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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Sep 13, 1988

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Array tbe Ubyssey
Inside:
Fun, fun, fun... at the Fringe
See pages 7,8,9 and 12.
Birds boot Clan
in Shrum Bowl 88
By Doug Bryson
Defensive back Mark Nykolaichuk was the answer to
coach Frank Smith's prayers last night as a rookie laden T-
Bird football team downed crosstown rival Clansmen 26-15 in
Saturday's annual Shrum Bowl action.
Nykolaichuk amassed four of five T-Bird sacks and the
game's only interception to lead an eager if inexperienced
defence on his way to earning the game's MVP honors.
The Clansmen drew first blood early after an opening play
with a 45-yard bomb from SFU quarterback Darren Trainor to
wide receiver Mazzolli. UBC's defence reeled but held strong
to deny two end zone pass attempts, and made the Clan settle
for a 15-yard field goal.
After a few stalled attempts, UBC returned with a strong
drive of their own, capped off by an 18-yard Mike Bellefontaine
field goal. Bellefontaine was a perfect 3 for 3 for field goals on
the day and displayed outstanding punting in the second half,
with three punts being downed inside the SFU 10-yard line.
The Clan returned Bellefontaine's booming punts an
average minus 7 yards, and were forced into poor field position
for the entire second half.
Quarterback Jordan Gagner turned in a less than perfect
performance with a total of 14 for 29, and 203 yards passing,
but with the talented receiving foursome of Tom Vlasic, Craig
Keller, Bellefontaine and Todd Wickman, and a little perseverance, he managed to carry the day.
The veteran Gagner, last year's Hee Creighton trophy
winner for the outstanding offensive player in Canada, received great protection from veteran front three interior linemen Kevin Clarke, Andrew Butschler, and Alan Jones. These
continued on page 16
ftl
STEVE CHAN PHOTO
Nykolaichuk (#34 ) soars as Birds down Clan
VOLUME 71, Number 3
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, September 13,1988 Forestry Undergraduate Society
presents
UNDERCUT
Featuring:
DAWN PATROL
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 17th
IN THE ARMORIES
TICKETS: $5.00 in advance from OMAR,
Forestry Students,
AMS Box Office
7:30 pm   MARGI HOUR
NO MINORS 	
BICYCLING BACK
TRAILBLAZER MTB
■15-Speed SHIMANO Gears
■ Light Alloy Rims
1 Alloy Cantilever Brakes
• 2-Tone Paint / 5 frame sizes
$ 289.90
TREKKER  MTB
•18-Speed SHIMANO SIS
• Light Alloy Componentry
• Tig-welded MTB frame
• 5 Frame sizes / 3 colours
$ 349.90
$ 74.99
BELL V-1 PRO Helmet
• Top selling hardshell helmet
• Lightweight, superior ventilation
• Safety approved
TUNE-UP SPECIAL     $24.99
• Adjust Gears
• General wheel truing
• General Lubrication
STUDENTS DISCOUNT
• 10% off regular priced accessories
• 5% off regular priced bicycles & helmets
(must present valid students card)
WEST POINT CYCLES
• Broadway 620 E Broadway
• Kerrisdale 6069 W Boulevard
• 10th & Alma 3771 W 10th Ave
• Downtown 1876 W Georgia
Adjust Brakes
Safety Inspection
24 hour Service
Classifieds
Rates: AMS Card Holders - 3 line*, $3.00,
additional Unas 60 cants, commercial - 3 Hoes
$5.00, additional lines, 75 cents. (10%
discount on 25 Issues or more) Classified ads
payable In advance. Deadline 4:00 p.m two
days before publication. Room 266, SUB,
UBC, Van., B.C. V6T 2A7
11 - FOR SALE - PRIVATE
FOR SALE - double bed - new, headboard,
shelving unit, sofa, 12 x 12 grey carpet,
blinds. Call Larry 731-3353.
BEAUTIFUL REDCAH (VW411,1972)new
paint, batt, muff, etc.! Ex. cond. $1600. Must
sell, going travelling. Ph. 738-2223.
20 - HOUSING	
APART. TO SUBLET, now to Jan. '89. Share
large, sunny, 2-bedroom with nonsmoking,
female grad student Near 41st and Arbutus. Call 263-2060 after five.
UBC ENDOWMENT LANDS, 2 bdr72 bath
luxury apt. to share. Bright, spacious; must
be clean & responsible. $395. Avail. Sept 12.
Pis. call Sept. 11-16 only 228-1867 Daryl.
30 - JOBS
85 - TYPING
25 - INSTRUCTION
MONTESSORI ELEMENTARY training
courses starting Fall '88. For further info
contact Montessori Elementary Foundation, c/o 6330 Sophia St., Van., B.C. V5W
2W6.
PIANO LESSONS, classical. Evenings 228-
0086.
TUESDAY
UBC Library
Tours of Main and Sedgewick
Libraries.   Weekdays  through
Sept. 23,10:30 am and 12:30 am.
Tours last about 45 minutes. Meet
in Main library entrance. All
welcome.
AMS Ombudsoffice
Recruitment for Volunteers. All
day. The AMS Ombudsoffice urgently require* volunteers to assist in resolving student complaints and concerns. If you are
willing to commit yourself to a
minimum of two hours a week *•
pick up an application form from
Speakeasy - SUB 100C or call the
Ombudsoffice, 228-4846.
United Way
The best of Vancouver's performers are getting together for a special performance to launch the
1988 United Way Fundraising
drive at noon in the Queen Elisabeth Theatre. Gala will feature
host Alderman Carole Taylor,
Djema Barra (African Drums), the
Vancouver Chamber Choir, Vancouver Theatre Sports League,
Purcell String Quartet, and more.
Reserved tickets $10 each at VTC-
Ticketmaster outlets or at the
door. 280-4444 to charge by phone
GREENPEACE - become a part ofthe solution. Outreach/canvass team. Positions
available now! Salary and benefits. Call
James or Lachlan, ph. 736-0321.
REQD. EXPD. PERSON for sandwich shop.
Part time lunch hours Mon.-Fri. 11-3 p.m.
Apply in person The Delly, SUB lower floor.
40 - MESSAGES
PEN PAL CLUB! Free details. All ages
welcome. International Pen Friends, PO
Box 6261, Stn. "D", Calgary, AB T2P 2C8.
50 - RENTALS
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST, 30 years exp.,
word proc. & IBM typewriter. Student rates.
Dorothy Martinson 228-8346.
YOUR WORDS professionally typed, fast &
reliable. Judith Filtness, 3206 W. 38th Ave.,
263-0351.
WORD PROCESSING, $2.00/dbl. sp. page,
MLA, APA, CMS, editing. Comput-
erSmiths, 3724 West Broadway at Alma,
224-5242.
TYPING, EDITING, RESEARCH. No notice required resumes (same day service),
tapes transcribed. 327-0425 (24 hrs.).
ACCURATE REPORTS word processing,
Word Perfect, laser printer, dictation, student rates avail. #16-1490 W. Broadway at
Granville 732-4426.
WORD PROCESSING services, laser
printer, experienced typist. Call Mary Lou 0
421-0818 (Burnaby).
5 HRS. IN SUB: $190     I
70 - SERVICES
G. TE HENNEPE
Barrister & Solicitor
#203 - 4545 W. 10th Ave., 228-1433.
Hot Flash
BUDDY NEEDS BUDDIES...
The AMS Ombudsoffice urgently requires volunteers to
assist in resolving student complaints and concerns. Ifyou are
willing to commit yourself to a
minimum oft wo hours a week -
pick up an application form
from Speakeasy, SUB 100c or
call the ombudsoffice 228-4846.
Lutheran Student Movement
Co-op Supper. 6 p.m., Lutheran
Campus Centre.
WEDNESDAY
Gays and Lesbians of UBC
First annual tweeting. 12:30, SUB
215,
Jewish   Students   Association/
Hillel
Hot lunch - Klezmer/Swing Music.
12:30 pan., Hillel House.
Institute of Asian Research
Demonstration of Tai Chi by Dr.
Yuan Shao-Liang, Taijiquan
Teacher, Lignan College, Hong
Kong. 12:30 p.m., Asian Centre
Auditorium.
ALSO:
Seminar an *Musk and comparative phonetics in language teaching and training (English and
Chinese)*, 4:30 p.m., Seminar
Room 604, Asian Centre, 1871
West Mall UBC (Gate 4).
Men's Junior Volleyball
Tryouts - flayers must be born
1969 or later. 4:30 - 6:30, Osborne
Gym^'.
Multifaith UBC
General Info Meeting
Noon, Buchanan D250
THURSDAY
UBC Men's Squash Team
Tryouts   for   team.   12:30   p.m.,
Squash  Courts,  Winter Sports
Stadium.
Institute of Asian Research
Institute seminar;    "Women in
Development - India." 12:30 - 2:30
p.m.,.   Asian   Centre,   Seminar
Room 604.
University Christian Ministries
Join us as we address the issue of
"Why Should I Believe?", 12:30,
Brock Hall 302.
Men's Junior Volleyball
Tryouts - Players must be born
1969 or later. 4:30 - 6:30, Osborne
Gym^'.
It's Just Talk with R.J. Moorhouse
"Telereg: Was It Worth the
Hassle?" With Alan McMillan
from the Registrar's Office. 5:30-
6:00 pan,, CITR 101.9 FM.
University Christian Ministries
"Why shouild I believe?" Talk by
Richard Vandewark
12:30pm, Brock 302
University Christian Ministries
Bible Study
7:00 pro, Lutheran Campus
Centre, Lounge
MONDAY
Chinese Christian Fellowship
Welcome back tea party! CCF
invites you back for fun and fellowship. Noon, Scarfe 204.	
WTihorne Ernst & Whinney Chartered
_Z   A ccountants. 'Ifelt pretty green coming
out of university but the staff at Thorne
Ernst & Whinney helped me build confidence. They encourage initiative and
responsibility and the support is always
there ifyou need it!"
For more information on a career in Chartered
Accountancy, call Bruce Pentecost at 661-3096.
Thorne Ernst & Whinney
Chartered Accountants
Member of
Ernst & Whinney
International
UBC Dance Club - Rm 241J
Free Jive Lessons
12:30pn_ - 1:30pm, SUB Ballroom
ehvery on stocL items)
Kenny
OYE SPORTSWEAR & DESIGN
* T-SHIRTS        $6.31 ea
'SWEATSHIRTS      $11.71 ea
"POLO SHIRTS      $12.03 ea
PLUS MANY MORE STYLES ....
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fabrics may vary in price additional colour
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Call: (Ask for Kenneth) 876-0828
- Mon-Thurs   10 am to 5 pm -
2/THE UBYSSEY
September 13,1988 NEWS
AMS combats
tuition hikes
By Deanne Fisher
UBC's skyrocketing tuition
fees have generated enough concern within the Alma Mater Society to warrant a special committee
designed to combat the problem.
The committee, which will
develop a proposal regarding tuition increases to bring to UBC's
body of decision makers is the
brainchild of AMS president Tim
Bird.
"The purpose is to go to the
Board of Governors (BOG) on
behalf of AMS members and show
the BOG that a tuition increase is
not the way to go for this year,"
said Bird.
According to Statistics Canada, tuition fees at Canadian universities have doubled and even
tripled at some universities during the past ten years. One ofthe
figures in a study released includes a rise in tuition fees for
science students at UBC from
$536 in 1978 to between $1455 and
$1746 today.
The .VMS committee will
compare tuition fees, costs of liv
ing, wages and student loan programs between provinces and
universities.
"I am quite confident that
UBC students have to contend
with heavier financial burdens
than other university students
and I think this can be shown to
the Board of Governors quite easily," said Bird.
"The net result is that students with any initiative are going
to get up and go to another university and you're going to lose some
good students," he said.
Bird is concerned that the
rising tuition rates will eventually
limit access to UBC. "If tuition
increases to a point where students are choosing other universities because they can't afford
UBC, then we're not giving everybody an equal chance to go to
UBC," said Bird.
Bird said that though student
loan programs often compensate
for the high tuition, "compared to
othor provinces, the student loan
system in B.C. is definitely no
better so in that regard there's no
reason for our tuition to be
higher."
Student Board of Governors
representative Geoff Lyster, who
is a member ofthe ad hoc committee, hopes the committee's final
report will be useful particularly
to new BOG members who might
not be aware of the details of tuition hikes that have occurred in
the past.
"Black numbers on white
paper are always helpful," said
Lyster, adding he hopes the report
will include a statement that
"students have been hit pretty
hard with tuition hikes and should
not be hit again this year."
The committee's report will be
the first of its kind in at least four
years, according to Lyster and
Bird. Last January, the BOG
announce a 4.5 per cent increase in
tuition fees.
"In the past, the way students
have reacted (to tuition fee hikes)
is by storming the BOG meeting
room on the day the decision is
made," said Bird.
"This technique hasn't proved
to be effective in the past. In fact,
I can imagine that it's almost
counter-productive," he added.
Though the committee has yet
to meet, Lyster believes they will
be welcoming student input and
involvement.
New graduate program
joins arts and business
By Stephen Scrimshaw
The UBC department of commerce, in close association with
the faculty of arts, is now offering
an innovative new graduate program in arts administration—
only the second of its kind in Can-
ada.The specific aim of the new
program is to prepare people with
considerable involvement in the
professional arts to become better
arts managers.
"Artists often haven't acquired the sophisticated business
and marketing skills necessary to
run a cultural institution," said
program director Robert Kelly.
Conversely, he said, "administrators who are business people
seldom understand or appreciate
the artistic product or process that
must be managed in an arts organization."
The program has been set up,
for the time being, as an option
within the school of business
administration and will be open to
individuals who qualify to study at
the university graduate level and
who have also demonstrated a
strong commitment to the arts.
Kelly and several UBC academics, after spending a consider
able amount of time examining
similar programs elsewhere, saw
the great need for one here and
sought funding from the provincial government. Their efforts resulted in the university being
given a sizeable sum of money
from the province's Education For
Excellence Fund.
According to Kelly, people
with sound business skill s who are
also sensitive to the special goals
and mandates of such things as art
galleries and museums are in
demand. This program seeks to
Tots on tarmac
Cyclists and motorists on
their way to UBC are presenting
a hazard to school children who
walk up Chancellor Boulevard
each day, according to concerned
teachers and parents.
The last serious incident resulted in "a car ending up about 2
and a half feet from a child," said
Duncan.
Because University Hill Elementary School is not visible
from the road, "people don't seem
to be aware that the school exists," said Karen Duncan, who is
concerned for the safety of the
young students.
The children walk to school
between 8:15 and 8:45 a.m. and
usually go home around 2:45
p.m. (1:30 on Wednesdays).
Parents have been patrolling the area in an effort to keep
it safe. Cyclists and motorists are
being asked to exercise more
caution.
FEATURE
teach arts professionals to better
perform this dual role.
When asked to comment on
the new commerce option, UBC
dean of arts Robert Will gave full
support for the program, and
added that the small enrolment of
approximately eight students and
the seminar-type arrangement of
classes would foster an environment very conducive to learning.
UBC is now the second Canadian university to offer a program
in this field; the other is offered by
York University in Ontario.
Alternatives to
incineration:
An expert exposes the truths
and myths of PCB disposal
By I Iona Biro
The federal government has made a commitment to eliminate the use of PCBs in Canada,
but according to one expert, the new policy may
be nothing more than pre-election doubletalk.
The government has plans to lease mobile PCB incinerators
from the U.S. for seven to eight months at a time to help solve
the problem of PCBs. But incineration is no answer, says Dr.
Paul Connett of St. Lawrence University in New York State.
It is "irrational" and "hasty" to incinerate PCBs, says
Connett, who was in B.C. to speak with local officials of Ashcroft/
Cache Creek about the area's proposed incinerator.
Connett says a powerful industrial lobby has convinced the
regulatory agencies in Canada and the U.S. ofthe efficiency of
their technology, although incinerators have never been proven
safe.
'I think that there are many people in our regulatory
agencies who have got this fixed idea that incineration is the only
"practical' quick fix solution to the problem, which is ludicrous,
because clearly a chemical method requires far less capital
investment and is much safer and more acceptable to the public,"
says Connett.
Following a Swedish conference on dioxins, Connett says it;
was surprising that incinerators were sold so quickly to government; officials. There are several other methods of destroying
PCBs and related toxins chemically which pose less of a risk than
burning toxic waste, he says.
"To my knowledge there are at least three different methods
of destroying chlorinated hydrocarbons of which PCBs are just
one family of compounds. One is ozonolysis, using ozone, though
it's only been successful on small quantities of PCBs. The second
method is sodium treatment which has a high potential for large
scale PCB destruction, and the third method is the use of an
agent called Ka-peg, or potassium polyethylene glycol. That has
been in the literature for a number of years."
But Connett's main area of interest has been exposure to toxins through the food chain.
He stresses that people in Vancouver should be concerned
about the proposed incinerator in the interior because food from
the region will be exported and sold in Vancouver. One quart of
milk that comes from the region can contain as much dioxin as
one would receive from breathing the air around it for 8 months.
One quarter pound of butter made from the same milk is equivalent to breathing the air for one and a half years.
Since Ashcroft Cache Creek was chosen by the provincially
appointed Special Waste Advisory Committee as the site for a 20
million dollar toxic waste incinerator, reports of incomplete
voter's lists, and misinformation have left the town torn between
economic health and physical risk.
While proponents of incineration claim that their plants
would be subject to continuous monitoring, there are no reliable
methods to measure the dioxin and furane formation that takes
place after the combustion chamber stage.
Once a company passes a test burn under ideal conditions,
the public has to believe that over the next twenty years the
facility will be operated up to that same level of efficiency, says
Connett.
The company which holds seventy-five per cent of the joint
venture to establish the Ashcroft incinerator has been the subject
of legal action in Arkansas. Due to the abnormally high rates of
neurological disorders, cancer and tumors in their community,
the medical community of El Dorado decided that ENSCO, the
See PCBs page 16
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September 13, 1988
THE UBYSSEY/3 Whatever the
subjects
keep you
informed
We invite you to
subscribe now at
the special student
rate of 50% off.
To start your subscription,
simply fill out the coupon below
and mail with your payment to
The Globe and Mail.
YES!
I would like to take advantage of this
special student offer at 50% OFF
"I
Please deliver The Globe and Mail to the address
below. Enclosed is my cheque or money order or
charge card authorization for □ 13 weeks — $26.00
□ 26 weeks — $52.00
Name	
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Residence.
Street	
Province	
-Campus.
.Room #_
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D MasterCard    □ American Express
Charge Card Expiry Date	
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Signature
(required to validate offer)
Note: Offer valid only where home delivery is available.
Offer expires October 31, 1988 STNA8-72
Mail to: The Globe and Mail, Circulation Dept.
444 Front St. W., Toronto, M5V 2S9
ANAOAS BUSiNES-f ftgWSPAPEF
■••"   - ■iiiiiiiitnin'i-timrm him     7"'
REPORT ON
,....mmm .
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tt^mmm%*t****mmmmtfmmtmtl^M^m^*t^f*
AMS BBQ bash mutate* Into Han Krishna revival
R.J. SINAL PHOTO
U.B.C. Thunderbird
Winter Sports Center  228-6121
6066 Thunderbird Blvd. - UBC Campus 228-6125
Squash - Racquetball Contracts
- We will be offering four month contracts for September 19th '88 through to Dec. 16th '88.
- These will be a one court a week contract with no reduced fee's.
- Courts will be Issued strictly on a first come first serve basis with payment required in full.
- Special rates available only on presentation of valid student AMS card or faculty/staff
card.
Contracts Can Be Booked On September 16th, Starting At
7:30 am. At the Sports Shop.
And Also Starting Sept. 16th...
Enjoy all the Seoul Olympic T.V. action on our large screen sports T.V. network.
Plus
Ask About Our Olympic Medal Winning Burger and Beverage Special Only $3.75
Fully Licensed Lounge
Open Daily at 11:00 am.
The Winter Sports Centre
6066 Thunderbird Blvd.
Office: 228-6121
228-6125
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For more information on our Student Loan Program
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4/THE UBYSSEY
September 13,1988 # Graphic proof
of high-tech leadership
CA©1?
* "4.
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5 .TTi-f-5-
"3   :„4_+A"+r^ii F.xTSc.
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Ion]
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The Casio fx-7000G $149.95. It's the
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For additional capabilities, there's the
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If you need even more power,
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If you have any doubts as to
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September 13,1988
THE UBYSSEY/5 Being on a Winning Team
thats what Coopers & Lybrand
is all about
And it's the winners we want on
our team.
At Coopers & Lybrand, we have an
all-star business advisory team specializing in
computers, taxation, insolvency, valuations,
accounting and auditing. Our players are
.rofessionals in an entrepreneurial and diverse
jusiness community.
If you believe yourself to be a "fast track"
ambitious career mover and a team player,
we'd like to talk to you about some exciting
opportunities.
You take the first step: send a resume
and transcripts to our Personnel Partner,
John Kay, at our business address or through
the Campus Employment Centre.
Then keep that
track suit handy!
Coopers
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Coopers & Lybrand Building
1111 West Hastings Street
Vancouver British Columbia
Canada V6E3R2
6/THE UBYSSEY
September 13,1988 . *!ss&**¥r's*sr*
■.v.\ij
^C
IMSBTAINIvlENT
UBC students ford Fringe
By Pat Nakamura
Dania Stachiw Zacjew is the
author of the award-winning
play The First Act which is
currently running as a part of
Vancouver's Fringe Festival.
She is a young playwright who
has had two plays produced by
UBC's Brave New Play Rites.
She has created, stage managed,
and produced for the stage and
radio in centres across Canada,
and is now in her second year of
a Master of Fine Arts degree in
Creative Writing at UBC.
Her idea for The First Act
came from working in the
theatre. She worked as the stage
manager in last year's Brave
New Play Rites. By observing
and using her own experiences
she created the characters for
her play. "I created the characters first then I let them run
around in my head. Eventually
they told me the story."
The play took one year to
produce—the first draft came out
in the spring of'87 and the final
draft was finished this spring. "I
had to let it sit for seven months
in order to look at it objectively."
"My early love of
Shakespeare has inspired me in
playwriting. His use of language
and strength of characters
fascinated me and he made me
laugh and cry. I also get inspired and excited when I discover young Canadian talent."
As for the future, Dania is
working on a couple of one-act
plays that she is hoping to have
produced in next year's Edmonton Fringe. She feels that
Vancouver, despite its population, doesn't have as many
theatre-goers as Edmonton,
especially if the weather is nice.
Karla Parks is the Director
of The First Act. She writes,
teaches, acts, produces and
directs for the stage. Her
experience includes the production of UBC's Brave New Play
Rites, directing "Ruffian on the
Stair" at UBC, as well as
numerous acting roles. She is
now completing her M. F. A.
degree in Creative Writing and
Theatre Arts at UBC.
She chose The First Act
after hearing through the
grapevine that it was the best
script around. As for casting, she
was forced to recruit from the
Arts Club Drama Centre after
the three original cast members
bowed out. Gary Banks was cast
as Willie, the leading man,
Glenn Mercer as Moses the
playwright, and Michael Audib-
ert as Evan, the director.
"I can really see the change
in Glenn's acting, since his
character is totally unlike him in
reality; I really had to get him to
work on that." Glenn's character, Moses, is a wimpy playwright who babbles poetically
and scurries about the stage,
intimidated by the rest ofthe
cast. Karla has previously
worked with Cathryn France and
Rose Sojka in Brave New Play
Rites so she was familiar with
their acting abilities and knew
they were perfect for their roles
as Celia and Liz.
Karla has written two plays
and produced one in Ontario.
She has a play in the works for
her thesis and hopes to have it
produced for next year's Fringe
Festival.
Prize-winning play
explores seminal subjects
By Pat Nakamura
The beauty of a small
theatre is that it intensifies the
emotions on stage. The Vancouver Little Theatre is just the
place to see The First Act, a
play written by Dania Stachiw
Zacjew and directed by Karla
Parks.	
Vancouver Fringe Festival
First Act
by Dania Stachiw Zacjew
Vancouver Little Theatre
until Sept.l4th	
The play opens (ironically,
as it turns out) with the music
Joy to the World as the characters make their entrance.
Tension is immediately felt and
grows continuously as the
audience discovers the complexity of the characters' relationships in this play within a play.
The play they are rehearsing focusses on a lusty dream
written by Moses, the wimpy
playwright (Glenn Mercer). This
scene entices Celia, the leading
lady (Cathryn France), to try and
steam the pants off Willie, the
leading man.
Liz, the stage manager (Rose
Sojka), has the horrendous responsibility of getting the cast to
rehearse the first act since Evan,
the director (Michael Audibert),
has disappeared. Meanwhile,
Celia upsets the entire cast by
taking out her frustrations on
them. This frazzles Jon, the quiet
stage hand (Brent Harron) who
dutifully goes about his tasks
amid the confusion.
Dashes of comedy give the
audience welcome relief from the
emotional stress. Rose Sojka and
Cathryn France, who have both
worked in Brave New Play Rites
and other productions, brilliantly
portray women caught up in
their own insecurities and
anxieties. Gary Banks convincingly plays an eager leading man
with more than acting on his
mind.
This one-act play has won
the UBC Grant Redford Memorial Prize in playwriting. It
questions dreams and realities,
examines relationships and sex,
and releases a flood of emotions.
With the exception of a few minor
glitches, these seminal subjects
are explored with impact by the
talented cast. For anyone with a
free afternoon, this play provides
a tempting break from classroom
drudgery.
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Consider employment opportunities with the Esso family of
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and technical excellence. We recognize and encourage achievement and reward it.
This fall we will be on campus looking for students in the
following disciplines:
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September 13,1988
THE UBYSSEY/7 HqEFRiiiqE fWdqE
ENTERTA
Barry shines in Female Parts
By Laura Busheikin
Ambitious actresses are always on the lookout for
substantial female parts that will
give them a chance to really act as
well as have fun. The aptly named
Female Parts provides just that
for actress Anna Barry, whose
marvellous acting is even better
than the intelligent, witty script.
Female Parts
by Franca Rame and Dario Fo
Cambrian Hall (Venue 10)
through Sept.l6th
Female Parts, by the Italian
duo Franca Rame and Dario Fo, is
actually two one-act monologues,
presenting two somewhat eccentric women, each in situations
which become increasingly
desperate while remaining
relentlessly funny.
The first woman spends her
time locked in her apartment by
her jealous husband. But her days
aren't uneventful—she has plenty
to deal with: her silent baby, her
lecherous, unidextrous brother-in-
law, whose one good hand never
stops grabbing, a series of heavy-
breathing phone calls, a peeping
torn across the street, a heartsick
lover whose arm beckons through
a crack in the door, and her
callous husband.
The second woman holes up in
a church to evade the police and
tells her story to the priest in the
confessional. She's been led astray
by her love for her son, a student
revolutionary who scorns his
mother's communism as too soft,
as "kissing the asses of the
Christian democrats."       When he
leaves home she takes to the
streets to find him and ends up a
sort of gypsy, happy in her
independence. While she is
hanging out with hippies and
biting off the ear of policemen
(honestly), her son does the yuppie
thing and trades in his placards
for a suit and a good job.
All this idiosyncrasy never
gets too bizarre. These are
realistic portraits of the sort of
women you might read about in
the paper and shake your head,
thinking that life is stranger than
fiction.
Barry doesn't play these
women as wierdos; she finds very
human motivations for their extreme choices and makes both
women sympathetic. She has perfect timing and delivery on the
humor—and this is a very funny
show—but also brings out the
play's seriousness. Both the
characters are unbearably
trapped; love has betrayed them,
men have disappointed them, and
freedom is beyond their grasp.
Barry is a joy to watch
because she trusts her craft and
takes her time. She shows how
stillness and silence can be
incredibly powerful dramatic
tools. And her face expresses not
only emotions but character. Her
acting conveys not just her
feelings but her history and her
environment. When, as the second
woman, she addresses her absent
son, she seems to actually see
him.
Best of all, Barry has stage
presence—that intangible, invaluable quality that focuses attention
more surely than a spotlight.
Female Parts plays at the
Cambrian Hall through Friday.
Barbara Russell, Wendy Gorllng, Bill Croft, Jay Brazeau and Miriam Smith in Blue Window
Tessa Mendel, Nickie St. John and Heather Irving in Letters Home
Opening windows
By Andrea Lupini
Libby is having a dinner
party. Her guests—an
author, a family therapist, a
musician, a secretary, a sky diving
instructor, and her friend Griever
are getting ready to attend it.
Each is wrapped up in personal
problems; each is coming to
Libby"s party for different reasons.
All, however, will come together
for one evening to amuse, irritate,
attract, bore and perhaps enlighten each other a little.
Blue Window
by Craig Lucas
Angry Actors
Heritage Hall, Sept.15-16
Craig Lucas' Blue Window is
a unique play. Scripted so that
separate conversations often take
place simultaneously, or overlap
each other to repeat certain
phrases or words, it demands precise timing and an almost intuitive communication between its
actors. This Angry Actors production fulfills these requirements
brilliantly.
Throughout the course of the
evening, the seven very humorous
characters reveal tiny bits of their
lives, rarely through open confidence, but much more subtly,
through the artificial and self-conscious banter of dinner party conversation. Just as in life, people
interrupt and talk over each other,
making watching the play sort of
like reading the paper and listen-
ing to a radio talk show at the
same time; one message is
processed, to the accompaniment of another.
Those messages, coming
from such different characters,
complement and inform each
other, and somehow, by the end
of the play, form a cohesive, if
still mysterious, whole. It's as if
seven very differently shaped
jigsaw puzzle pieces were placed
on a table next to each other:
before you put them there, they
looked like they came from
different boxes; now, the corner
of one matches a line on
another, that weird triangle
edge has a perfect mate, and so
on until you've fitted them all
together. But you still have—as
one character notes—a puzzle.
That miraculous unity
wouldn't be possible if it weren't
for the fine performances of all
the actors. Each was so believable that watching the play
really became a voyeuristic
experience (like creeping down
the stairs to listen to the grownups talk when you were supposed to be in bed).
The mystery (or mysteries)
that remain, however, are
perhaps the reason that the
play concludes with the wistful
wish of one character: that
everybody had "just a little
window where you could see in
and see what they were feeling
and thinking about." Blue j
Window makes those windows
exist, if only for a few hours.
ALL      1' K (> CFFDS     T O     T H F.      <; A K D F N
THI'liS I) A V ,       F K I p AY .      S A T F 1U> A Y
SEP IE.M HER      15,      16      &      17.      1 9 8 H
12     N ()() \      INI"! I.     =i      I' M      DAI 1,Y
UBC      BOTANICAL      GARDENS
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F   K I   [■       I1 A K K I \ (,       A \ A I I  A It !. F
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Surrey's amazing folk-rock
of Rock & Roll's drug hei
SUB241K. Friday Se
— Amber I
8/THE UBYSSEY
September 13,1988 mmmt
?
v
yjiffE FK/tiqE
Visual comedy rescues
groaning audience
By Keith Damsell
Bones, a Touchstone
Theatre production,
relates the exploits of two
destitute hobos-turned-grave-
robbers, Raz (Maxie) and Lester
(Peter Anderson). Despite the
ludicrous subject matter, the
play succeeds by relying on the
conventions established in silent
film comedy.
Bones
By Peter Anderson
Touchstone Theatre
Arcadian Hall
Sept.15-17,11:45PM
We follow Raz and Lester
through a surrealistic cartoon
world, nicely created by means
of an inventive set and lighting
design. Raz and Lester complement the atmosphere, becoming
larger than life eccentrics. Each
possesses a wonderful sense of
visual humour, most notable in
the circus style performance "Rich
Bones".
Greg Ruddell deserves a
mention for fine sound cues; he is
responsible for the best gags in
the show—Lester's attempts at
grave digging and, later, his
imaginary dinner. A magical
control over the elements is
exercised fully by our hobo heroes;
bizarre scene changes occur with a
flash of Lester's hands. The
audience is drawn into the action
and the energy and pace the two
exert never let up.
However, just as Buster Keaton didn't make it in the talkies,
Rod Nagel plays a
convincing madman
By John Hudson
"I
must confess that as of
.late I have been seeing
and hearing things such as no
one has ever seen or heard
before."     —Gogol
Diary of a Madman
by Nikolai Gogol
Cambrian Hall
Sept.13-14,12 midnight
This is a statement which
might have been made by any
member of the audience at the
end ofthe first night of this
year's Fringe. Like any such
festival, this one abounds with
the unusual, the fantastical and
the magical. Also, as even the
most cursory glance over the
program will show, it abounds
with madness.
Gogol's classic Diary of a
Madman has never been an
easy play. Like all one-man
shows, it is a challenge to both
performer and audience. The
actor must seek to hold your
attention for an hour, and you
must seek to concentrate and
focus without relief on the antics
(and in this case, ravings) of a
single person. None of this is
made easier by the late showtime.
The challenge is well met by this
excellent production.
Rod Nagel, graduate of the
Studio 58 program at Langara,
plays the role of Akentsky Iva-
novich Poprischin—a government
clerk in 19th century Russia. Poprischin lives in abject poverty,
and suffers interminably from the
contempt of both his colleagues
and superiors. To combat the
drudgery of his alienated life,
Porprischin invents elaborate fantasies of nobility and importance—fantasies which soon become full-fledged delusions and
madness.
As the play progresses, and
Poprischin goes from seeing talking dogs to a romantic pursuit of
his employer's daughter, through
rising levels of nobility until, fi-
neither does Bones. Some of the
puns fall flat on their face like a
bad Carson monologue. In the
desert, Maxie states that there's
no sign of civilization anywhere.
Guess what sign Lester holds up?
This kind of clever word play did
nothing but illicit groans from the
audience. And despite all the silliness on stage, I couldn't help
wondering what the point of it all
was. Call me a spoil-sport, but I
like my humour with a social
punch.
Nevertheless, Bones is worth
catching simply to see Peter Anderson and Maxie toss their bowlers around. After its Arcadian
Hall run, the show will be held
over with Millions Die! at the
Firehall Arts Center until October
8th.
nally, he imagines himself royalty,
the audience watches a man slip
deeper and deeper into inexorable
insanity. Rod Nagel handles this
transformation with great skill,
taking us on a veritable tour of the
levels of madness, always that
tiny bit more insane than a
minute before. In this role Nagel
has created something of a tour de
force; his Poprischin is by turns
funny and tragic, but always fully
engaging.
The simple set reflects the
character's poverty. He lives out of
an open trunk which occupies
center stage. His tattered clothes
spill out onto the stage in a
strange parody of the running-
over of his mind. It is an intimate
setting for a most intimate view of
a man's deterioration.
In Diary of a Madman
Gogol created an enduring
portrait of insanity: a character
who commands both our sympathy
and our terror. More than a
hundred years after it was written
it remains a play of great power,
because it presents a particularly
modern madness. Poprischin's
ravings will not be lightly forgotten by Fringe audiences who
return to their own offices and
paperwork the morning after this
excellent production.
Peter Anderson and Maxie in Bones
DAVID COOPER PHOTO
Sylvia Plath's
words survive
By Laura Busheikin
Letters Home succeeds despite itself. It manages to
be a moving and memorable piece
even though it lacks all the
elements of good theatre—
actually I should say all the
elements of theatre, period.
Letters Home
by Rose Leiman Goldemberg
Foreigners Abroad Playact
Company
Grunt Gallery, til Sept.l8th
What carries the show is its
subject—the writer Sylvia Plath.
Letters Home is billed as the
"intimate exploration of the
mother/daughter relationship
through the correspondence of
Aurelia and Sylvia Plath." So the
play relies on Plath's words, and
what words they are—wise, passionate, honest, intense and poetic.
Director Tessa Mendel has
made some rather feeble attempts
to dramatize what is essentially a
reading, but the production still
hardly warrants the word 'play.'
Aurelia (Nicki St. John) and
Sylvia (Joadie Newcomb) sit at
opposite sides ofthe stage and
read letters. At times they rise
and approach each other, even embrace occasionally; at times their
voices overlap. Sylvia keeps occupied ironing and folding clothes—a
piece of stage business that seems
designed mostly to give the actress
something to do.
The whole thing risks being
an effective sleep-inducer but
Plath's words and her artist's
spirit are so beguiling, so powerful, they don't need any dramatic
support. Rose Leiman Goldenberg,
the playwright (really just someone who organized Plath's words)
perhaps banked on this and chose
to create a simple setting for a
glorious jewel, but she's lucky she
has such a precious jewel.
Newcomb and St. John give
solid, sensitive performances. This
play will be nectar for English
students and writers who will
eagerly drink up the insights into
Plath's creative development.
People looking for crackling, dynamic theatre should go elsewhere.
BYSSEY
tsents
muGS
tuo will perform their celebration
tage live in The Ubyssey office,
cember 16th, 3:30 - 7:30pm
quids will flow —
im
Applications Now
^^   Being Accepted
For The 1 Vacant
Position on
The Thunderbird
Winter Sports Centre
Management Committee
• Applications available from SUB Rm 238
• Applications deadline 4p.m. Tuesday,
September 27th, 1988
&
presents
PRINCIPLES OF FUN 88/89
Dioteb & Covcert Studies
(prerequisite: The Philosophy of Fun)
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September 13,1988
THE UBYSSEY/9 "fifoOI-V / ffl&ClMO
BACK    PACKS
20%-30%off ■
RACCOON JUMBO $1 BPmgmos
■ An extra large backpack with full-length two-way zipper
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WOMBAT   $2695reg.m.95
An extra large capacity leather bottom
1000D Kodra nylon backpack.
SCHOLAR ORGANIZER $3195^m95
»Welf-designed squared book pack in rugged 1000D Kodra nylon.
• Front organizer pocket, padded bade and detachable waistbelt.
SALE ENDS SEPTEMBER 30TH, 1988 • WHILE QUANTITIES LAST
Come in and see our other store specials!
BOOKSTORE
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\fRmy- SEPTEMBERS.
 Ttm£>&\Tl£S ofsum&
COmmUNITY 6PORT6 LTP
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sale $24.95
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PACIFIC
TRAILS
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Preamble to 1988/89 Budget
for the
Alma Mater Society of UBC
The Alma Master Society ofthe University of British Columbia is comprised of every student enrolled in a credit course at
UBC. The AMS mandate as per its constitution is to promote,
direct, and control all student activities at UBC. However, the
AMS's main goal is to provide first rate services at the lowest cost
to the students of UBC.
In order to provide these services, the AMS collects a fee of
$39.50 from each full time UBC student, and a proportionate
amount from part time students.
This fee of $39.50 is broken up and divided among several
areas. $15.00 goes directly into the Capital Projects Acquisition
Committee Reserve which goes towards capital building projects
such as the planned Recreation Facility, the completed south
SUB expansion, the planned Pit Pub Expansion, Daycare facilities, etc. $4.50 goes to the Intramural Sports Program to support
the majority of its costs. The constantly growing Intramurals
Program is a unique and one ofthe best programs anywhere in
North America. It is an excellent example of student money well
spent as Intramural sports offers a huge array of activities for
students at UBC. $0.50 is allocated to sponsor two United Nations refugee students here at UBC. This leaves the AMS with
$12.50 ofthe original $39.50 as a subsidy for student government and the many student services provided by the AMS. Thus
the fee the AMS collects serves to cover many areas, all of which
are geared towards serving students.
This year, the .AMS is getting ready for the start of several
very large and exciting projects. The first is the upcoming
referendum concerning the planned Recreation Facility which
will provide space and ease the burden of the already cramped
Student Union Building.
This year is also important for CITR Radio as it is very close
to receiving the right to go to a high power system from the
CRTC. Growth in business revenue over the last few years has
allowed the AMS to allocate money to the high power reserves of
the new system, making CITR FM 102 receivable all over the
city.
The AMS is constantly looking for new avenues through
which it can expand both its business operations and its service
organizations in order to provide still more services to the UBC
students.
It is because of this attitude of careful, intelligent expansion
of its business operations which serves to further strengthen the
security ofthe AMS, that I can proudly boast that the UBC Alma
Mater Society is perhaps the most comprehensive and powerful
student society of any throughout Canada.
I would like to thank everyone who helped to create the 1988/
89 AMS Budget, especially the Budget Committee and the AMS
Vice President, Carolyn Egan.
Sincerely,
Karl Kottmeier
Director of Finance
GMAT    LSAT     GRE
(Graduate Management
Admission Test)
(Law School Admission Test)
(Graduate Record Exam)
WEEKEND TEST PREPARATION COURSES
at The University of British Columbia
Next Courses:
LSAT —Sept. 16, 17, 18
GMAT —Sept. 30/Oct. 1,2
GRE — please inquire
bexton
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PROFESSIONALS IN TEST PREPARATION
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222-8272
Hair Styling
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10/THE UBYSSEY
September 13,1988 ALMA MAim SOCIE1Y OF UBC
REVENUE
Fees
Investment
Building
Commercial Bookings
Copy Centre
Games Room
Gallery Lounge
Pit Pub
Restaurant Operations
Vending
Subcetera
Summer Film Series
Used Bookstore
Office Services
Total Revenue
Non-discretionary Allocations
1987/88
Budget
750,000
80,000
154,000
22,950
9,200
64,200
8,916
16,500
1,000
1,000
6,000
183
(2,095)
(9,000)
1,102,854
AMS Bursary Fund
Art Fund
CPAC Reserve
Intramurals
Refugee Student Fund
Registration Photos
SUB Management Reserve
SUB Renovations & Replacements Reserve
11,500
1,500
351,000
105,000
11,620
6,000
11,620
8,000
Total Non-discretionary Expenses
Revenue Subtotal
Less Constitutional Margin (5%)
Total Discretionary Income
Student Government
Publications
CITR Radio
Art Gallery Committee
AMS Bursary Lottery
AMS Women's Committee
External Affairs
Gays Sc Lesbians
High School Conference
Homecoming Committee
Job Link
Ombudsoffice
Programs
Speakeasy
Student Administrative Commission31,965
Students' Council
Volunteer Connections
Disabled Students Association
First Year Students Committee
Ubyssey
Inside UBC
Summer Ubyssey
Publications Administration
Typesetting & Graphics
CITR Radio Station
CITR Disco
CITR Discorder
CITR High Power Allocation
Ancillary Operations:
Business Office
Food & Beverage Admin.
Stores
Whistler Cabin
Workshop
Total Expenses
559,674
Net Income
Discretionary Allocations
Net Income After Allocations
7,055
0
7,055
jUS^^TfT^BE^iOU^S'EWlS
by Alan Ayckbourn * directed by Roy Surette
SEPTEMBER 14-24
Special Previews- Sept 14 & 15
2 for the price of 1 regular admission
Curtain; 8pm
Sat Matinee - Sept 24 at 2pm
STUDENT SEASON TICKETS
Main Series (4 plays) $20
JUST BETWEEN OURSELVES
Ayckbourn
Sept 14 - 24
HENRY IV, Part I
Shakespeare
Mar 15 - 25
YERMA
Lorca
Jan 11-21
JACQUES AND HIS MASTER
Kundera
Nov 16 - 26
Mini Series (2 Plays) $10
ANTIGONE
Anouilh            Oct. 11-15     &       ZASTROZZI   Geo. F. Walker
BOX OFFICE • FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE • ROOM 207
Support Your Campus Theatre
Feb. 7-11
1987/88
Actual
766,013
110,948
148,248
11,1928
128
76,735
13,458
20,960
2,366
5,240
228
(2,079)
2,660
(1,693)
1,155,140
11,500
1,500
359,069
106,893
11,933
5,476
12,795
11,095
Subsidies
2,418
1,279
0
1,877
2,297
1,868
1,695
5,434
2,415
616
250
2,560
1,062
1,524
14,075
11,963
1,412
1,498
20,000
30,574
4,150
3,742
31,028
35,030
81,870
90,858
1,841
1,440
220
200
208
806
31,287
37,811
4,400
(10,242)
9,379
12,058
0
0
10,280
6,089
77,115
78959
(15,450)
(16,757)
285
5.509
20,000
20,000
232,000
233,863
0
0
0
0
24,500
25,044
0
0
579,601
25,534
23,046
488
1988/89
Budget
750,000
110,000
167,700
800
5,600
80,600
19,700
16,600
2,000
4,900
100
350
2,625
(1,300)
1,159,675
11,500
1,500
351,000
105,000
11,620
6,000
11,620
8,000
506.240
520,261
506,240
596.614
634,879
653,435
29,885
31,744
32,672
566.729
603.135
620.763
2,035
0
2,517
7,030
700
350
1,000
14,410
1,725
32,146
3,734
93,260
1,800
1,923
(500)
38,500
7,100
12,524
0
11,680
81,660
(14,200)
2,400
20,000
243,100
0
20,700
0
620,624
139
0
139
w
Monte Cristo
(Restaurant • Patisserie
In %errisdaCe
2105'West 40th
(Just off of "West (Boulevard)
A fabulous 'Dinner Menu
featuring Camembert Amandine, QarCic (Prazmts, Chic fen &
(Prazm Crepes, our famous chic fcen cashew salad
and many more (Pastas, Salads and (Dinner (Entrees.
Available Mon - Sat
from Spm — 10pm
266-5226
September 13,1988
THE UBYSSEY/11 INJEWAINMENT
The Institute of Higher
Looning Needs You!!!!.1!
Professor Ryan Stiles invites you to enroll in Comedy College.
Here's your chance to be in the studio audience for
the looniest show in TV land - CBC's Comedy College.
See some of North America's top comics wrestle wits
to be number one in the funny business.
Free! Free/ free1.
And you get the last laugh!
Audience tapings September 15, 16 & 17, 6:30 p.m. at the CBC.
For FREE! tickets call 662-6603 today!
Or visit the UBC Ticket Centre.
.JJgli. CBC Television
'wJ!  British Columbia 2/3
-j.*.!*'*.-*'*-**'*'*"*'*-'*'*"*"**'*'*"**
At Granada,
students rate
student rates*
Motherhood is hell
By Keith Damsell
A Killing Frost takes a big
bite out ofthe universal
themes pie; motherhood, art,
death and freedom are all
touched upon. Serious issues for
a first play by Saskatchewan
writer Sharon Butala. Despite
the efforts of a passionate cast,
what results is a half-baked
naturalistic piece from the
recesses of Eugene O'Neill's
basement.
A Killing Frost
by Sharon Butala
Carousel Theatre
Sept.9-12, Cambrian Hall
The premise of A Killing
Frost is interesting enough: a
mother and son coming to terms
with one another after years of
misunderstanding. From their
first moments together, Sean
Hoy's Zach and Karen Austin's
mother Brenda establish a
believable vulnerability with
each other (Hoy's own mother
wrote the play).
Soon, the ghosts of the past
are unearthed and resentments
rise. Particularly memorable is
Brenda's melodramatic description of leaving the family, a
goodbye note tacked to the
fridge. The tension ofthe
moment is relieved by the humor
in which she paints the bitter
scene. However, laughs do not
come easily in this play. That is
the biggest problem of A Killing
Frost; it takes itself far too
seriously.
Often Butala's dialogue is
flowery and overstated; the imagery of winter frost and the
symbolism of Zach's dream are
both discussed at great length to
make sure that the audience gets
the point. Brenda's goodbye
speech to Zach at the play's close
is poetic with a capital P. Do
people really talk like this?
Furthermore, much of the
action ofthe play is simply reminiscing. The two discuss the past
in great detail. The drama becomes lost in nostalgia and consequently so does the needed
action to keep the conflict rolling.
It is much more interesting to
see a character engaged in a
struggle than relating a past
battle. I couldn't find a point to
much of the reminiscing; from
the lack of excitement on stage
and the rapid speed at which
much of it was recited, I think
the actors had the same difficulty. As a result, the blocking
became a little gooey and forced.
Moreover, the length of the
play is a problem. Zach breaks
down midway through the production and it seems as though
all the dirty laundry has been
aired. Yet another half hour goes
by in which Brenda collapses not
once, but twice.
Many tears are shed and the
play becomes anger and despair
from beginning to end. So many
sins and doubts are cast into the
open that no secrets remain for
us to discover. What results are
two characters dwelling in their
own failures—Zach becomes a
whiner and Brenda a sarcastic
pain. Karen Austin attempts to
rise above her cynicism but her
dialogue is so overwrought we
can't believe it. Does anyone care
about characters revelling in
their own angstl
Unfortunately, the seriousness ofthe play's themes gets
lost in the shuffle due to a lack of
economy in the script. Excuse
the pun, but A Killing Frost left
me a little cold.
Hillel's Famous Hot Lunch
f" Returns!
J\_-^v/!v~r>J>    Wednesday Sept. 14th
^.v\\v>!*^ 12:30 — 2:00 P-m-
•'■& V*K.!" '■'•'••'■'• ■i'w Featuring
f?\ "XyV^wV-S-fr^  John David Lawrence on saxophone
l L -i—lUSBm9\C^y playing Klezmer and swing!
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JBy*Tjtrf8yF For more information: 224-4748
*^*~       mmlE^^^ HUM It locatad acrosa »om SUB and behind Brock Hal
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IDI
At Granada, we're offering special student rates on a wide assortment
of top-quality home entertainment products. We'll give you our low 12-month
rate for a special 8-month term so you can enjoy a colour TV for as
little as $15.95 a month. Or rent a full-function VCR for $17.95 a month. And,
to top it off, our in-home Granadacover service is yours at no extra charge.
Just clip this ad and take it to your nearest Granada Home Entertainment
Centre today for the complete picture. But hurry, offer expires September 30th.
After all, if you don't have a TV, where will you do all your studying?
STUDENTS RATE STUDENT RATES
ei:
TV's Audio ■ VCR's ■ Camcorders
°H
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you wearing
12/THE UBYSSEY
September 13,1988 ENTERTAINMENT
They're dancing on the edge
By Alexandra Johnson
The Firehall Arts Centre's
first Dancing On The Edge
festival of contemporary dance
invites Vancouverites to experience festival fever and get
caught up in dancemania. For
anyone who enjoys music and
motion, innovation and unpredictability, drama and dialogue,
rock, new-age, opera, ethnic,
classical, contemporary or the
truly bizarre, this will be a
sensory experience of notable
intensity.
Dance
The Firehall Arts Centre's
Dancing on the Edge Festival
September 8-18
Last Thursday began this
ten day celebration including
thirty-eight performances
involving over forty different
choreographers and many more
dancers from across Canada.
The styles range from experimental to Balinese, from Middle
Eastern to contemporary, with
attitudes reaching from melodrama to comedy, and the
quality from acceptable to excellent (with the balance of performances leaning toward the
higher end of the scale).
Of those I was able to see,
many were worthy of note.
Calgary based choreographer Elaine Bowman, in "African
Sanctus", enticed the audience to
feel the warm, living soul of her
jungle cat-like character. With
energy-corralled movement she
took us from blissful contentment through frustrated intensity to the bitter agony of
bondage, successfully leading us
to feel the injustice of human
degradation.
In her performance of
"Someone", along with dancer
Shelly Tognazzini, we were once
again persuaded to experience
the birth, awakening, inevitable
corruption and final self-
awareness of the fictitious,
human-like characters. The
setting of a futuristic planet
created a surreal, dreamy background for the short violently
explicit scenes that flashed pictures ofthe darker side of humanity.   These two are easily
the most hard hitting performances for clarity of message
mixed with dance excellence.
At the other end of the 'message' scale, a performance with
absolutely no intended purpose
except to entertain was fascinatingly and precisely executed by
EDAM (a dance organization
concentrating largely on contact
improvisation). The five members rose from the audience,
assembled on stage and proceeded to improvise their
collective bodies through a
sometimes tragic, melodramatic
classical piece of music. The
result (in the eyes of this viewer)
was a comical, soap-opera type
interaction that carried the
audience along with the obvious
enjoyment ofthe dancers.
For the pure pleasure of
watching, The Balance of The
Journey" (choreographed and
danced by Junia Mason) takes a
top position. Mason glided,
walked, stomped, hesitated and
plowed through life' along a solid
black line taped along the floor.
Her facial expressions, body
attitudes and sometimes impulsive movement displayed an impressive talent and an obvious
love for dance that was no less
than inspiring to watch.
In yet another twist of attitude Harvey Meller and Cornelius Fischer-Credo took us to
those late night black and white
movie musicals that while away
our sleepless hours. To the Nat
King Cole/Frank Sinatra type
crooning of the soundtrack the
two dancers hammed their way
through the up and down stage
career of two long-time bud-
dies—including the break up and
reuniting of their act in true
Broadway style. The audience
joined that of the recording in
calling the pair out for an encore
and applauded with that long
ago crowd as the 'stars' waltzed
off the stage.
"White Vision", danced by
Serge Bennathan and Dawn
Trudeau, and Dance Corps' "Mirror, Mirror" were both finely executed classical routines. The
mixing of graceful ballet movement with the almost uncontrolled exuberance of 'modem' dance
succeeded in extracting appropriate audience appreciation.
The final mention goes to
Andrew Olewin entering under
the aforementioned 'truly
bizarre' category. Obviously a
man of versatile talent, his
performance ofthe piece "Cat
Head" has got to be seen to be
believed. Simply watching (and
listening to) someone laeing
weird' is very funny and that,
very simply, is what Olewin's
performance was.
The shows start in the early
afternoon and runs through to
around 11pm. So you can choose
your own time, your own cost ($5
per show—4 or 5 routines, $12
for three shows or $15 for the full
day) and sample an endless
variety of performances.
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THIS WEEK
Wednesday & Thursday
8 pm
Hugh Fraser &
Chris Nelson
Friday & Saturday
8 pm
Marty Franklin,
vibes
Chris Sigerson,
piano
with June Katz
at 10 pm
2505 ALMA ST
222-2244
Applications for Positions on the 1988/89
AMS SUB
SECURITY TEAM
Are Now Being Accepted
The Security Team works Wednesday,
Friday, Saturday, and other designated days in
the Student Union Building. The Team is
responsible for assisting the Proctor in
protecting SUB from vandalism, aiding
security teams hired for any SUB function and
implementing SAC policy in SUB.
Application forms are now available in the
AMS Executive Secretary's Office, SUB Room
238.
These positions are open to male and
female U.B.C. students.
APPLICATIONS MUST BE RETURNED
TO SUB ROOM 238 BY
4pm Wednesday September 14,1988
To all
AMS Clubs and Service Organizations
CLUBS DAY:
SEPT. 21-23, 1988
STUDENT UNION BUILDING
To book a display booth, AMS Clubs and
Service Organizations must pick up an application form from SUB Room 238 and return
it by 4:00pm Wednesday Sept. 14,1988.
JDonfej&isfo
*81
Restaurant • Kerrisdale
Unique Continental Dining in a Casual Atmosphere
Rotating Wine Selection
Fresh Unique Salads
0 Innovative Pastas & Sandwiches
0 Creative Entrees
0 Sinful Desserts
0 Special Coffees & Cappucinos
Fresh Pastries & Breads to order
one day in advance
Monday to Friday
U:30am-2:00pm 5:00pm-10:00pm
Saturdays
ll:30am-10:00pm
Closed Sundays
Monte Cristo
2105 West 40th Ave.
On the corner of West Boulevard
266-5226
5^-,
September 13,1988
THE UBYSSEY/13 ».   ""   "^m
Somewhere in
Rosedale,
a toilet flushes....
What hath John wrought? He left these
hallowed halls with a golden laurel on his head
and returns with egg on his face. A fine young
man of such promise led astray by an overbearing mother and a woman who lavishes nothing
but the best upon her toilets.
The polls have never vaulted Turner to the
top of the electoral heap, but the faithful liberal knew that John was a track star—used to
a good run and not a quick jump. But now the
Rosedale Rhodes scholar may find it difficult to
be bookish. Books, it seems, do not like him.
People, it seems, are reading books.
Poor John. We wanted to like you. We
waited for you to do something fantastic. We
waited for you to show Brian Mulroney that his
conservative excesses would never stand up
against liberal moderation.
Was it the ghost of your mother that came
back to haunt you? Was she seeking revenge on
that fateful May day, when some twenty odd
Liberal members of Parliament decided you
should step down? Did she tell you the throne
was yours, dear Hamlet?
We watch you, a hesitant prince, confounded by your circumstance. Don't you remember what your Uncle Pierretrudeaunius
said? Neither a borrower nor a lender be; set up
crown corporations instead.
Alas, the crown shall never be yours to
wear. Like all procrastinating princes who live
in a world of delusion, your story is nothing
more than a tragedy, with bits of humour to
help us forget you are a leader in this country.
"Tis true, something is rotten in the state of
the red L mark. But the sooner you exit, the
easier it will be for those left to start over.
Enter Campagnolo, Lalonde, Chretien
...please.
But perhaps we need more than that. Perhaps we require the return of the Book-man.
The aging liberal patriarch, the one who confounded the West with the lift of a single finger.
But alas, poor Elliot, we knew you once.
theUbyssey
September 13, 1988
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays and Fridays
throughout the academic year by the Alma MaterSociety
ofthe University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions
are those of the staff and not necessarily those of the
university administration, or ofthe sponsor. The Ubyssey is published with the proud support of the Alumni
Association. The Ubyssey is a member of Canadian
University Press. The editorial office is Rm. 241k ofthe
Student Union Building. Editorial Department, phone
228-2301; advertising, 228-3977.
"I thought we were finished!" exclaimed Rachel Cayley
from beneath the table. Martin Dawes looked at the form
beneath the arborite and giggled. Rachel Cayley was in
another room looking for Godot. "I said wait, not look!"
screamed Deanne Fisher, as she gagged herself with the
telephone cord. Katherine Monk, Olivia Zanger, and Alex
Johnson broke into a chorus of Three Little Maids from
School. Andrea Lupini and Pat Nakamura were amazed at
the dated selection, and started an a cappella version of
Laurie Anderson's O Superman. Chris Weisinger teetered
on tip toe while Steve Chan looked for a contact lens. "Did
someone say lens?" asked Mandel Ngan with his hands in
his pockets, and a curious expression. Ted Aussem said
"Nikon" in his ear, and Ilona Biro heard violins. Laura
Busheikin was happy she didn't take pictures, although
Stephen Scrimshaw would make a nice trophy in the
sitting room. Keith Damsell had no idea how he ended up
as chaperone, next time he would oreder anchovies.
entertainment:
Martin Dawes
news:
Deanne Fisher
city desk:
Katherine Monk
photography.
Mandel Ngan
production:
Chris Weisinger
Letters
Ubyssey
accused of
hypocrisy
The Ubyssey's righteous indignation over Bob
Seeman's threat to "the
paper's editorial autonomy"
(Editorial, September 9th
1988) would have been more
credible had the paper not so
strongly endorsed a move
this summer by two female
engineering students to cut
the funding of the Engineers' newspaper because
they found its contents offensive.
Why was their action
laudable and Seeman's deplorable? In both instances,
people were attempting to
limit funding because they
objected to what a newspaper was printing. The principle —and the tactic—was
identical in each case.
If "What The Ubyssey
prints in its [sic] pages is the
Ubyssey's business," surely
what the Engineering editors print in theirs is their
business. Or is the "freedom
of the press" something reserved for the Ubyssey and
those who espouse views its
staffers are comfortable
with?
In a different vein, incidentally, Benjamin Franklin once noted that the
"press is free only to those
who own one"; and the council, not the staff, owns yours.
A. Stephan Brewer
_Vrts3
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any Issue. Letters must be typed and are not to exceed 300 words in length. Content
which Is Judged to be libelous, homophobic, sexist, or racist will not be published. Please be concise. Letters may be
edited for brevity, but it is standard Ubyssey policy not to edit letters for spelling or grammatical mistakes. Please bring
them, with Identification, to SUB 241k. Letters must Include name, faculty, and signature.	
Who's welcome at AMS
concerts and barbeques?
On Friday, September 3, our family tried to attend
the AMS sponsored barbeque and concert. We were told
at the gate that we could not enter because we had 2 chil *
dren (a 1 year old and a 3 year old) who were under the
age of 19. So my husband explained that we pay student
activity fees too. We were told to move to a gate close to
the barbeque and we would have no problem getting a few
burgers. At that gate, we were told that we had to leave
our children outside the fence to purchase our ibod at the
barbeque which was located quite a distance from this
fence.
Upon investigation, we found out that there was an
area set aside for underaged students and families. However, that fence had been pushed down by the crowd and
we could not come anywhere near it. We were tol d by the
AMS General Manager that there was nothing he coul<J
do to keep the crowd out ofthe family area. "Besides," the
AMS president said, "this is not a place for young children."
I feel that an area should always be set aside for
families at these social events. After all, if we can be
excluded from the drinking areas, so too must drinking
students be excluctect from the family areas.
Furthermore, the barbeque area at these social
events should be easily accessible from both the drinking
area and the family area.
Dianne Roy
Student Spouse
Family Housing
card holders. Will it ever
end? There must be a better
method of getting much
needed books to thirty thousand students before first
week assignments are due.
I suggest extended hours for
the first week or two of
school; up to twenty four
hours a day might meet
demands. Even more cashiers should be added to the
already increased number,
preferably experienced
cashiers with a quick hand.
Students living in Vancouver during the summer
months could lend ahand by
buying their texts in August
before their out of town
friends come back to nest.
Bookstore
line-ups
slammed
So you think Telereg is
a nightmare? You obviously
have not been over to the
bookstore lately!! Miles and
miles of student bodies line
the sidewalk up to and beyond the biology building.
Oh, the courageous souls
who risk their peace of mind
to obtain those rather overpriced texts. Line-ups outside lead to more line-ups
inside, double that for credit
Will the bookstore make any
attempt to control these line
ups in the future? They
have not thus far so, for you
students out there, don't get
your hopes up too high -
especially ifyou are only in
first year.
Liana Dobbs
Arts 4
P.O.'ed
at T.A.s
I suffered through it in
my first year at UBC, and
I've suffered through it yet
again in only the first week
of my second year—I made
the mistake of attending
tutorials with absentee
T.A.S.
It wasn't reported in my
classes, I didn't see it on the
walls, I didn't read it in the
toilet, and no notes were
posted on the classroom
doors. This unfortunate
occurrence can and should
be avoided and is easily
stopped.
What effort does it really take to post a note in a
classroom or make a quick
mention during a lecture?
Our time, as students,
is valuable. Oversights
such as these are unacceptable, especially since in my
case and others time was not
the only loss. Today, I also
missed two hours of paid
work which I could have
taken advantage of.
I trust some future effort will be made to rectify
this problem.
Carla Olson
Commerce
14/THE UBYSSEY
September 13,1988 OP-fD
Thank God for apathy
Fm not sure if Richard Nixon ever said
this, but the key to success in politics is the
smoking gun. When the bullet does good-
creating jobs, cleaning the environment,
cutting taxes- the possession of a visible
and smoking gun is imperative. And when
the bullet did bad- wage and price controls,
Perspective
missiles to Iran, slush funds, wiretaps and
illegal break-ins- the smoking gun is lethal. In the United States, George Bush is
having a very difficult time, displaying the
gun proudly, then suddenly burying it, then
digging it back up, then throwing it out into
the sea, then rowing out to get it again...
Brian Mulroney would be doing the
same thing but he's just hoping that we
weren't paying attention during the ugly
parts of his term (and that the breathtaking
wonderfulness of free trade will make Defence Ministers who like chatting up West
German strippers seem like some goofy
anomaly). But for the good parts, he definitely wants a strong bond linking his government with beneficial actions. In many
cases he just needs an action, just a bill or
something, so that he can say that he did
good while in office, and the rest of us can
just assume that it must have benefitted
someone else whom we don't know.
This particular government has been
quite blatant in the passing of essentially
useless yet visible legislation packages. A
prime example of this is the recently passed
ethics legislation. Normally in a government this corrupt, passing ethics bills
wouldbe laughable, but in this age of Meese
and VanderZalm, government action must
be more bizzare to qualify for laughability.
This ethics package, ideally, would
come out of a deep and profound concern for
ethical conduct in government on the part of
the Prime Minister and his cabinet. In this
case, however, the Prime Minister and his
cabinet have a deep and profound concern
for very little with the notable exception of
keeping their jobs. Therefore a package of
this sort is forwarded to assist in that regard. It's the visibly smoking gun to the
corpse of corruption in government. The important thing for them to ignore and hope
others follow suit, is the vitality and verve
displayed by the alleged stiff in question.
This is a significant advance in the
field of voter deception; Smoking Gun Sans
Corpse. This method makes the whole process of re-election simpler. There is no need
to affect the petty lives of members of the
electorate, they can simply pass legislation
in the evacuated confines of the House of
Commons, and when the voters ask, "What
have you done for me lately?", show them
the Hansard; a veritable potpourri of helpful government action. And ifyou haven't
been affected, well then they just haven't
gotten to you yet, give them another term
and they'll get you a job, lower your taxes,
or get your brother-in-law out of jail.
The only difficulty with this technique
is the remote possibility that people have
paid attention. If the electorate has followed the actions of government and the
subsequent (non)reaction of the economy,
then the man with the victimless gun will
be joining a Toronto law firm by sundown.
This is why all politicians pray daily to the
patron saint of voter apathy. Just imagine
what would happen if people really knew
how useless and pathetic their government
was: Traffic Gridlock, Mob Lynchings,
Looting in the Streets, Pandemonium.
Whew.   Thank God no one cares.
•James Thorburn
Spare the chainsaw
and spoil the child
It could all have been a CBC
Movie of the Week: vigorous yet
well-meaning environmentalists
struggle to save the wilderness
from the belligerent forces of big
business while being bullied and
oppressed by the police. With the
media's lights and cameras glaring down upon them, these determined treehuggers fought to save
their park.
Perspective
While not the cast of Danger
Bay, the Friends of Strathcona, as
they are known, were made out to
be the victims of these protests.
They announced their intention to
disrupt progress on the site, they
decriedbig business for wanting to
destroy nature, and they bleated
when the police threw them in jail.
Poor babies.
If anyone was a victim in
these affairs, it was either the poor
foreman who was trying to do his
job, the drillers who were trying to
carve out a living, or the police who
would rather prevent crime and
eat donuts than referee these
pointless contests.
These 'Friends' are among a
segment of the population who
would rather see no resource-
based industry take place here.
These 'Friends', some of whom I'm
sure had never been to the park
before these protests, were protesting the right of a company to
test a portion of Strathcona Park
for mineral exploration and extraction feasability. This permit to
drill was legally obtained from the
government as a test mechanism.
That's it. They weren't going to
sink a shaft or open a pit (that's
another bureaucratic process en
tirely), just test. They may never
have sought permission to mine
the property. A 'look but not touch'
operation.
What's the big deal then?
First of all, these showboating clowns protest out of some
warped desire to turn the entire
province into a park. Sorry kids,
but tourism will not keep over one
million employed. Whether they
like it or not, this province was
and will continue to be built
around resources and resource
management. We are all dependent upon the resource industry for
our livelihood. All the protesting
in the world ain't gonna change
that. Parks have their place in
this province, but on a par with
mining, fishing and logging. That
way, everyone benefits.
Secondly, and probably more
obviously , these 9 to 5 robots are
doing it for the FREE publicity.
It's the main reason these groups
do things like this. What kind of
idiot is going to throw himself
under a drill in the middle of
nowhere, possibly getting himself
killed, if he knows he's not going to
be arrested on T.V.. Plus, the
method of arrest they used was
nothing more than a media ploy;
it's done for the camera, and it's
bad acting. To them, getting arrested is something they can videotape off the news to show their
grandchildren.
As for being arrested, they
deserved it. The company was
drilling, utilizing a legitimate
government authorized permit,
and they, the Triends', were illegally preventing production on
the site. As they were in defiance
of a court 'cease and desist' order,
they were breaking the law. And
as   such,   they   deserved   to  be
thrown in jail.
The officers in this matter
were not the SS and not the KGB,
they were simply people entrusted
by us to uphold the laws which
bind us all and prevent their infraction. As a member of this province, bound by these laws, I ap-
pauld the Friends of Strathcona
arrests. Let them rot in jail, and if
they refuse to obey the law, let
them sit there for awhile to think
things through. No one is above
the law.
The sympathy that these
'Friends' thought they evoked was
neither provincial nor local, it was
in their heads. Most who watched
the protests on T.V. giggled when
they spoke, chuckled while they
hung their placards, and laughed
uncontrollably when the 'Friends'
were thrown in jail. These people
claim to speak for the entire population. They don't. People like the
'Friends' protest just to see themselves on T.V..
Today there is a freedom to
choose between a) unemployment
and scenery and b) selective resource 'exploitation' run by a company which, by law, must return
the site to near pre-operating condition upon closure, and jobs.
I say, pass the chainsaw and
shut up.
-Rob McGowan
Opinions printed tn
Perspectives are
those of the author
and do not
necessarily reflect
those of The
Ubyssey.
Beauty pageants
promote false
ideals
Coming up the stairs to SUB
241k this morning, I ran into an
army of Barbie clones. You know
the kind. Blonde, not too tall, no
facial blemishes. Carefully made-
up faces. On their feet were spiked
heels, the kind that produce the
crippling ladylike' walk that is in
vogue with the fashion industry.
Perspective
I was the object of some
amusement as I passed by. I can't
say I blame them. After all, my
canvas packsack, Army and Navy
sneakers and I THINK - THEREFORE I'M DANGEROUS button
were light years away from their
carefully tailored outfits.
Though my English courses
have taught me synchronicity is a
cheap cop-out, my experience is
that it happens all the time in real
life. Arriving at the office, I was
handed a press release for a group
calling itself the Miss World-Canada Beauty Pageant. The headline on the release read: Photo
opportunity. Miss World-Canada
finalists don swimwear aboard
yacht.
Detective work revealed the
group I had encountered earlier
was from another beauty pageant:
the Miss North America Contest.
Apparently these pageants are
reproducing out of sight, like cancers, and releasing their progeny
on the unsuspecting world.
No doubt the sponsors of these
events will contest my unease.
After all, no one's forcing young
women to enter the contests. And
there's incentive for them to win.
For example, the winner of the
Miss World pageant receives $1/4
million  in  prizes  and  endorse-
ments. So why shouldn't beautiful (or handsome) people be able to
extract financial reward from
their appearance?
Several reasons come to mind.
Certain elements of our media
seem unduly preoccupied with
physical attractiveness. Bathing
beauties often occupy front-page
space in the Province and Sun,
while more important stories are
pushed toward the classifieds.
Secondly, physical attractiveness is a kind of false ideal. Daily,
I am told by that attractive young
women will hurl themselves into
my arms if I replace my glasses
with contact lenses (colored,-
natural eye color is no longer acceptable), or weightlift, or get a different kind of haircut. Somewhere
along the line, the concept of being
unique has been replaced by the
concept of changing yourself into
Superman (or Superwoman).
All of this disturbs me. I am
not sure I care to live in a society in
which photographers are invited
to shoot pictures of an "outdoor
tanning session" while elsewhere
children starve, and logging companies strip the forests.
Most of all, I want nothing to
do with the most corrupt version of
the 'beauty pageant': the
'children's beauty pageant.' Capilano Mall advertised such an exercise in child pornography last year
around Christmas, and hundreds
of crazed parents were only too
happy to push their offspring into
the floodlights.
After all, the young women I
encountered this morning were
adults, fully capable of deciding
whether or not they wanted to
enter. The prospective Young
Miss Capilanos I saw last fall were
far too young to make such a
choice.
If society wants to condone an
exercise in banality like a 'beauty
pageant,' by all means allow it.
But don't let it infect our children.
 -Chrit Brayshaiv
Applications Now ^^
Being Accepted
For The 1 Vacant
Position on
The Aquatic Centre
Management Committee
• Applications available from
SUB Rm 238
• Applications deadline 4p.m. Tuesday,
September 27th, 1988
Kenny
OYE SPORTSWEAR^&^DESIGN
• SPORTS JACKETS   $25.00 ea
• NYLON SHELLS      $19.50 ea
•POLO SHIRTS      $17.00 ea
• BASEBALL CAPS       $6.50 ea
PRICE  INCLUDES:  Direct Swiss  Embroidery  onto
garments   or    accessories     with    facLjIty stafl   or
department, club names       layout _ set up       name
bars & chenille crests by quotation
Basea on ^5 p.eoer.i
WE DO CUSTOM
FACULTY KNITTED SWEATERS
Call: (Ask for Kenneth) 876-0828
- Mon-Thurs   10 am lo 5 pm -
^fc
APPLICATIONS
are now being accepted for
five positions on the
STUDENT ADMINISTRATIVE
COMMISSION
Applications can be obtained from the
Executive Secretary (SUB Room 238).
APPLICATIONS MUST BE SUBMITTED NO LATER THAN 4:00 p.m.
MONDAY, September 19,1988 to SUB
Room 238
September 13,1988
THE UBYSSEY/15 PCB's exposed
from page 3
operators of the plant, were
subject to legal action.
Connett says industries have
been allowed for decades to
produce chemicals that they
themselves are unable to
destroy. ^If you're clever enough
to make a chemical then you
should be clever enough to
destroy that chemical, and ifyou
can't destroy that chemical,(of
which you have the most knowledge and experience), then you
have no right to put it out on the
marketplace."
The company whose PCBs
raged in the chemical fire in
St.Basile Le Grand had nowhere
near the resources needed to
fund their disposal. To aid the
destruction of PCBs and other
toxins in Canada, some analysts
have suggested the establishment of a "superfund" like the
one in place in the U.S. This type
of fund would ensure that cleanup of hazardous waste could take
place immediately. Arguments
about who would pay for the
process could follow.
Connett urges that toxic
waste destruction should be
regulated on a continent wide
basis much like the acid rain
Jubilant T-Birds celebrate Shrum Bowl victory
Birds win again
if:
STEVE CHAN PHOTO
continued from page 1
three 250 plus pounders (affectionately known as "The Black
Hole" for their uncharacteristic
black cleats and their affinity for,
as they put it 'letting defensive
linemen enter but never letting
them escape") were rock solid as
they denied SFU sack opportunities and provided Gagner the time
needed to throw.
SFU finished scoring for the
half with a 13-8 lead resulting
from a late second quarter Trainor.
touchdown connection with fullback Carey McDonald, following a
pair of controversial UBC penalties totaling 30 yards.
After an inspiring half-time
speech by the self-proclaimed
John Wayne of Point Grey,
Smith's 'Birds retook the field
with a vengeance.
Matt Pearce, the game's offensive MVP, opened the second
half with a slashing 33-yard kick-
off return to the Clan 35-yard line
and set up his own 1-yard touchdown ramble after a 28-yard
Gagner to Keller completion.
After a mid-quarter Bellefontaine field goal, the TBirds were up
by five. The 'Birds controlled the
play for most of the second half,
giving up only an early fourth
quarter field goal to allow the Clan
to pull within two.
The final T-Bird drive was
held together by two clutch Tom
Vlasic grabs in a row for a first
down after penalties left them in
danger of giving the Clan the ball
in good field position with enough
time left to get the three points
they needed to win.
UBC finished the scoring with
only 1:11 remaining on the clock
when Gagner connected a thirty-
six-yard strike to Keller all alone
in the end zone to clinch the victory.
The next UBC home game is
Oct. 1 when the 'Birds take on the
University of Saskatchewan Huskies.
APPLICATIONS
for Volunteer Positions at
Speakeasy
UBC's Student run Peer-
councelling and Information
Centre
Are available at the Speakeasy,
office
SUB 100B
Deadline for applications is
Friday, September 16th.
Injured in a car
accident?
Call us First!
Before you sign anything.
get the facts first from Zimmer Wiseman, lawyers devoted
to helping accident victims and their families. Free initial
consultation.
ZimmerWiseman
V
PERSONAL INJURY LAWYERS, 873-8446
"701 686 West Broadway. Vancouver. British Columbia. V5Z 1G1
■%-  i%  tik J&
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UBC   BOOKSTORE
Check out Panasonic's
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BOOKSTORE
6200 University Boulevard • 228-4741
UBC   BOOKSTORE
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BOOKSTORE
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16/THE UBYSSEY
September 13,1988

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