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The Ubyssey Mar 11, 2013

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 THE
UBYSSEY
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WHAT'S ON // THIS WEEK, MAYWE
MONDAY /11
SECOND WAVE
OF GLOBALIZATION
12-2 P.M. @C.K. CHOI 120
Visiting fellow Dr. AmandeepSandhu
discusses the role of India's IT industry
in constructing a "global working
class."
TUESDAY ' 12
IS UBC LIVING UPTO
THE CHALLENGE?
4:30P.M. @ LIU INSTITUTE
Six featured speakers will present
on their experiences with intercultural learning. Is UBC making
space for different ways of learning in its degree and course curricula? Food and drinks offered.
Admission by donation.
OUR CAMPUS//
ONE ON ONE WITH THE PEOPLE WHO MAKE UBC
WEDNESDAY' 13
OMG BUT MY THESIS...
4-6P.M. @ KOERNERLIBRARY
Koerner Library Research Commons staff will give you a rundown
on Microsoft Word, page layout,
numbering, headings and more!
As well, find out more about the
resources that are available to
help you in writing your thesis or
dissertation.
ON
THE
COVER
The Bloomberg
Businessterminalsin
theSauderbuilding
allow students to get
up-to-the-second info
on financial markets.
Video content
Tyler McRobbie makes some pasta salad in
the latest edition of The Ubyssey's student
cooking show. Check it out at ubyssey.ca/
videos/.
'JJthe ubyssey	
<AI JACOBSON PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
MARCH 11. 2013 I VOLUMEXCIV| ISSUEXLV
Coordinating Editor
Jonny Wakefield
coord inating@u byssey.ca
Managing Editor, Print
Jeff Aschkinasi
3rinteditor@u byssey.ca
Managing Editor, Web
Andrew Bates
webed itor@u byssey.ca
News Editors
Will McDonald*
Laura Rodgers
iews@ubyssey.ca
Senior News Writer
Ming Wong
Tiwong@ u byssey.ca
Culture Editor
Anna Zona
culture@ubyssey.ca
Senior Culture Writer
Rhys Edwards
•edwards@u byssey.ca
Sports + Rec Editor
CJ Pentland
sports@ubyssey.ca
Senior Lifestyle Writer
Justin Fleming
jfleming@u byssey.ca
Features Editor
Amo Rosenfeld
featu res@u byssey.ca
Video Editor
David Marino
video@ubyssey.ca
Copy Editor
Karina Palmitesta
copy@ubyssey.ca
STAFF
3ryce Warnes, Josh Curran,
Peter Wojnar, Anthony Poon,
Veronika Bondarenko, Yara
Van Kessel, Catherine Guan.
Ginny Monaco, Matt Meuse,
Hogan Wong, Rory Gattens,
3randon Chow, Joseph
Ssettuba. Tyler McRobbie,
Sarah Bigam,StephanieXu.
Natalya Kautz, ColinChia,
-(iin Pringle, Geoff Lister
Business Manager
Fernie Pereira
fpereira@ubyssey.ca
Ad Sales
Ben Chen
3chen@ubyssey.ca
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Tom Tang
ttang@ubyssey.ca
Editorial Office: SUB 24
604.822.2301
Business Office: SUB 23
advertising 604.822.1654
nquiries 604.822.6681
Student Union Building
6138 SUB Boulevard
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Online: ubyssey.ca
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Kai Jacobson
a rt@ ubyssey.ca
Graphics Assistant
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joe l@ ubyssey.ca
Layout Artist
Colly n Chan
cchan@ ubyssey.ca
Videographer
Lu Zhang
zhang@ubyssey.ca
Webmaster
Riley Tomasek
webrnaster@u byssey.ca
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of the University of British Columbia. It is
published every Monday anc
Thursday by The Ubyssey Publications Sociely. We are an autonomous, democratically rur
student organization, and al
students are encouraged tc
aarticipate.
Editorials are chosen anc
written by the Ubyssey staff.They
aretfieexpressedopinionoftfie
staff, anddo not necessarily reflect the views of The Ubyssey
^ublicatj ons Sociely or the Uni-
versity of British Columbia. Al
editorial content appearing in
The Ubyssey is the properly of
The Ubyssey Publications Society. Stones, opinions, photographs and artwork containec
nerein cannotbe reproducec
«i thout the expressed, writter
aerrnission ofThe Ubyssey
Publications Society.
The Ubyssey is a foundinc
member of Canadian University Press (CUP) and adheres
to CUP's guiding principles.
Letters tothe editor must
ae under300 words. Please
nclude your phone number,
student number and signature (not for publication) as
well as your year and faculty
with all submissions. ID wil
ae checked when submissions
are dropped offattheeditoria
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ay phone. The Ubyssey reserves the right to edit submissions for length and clari
ty. All letters must be receivec
ay 12 noon the day before intended publication. Letters received after this point will be
aublished in the following issue unless there is an urgent
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It is agreed by all persons
olacing display or classified ad-
verDsing that if the Ubyssey Publications Society fails to pub-
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or typographical errors that
do not lessen the value orthe
mpactofthead.
<AI JACOBSON PHOJWHE UBYSSEY
Women's studies chair draws
on experience for research
Sarah Bigam
Staff WrRer
Becki Ross grew up in a lakeside home built atop
the foundation of an old brothel and dance hall.
"I still want to go back and investigate more
about that particular institution," Ross said. "I
think it's a fitting foundation for my later work."
Ross, who is a sociology professor and the
chair of women's and gender studies at UBC, has
done work on sexual identity, sex work, sexual
communities and family.
The recipient of several teaching awards,
including the Killam Teaching Award for best
professor in the Faculty of Arts, Ross has taught
at UBC since 1995.
Ross has spent the past few years researching
the history of sex workers in Vancouver. In 2007,
she was given a grant from the Social Sciences
and Humanities Research Council of Canada
to research the expulsion of sex workers from
Vancouver's West End between 1975 and 1985.
In 2010, she won the British Columbia Clio Book
Prize for her book Burlesque West: Showgirls,
Sex, and Sin in Postwar Vancouver, which examined the social history ofthe striptease entertainment industry in Vancouver after the second
world war.
Some of Ross's motivation for her work comes
from her early years. Ross's father was general
manager ofthe Sudbury Wolves hockey team,
and she said spending time with the team introduced her to issues of masculinity that she has
since investigated as a professor.
She said her commitment to reproductive
rights for women was catalyzed when she had an
abortion at age 17. She described going through
a difficult process of finding an underground
feminist health centre, which gave her a referral
to an abortion doctor in Boston.
"It was a long, cumbersome, very anti-women
process," Ross said.
Ross, who has been involved in athletics her
whole life, often noticed gender inequality in
sports as a child.
"Boys had better uniforms, they had more
experienced coaching, they had more gym time,"
she said.
Ross has also looked into issues of motherhood. This has included both the stigma that
women like Ross face for choosing not to have
children as well as the challenges faced by
women who do.
"My own mother really sacrificed herself and
her opportunities for life for her children," Ross
recounted. "I'm really grateful to her for the sacrifices that she made to enable all five children
to go to university and to try to reach our goals
and to strive to be the best we can."
Earlier this year, Ross was awarded the Hooker Distinguished Visiting Professor Fellowship
at McMaster University in Ontario, and this fall
she'll travel there to give lectures and meet with
graduate students.
Ross is committed to ending the sexual,
physical and emotional violence that many
women and young children face.
"It has to stop, and so when we think about
how it's going to stop, it has to start with socialization and with efforts that parents and
teachers and coaches and dance instructors and
vocal coaches and whoever is an adult other in
a person's life, contributing to this effort to stop
the bullying, stop the bad behaviour, stop the
sexism and racism." Xi
—With files from Annie Ju
Write
Shoot
Edit
Code
Drink
COME BY THE UBYSSEY OFFICE"
SUB 24, FOLLOW THE SIGNS
If Christ
Lives in Us...
Mam then Shcrfl We
I
i
A speaker series
exploring Christian
perspectives on ethics,
justice and the good
life starting Mar. 7th
www.ubc-uniteds.ca // News I
)RS WILL MCDONALD + LAURA RODGERS
MONDAY, MARCH ll, 201:
DRINKING »
HOGAN WONG PHOJWHE UBYSSEY
Elin Tayyar, a former AMS VP Finance and member of the committee in charge of the brewery, stands at the UBC Farm, the new location slated for the brewery.
Campus microbrewery moved to the farm
Financial, space concerns cancel plans for new SUB brewery
Will McDonald
News Editor
There's still going to be a campus
microbrewery, but it won't be in the
new SUB.
At the March 6 Alma Mater
Society council meeting, the AMS
unanimously approved a motion
to spend up to $1.1 million over the
next four years to build a microbrewery on the UBC Farm. The
brewery was originally slated for
the new SUB, but the AMS has
decided that the farm is a more
practical location.
Elin Tayyar, former AMS VP Finance and a member ofthe committee in charge ofthe brewery, said
building on the UBC Farm will cost
$350 per square foot as opposed to
the $410 per square foot projected
for the space inthe new SUB.
The decision came after
spending almost $50,000 on consultations considering options for
the brewery.
The AMS hopes to make the
microbrewery part ofthe new
UBC Farm Centre, which is
scheduled for completion in 2017.
"I think doing it in the farm
just makes way too much sense.
Although it's a little bit down the
timelines, it is building it for the
future generations," said Tayyar.
"The new SUB would have been
a nice marketing tool... [but] it
makes a lot more sense to do it on
the farm."
Tayyar said the farm will
allow more space for brewing
and storing beer. He added that
the farm already grows hops and
barley, which could contribute
to a unique and sustainable UBC
brand of beer.
The AMS still needs to negotiate an agreement with the
university to be able to use the
space on the UBC Farm.
"There's been a lot of support
from the UBC executive since
day one, so I'm hoping that support still exists," said Tayyar.
AMS President Caroline Wong
said she had previously hoped for
a brewery in the new SUB, but
the farm makes more financial
sense.
However, she's worried about
the AMS now needing to reach
an agreement with the university. "It will be an uphill battle
for sure," said Wong.
Dano Morrison, president
of BrUBC, a brewing club on
campus, said he was "exhilarated" with the decision to put the
brewery on the farm. It remains
to be seen what role BruBC
will have inthe operations of
the brewery.
"We'd be a great club to be involved with the brewery in terms
of creating recipes and making
sure our needs as a UBC beer
enthusiast community are being
met by our local craft brewery,"
said Morrison.
The AMS is still looking for
a third party to help run the
brewery. Tayyar said a number of
groups expressed interest when
the brewery was slated for the
new SUB, so he expects similar
interest for a brewery on the
farm. Xi
—With files from Colin Chia
NEWS BREFS
Unionized childcare workers
approve deal with university
Unionized campus childcare
workers have approved a tentative
deal with the university.
The workers, represented by
a bargaining unit of around 160
employees within BCGEU Local
303, voted 93 per cent in favour of
the agreement last week.
BCGEU local 303 chair Andrea
Duncan said the deal, which
expires April 30,2014, includes
a two per cent wage increase
retroactive to May 1,2012, and
an additional two per cent wage
increase on May 1,2013.
The agreement is similar to
the otherdeals UBC made with
unionized workers this year, such
as service worker union CUPE 116
and TA union CUPE 2278.
Before the deal, campus
childcare workers made between $11.81 and $21.19 per
hour, depending on education
and experience.
The bargaining unit was originally asking for a minimum wage of
$20 for all members.
The union served strike notice
on Feb. 21, threatening to picket
daycares beginning on March 1.
UBC responded to the strike notice by requesting mediated talks.
Afterthree days of mediation, both
parties reached a tentative deal.
The deal still has to be approved by the UBC Board of
Governors. Xi
EXCHANGE»
Chinese
bureaucrats to
study at Sauder
Ming Wong
Senior News Writer
UBC has finalized a deal for Chinese government officials to come
to the university and take summer
classes for the next five years.
As part of a multi-year partnership, government bureaucrats from
the province of Guangdong in China
will be coming in groups of 25 for
the next five years to study the Canadian political system at the Sauder
School of Business.
"The Province of Guangdong is
seeking additional training to enhance their employees' knowledge
of public administration and to gain
insight into what comprises best
practices in Canada," said Sauder
associate dean Bruce Wiesner in
an email.
The Chinese officials, who are
division directors and section chiefs
within the Guangdong government, will spend 30 days at Sauder
taking courses on public policy
analysis. As part ofthe curriculum, they'll participate in panel
discussions and take field trips to
government offices.
"The goal... is to help the participants grasp theories of public
administration," wrote Wiesner.
The classes will be exclusively
customized for the Chinese delegates. They'll be part of Sauder's
Chinese Executive Education pro-
<AI JACOBSON FILE PHOJWHE UBYSSEY
The Sauder School of Business will host groups of 25 Chinese bureaucrats on exchange.
gram, a customized management
training program that integrates
management development, business
skills, English language training
and cultural immersion specifically
aimed at government and business
executives in China. Wiesner said
clients ofthe program tell Sauder
which areas of business they wish
to learn about, and then Sauder customizes a program for them to take.
Wiesner said the amount the
Guangdong officials have to pay for
this program is confidential.
UBC hosting a group of Chinese
government officials may be seen as
controversial by some, but Wiesner
doesn't think it's anything out of
the ordinary, given UBC's history
of partnering with China. "We are
pleased to be able to play a role in
helping China develop its governmental institutions and exposing
their leaders to best practices in
Canada," he wrote.
As part of building its international reputation, Sauder has
previously worked with other Chi
nese clients as part of its executive
education program, such as Beijing
Television and the Industrial and
Commercial Bank of China.
"We're taking action to increase
international awareness of British
Columbia as a high-quality education destination, paving the way
for partnerships like this one," said
former B.C. Minister of Advanced
Education, Innovation and Technology John Yap in a release. Yap
has since resigned over a scandal
involving a leaked memo.
In the release, Yap said that
maintaining ties with other nations
may work towards attracting
international students to attend
B.C. post-secondary institutions.
Over 100,000 international students
contribute approximately $2 billion
to the B.C. economy.
China is one ofthe key priority
nations the B.C. government has
long been courting in order to foster
a long-term economic relationship,
as detailed in their International
Education Strategy plan. Xi
GAMBLING »
Psychology dept.
to study gambling
addiction
Lawrence Neal Garcia
Contributor
UBC's department of psychology
will soon be home to a centre for
gambling research.
With a $2-million investment
from the British Columbia Lottery
Corporation (BCLC) and the B.C.
government, the centre will study
the psychology of betting and
gambling addictions.
"This will be one of a handful
of centres worldwide dedicated to
research on gambling psychology
and problem gambling," said Alan
Kingstone, the head of UBC's department of psychology, in a press
release. "Much of how gambling
impacts our brains and behaviour
is still a mystery — so there's a lot of
important work to be done on this
issue."
Kingstone sees the centre as a
novel opportunity to bring together
researchers in this specific field.
"In Canada, I don't think there's
anything like this," said Kingstone.
Marsha Walden, the BCLC's
vice-president of strategy, transformation and social responsibility, said she hopes that with the
academic credentials of UBC, the
new centre will shed light on ways
to identify, understand and prevent
problem gambling.
Walden said research shows
about 4.6 per cent of adults in
Canada have some problem related
to excessive gambling, with about
0.9 per cent of those categorized as
severe cases.
The centre, which will be headed
by an expert to be hired by the UBC
psychology department, would add
to current research on related topics
such as judgment, decision-making
and the effect of rewards.
Walden said that the centre will
operate with complete academic
independence from BCLC, whose
involvement will be limited to one
position on a steering committee.
While the BCLC has no further
financial commitment, Kingstone
said he hopes that the potential
success ofthe centre will encourage
future investments.
Michael Souza, a UBC psychology professor looking to start
a course on the psychology of
gambling, is excited by the potential ofthe Centre for Gambling
Research. "[The] really cool thing
about this centre is that it'll open up
even more opportunities for more
advanced courses for people who
want to study this in more depth,"
said Souza.
Souza also sees the centre as
a way to bridge the gap between
clinical research and practice.
"We don't want to do work just
in a lab for the sake of doing it in a
lab, we want it to translate and help
people.... It's all about integration
and this is an opportunity to do
that inthe context of gambling,"
said Souza.
But putting research into practice may not be so easy.
While Walden said that the
BCLC would consider changing
its practices to align with research findings, she also emphasized the academic nature ofthe
research centre.
"This is about learning," said
Walden. "In the same way that
there's academic independence on
UBC's part, there's also commercial
independence on our part. So we
will continue to have the right to
implement decisions or findings
that we see from UBC ... in our
business as it makes sense."
The Centre for Gambling Research is scheduled to open this
September. tJ NEWS    I    MONDAY, MARCH 11, 2013
PROVINCIAL POLITICS »
Cast your bets for the B.C. election
Sauder prof's futures market aims to predict the outcome — down to the seat
Laura Rodgers
News Editor
You might have some idea of
what's going on in the upcoming
provincial election, but are you
willing to bet on it?
Sauder professor Werner Antweiler is. Since 1993, he's been
running an elections futures market to teach his students about
long- and short-selling — and how
to predict election outcomes.
"It allows people to invest
money into the election outcome, predicting what is the
vote share the parties receive,
or the share of the seats in the
legislative assembly, or who will
form the majority government,"
said Antweiler.
"The traders try to answer the
question, 'What do you think the
election outcome will be?' And
that's a very different question
from, 'Who are you going to vote
for?'" he continued.
"The traders are actually
forward-looking.... They actually
take the information from the
polls, what they hear, what they
discuss, and try to form an opinion about where the momentum
is heading."
In the currently running
market to predict the outcome of
this spring's upcoming provin-
=HOTO COURTESY BCNDP/FUCKR
Investors in a Sauder futures market think Adrian Dix's NDP has a 92.5 per cent chance of winning a majority government in the
upcoming provincial election.
cial election, an NDP majority is
trading at 92.5 per cent, while a
B.C. Liberal majority is trading
at six per cent. The market also
predicts that the NDP will end up
with 64 per cent of legislative assembly seats, the Liberals will get
26 per cent and the Conservatives
will wind up with 10 per cent.
As in a real-world futures
market, investors can benefit
through buying a commodity
they expect to rise in value, or
through "short-selling" a commodity when they expect its price
to drop. This means the market
quickly adjusts when a sure-
thing prediction is trading below
its expected value or when an
overblown prediction is trading
above it.
Antweiler's markets have a
reasonably good track record. In
the days leading up to the 2008
federal election, the Conservative
seat prediction traded steadily
at just above 40 per cent, and on
election day they picked up 36 per
cent of seats. The seat prediction
for the federal Liberals traded
just below 30 per cent, and they
wound up winning 30 per cent of
seats. The Bloc Quebecois settled
to trading at roughly 15 per cent,
and won 11 per cent of seats.
And this isn't the only futures
market tasked with predicting
election outcomes. At the University of Iowa, a market ran to
predict the outcome ofthe 2012
U.S. presidential election, and
the values of shares accurately predicted the re-election of
Barack Obama. That election also
saw a distinct rise in prominence for quantifiable predictions
over soft punditry as marked by
the ascendance of Nate Silver's
statistics-heavy (and, ultimately, heavily accurate) election
prediction blog.
Antweiler hopes to use these
markets to crowdsource information about other topics as well.
He's looking at setting one up
to predict yearly changes in the
extent of Arctic sea ice.
"Predicting how fast the ice is
shrinking has been quite difficult, and often quite wrong," he
said. "So we're hoping that exercising crowdsourcing is going to
produce some useful information." Xi
^ft Keep up to date by following us on twitter!      @Ubyssey
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Quality In Everything We Do II Culture I
ANNAZORIA
LIFESTYLE »
SHOULD YOU MOVE
THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY OF INDEPENDENT LIVING
WHY YOU SHOULD STAY
MattMeuse
StaffWriter
So you want to move out. Well, I am
here to tell you that it's not worth
it. Speaking as someone who has
been living away from home for the
better part of five years now, I urge
you: you need to milk this particular teat as long as you can.
First off, you're in university.
It's been a while since you paid
tuition in January, so here's a
quick reminder: university is really
expensive. And do you know how
expensive it is to live in Vancouver? Unless you have some weird
romantic ideas about spending
your college years living in abject
poverty, you'll be in for a substantial hit to the savings account.
You'll be lucky to find a half-collapsed garden shed for less than
$650 a month, plus utilities — and
even then you'd probably be sharing
the shed with a roommate or two.
Roommates! You think your
sister hogging the bathroom for an
hour every morning is bad? Just
wait until you get some roommates. Do you like random people
coming and going from your house
at all hours ofthe day, seemingly
indifferent to the squalor in which
you live? Do you like the constant
sound of loud sex and the smell
of body odour and six-week-old
take-out wafting out ofthe room
next to yours, like some sort of
Glade plug-in from hell? Do you like
walking into your kitchen at 3 a.m.
to be hit in the face with the overpowering stench of rubbing alcohol
and finding your hairdryer and
your grandma's good casserole dish
being used to make hash oil? Then
let me tell you, you'll love having
roommates — and you'll like having
a landlord even more.
Speaking of casseroles, you'd
better learn to love them, because
after a day of busting your hump
at school — and the inevitable
part-time job you'll need to pick
up to pay for your extravagant independent lifestyle — you'll be too
exhausted to make anything else to
eat when you get home. And don't
forget that you'll have to buy all of
your food yourself now. But don't
worry; soon enough, you'll find
out just how far you can stretch a
jar of peanut butter and a flat of
instant noodles.
My colleague will try to
persuade you with lofty-headed
arguments about rites of passage
and becoming your own person, but
remember: youth is limited and maturity is forever. There will come
a time when living at home will
start to negatively affect how other
people think of you, but it is not yet
that time. Now is the time to make
the most ofthe free meals and cable
TV while you can. You'll miss them
dreadfully when they're gone.
Moving out sounds great on
paper. But unless you hit the jackpot, it's just not worth the extra
stress and financial drain. University is a big commitment, with no
guarantee of gainful employment
on the other side. You need every
bit of support you can get. Dealing
with a bit of parental hassle and
a few more minutes on the bus is
nothing compared to the trials of
living on your own. Xi
^r
SO YOU'RE SICK OF YOUR OVERBEARING PARENTS, YOU'RE SICK OF
YOUR SIBLINGS AND YOU'RE SICK OF COMMUTING FROM RICHMOND
EVERY MORNING. YOU WANTTO DO ITYOURSELF. YOU WANT TO
MAKE YOUR OWN NAME. YOU WANT INDEPENDENCE. YOU WANT
TO FEEL THE WIND IN YOUR HAIR AND THE WARM BREEZE ON YOUR
FACE. YOU WANT TO MOVE OUT.
HAVING EXPERIENCED BOTH FLYING SOLO AND LIVING WITH PARENTS, TWO UBYSSEY WRITERS SHED SOME LIGHT ON THE BENEFITS
AND PITFALLS OF BOTH SITUATIONS.
NDIANAJOELILLUSTRATIOWHE UBYSSEY
WHY YOU SHOULD LEAVE
Bryce Warnes
Columnist
Living separately from your folks
is a basic rite of passage. No matter
how much independence your
former legal guardians give you — a
basement suite, your own car —
you're still in that phase of your life
where you Haven't Moved Out Yet.
There is no point prolonging it.
Whether you're in a house with
roommates, living in university residence or truly going solo with a studio apartment of your own, you're
goingto learn from the experience.
Sharing a house with non-relatives is a lesson in what makes you
tick. You're inevitably goingto learn
what you find difficult to accept in
others — slovenliness, bad taste in
music — as well as what others find
difficult to accept in you (the two
are usually the same).
Having a home comes with all
kinds of banal duties that work their
way into your personality, like locking the door at night and keeping
the place infestation-free. It's about
situating yourself in the city and the
world at large, carving out a space
for yourself and caring for it. I don't
care how nice your bedroom at mom
and dad's is; it isn't the same thing.
Then there are the obvious
reasons for living alone: sex, drugs
and rock 'n roll (okay, EDM, you
whippersnappers.)
You may not be a party animal,
but everyone in their early 20s
enjoys things their parents don't
approve of, whether it's dancing til
sunrise or bingeing on Call of Duty.
You'll have more freedom to do
those things, and hopefully learn a
few lessons about moderation.
It's all fun fun fun, right? Crazy
parties and learning important life
lessons like a real grown-up! But
the best reason for living on your
own while you go to university is
more sobering.
You should live away from home
now because you'll be moving back
there once you graduate. The latest
stats indicate that 85 per cent of
college seniors plan on returning
to their childhood bedrooms once
they graduate.
Why? Recent grads on the hunt
for their "career" may find themselves unemployable in the bare-
ly-scraping-by sector. No 7-Eleven
manager is goingto hire someone
full-time when everything on their
resume suggests they'll jump ship as
soon as an unpaid internship in their
industry of choice pops up.
Granted, as most engineers are
happy to remind arts students, this
is more of an issue for some programs than others.
All the same, with a sickly economy and a glut of young-and-hope-
fuls with bachelor degrees flooding
the job market, there is a good
chance you'll find yourself living
with your parents again before you
reach total financial independence.
University may be your big
chance to get away from the old
homestead and try things on your
own for a while. Nobody's saying
you'll have to move back home for
sure, but look at it this way: would
you rather move out for four years
and then be forced to move back
home, or stay at home for four years
and then find yourself unable to
leave? tJ // Sports + Rec
EDITOR C.J. PENTLAND
MONDAY, MARC
CIS NATIONALS »
KAIJACOBSON PHOJWHE UBYSSEY
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: UBC's Genevieve Carpenter-Boesch finds her way past the University of Montreal defensive line; defender Sarah Casorso collides with a
Toronto player; Goalie Samantha Langford deflects a shot.
Women's
hockey
dream
season
ends in
Hogtown
heartbreak
UBC women's
hockey finishes fifth
at CfS nationals in
Toronto
C.J. Pentland
Sports Editor
(TORONTO) - Not many teams can
say that they won their last game of the
season, but that is the case for the UBC
women's hockey team. Granted, the win
didn't come in the national final, but
Sunday's 2-1 victory over the Queen's University Gaels saw the Thunderbirds finish
in fifth place at CIS nationals in Toronto. The win over Queen's was the team's
first-ever win at the national tournament,
adding yet another first to the team's
incredible season.
A day after losing a spot in the gold
medal game, the 'Birds could have easily
come out in the fifth-place game without
much motivation. But after a bit of a slow
start, the T-Birds picked up the play in
the second period. Nadine Burgess and
Genevieve Carpenter-Boesch tallied just
38 seconds apart, giving UBC their first
two-goal lead ofthe tournament.
Queen's applied intense pressure inthe
third period, as they spent the majority of
the frame on the power play. They finally
were able to cut the lead in half when they
capitalized on a five-on-three advantage,
but that was as far as the Gaels would get.
Thanks to several blocked shots, numerous big saves from Samantha Langford
and a few hits off the posts, the T-Birds
were able to hold on to the victory and end
their season on a winning note.
"We set so many bars and a lot of history this year, and accomplished a lot of
things that were never done here before,
and we wanted to finish on that note as
well," said Thomas. "We wanted to win for
the first time ever at a national event and
representing UBC as a team to finish the
year."
Langford made her third straight start
at the tournament, as she stepped up again
to fill in for regular goaltender Danielle
Dube, who was sidelined with pneumonia.
She made 24 saves on the night, many
of which were strong pad saves with the
Gaels looming around the crease and looking for a rebound.
"There were pivotal times in that game
where Sam held us in," said Thomas. "She
really held down the fort for us. She was
very patient in the playoffs, she supported
her teammates, prepared and worked hard
so when she got the call she was ready to
deliver. It was amazing for her to have that
accomplishment, for her to be the one to
get that first nationals win for us."
The finale also saw the end of five
T-Birds' careers. Kaitlin Imai, Emily Grainger, Kaylee Chanakos, Kelsey
Halvorson and Dayle Poulin all played
their last game in the UBC blue and gold
TOURNEY
ATA
GLANCE
The fourth-seeded UBC Thunderbirds have
finished fifth place in the CIS national championships, losing against the University of
Toronto and the Universite de Montreal before
beating Queen's.
The T-Birds gave up a controversial, late
equalizing goal in their first-ever national
championship game against the hosts Toronto. With Toronto on the power play and having
pulled theirgoalie, UBC goaltenderSaman-
tha Langford was bumped into and the net
knocked loose as Marlie McLaughlin tied the
game at 4-4 with 34 seconds remaining. UBC
lost in the shootout for a final score of 5-4.
Needing to beat the first-seeded Montreal
Carabinsfora place in thefinal, UBC wentinto
the third period with the game tied 2-2 but
couldn't hold out against the Quebec champions' potent offence, conceding three goals
to lose 5-2.
UBC then notched its first-ever national
championships win in the fifth-place playoff,
beating the Queen's Golden Gaels 2-1 with
goals from Tatiana Rafter and Rebecca Unrau,
the team's top two goalscorers in the regular
season.
A HISTORIC SEASON
Awards
• Graham Thomas | CIS coach of the
year, Canada West coach of theyear
• CIS All-Canadian | Danielle Dube
• Canada West all-stars |
Danielle Dube, Christi Campozzi,
Tatiana Rafter
UBC top scorers (regular season):
1. Tatiana Rafter: 13 goals, 10 assists,
23 points
2. Rebecca Unrau: 11 goals, 11 assists,
22 points
3. Kaitlin Imai: 10 goals, 8 assists,
18 points
GOALTENDER DANIELLE DUBE S
STATS:
11-5 win/loss record, 2 shutouts, 0.943
save %tage, 1.67 goals-against average
on Sunday. The victory over the Gaels
was their 28th win of the season, equal
to the total number of wins that UBC
women's hockey had over the past four
years combined.
It was a significant win for
us. Very few teams can say
they finished their season
with a win. These players are
national champions in our
eyes.
Graham Thomas
Women's hockey coach,
CIS coach ofthe year
After such an impressive run, UBC's
season has finally come to a close. Though
they didn't win the ultimate prize in 2013
— the CIS championship — they did win a
Canada West title and proved every doubter wrong by making it as far as they did.
"It was really important to represent
our league, our school, and to get a victory
to make history one last time for this
special group," said Thomas. "It was a
significant win for us. Very few teams can
say they finished their season with a win.
These players are national champions in
our eyes." tJ MONDAY, MARCH 11,2013    |    SPORTS    |   7
MEN'S BASKETBALL »
Loss at nationals, a passing of the torch
Senior guard Plumb sidelined in key game, but young talent rises to challenge
K0N1J(\M1N0LT/
RICH LAM PHOTO/UBC ATHLETICS
19 points from Brylle Kamen wasn't enough to put UBC over UVic at the CIS finals in Ottawa. UBC ended their season with a 71-65 loss.
C J Pentland
Sports Editor
In a season where bounce-back
efforts have been key to success,
the UBC men's basketball team
couldn't deliver at the crucial
moments. The Thunderbirds
dropped their consolation match
against the University of Victoria
Vikes on Saturday in Ottawa, losing 71-65 and seeing their season
end prematurely.
The 'Birds, ranked fourth in
the tournament and in the CIS
top four for the entire regular
season, struggled on offence
throughout the contest, losing
to the team that they defeated
in the Canada West final last
weekend. The game was tied at 61
with only 1:40 left on the clock,
but UBC failed to come up with
defensive stops on Victoria's last
few possessions and saw the win
fall out of reach.
The 'Birds delivered a much
better defensive game against
Victoria than they did during Friday's match, when they gave up 89
points to the University of Acadia,
but their offence on Saturday was
lacking. They shot only 35.9 per
cent from the field, and their 65
points were their second-lowest
point total ofthe season.
The loss of injured fifth-year
Doug Plumb was evident throughout the entire contest. Plumb sat
out after falling hard in Friday's
game and receiving 10 stitches to
close a gash above his eye. Without
Plumb's ability to lead a strong
offence, the T-Birds struggled to
find quality shots.
"Playing without Doug today,
our fifth-year leader, obviously
was tough on us, but also tough
on him not being able to finish his
final year on the floor," said UBC
head coach Kevin Hanson.
Brylle Kamen led the T-Birds
with 19 points, and rookie point
guard Isaiah Soloman finished
with 11 points, six assists and six
rebounds. Fellow first-year Conor
Morgan also had another strong
game, recording eight points and
11 rebounds.
The younger T-Birds carried
the team, with the first- and
second-years playing well beyond
their years while taking on key
roles. While they weren't able
to lead the 'Birds all the way to
a national championship, their
talent bodes well for the future.
The team will only lose two
players next year: Plumb and
O'Brian Wallace.
"Conor Morgan played 35 minutes [on Saturday], which bodes
well for the rest of his career. To
get that much playing time on a
national stage like this is a huge
learning experience, not only for
him, but for all our other guys
who played major minutes," said
Hanson.
The team will look to build
off this experience next year, as
the returning players will come
back with a bitter taste in their
mouths. They have now been to
the national stage and know what
it's like to get so close to a national
championship, and it's undoubtedly a feeling that they won't want
to relive. Now they know what it
takes to be number one. 31
OUT WITH THE OLD
THREE STANDOUTS FROM THIS WEEK'S NATIONAL TOURNAMENT WILL
BE BACK FOR NEXT YEAR'S CAMPAIGN
**»?
CONOR MORGAN .%i^OV-°
\t&
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Learn the strategies and processes of
publishing. Gain skills in design, graphics,
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Students also create LangaraPRM.com and
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Globe and Mail each May.
Learn more.
publishing@langara.bc.ca
www.langara.bc.ca/publishing
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I
Write for
sports
— we'll
flYYou
across the
country!
(If UBC makes nationals.
And I mean, come on. That's
pretty likely.)
C J Pentland I spoi'ts@ubyssey.ca 8    I    FEATURES    I    MONDAY, MARCH 11,2013
Local industry professionals have mounted a lobbying campaign they hope
will be able to staunch the bleeding in B.C.'s beleaguered film industry
Julian Legrere
Capilano Courier
NORTH VANCOUVER (CUP) - If
there's one group that you can be
sure has passion, it's artists. That's
likely the reason why a rally two
months ago at North Shore Studios
drew over 2,000 people to hear
industry experts and lobbyists speak
about recent efforts to save the film
industry in B.C.
THE NEW HOLLYWOOD
NORTH
Save B.C. Film, the lobby group
that organized January's rally, has
been advocating on behalf of an
estimated 25,000 industry professionals whose livelihoods they claim
are being threatened by increased
government support for the film
industry in Ontario and Quebec.
The first concern is the loss of
foreign, mainly American, film
productions, the presence of which
inthe past earned Metro Vancouver
the moniker "Hollywood North."
Currently, the B.C. Production
Services Tax Credit offers a credit of
33 per cent, but only for B.C. labour
expenditures, whereas Ontario and
Quebec offer a 25 per cent credit on
all production expenditures within
each respective province.
In 2011, B.C. fell to the fourth-
ranked production centre in North
America, behind Ontario. Industry
advocates, including those present
at the rally in January, are calling
for policy changes in order to keep
B.C. competitive.
Peter Leitch, president of North
Shore Studios, advocated at last
month's rally for an "all spend
policy" that would give foreign
productions tax breaks on all
production spending within B.C.,
rather than solely labour spending.
This policy is currently in place in
Ontario and Quebec.
Premier Christy Clark defends
the current policies, describing
B.C.'s current $285 million tax credit
as "generous." She also calls the
increased tax credits in Ontario and
Quebec a "race to the bottom," and
makes it clear that she has no intention of increasing film subsidies in
B.C., a position reflected in her government's recently released budget.
Industry members contest the
idea that increasing B.C.'s invest-
The profits of domestic film production in B.C. have fallen by $300-400 million since 2009.
=HOTO COURTEWOF SAVE BC FILM
ment in the industry would create a
bottomless subsidy climate, because
according to Brian Hamilton,
a vice-president at Omnifilm,
American productions prefer B.C.
due to its better infrastructure and
talent pool.
Leitch said that American clients
who have worked with North Shore
Studios have told him the same
things. "We don't need to match
Ontario and Quebec, we just need
to be competitive," he said to the
rally crowd.
HOME-GROWN FILMS
The second concern is the loss of
domestic film production. Currently, B.C. gives tax credits to domestic
productions, to the tune of 35 per
cent. In 2009, Quebec and Ontario
both raised their incentives to
match that 35 per cent. According
to Jackson Davies, vice-president of
the Union of B.C. Performers and an
instructor at Capilano University,
B.C. saw about $500-600 million
worth of domestic film production
annually prior to 2009, but since
Ontario and Quebec increased their
domestic productions tax credits,
that number has fallen to about
$200 million.
Davies also worries about the
long-term implications ofthe
$300-400 million loss triggered in
2009, because the lack of productions causes a loss of film industry
infrastructure, including facilities
like studios and editing suites.
"Once all the infrastructure is
gone from the community, they have
to shut down or move to Ontario,"
he said.
Once that infrastructure is gone,
and the talent moves east, there's
even less incentive for revenue and
job-generating American productions to come to B.C.
TAKING ACTION
As part ofthe Save B.C. Film campaign, a petition circulating online
has gained over 30,000 signatures,
and a poll funded by the Motion
Picture Production Industry Association of B.C. has reflected fairly
strong public support as well.
Accordingto the poll, 56 per cent
of British Columbian adults believe
the province should "encourage
strong growth" ofthe film industry,
just behind the 67 per cent who
believe in promoting growth ofthe
tourism industry.
In addition to more funding for
tax incentives, industry leaders such
as Brian Hamilton would like to
see B.C. create some sort of body to
liaise between the government and
the film industry, similar to the Ontario Media Development Corporation (OMDC).
"Where is our ministry?" Hamilton demanded at January's rally, to
rousing applause from the crowd.
B.C. NDP leader Adrian Dix has
expressed support for a government
ministry to support the creative
sector, similar to the OMDC, though
neither his party nor anyone from
the industry seems to have a viable
plan as to how that would work or
how much it might cost.
Ultimately, the implications
of a declining industry would
be undeniable.
"I know acting is a risky profession to go into," said Aaron Stewart,
an acting student at Capilano, "but
this just makes it even harder to
secure a living doing what I love."
1*1
Citizenship and Citoyennete et
Immigration Canada     Immigration Canada
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS.
IMMIGRATE TO CANADA PERMANENTLY.
The Canadian Experience Class program offers foreign graduates with Canadian work experience the opportunity to apply
and stay in Canada permanently. Visit immigration.gc.ca/cec for more details and see if you're eligible.
ETUDIANTS ETRANGERS.
IMMIGREZ EN PERMANENCE AU CANADA.
Le programme de la categorie de I'experience canadienne offre aux diplomes etrangers ayant une experience de travail au
Canada la possibilite de faire une demande en vue d'habiter en permanence au Canada. Visitez le site immigration.gc.ca/cec
pour en savoir plus et pour voir si vous etes admissible.
Canada MONDAY, MARCH 11, 2013    |    NATIONAL
HIGHER EDUCATIOH »
Alberta cuts university funding
U of A scrambles as resource-
dry budget slashes post-
secondary by 6.8 per cent
Michelle Mark
The Gateway (University of Alberta)
EDMONTON - The University of
Alberta received a shock Thursday afternoon as the provincial
government announced a 7.2 per
cent — $43 million — cut to the
university's base operating grant
instead of last year's promised
two per cent increase.
This comes along with a
$147-million cut — 6.8 per cent
— across the entire Alberta
university sector.
The University of Alberta
would have required a four per
cent increase to the grant just
to cover the cost of inflation,
not including a $12 million
structural deficit the university
has accumulated.
Shortly after the budget was
announced, U of A President
Indira Samarasekera said she was
horrified at the severity ofthe
cut, which she said came without
warning and will affect the institution's quality.
"I was very surprised.... We've
been asking for about two months,
'Give us some numbers so we can
plan,'" she said.
"Quite frankly, there's going to
be a very significant reduction in
quality ofthe student experience."
Since the U of A has already
based their 2013-14 budget
and yearly plan on a presumed
two per cent increase to the
school's operating grant, their
plans for the next year will now
require revision.
Although Samarasekera said
it's still too early to tell how student enrolment maybe affected
or what types of program cuts
will have to be made, the administration has already been putting
plans in place.
"We intend to make the
University of Alberta stronger
throughout this, not weaker,"
she said.
"I am going to do everything I
can to ensure we come out of this
a stronger, more vibrant institution, even if it means that certain
services for certain kinds of students may not be there."
Students' Union President
Colten Yamagishi said although
the provincial government
supports the current tuition cap,
which ties increases to inflation,
students will still be affected and
will face uncertainty through
possible raises to mandatory
non-instructional fees.
"This is going to be huge, not
only for the institution, but for
students," he said.
=HOTO COURTED PREMIEROFALBERTA/FUCKR
Progressive Conservative Alberta premier Alison Redford, just after the announcement of the 2013 budget. Provincial funding to
universities and colleges was cut by $147 million in the budget.
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LAST WORDS
PARTING SHOTS AND SNAP JUDGMENTS ON TODAY'S ISSUES
AMS MAY BE KICKING
A METAPHORICAL
HORNETS NEST WITH
FARM REZONING
The AMS has recently, finally
and unexpectedly agreed to
finance a student-run brewery
at the UBC Farm. It's the first
positive, concrete development
to materialize in the quest for a
student-run brewery, but what
does it mean for the farm it'll be
built on?
Once upon a time (starting in
1997, up until 2008-ish), UBC
considered the farm a "future
housing reserve." All of that
lovely land used to grow the
organic kale that shows up in
those coveted CSA boxes was
slated to become yet another
sea of condos.
But back in those mythical days, UBC students were
louder and angrier, and they
tended to band together more
often. So they started a protest
movement to save the entire
24-hectare farm from development forever, rather than just
leaving few greenhouses in
whatever area wasn't needed
for glass towers.
They held rallies, marches,
concerts, petitions. Support for
the farm stretched beyond its
kombucha-swillingbase and
became one ofthe most widely
embraced campus causes in
recent memory.
And the cause was embraced
outside of UBC, too: the board
of Metro Vancouver voiced
their support for the farm, as
did superstar local-food pundit
Michael Pollan.
And then, facing overwhelming pressure, UBC capitulated.
In 2008, they promised to back
off on any possibility of future
market housing in the area.
In 2011 the farm was officially zoned "Green Academic,"
precluding any market developments in the future.
But the plan to open up a
commercial brewery on the
farm poses a potential snag.
In a pair of documents outlining UBC's official stance and
plan for the Farm going into the
future, there's no mention of a
large-capacity brewery project.
The AMS is already starting to express concern that
UBC might need to "reopen"
or amend its Land Use Plan in
order to accommodate an ambitiously sized brewery.
Let's hope today's students
are up to the task of defending
the purpose ofthe farm as
passionately and aggressively as
their forebears were. Because
we just might still need it.
COME ON, TOOPE. SAY
YOU WANT A SUBWAY
Vancouver mayor Gregor
Robertson, an elected official,
is currently in the middle of a
major, potentially risky campaign: trying to get a Broadway
subway line built from Com-
mericial Drive to UBC.
It's risky because the city
has no power to get the subway
built; the decision to fund the
project will likely be made in
Victoria, not at our city hall. So
if the next provincial government doesn't dig the idea
The plan to open up a
commercial brewery
on the farm poses a
potentiol snag: UBC
might need to repoen
or amend its Land Use
Plan.
RE: The decision to put the
student-run brewery at the farm
instead ofthe new SUB
(sorry!), Robertson's reputation
could fall in voters' eyes.
UBC President Stephen
Toope accompanied Robertson
at a press conference to promote the subway project. Well,
sort of. The purpose ofthe
press conference has now been
called into question — courtesy
of UBC Public Affairs.
Vancouver Courier city hall
reporter Mike Howell wrote a
column that stated Toope and
Robertson called the conference to promote building
a UBC-bound subway. Then
UBC's public affairs department gave Howell a call.
NDIANAJOELILLUSTRATIONfTHE UBYSSEY
Apparently, although Toope
appeared at a press conference
promoting a subway line, Toope
himself (and the rest of UBC, by
extension?) doesn't support a
subway line per se.
No, Toope likes the idea of
rapid transit out to UBC, but
he doesn't care whether it goes
above ground or below it.
And to this, we say bah.
C'mon Toope, put your subway
where your mouth is. If you're
going to ride the media wave
started by Robertson and co.,
don't expect that you can turn
around at the last minute and
say you never actually wanted
to promote the thing you were
ostensibly there to promote.
A underground subway tunnel is a more expensive option,
but it'll also be better-suited to
accommodate a rise in ridership
if, say, UBC raises enrolment,
hires more staff and becomes
more densely populated. And
those definitely aren't things
Toope wants to happen, right?
So stop being timid. Take an
actual goddamn position on this
and enter the fray.
THE SUB IS FALLING
APART
Last week an entire stall in the
SUB basement men's washroom
was "closed for maintenance."
The maintenance involved a
garbage can under a leak in the
ceiling.
Turns out the reason water
was dripping through the ceiling
was because there was a much
larger pool of water accumulating over the stall.
At some point last Wednesday, the ceiling over the stall
collapsed. The result: wet debris
covering the entire stall. The stall
is still closed for maintenance.
Just when we thought the
SUB's plumbing was under control, brown sludge began dripping from the ceiling outside
the bubble tea place on Friday.
The AMS has gone out of
their way to create a marketing
campaign to promote the old
SUB.
They should probably put
more effort into making sure it
isn't falling apart. tJ
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by Gordon Katie
To celebrate TED's 30th anniversary, TED is moving its annual
conference from Long Beach to
Vancouver. Our city couldn't be
a more fitting locale. Like TED,
Vancouver's elitism and privilege
is thinly veiled by its idealistic but
unthreateningfaux-progressivism.
It may surprise you that $7,500
is the price for a front-row seat
to TED's "ideas worth spreading," but where else can you meet
thought-leaders at super-charged
networking events, like TED2013's
"organic local cuisine under the
stars in an isolated desert canyon"?
There is some value in local, independently organized
TEDx events (I organize the
TEDx Terry Talks), but the main
TED conference has become
completely insufferable.
When I first started to watch
TED talks, I thought this interesting new medium might help
to make challenging ideas more
accessible. However, TED is
anything but challenging; it is
intellectual pablum that has done
little more than create a bloated
ideas industry. Dominated by a
culture of feel-good techno-uto-
pian do-good millionaires, most
TED talks over-simplify complex
global problems and offer quick
technological fixes.
I am not the first person to
raise these concerns, though; it
has become almost cliche. TED
talks are "intellectually pretentious and almost industrialized
in their production" (Globe and
Mail), "quick hits of epiphany
from our pundit overlords,...
a one-night stand with ideas"
(Harvard Business Review) and
"a massive, money-soaked orgy
of self-congratulatory futurism"
(Salon). The philosopher Daniel
Dennett even went so far as to
suggest that TED has become
something of a religion, observing that it "already, largely
wittingly I think, adopted a lot of
the key design features of good
religions."
However, a simple takedown of
TED's self-congratulatory culture
would miss the mark: its flaws
are more fundamental than that.
TED's biggest weakness is its unwavering commitment to a unique
brand of feel-good, please-every-
one techno-optimism.
For instance, take global
poverty. Typical TED answers include giving the rural poor access
to cell phones and laptops. Like the
missionaries of old who believed
Africans could lift themselves out
of poverty if only they had enough
Bibles, these millionaire missionaries think iPads might do the
trick.
But this feel-good fix entirely
ANDREW BATES PHOTO ILLUSTRATION/THE UBYSSEY
removes the many real political
issues that underlie the problem, like weak institutions,
corrupt regulators, unfair
trade deals, unsafe working
conditions and exploitative
multinational corporations.
Another popular idea is
micro-finance, which tells a
similar feel-good story of how
wealthy philanthropists can
use an exciting new financial
innovation to help the poor help
themselves. However, to borrow
a phrase from Evgeny Morozov,
micro-finance demonstrates how
TED's "idea worth spreading"
have become "ideas no footnotes
can support."
I just produced an extensive
radio-documentary on micro-finance for the Terry Project Pod-
cast, and we found no scholarly
evidence that micro-finance has
any capacity to lift a society out
of poverty. However, we did find
that the industry capitalized
on TED-style optimism to fuel
a micro-finance bubble, with
some micro-finance profiteers
charging the poor 4,000 per cent
interest (that is not a typo), and
others intimidating their clients
to the point that it caused a spate
of suicides.
But you are never going to
watch a TED talk about micro-finance suicides or micro-finance
millionaires, or other such messy
issues that might leave you
feeling confused, guilty, overwhelmed, angry or offended.
The best demonstration of this
came from none other than Chris
Anderson himself, TED's chief
curator. Anderson decided not
to publish a Nick Hanauer TED
talk that advocated for aggressive
income redistribution through
taxation. When Hanauer accused
Anderson of censorship, Anderson
replied by denigrating Hanauer's
talk for being "partisan head-butting" that would make "a lot of
business managers and entrepreneurs feel insulted."
Therein lies TED's fundamental
flaw. Chris Anderson thinks TED
can have its cake, but eat it too:
radically transform the world and
keep everyone happy while doing
it. Unfortunately, the solutions to
complex global problems will not
always please everyone. Issues like
poverty or climate change have
their villains, and a real solution would strip those villains of
their privileges.
However, I wouldn't expect
to hear those sorts of ideas at an
elite conference like TED, because many of those same people
will be in attendance. Best that
TED feature some venture capitalist with an idea for combating
poverty with 3D printers, because we wouldn't want to upset
the feel-good vibe with an honest
conversation about justice, oppression or privilege. Xi MONDAY, MARCH 11,2013    |    OPINIONS    |   11
UBC HISTORY »
Remembering the fight to save the Grassy Knoll
PERSPECTIVES
by Aran Rosenberg
On the night of April 4,2008,19
UBC students were arrested for
obstructing peace officers following a day-long concert meant to
protest a proposed construction
plan. Students believed the plan
had been poorly thought out and
pushed through without consultation.
The project would have seen
the grassy knoll beside the Student
Union Building (currently a part of
the construction ofthe new SUB)
turned into an underground bus
loop featuring commercial space
and a private condominium complex on top. Beyond just protesting
the idea of turning a public area of
campus into a private space where
students would not be welcome
unless they were spending or had
spent money, the construction
project also had the following
downsides: the new bus loop
would not be able to accommodate
trolley busses or bicycles on the
fronts of busses.
Another downside was that the
condominiums that were to be
built on top ofthe new bus loop
would have raised the price of real
estate across campus. Most ofthe
people who would be able to afford
these condos at the heart of campus would probably not have been
students. For all these reasons,
=ILE PHOTO COURTESYOF JEFF DUNBARCK
This spring marks the fifth anniversary of the
action centred on the grassy knoll got out of
and because it's fun to organize
outdoor musical celebrations for
any cause, a group of students
without any definitive leadership
held a concert by the knoll to raise
awareness about the downsides of
the proposed construction project.
At one point early in the
evening, a bonfire was lit. The
fire department was called and
instead of asking anyone to put
out the fire, the firefighters
approached aggressively with
their hoses. Fearing that they
were planning on using the hoses
Trek Park protests. On April 4,2008,19 students were arrested when an anti-development
hand.
for crowd control, then-AMS VP
External Stef Ratjen approached
the officers to ask what they were
planning. Instead of speaking to
her, though, the fire department
sprayed Ratjen, knocking her to
the ground. They proceeded to arrest her while holding her head in
a puddle of dirty water. Outraged,
several spectators gathered in a
link of bodies surrounding Ratjen.
People tried to reason with the officers, suggesting that Ratjen had
not done anything wrong and that
the situation did not need to escal
ate. The officers relented and let
Ratjen free. Meanwhile, though,
they had gone and arrested one of
the musicians who had performed
during the day's concert protest, a
man known as Icarus. Allegedly,
Icarus assaulted a police officer.
Supporters linked their bodies
around the cop car and asked the
police to let Icarus go. The police
did not listen but rather called in
reinforcements. With around 100
police, peace and RCMP officers
on the scene, the police came into
the fray and dragged 19 limp-bod
ied peaceful protesters away from
the cop car so that it could take
Icarus to the police station. The
students who were surrounding
the car —including at least one
student who was not involved
but had just happened by on his
bicycle — were also taken away
and spent the next 24 hours in jail
at Main and Hastings.
The response on campus was
mixed. Some supported the
protestors' actions, but some
protested the protestors: several
students showed up on the knoll
a few days after the protest with
shovels and began digging. Although those arrested attempted
to defend themselves and complained about what they felt had
been unjust treatment by police
using excessive force, they were
more concerned with their pending charges, bail agreements and
potential permanent records.
Regardless, looking at campus
today, there is no underground bus
loop, no commercial space and no
private residences inthe centre of
campus. In fact, the knoll has been
partially saved to be incorporated
into the new SUB. Whether or not
the new SUB construction project
has issues that require protesting,
though, is for a new generation of
engaged students to decide. 31
—Rosenberg was among the 19
arrested at the Trek Park protests.
He is finishing a second degree at
UBC.
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