculty
member seeking sanctuary
from local police who want to
arrest them, have holed up in
the San Francisco State College art gallery.
The arrests were ordered on
college president John Sum-
merkill's complaint about the
twelve's actions during a Dec.
6 mill-in when 200 students
occupied the locked administration building.
Warrants are out for their arrests but city police can't serve
them unless Summerkill invites police on campus.
The eleven students and
John Gerassi, the only faculty
member who participated in
the mill-in, were selected because of their leadership roles
in campus left-wing organizations, spokesmen charge.
Trouble began at the college
in November when newspaper
editor Jim Vaszko was beaten
by members of the Black Students Union. They claim the
paper delayed unnecessarily in
publishing the picture of their
candidate for homecoming
queen.
Another contributing factor
in the disturbance was the
radical weekly paper Open
Process which printed a poem
about anal masturbation. Summerkill suspended publication.
About 75 people are staying
with the live-ins in the art
gallery. Students expect the
arrests to be put off for at
least eight days until the semester break begins.
BRITISH  COLUMBIA
TRACK
& FIELD
COACHES
COURSE
An eight week course (1
hr. per week) leading to the
B.C. Track and Field Official
Coaches Award will be starting soon. Registration will be
on Friday, January 26th from
12:30 to 1:30 in the hallway
of the Memorial Gymnasium.
Course free of charge. Exam
fee $3.00.
School of Physical Education
and Recreation
Recreational Activities
Programme
Phone  228-3838
BRUCE CARLSON
PSI   UPSILON'S   King   candidate
invites all king & queen candidates to a cocktail party at
"The London Hilton" on Friday morning from 3 a.m. to 5
a.m., Room 625, 55 Hyde Park Road, London SW 1, England.
Please pick up your pre-paid tickets from the C.P.A. terminal
in Havana Cuba. R.S.V.P. "The Arms"
MENf and WOMEN'S
SKI and CURLING PANTS
Ready-made and made-to-measure
PANT SUITS VJTSL
Quick Service—Buy Direct from the Manufacturer
Alto SKIRTS. SWEATERS and SKI OUTFITS
10% off for students
s
654 Seymour St. Tel. 681-8621
MARDI GRAS
Pep-Meet                 Noon                 Today Gym
Bazaar               6:30-11:00                P.N.E. Show mart
Costume  Dance       9:00-1:00 Jan. 27 Showmart
Tickets    AMS $5.00
The House of Seagram
Interviews
will be conducted
the afternoon of
FEBRUARY 5th
for students graduating in
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
BACTERIOLOGY
BIOCHEMISTRY
CHEMISTRY
FOOD TECHNOLOGY
See The University Placement Service
for Information and Interview Appointment
Alma  Mater  Society
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
A.M.S.  Elections
First Slate
Wednesday,   Feb.   7,   1968
Second  Slate
Wednesday, Feb. 14, 1968
President
External   Affairs   Officer
Internal   Affairs   Officer
Secretary
Vice-President
Treasurer
Co-ordinator of Activities
Ombudsman
, Nominations for first slate will open on January 24, 1968
and close at 12 noon on Thursday, February 1, 1968;
for second slate, nominations will open on January 31,
1968 and close at 12 noon on February 8, 1968. Nominations forms, certificates of eligibility and copies of the
election rules and procedures are available from the
A.M.S.  Office.
/
Senate Elections
Nominations for the vacant student seat on senate will
open on January 24, 1968 and close at 12 noon on Thursday, February 1, 1968. Voting will take place Wednesday, February 7, 1968. The term of office ends this term.
Nomination forms and information are available from
the A.M.S. Office.
Academic Symposium
Feb. 2- 4,1968
"Turned-On Education
rr
Bob Barker      —      Free School
formerly taught at Summerhill
Rob Watt     —     Knowplace
Bernie D'Aust      —      Ombudsman for New School
S.F.U.  Faculty of Ed.
APPLICATION       FORM
NAME   	
ADDRESS	
PHONE NUMBER   	
FACULTY     YEAR	
MALE FEMALE	
Have you attended any previous symposiums?
Yes No When	
What topic would you like to see discussed at the Symposium? Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
'TWEEN CLASSES . . .
Thursday, January 25,  1968
..BY RICHARD  BLAIR
Three poets and candles, noon today
ARTS COUNCIL
Poetry reading and strobe
candles by Bill Bissett, Scott
Lawrance, David Frith, today,
noon, Bu. 104. First of a biweekly series.
SCM AND LSM
Performance of Benjamin
Britten's Rejoice in the Lamb,
by Camerata Chorale conducted by Len Lythsoe. Tonight,
10 p.m., Lutheran Campus
Centre.
FILMSOC
Blowup has been cancelled.
AMS
The AMS housing survey is
coming. Watch for it in the
mail. Fill it out when it comes
and return as soon as possible.
VCF
Dr.   D.   A.    Hubbard   from
Fuller   Theological   Seminary,
Calif.,   speaks   on   a   Christian
Looks at Marshall McLuhan.
NEWMAN CENTRE
Hootenanny Sunday 8 p.m.,
St. Mark's College Lounge.
UN CLUB
Panel discussion: learn about
CIASP,   CUSO,   WUS,   Cross-
EDITOR: Danny Stoffman
City   Stuart Gray
News   Susan Gransby
Managing   Murray McMillan
Photo   Kurt Hilger
Senior   Pat Hrushowy
Sports  Mike Jessen
Wire       Norman   Gidney
Page Friday   Judy Bing
Ass't. City    Boni  Lee
When west winds whither weathered widows, wads weally work well.
Among them were Paul Knox, who
ate six bags of popcorn and was promoted to  kernel, Alexandra Volkoff,
Someone's
birthday
this week?
Show that you care
- phone that night!
B.C.TEL^
—let Balaam appear
with an ass . . .
—for the mouse is a
creature of great
personal valour . . .
—cat takes female
mouse . . . male mouse
will not depart . . .
Camerata Chorale sings Benjamin
Britten's setting of Christopher Smart's
paranoic (?) poem "Rejoice in The
Lamb" at the
LUTHERAN CAMPUS
CENTRE CHAPEL
Thurs., January 25 at 10 p.m.
—Conductor
LEN   LYTHGOE
—Soloists
DON   BROWN
JANET  MOWETT
roads Africa, the Peace Corps
—at IH today, noon. Everyone
welcome.
EL CIRCULO
Talk followed by discussion
in   Spanish   today,   noon,   IH
402 - 404. Everyone welcome.
MUSSOC
See Half A Sixpence free by
ushering Feb. 8 to Feb. 17.
Sign up in the auditorium box
office.
MUSSOC
All cast for Half A Sixpence
—get to Watts costume for fitting  by Friday.   Rehearsal  at
Grace's, 7 p.m., Friday.
EUS
Engineering mixer Friday, 9
p.m. to 1 a.m., at Lions Gate
Hall.    Girls,    only    25    cents.
Otherwise engineers only.
COLLEGE LIFE
Teach-in, noon today, in ed.
1006. Also formation of action
groups.
CONSTITUTIONAL
REVISIONS COMMITTEE
The committee meets again
Friday, noon, in the AMS vice-
president's office in Brock.
Anyone with ideas welcome.
who brought her giraffe down, and
Mike Fitzgerald, who was zealous.
Irene Wasilewski wore a scuba diving outfit, Mark DeCoursey wrote
superb headlines, and Fred Cawsey
made sound effects. Steve Jackson
was eaten by a giant mortician and
became trapped in the coroner. Mike
Finlay, walking unevenly, talked
about uneven  representation.
Jim Maddin and Bob Banno took a
pot (of tea) in the jock shop.
Among brilliant, energetic workers
in the darkroom were Bob Brown,
Chris Blake, Lawrence Wood and
Geroge  Georgy Hollo.
UNITED CHURCH
CHAPLAINCY
Consultation on ministry,
Union College, Feb. 3, or phone
224-3266 or 224-0069.
DEBATING UNION
Finals of McGoun Cup debates, UBC vs. Saskatchewan,
Friday, 8:30 p.m., IH. Topic:
This House Would Rather Plymouth Rock Had Fallen on the
Pilgrim Fathers.
NDP
Meet Jim Renwick, national
NDP   president   and    Ontario
deputy-leader,    Friday,    noon,
Ang. 104.
GERMAN DEPT.
Prof. Leonard Forster, of
Cambridge University, speaks
on Literary History as an
Academic Discipline today,
noon, Bu. 100.
SCM
Symposium on creativity and
contemporary man, with Shad-
bolt, Harlow, Darcus, Ritch
and Shaver, Lutheran Campus
Center, today, 6 p.m.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Dr. Huston Smith, professor
of philosophy at MIT, speaks
on the Coming World Civilization, Friday, noon, Brock Hall.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
Field    trip    to    Willingdon
leaves   Bu.    Extension   today,
12:30 p.m.
REHAB MEDICINE
Three films: PNF, Transfers
and Use of Psychoprophylaxis
in Childbirth, tonight, 7:30,
lecture room A.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Former Conservative MP
Douglas Jung speaks on Chinese in politics, Friday, noon,
Bu. 205.
CONSERVATIVE CLUB
Club members invited to
meet John Loney, MP for
Bruce, Ontario, tonight, 8:00,
room 405, York Hotel.
' BLOW-UP CANCELLED. NO SHOWS
today.  Film  Soc.  apologizes.
When?
IN   1968
When   we're   good   and   ready
Zeta   Psi
Panel Discussion
on
C.U.S.O. THE PEACE CORPS
W.U.S. C.I.A.S.P.
CROSS ROADS AFRICA
What Are They?        What Do They Do?
International House— Thursday 12:30
EVERYONE WELCOME
SCHOOL DISTRICT
No. 36 (SURREY)
Interviews with student teachers who have completed their
professional year of training and who will be eligible for an
E.A. certificate or better by September, 1968 will be held
regularly at the School Board Office in Surrey, 14225—56th
Avenue, Cloverdale, each Friday.
Interviews during other days of the week may be arranged
by phoning 594-0411.
E. Marriott,
District  Superintendent
of Schools.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students. Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*, 3 day* 92.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone..
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
Lost & Found
13
LOST: NURSE'S WATCH ARMOUR-
ies—Farmers' Frolic, also gold signet   ring,   initials   L.K.   Call   Linda,
266-5857.
FOUND ON MAIN MALL BETWEEN
Buchanan and Lassere, Girl's
change purse( brown) Ph. 266-
9748.
REWARD ! ! ! FOR TAN BUXTON
wallet lost Mon. after 4. Phone
Maureen   261-7819.
LOST WALLET — NEED CARDS
desperately. Call Al Verlgin. 263-
0334   after   5:30  p.m.
Rides & Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSURANCE
rates? If you have a valid driver's
license and good driving habits you
may qualify. Phone Ted Elliott,
321-6442.
DON'T MISS "EYE BALL" COMING
Feb. 9th. An International event at
the Hotel Vancouver's "Pacific"
Ballroom.   Tickets   at   I.H.   or   from
A.M.S.
YOUR FUTURE FOR A DOLLAR.
Authentic Fortune Teller. Zeta Psi
booth at the Bazaar.
MEET A BEAUTIFUL "ZOO" GIRL
at the Zeta Psi booth — Mardi Gras
Bazaar.
WOULD THE GIRL IN RESIDENCE
who wished to see the survey results
please contact me again. Lost your
name.  Thanx.   Blaize  Horner.
Travel  Opportunities
16
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
WANTED, MORRIS, AUSTIN, ETC.
1957 on. Reas. shape. $100 — $150.
Phone   Brian.   266-5521   after   6   p.m.
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'63 V.W., 1500 SEDAN. NEW VALVE
job, good tires, clutch, and body.
$800.   phone   325-2687   or   684-4011.
WHY BUY A BRAND NEW ONE ?
Save $300.0 on this '68 M.G.B. 4500
miles.   738-5291.
1954 BUICK SPECIAL 4-DR SEDAN
(American). Auto. Trans. Radio.
Good   condition.   $200.   S22-7171.
'59 M.G.A. $700. GOOD CONDITION,
Michelin X tires, wood panelling,
navy blue metallic. 732-6695 after
6:00.
1962 METEOR 4 DOOR SEDAN. V-8
standard. 55,000 miles, good tires,
new brakes, immaculate condition.
F.P. $975. 261-8006.	
Automobile Parts
23
SEE OUR COMPLETE RANGE OF
Sports Car Accessories. 10% discount with AMS card. Overseas
Auto Parts. 12th and Alma. 736-
9805.
TR4 (4A) WORKSHOP MANUAL,
Tonneau cover, mounted snow tires,
offers.    738-9032.
TWO NEW 165-15 SEMPERIT STUD-
ded snow tires with tubes,with or
without   TR   rims.  431-2131.
Motorcycles
26
HONDA-FIAT
Motorcycles -  Cars
Generators  - Utility Units
New and  Used
SPORT  CARS
N T
O      Motors      S
R B
T       W
145 Robson H 688-1284
1965 YAMAHA 250CC. 5800 MI. LIKE
new and must be seen. Open for
offers.   266-5002.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Miscellaneous
32
Scandals
37
BLOW-UP CANCELLED. NO SHOWS
today.  Film   Soc.  apologizes.	
SELLING YOUR TEXTBOOKS? TRY
The Bookfinder. 4444 West 10th
Ave. 228-8933.
Typewriters & Repairs
39
STANDARD REMINGTON "NOISE-
less", excellent condition, $60. Older
Underwood standard, $15, evenings,
433-7844.
Typing
40
EXPERT   TYPIST    -    ELECTRIC
224-6129   -   228-8384.
Typing  (Conl.)
40
EXPERT   ELECTRIC   TYPIST
Experienced   essay   and   thesis   typist
Reasonable   Rates   TR.   4-9253
EXPERIENCED   TYPIST.   REASON-
able   rates,    phone   733-6679.	
GOOD EXPERIENCED TYPIST
available for home typing, please
call   277-5640.
UNIVERSITY TYPING SERVICES,
2109 Allison Rd., 228-8414, around
the corner from World Wide Travel
next to RCMP open 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Monday  to   Friday.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
Male  or Female
53
PART TIME HELP (MALE OR FE-
male) for weekend evenings. Age
over 21 preferred, licensed dining
room, apply 1312 S.W. Marine Dr.,
261-7951.
Work Wanted
54
INSTRUCTION
Instruction   Wanted
61
Tutoring
84
ENGLISH, FRENCH, HISTORY
tutoring given by B.A., M.A.,
B.L.S. Individual, $2.95 hr. Phone
736-6923. ;	
MATH, PHYSICS, CHEMISTRY, Biology lessons given by competent
tutors. First year only, 736-6923.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
Still a  few  left
—    BIRD CALLS    —
on Sale at: Publications Office
Brock   Hall   or   UBC   Bookstore
SITARS FROM INDIA. OLD WORLD
quality hand crafted. Roy Lowe
Agencies,   phone   434-6947.	
ONE PAIR NEW ALBERG SKI-
boots, mens, size 8M, never used.
$45,   phone   261-1714.	
NEW MAGNETIC TAPES FOR SALE
1 mil. Mylar Acetate. 5" reel at
1.25   at   International   house.
7' HICKORY SKIS, SIZE 11 BOOTS,
Cubco binders, poles, $35.00. See
hut   A-2,   Don   Gill,   224-4611.	
VOX 12 STRING GUITAR WITH
case. $275 or best offer. Bill 922-
2450.
VR-17 207 CM.  "G" SKIS FOR SALE.
Used one season, ph.  Ken.  738-3380.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
SINGLE ROOM AND BREAKFAST,
UBC male student, 3708 W. 38th
Ave.,   266-9280.
Room & Board
•2
IGNORE CLAIMS OF BRAND X —
check with Dekes first, phone Len,
224-5916,  after   6.
EXCELLENT FOOD — GOOD Accommodation for second term. 2280
Wesbrook  224-9986.
RESIDENCE ACCOMMODATION,
Carey Hall. On Campus, good food,
friendly atmosphere, privacy respected. Single or double room.
University rate. Phone the Dean,
224-6939 or evenings 224-5086.
BEST     ROOMS.     BEST     FOOD     ON
campus.   Phi   Kappa   Pi.   224-9667.
ROOM AND BOARD ON CAMPUS.
Zeta Beta Tau. Phone 224-9660 between   5-7   p.m.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
WANTED TO RENT FOR DOCTOR
and wife small furnished house,
UBC vicinity from April for 6 mths.
Call 521-1911, local 521 (Office); or
733-0229  (res.).
NEAR UBC. MODERN 3 BDRMS.
fully furn. hse: 5 mths lease: Feb.-
June $300 monthly incl. heat and
light.   Phone  224-4992   after  6  p.m.
WANTED MALE ROOMATE TO
share furnished apartment. West-
End.    Phone:    685-9684.
Unfurn. Houses & Apts.
84
TWO MEDICAL STUDENTS WITH
apartment near V.G.H. would like
another roomate to share expenses.
Phone 731-6630 around 1:00 p.m. or
between 11:00 p.m.  and midnight.
BUY - SELL - RENT
WITH
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED Thursday, January 25,  1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
Dohling is
too much
for Birds
Portland State guard Hal
Dohling may be no Lew Al-
cindor or Elvin Hayes but he
looked pretty big to the UBC
basketball Thunderbirds Tuesday night at War Memorial
Gym.
Dohling poured in 26 points
as the Vikings outlasted UBC
83-79 in the hard-fought contest.
The San Leandro, California,
native hit on 11 of 23 shots
from the field and sank all
four of his free throws.
"I felt we could take them
but Dohling made the big difference," said UBC coach
Peter Mullins.
With less than three minutes
remaining, PSC enjoyed a ten-
point margin but two 25-foot
jump shots by guard Phil
Langley and two foul shots by
Frank Rotering brought UBC
to within two points.
But the desperate Birds were
forced to foul the stalling
Oregon squad and forwards
Ed Gorman and Don Suloff hit
four last-minute free throws
to sink UBC.
Rookie center Frank Rotering made his starting debut a
success by leading UBC scorers
with 24 points.
Forward Ian Dixon, back
after an ankle injury, hit for
17 points and veteran Neil
Murray added 15 more.
Forward Peter Ness backed
up Dohling's efforts with 20
points for PSC.
The Birds travel to Saskatchewan this weekend for a
pair of Western Conference
games with the last place
Huskies.
The basketball Jayvees are
also away this weekend as
they visit Seattle Friday to
play the Seattle University
frosh. Saturday the Jayvees
are in Moses Lake for a contest with Big Bend Community
College.
— derreck webb photo
"WHEN'S THAT BALL coming down?" yelled these players
at Tuesday night's basketball game. Thunderbird players
Ian Dixon (30) and Bob Molinski (42) waited patiently but
the Birds lost 83-79.
Ice  Hockey Braves win  lucky  13th
Will 13 be an unlucky number for the UBC ice hockey
Braves?
The winningest team in the
Richmond Intermediate Hockey
League Wednesday night won
their 13th straight league
game 7-1 at the expense of the
Richmond Flyers.
Wes Borkowski and Brian
Shillington led the Braves
with   two   goals   apiece   -while
Bob Barrie, Dwayne Biagioni
and Stan Stewart scored
singles.
UBC goalie Don Cram lost
his shutout with about five
minutes left in the game.
NOW AVAILABLE
TICKETS
to
THE   INTERNATIONAL
BALL
FEBRUARY   9th,   9   p.m.
HOTEL   VANCOUVER
INQUIRE I. H. OFFICE OR A.M.S.
SUPPORT OUR
SKI TEAMS
attend
"The Magnificent
Skiers"
by RICK GLOCKNER
8:30 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 25
John Oliver High School Aud.
Price $1.50 at door or
Ski Shops
Sponsored   by  the   Canadian
Amateur Ski Association
—W.D.
WINRAM
An M.A. Thesis Production
A SCENT
INSURANCE
OF FLOWERS
LIMITED
Directed by Judith Freiman
Specializing  in
JANUARY 31 -
Reducing
FEBRUARY 3 - 8:30
Surcharged Auto Premiums
Matinee  Feb.   1   —   12:30
731-5328
Students $1.00                   Adults  $1.50
1678 West Broadway
FREDERIC WOOD
STUDIO
%4ia REPUBLIC
DAY CELEBRATION
DANCES
SONGS
INDIAN FOOD
SKIT
FILMS
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
SAT. JAN 27th - 7:30 p.m.
50c EACH
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
ALL RESIDENCES
EVERYONE WELCOME
ORGANIZED BY
INDIA STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
foUiH
m ^4       JAN 18
WV> -FEB 16
In The New MUSIC BUILDING Recital Hall
TODAY -  12:30 - UNIVERSITY CHAMBER SINGERS
directed   by   Cortland    Multberg
Music   of   Webern,   Gabrieli,   Hindemith
JAN. 26-8 P.M
UNIVERSITY CHAMBER SINGERS
(Program   as   above)
NO ADMISSION CHARGE
WINTER IS HERE!!
■j{ Free Antifreeze Check
-^ Free Battery Check
jt Goodyear Winter Tires
+ Imported V.W. Chains
UNIVERSITY SHELL SERVICE
4314 W.  10th
224-0828
IN THE MINISTRY?
Union College of B.C. (a Theological College of the United
Church of Canada) invites applications to attend a "Consultation on Ministry", on Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 3 and 4.
It is open to men and women who have completed grade 12
and would Ibe interested in discussing vocations in and
through the Church, without obligation or pressure to enter
a Church vocation.
If interested, please write to Principal W. S. Taylor, Union
College of B.C., 6000 Iona Drive, Vancouver 8 by Monday,
January 29th, or phone the College office <224-3266) or (224-
0069) and leave name, address and telephone number.
COMMERCE
LAW ... AND
ARTS STUDENTS
TORONTO HEAD OFFICE OFFERS
OPPORTUNITIES IN ESTATE
PLANNING.
CONTACT THE OFFICE OF STUDENT SERVICES
REGARDING   INTERVIEWS  JAN.   31,   FEB.   1   AND 2
^ EXCELSIOR LIFE Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 25, 1968
Y-J^^v-:
-*jtr-'i
. ■ *,j •
**■*-. *■
■ *. '  ' By MIKE jSSftER   '",•'..
Ufcjrwe* Spotfe Sdtter    ■■ '
We got a letter recently which called for a re-examination
of the sports coverage policy of The Ubyssey. As sports editor
and the sole one responsible for the content of The Ubyssey's
sports pages, I would like to reply to this letter and to squelch
some of the idyllic dreams of the co-authors, Rick Angus and
Jon Sigurdson.
As the co-authors stated in their letter, "The Ubyssey is
responsible for reporting campus activities of which sports are
an integral part deserving wider review."
Angus and Sigurdson may not realize it but sports this year
are receiving the widest coverage in The Ubyssey's history. For
the first time we have a sports page three times a week.
There are, however, limitations as to how
wide a review UBC's $100,000-a-year sports
program can be given. The chief restrictions
are space and staff.
To give adequate coverage to all sports on
campus would require The Ubyssey to devote
itself entirely to reporting athletic news. This
would be impossible for it's not The Ubyssey's
purpose.
The  Ubyssey,  like  all  other newspapers,
attempts to cover all news and sports events
and  like  all  newspapers  we  cannot  possibly
JESSEN cover them all.
My policy this year, because of our limitations, has been to
give consistent coverage to the most attended sports, which are
football, basketball and ice hockey, and to include features at
regular intervals on the other sports to show the students that
these events exist and that they are also worth attending.
Therefore, some sports occasionally receive only brief re-
sumees which Angus and Sigurdson condemned as "hardly sufficient to promote wider interest in university athletics."
Angus and Sigurdson go on to say that "reporters should be
opinionated, stressing the highlights rather than reciting the
statistics. Another good point but it's rather hard to be opinionated when one did not see the game one is writing about.
It is impossible to have a reporter cover each of the 25 or so
so sports played by UBC teams. Sports writers go to as many
games as possible but they rely heavily on reports from managers, coaches, players or other interested persons. These reports
are often mostly statistical for this is what interests the people
who give them to us.
If I had 25 reporters I would assign one to each sport and
then the stories which resulted would most likely be more interesting and informative.
But I don't have that many reporters. I have only seven. Of
these, five cover one specific sport each because they have no
more time to spend on writing stories. This leaves the bulk of
the work to be done by two other reporters and myself and we
often have many other things to do as well.
Student journalists are both students and journalists and
this is often forgotten. We are not covering and writing for The"
Ubyssey on a full-time basis and we get no pay for what we do.
Like other students we have classes, homework, essays and exams.
In short we're human, just like our readers.
If Angus, Sigurdson or anyone else, however, feel that they
have some spare time and if they would sincerely like to improve the sports pages of The Ubyssey, they are invited to come
in and see us and help us put out a better product.
The only limitation to a better newspaper is that too many
people just sit back and criticize but never act on their complaints.
£jt0?U
UBYSSEY
Thousand-mile run ahead
for car rally competitors
By JIM MADDIN
For peaceniks and hippies a rally is a place
to go and complain; for motor sport enthusiasts,
who can always be found complaining after a
rally, it is a way to enjoy their sport.
The subject is car rallies and the UBC
Sports Car Club's Thunderbird Rally, which gets
under way from the Pacific Press building on
Friday at 9 p.m., in particular.
Rallymaster Don Munro and his assistant
Bob Owen have set out an 1,100-mile route leading from Vancouver into the interior and back
for the rallyists.
The course this year will be on highways and
secondary roads, mostly snow covered, with a
few not-too-well defined paths in the interior
thrown in for the fun of it.
FIRMS HELP SPONSOR
Due to the hard work of certain members of
the Sports Car Club, notably Munro, Owen,
Alan Gentles, Gary Tindall, Norm Daniel, Barry
Child, Greg Oryall and Mike Hunter, this rally
has many large business firms willing to help
sponsor it.
Especially notable among these sponsors are
car dealers who are awarding special prizes to
the highest placing competitors driving their
products.
This will certainly make the rally more interesting as far as the competition goes, as these
are beautiful and prestigious trophies.
GOOD REPUTATION
Because the Thunderbird has always been an
interesting, well organized and well planned
rally it has a very good reputation.
This reputation was enhanced when about
five years ago the rally was given regional status,
which means that people who wanted to be
recognized as good rallyists in the region had to
compete and do well.
Its success as a regional event brought it another promotion and it now is one of the few
national rallies on the west coast.
This level of competition precludes all but
experienced competitors entering and this brings
all the good rallyists from the U.S. and the rest
of Canada.
Each entry is composed of one car, one driver
and one navigator.
The car conveys the driver, who directs It,
and the navigator who directs him.
Preparation of these cars is carefully done,
because they must last for the whole distance.
SPECIAL EQUIPMENT
Special equipment is also used, such as driving lights, special odometers and speed pilots
(special little computers which tell you whether
or not you have gone the required distance in
the proper time).
The Sports Car Club is producing a movie of
their masterpiece.
A camera crew under the direction of club
photographer Norm Daniel will be found at
various out of the way places on the route, taking pictures as people motor past them.
The movie will star all entrants of the rally
and will be ready for its first public viewing
sometime in early March.
OFFICIAL STARTER
The official starter of last year's rally was
B.C.'s minister of highways Phil Gaglardi. To
do one better this year, the organizers have got
Jim Gunn, the official Shell 4,000 rallymaster,
to do the honors.
Gaglardi is still high on the club's list of
favorites, though, because his department goes
to a lot of trouble to keep the rally roads open
under all conditions for the club^
Last year's winning navigator, Alan Robi-
taille, has this to say about the rally, " . . . this
rally is by far the best, most enjoyable in B.C."
Jean Calvin, an American motoring journalist concurs with Robitaille. She also rates the
Thunderbird as one of the best rallies in Western
Canada.
Rallyists will drive many snow and mud covered
roads like these in the 1,100-mile Thunderbird
Rally.
SPECIAL EVENTS PRESENTS
DR. HUSTON SMITH
Prof,  of  Philosophy
SPEAKING     ON
The Coming World Civilization
AUTHOR OF:
1. "The Religions of Man"
2. "Condemned   to   Meaning"
3. "The  Purposes   of   Higher   Education"
4. "The   Search   for   America"
Prof. Smith describes his current interest as centering in Philosophical Anthropology — Reflection on the human condition; What it means to be a human being, to live a human life
or alternatively; can we, by taking thought, add to our stature, increase the quality of our
personal  lives?
He has pursued this interest by attending to the complementing perspectives on man afforded
by  east  and   west,  science  and   the   humanities,  and  philosophy a^id  religion.
fan. 26th, Tloon — BhDck <£owiq& — J^hidaij.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0126906/manifest

Comment

Related Items