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The Ubyssey Jan 9, 2014

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  // Page 2
WHAT'S ON // THISWEEK,MAYWESUGGE$
THURSDAY   09
SKI & BOARD
WELCOME BACK
9P.M.@CEILIS
Feeling the pressures of school
already? Dance (and likely booze)
the night away with the classy
S&B crew. $5 for members, $10 for
non-members
FRIDAY ' 10
CLOUD COMPUTING
ESSENTIALS
9 A.M. @ UBC ROBSON SQUARE
Are you still wondering what the
newfangled "cloud" computing
business is? Go take this continu
ing studies class and get educated. $345 for day-long session.
Alternatively, go on a Wikipedia
hunt and learn about it for free!
SATURDAY ' 11
HOCKEY: T-BIRDS
vs REGINA
7P.M. ©THUNDERBIRD ARENA
The women's hockey team takes
on the Regina Cougars forsome
good ol'-fashioned hockey. Start
off your weekend by cheering
for your 'Birds. Adults $10, youth,
seniors and A-Card $5, UBC
students $2, free for Blue Crew
members
The SLC is a pretty big deal at
UBC— when else doyousee
1300 students in one place
outside of class? Trouble is, you
can't really grab a photo ofthe
conference until day-of. So we got
some guick snaps of organizers
Erica Baker and Holly Dysserinck
and got creative. The result is
middling at best.
—Jonny Wakefield
Doesn't even go here
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your events listings to
printeditor@ubyssey.ca.
<*«-
^|THE UBYSSEY
JANUARY9.2014 | VOLUMEXCV| ISSUE*
EDITORIAL
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iews@ubyssey.es
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eulture@ubyssey.es
Senior Culture Writer
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atejeida@ubyssey.es
Sports + Rec Editor
Natalie Scadden
sports@ubyssey.es
Senior Lifestyle Writer
Reyhana Heatherington
"heatherington@ubyssey.es
Features Editor
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features@ubyssey.es
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I.
OUR CAMPUS//
ONE ON ONE WITH THE PEOPLE WHO MAKE UBC
1 wd
cut
+0 Stan' \
ft
hoc
CP^PlAS  A
Erica Baker (left) and Holly Dysserinck are the co-chairs of UBC's signature
y
student conference.
PHOTO CARTER BRUNDAGE3THE UBYSSEY
To infinity and beyond at the
Student Leadership Conference
Tara Chan
Contributor
One day. Two keynotes. Thirty
committee members. One hundred eighty-eight volunteers.
Thirteen hundred delegates. And
in the middle of it all are two
co-chairs.
Meet Erica Baker and Holly
Dysserinck, who first met each
other during Totem residence's
Colour Wars in 2011.
Fast forward three years: they
are now fifth-year arts students
co-chairing this Saturday's 12th
annual Student Leadership Conference (SLC).
The SLC brings together
professional and student leaders from all walks of life; the
conference goal is to teach and
inspire emerging leaders. This
year's theme is "Be Infinite,"
which is meant to showcase
the plethora of opportunities
UBC students can pursue in the
Lower Mainland.
"We really wanted a theme
that left opportunities for
students to picture what their
version of infinity is and their
version of long-lasting impact
personally, on their community
[and] for the world," said Baker.
An Olympic athlete, the
founder of Jones Soda, musicians
and activists are just some ofthe
100-plus speakers who will be
sharing their wealth of knowledge at the conference.
Originally from Thorold, Ontario, Baker is pursuing a major
in First Nations studies. Over the
five years that Baker has attended
the SLC, she's worked her way up
from workshop presenter to co-
chair. In 2012, Baker was behind
the video and photos for "Faces
of Today," an SLC award that
highlights student leaders. After
that project, she was hooked and
knew she wanted to eventually
organize the event.
As for Maple Ridge's Dysserinck, this is her fourth time
attending the SLC. When she's
not organizing a conference or
hitting the books to study for her
French major, she loves to jog
and play on rec soccer teams to
stay active.
Since early last year, Baker and
Dysserinck each put in upwards
of 20 hours a week to organize
the SLC, but they both agreed
that their experiences and mem
ories are invaluable and worth all
the hard work.
"I hope people find something different or something
unexpected,... something that
they wouldn't otherwise connect
with if it was not for the SLC,"
said Baker.
"Find that one thing that you
can walk away and say, 'This is
what I took away,'" suggested
Dysserinck. "You don't need to
get to be inspired by every single
session you attend, but try to
find your own thing to be happy
with."
Having been so involved in the
UBC community over the last
five years, Baker and Dysserinck
are both excited yet sad to leave
UBC when they graduate this
May. They hope to continue on
to graduate school in the near
future.
"Just put your full heart into
whatever you do, and if you love
UBC, just give back to it and be
kind to it and it will be kind to
you," said Baker.
"If you aren't feeling great
about UBC, it is because you have
not found your thing yet," said
Dysserinck. "So go find it." XI
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ubyssey.ca // News
ORS WILL MCDONALD + SARAH BIGAM
VNUARY 9,20
SCIENCE »
UBC prof Andrea Damascelli's research into superconductivity — the phenomenon of electricity transfer with zero resistance -
PHOTO HOGAN WONG3THE UBYSSEY
- might one day lead to more efficient power lines.
Cool cuprates yield superconductivity coup
UBC team makes progress on low-resistance energy transfer
Austen Erhardt
StaffWriter
A team of UBC researchers has
made a major discovery in understanding the nature of superconductivity.
The team, led by UBC professor Andrea Damascelli and UBC
Ph.D. student Riccardo Comin,
consists primarily of members of
UBC's Quantum Matter Institute,
but also includes collaborators
from the Max Planck Institute
and Canadian Light Source, as
well as scientists from the U.S.A.
and Japan.
Superconductivity, the phenomenon of electricity transfer with
zero resistance and the alteration
of magnetic fields, occurs when a
conductive material is cooled to a
NEWS BRIEFS
=HOTO CARTER BRUNDAGE3THE UBYSSEY
UBC acquires theology school
"castle" for new econ program
UBC has found a home for its
new School of Economics. UBC
announced Tuesday that it has
purchased the lona Building from
the Vancouver School of Theology,
an independent institution that operates out ofthe castle-like building
in the north end of campus. UBC
paid $28 million forthe stone-faced
structure, which was built in 1927.
lona will provide UBC with new
academic space as various initiatives draw more students, faculty
and staff to its Vancouver campus,
the university said in a release.
ThenewVancouverSchoolof
Economics — a boutique economics program with above-average
tuition — is slated to be the primary
occupant. "This will generate great
excitement for the Faculty of Arts.
The magnificent lona building is
ideally suited for the UBC Vancou-
verSchool of Economics," said
Gage Averill, the dean of arts. "It
is a treasure that will provide an
inspiring setting for our faculty and
students." xi
specific "critical" temperature. For
many materials, this temperature
is extremely low and difficult to
reach. However, some materials
— such as cuprates (materials that
contain copper oxides) — have a
more moderate, achievable temperature, leading to them being
termed "high-temperature superconductors." Superconductivity
has a range of real-world applications; today, for instance, it is
used in MRI machines, but in the
future, it could potentially be used
to create 100 per cent efficient
power lines.
The researchers set out to study
the normal state of cuprates to
determine whether or not there
are natural characteristics that
predispose these materials to becoming high-temperature super -
VANCOUVER»
UBC students'
prepaid parking
plan passed by
council
Milica Palinic
Contributor
Vancouver City Council has approved a proposal for drivers who
plan to drink after they park.
In November 2013, two UBC
students, Leighton Hay and
Curtis Kuznecov, proposed that
the City of Vancouver offer prepaid parking for drinking drivers
as part of a Gateman economics
project.
The city of
Vancouver gave
the opportunity for
drivers who had perhaps drank a little
too much to make the
right choice.
Raymond Louie
Vision Vancouver city councillor
Now, less than two months
later, their suggestions are beginning to be implemented.
The students based the plan on
a system in Seattle, Washington
that has been shown to reduce
drunk driving. Councillor Raymond Louie, chair of City Finance
conductors, and if those characteristics are universal for all cuprates.
The team's discoveries suggest
that this is the case — a finding
that could significantly influence
the study and application of potential superconductive materials.
"The research isn't decisive,
but it's a major step forward in
the right direction. We'll have to
confirm and generalize this discovery," said Damascelli.
The superconducting cuprates
have been found to exhibit a
form of charge ordering, where
electrons behave differently from
the normal electron structure.
The findings ofthe researchers
suggest that these characteristics are universal to all materials
in the same family, according
to Damascelli.
Though the researchers have
made considerable progress and
their discovery is significant to
developing an understanding of
superconductivity, Damascelli
said there is still a lot of work to be
done on the topic.
Damascelli said instead of focusing on discovering what types
of materials are capable of becoming superconductors, knowledge of
their universal characteristics will
allow researchers to shift attention to real-world applications.
"We have found in a number of
materials this kind of behaviour,
and that's really suggestive that
this may be the way to look for the
standard of superconductivity. But
even at that level, there is more
work that needs to be done," said
Damascelli. 31
^kM
PHOTO GEOFF LISTER3THE UBYSSEY
Economics students Leighton Hay (left) and Curtis Kuznecov's class project has made
real change in the Vancouver. Their proposal to allow drivers to pre-pay at parking
meters downtown was adopted by council in late 2013.
Services, said, "The expectation
that it would also happen here
in the city of Vancouver gave the
opportunity for drivers who had
perhaps drank a little too much to
make the right choice."
Louie was a key player in
passing the motion. He consulted
everyone from the chief of police
to the Downtown Vancouver
Business Improvement Association to the mayor and CIBC.
The two UBC students also
discussed the matter with
Mothers Against Drunk Driving. The City Council passed the
motion unanimously.
Louie hopes the decision will
help downtown businesses as
well. "People can come down to
our cores and frequent our restaurants ... to have a good time,
but to do so responsibly," he said.
The parking system will allow
users to pay by phone.
City staff have already done
preliminary discussions to
work out some ofthe logistics of
the project.
The students hope the changes
will be completely implemented
sometime this year. XI
TEXTBOOKS»
U of T follows
UBC, ends Access
Copyright
agreement
Sarah Niedoba
The Varsity (University of Toronto)
TORONTO (NUW) - The University of Toronto has decided to end its
licence with Access Copyright.
U of T announced the decision
on Dec. 11, optingto handle its
copyright dealings without the company's assistance. The licence cost U
of T students a fee of $27.50 per year.
"This is a significant victory
that will save students over $1.5
million annually and is the result of
a campaign led by students and faculty," said Agnes So, vice-president,
university affairs ofthe University
of Toronto Students' Union (UTSU).
"I am glad that the University of
Toronto has listened to our concerns
and ended the collection of a fee that
many students saw as a cash grab."
Other universities have
decided to end their
licences with Access
Copyright, including
UBC Access Copyright
sued York in April 2013;
the case is being closely
watched across the
education sector.
In a press release, the university
stated that it was unable to reach an
agreement with Access Copyright at
a price that was fair for the services
the company provided. It cited
changes in copyright regulation
— including the alterations to the
Copyright Act made in 2012, the Supreme Court's expansive approach
to fair dealing, changing technology
and increased availability of open
access material — as reasons for
why the price ofthe licence was no
longer fair.
Other universities have decided
to end their licence with Access
Copyright, including UBC, Queen's
University and York University.
Access Copyright sued York in
April 2013; the case is being closely
watched across the education sector,
as it is widely seen as the first real
test of two competing interpretations of recent changes to the law.
Western University was in negotiations with Access Copyright at
the same time as U of T It has also
chosen not to renew its licence.
The UTSU has long advocated
the end ofthe licence in favour of
a university-run copyright department, similar to the systems currently operating in other schools in
the country, such as UBC. The union
repeatedly said that the $27.50 fee
was unnecessary and could be better spent elsewhere.
Access Copyright released a
statement expressing its discontent with the termination of the
agreement. The company believes
the university will now attempt
to mimic its services by relying
solely on fair dealing guidelines
— a process that, according to the
company, is untested and unlikely to
work. Access Copyright holds that
the interpretation ofthe fair dealing
regulations the university uses is too
broad, and not in accordance with
what the Supreme Court's ruling
actually implies.
The company's statement implied
that under the university's new
model, creators and publishers
whose work is used by the university would not receive the royalties
they deserve. The university's
statement outlines that it intends
to continue its compliance with
copyright law, and make proper use
of other licences and fair dealing
guidelines. The faculty will continue
to be educated on how to comply
with copyright law. // Sports + Rec
EDITOR  NATALIE SCADDEN
VNUARY 9,20
FITNESS »
The basement of the UBC Aquatic Centre houses a weight room, sauna and steam room — all of which can be accessed for free using your UBC student card.
Kick off your resolutions at
on-campus fitness centres
Our guide to the BirdCoop, the Aquatic Centre gym and Gold's Gym
=HOTO CARTER BRUNDAGE3THE UBYSSEY
Reyhana Heatherington
Senior Lifestyle Writer
Fitness-based New Year's resolutions are as common as rain-
drenched UBC students, so it's no
surprise that activity at the fitness
centres around campus picks up
noticeably in January. Below,
students evaluate three of their
calorie-burning establishments
of choice.
THE AQUATIC CENTRE
GYM
The Aquatic Centre gym, built
in 1978, is sometimes referred to
as "the dungeon" for its warm
temperature and underground
location. This basic weight room
has the benefit of surrounding
amenities, including a swimming
pool, sauna and steam room, and is
often part of a multi-step workout
for patrons.
Franck Benichou, a third-year
arts and commerce student, has
worked out at the BirdCoop gym
in the Student Recreation Centre, as well as the Aquatic Centre
basement gym. Despite the old
machines, he favours the Aquatic
Centre gym for its affordability
and proximity to other amenities.
"There's not a lot of people, and
it's free, and there's showers and a
steam room," Benichou said.
Benichou added that the
basement gym is usually devoid
of "stereotypical bodybuilders,"
who he says contribute to a more
regimented atmosphere.
"I prefer [the Aquatic Centre
gym] because [it] is more chill,"
he said.
THE BIRDCOOP
Sanna Mo, a front desk receptionist at the Aquatic Centre and
fourth-year commerce student,
likes the BirdCoop because ofthe
newer machines and availability of
cardio equipment like stationary
bikes and treadmills. The Aquatic
Centre gym has only one treadmill, a rowing machine and several
stationary bikes.
"What I don't like about [the
BirdCoop] is there's only [a few]
benches," Mo said. "And it's
cramped."
In 2009, the BirdCoop student
membership was lowered from
$148 per semester to $25 per semester, or $5 for a daily drop-in.
GOLDSGYM
Another option is Gold's Gym in
the University Village. One of
several hundred gyms of its kind
around the world, Gold's has been
at UBC since 2006. The original is
located in Venice Beach, California.
While the comparably high cost
deters some students, Gold's offers
new equipment and even boasts
"machines for muscles I haven't
even heard of," according to one
student who tried the gym on a
free trial.
Amon Kawamoto, a fourth-
year fine arts student, has been
a patron at all three gyms and
decided to choose the BirdCoop
this semester.
"[The Aquatic Centre gym] is
small and not as versatile," he said.
"[Gold's] is kind of too expensive for
students. But if you're looking for a
more serious gym, it's preferred."
Membership costs at Gold's
Gym vary; on top of start-up
fees, one option is $24 every two
weeks with a two-year contract
or $28 biweekly with a one-year
contract.
Whether you fancy yourself a
dungeon dweller or prospective
bodybuilder, there's a fitness
centre for you on campus to blow
off some steam and jumpstart the
new year. XI
THUNDERBIRDS
HOME GAMES
THIS WEEKEND
WOMEN'S BASKETBALL
(7-3)
UBC vs. Alberta (8-2)
Friday, Jan. 10 at 6 p.m. War
Memorial Gym
UBC vs. Saskatchewan (9-1)
Saturday, Jan. 11 at 5 p.m.
War Memorial Gym
MENS BASKETBALL
(4-6)
UBC vs. Alberta (9-1)
Friday, Jan. 10 at 8 p.m.
War Memorial Gym
UBC vs. Saskatchewan (9-1)
Saturday, Jan. 11 at 7 p.m.
War Memorial Gym
WOMEN'S HOCKEY
(14-3-1)
UBC vs. Regina (10-6-2)
Friday, Jan. 10 at 7 p.m. and
Saturday, Jan. 11 at 7 p.m
Thunderbird Arena
THUNDERBIRDS
FILE PHOTO KAIJACOBSON3THE UBYSSEY
Gold's may be the most spacious gym on campus, but be prepared to pay more for it. THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 2014    |   SPORTS
T-BIRDS 5-ON-5
NATIONAL TEAM
KATE
GILLIS
Field hockey
MAX
LATTIMER
Rowing
TERA
VANBEILEN
Swimming
LUC
BRUCHET
Track
NATALIE
SOURISSEAU
Field Hockey 1
1. What is your New Year's resolution for
2014?
To have dates with my
foam roller at least three
times a week.
My New Year's resolution is to crush it on
the erg. That or ride the
bike.
Shareasmilewith
someone every day
To increase my girth.
Putdownthedough-
nuts!
2. Favourite place your sport has taken you?
3. Weirdest tradition a team you've been on
has had?
4. Who would play you in a movie?
Australia.
With the Ontario field
hockey team, we would
eat Life cereal after every
game. I have no idea
how or why that tradition
started.
would like Jennifer
Lawrence to volunteer
astributeand playmein
a movie.
Trakai, Lithuania. I'm
surprised it isn't the
highlightspotof more
Euro trips.
For my first year I went
to Western, and on
the men's rowing team
the rookies each got
"unique" haircuts they
had to wearfora week.
Leonardo Dicaprio,
pre-Titanic.
Australia. I always
dreamed of travelling
there and an added bonus was theiradorable
accents.
Every time you were
called a rookie, you had
to do a weird dance.
Sid the Sloth, because
can nail his accent.
SFU in March.
Pre-race Harlem Shake.
That awkward guy at that
party
Brampton, Ontario
— greatspot, highly
recommend.
Oranges at halftime.
I mean, what is that
about?
Blue Ivy Carter.
5. What activity will you take up when you
Rainbow loom —
Ithinkonce the rowing
1 love board games, so
Cowbell! We need more
Geocaching, mostly
retire?
seems like all the cool
game ends, I'd want
when I'm old and retired,
cowbell.
kids are doing it.
to get into cycling,
but more likely I'll do
something a little less
physical, like golf.
1 want to start a board
game club. Lame, but so
amazing!
HOT
Our take on the latest happenings in the world of
UBC sports
PHOTO JOSH CURRAN3THE UBYSSEY
The UBC men's hockey team had reason to celebrate after starting 2014 off well.
Tatiana Rafter    The fourth-year forward added four more points to her
Canada West-leading tally (24) over two games last weekend and was honoured as the CIS female athlete of the
week. Oh, and she won a gold medal with Team Canada at
the FISU Winter Universiade overwinter break.
Men's hockey Though they have struggled so far this
season, the T-Birds men's hockey team upset
the NCAA Division 1 powerhouse University
of North Dakota — a team with a $3 million
budget and 15 NHL draft picks —with a 3-2
overtime victory at the Great Northwest Showcase in Burnaby. They followed it up with a 1-0
shutout of Princeton — another NCAA Division
lteam — the next night.
• Designed primarily for non-business undergraduates
• For careers in Management, Finance and Accounting
• Extremely high co-op and permanent placement
To learn more about the MMPA I
, attend <
information session:
Friday, January 14, 2014 11:00 am - 1:00 pm
Room Council Chambers, Student Union Building, The University of British Columbia
www.utoronto.ca/mmpa
In non-conference action, UBC
swept Pepperdine — ranked sixth
in NCAA Division 1 — 3-0 on Dec.
30. However, Pepperdine bounced
back to take the rematch 3-1 the
following night.TheT-Blrds return
to regularseason play this weekend
at UBC Okanagan.
Andrew McGuinness sunk seven three's, but it
wasn't enough to start 2014 with a T-Bird victory.
UBC lost 82-75 to the NCAA Division II Hawaii
Pacific University Sea Warriors in non-conference
action. McGuinness finished with 25 points.
New Year's resolutions are great and
we encourageyou to keep them, but
it really sucks getting stuck waiting
forfree machines in a room of sweaty
people. Try heading outdoors
instead! II Culture
)R  RHYS EDWARDS
VNUARY 9,20
ART»
Havana comes to life at Belkin
Artists explore the politics and personality of contemporary Cuba
Gregory Pitts
Contributor
The Morris and Helen Belkin Art
Gallery will soon open its first
show of 2014.
The Spaces Between: Contemporary Art From Havana will
explore contemporary Havana
from artistic, cultural, sociological
and anthropological perspectives,
with a focus on the new economic
and social reality that has characterized Cuba in recent years. But
its origin is much more personal
than political.
Longtime colleagues at the
Belkin, artist Antonio Eligio
(known as Tonel) and associate
director/curator Keith Wallace,
have a lasting connection to Cuba.
In 1997, they put on a similar show
at the Belkin. Now, almost 17 years
later, they feel circumstances
have changed enough to warrant
a new exhibition, which they are
co-curating.
The more realist nature of the exhibition
is a part of its stress
on art as a learning
experience rather
than connoisseurship.
Keith Wallace
Belkin Gallery curator
"The economy has changed
since the years following the
collapse ofthe USSR, and there
have been shifts in power, as well
as changes in the way tourism
and investment are handled," said
Wallace. All of this is reflected in
the art made in Cuba today, but
rather than just show a chronological update of Cuban art since
the 1990s, Wallace and Tonel want
their exhibition to have a more
personal, human context.
The exhibition will be intimate,
with a focus that "deals with how
individuals function in a society
Working across a broad array of mediums, the artists of The Spaces Between challenge
preconceptions about Cuban culture while presenting their own images of Havana.
=HOTO CERI RICHARDS3THE UBYSSEY
with changing social and economic parameters, but is at the
same time relevant to all of us,"
said Wallace.
"There is always this idea of
finding universal connections,"
said Tonel. Rather than try to
exoticize a culture that may be
unfamiliar to Vancouverites,
the Belkin is taking a grittier,
more realistic and more human
approach. This is in contrast to the
typical Western tourist experience in Cuba, which, according
to Wallace, makes Cuban society
seem a lot more homogenous than
it actually is.
Wallace emphasized the ap-
proachability of this exhibition.
"Many ofthe artists were students
of those that participated in the
1997 exhibition. And the more
realist nature ofthe exhibition
is a part of its stress on art as a
learning experience rather than
connoisseurship."
Additionally, two ofthe eight
artists on display at the Belkin will
conduct a series of guest lectures
for the student body.
The exhibition proposes to be
relevant to all audiences, from
veteran connoisseurs to the less
artistically inclined. XI
The Spaces Between: Contemporary Art from Havana opens Jan. 10
and runs until April 13.
PHOTO CERI RICHARDS3THE UBYSSEY
Pictured: Of Permanence and Other Necessities, a video installation by Grethell Rasua.
Who is Tonel?
"I am from that generation that was
born with the Cuban revolution,"
explained Antonio Eligio, also
known as Tonel.
The world-renowned curator,
artist and UBC professor was born
in December 1958, less than a
month before Fidel Castro came
into power in January 1959. "I grew
up in a country that was changing
rapidly,... but in a way, my generation was the most privileged
from the change because we went
through a new school system,"
he added.
The Cuban Revolution was the
first of its kind in the American
continent, and even though the
change created many improvements — particularly in matters
of health and education —there
was also hardship and scarcity of
food and clothing. "But nothing
that would make you starve or go
without shoes," said Tonel.
By the time Tonel was a teenager, he was studying in a boarding school. This had become the
standard model forthe educational system in Cuba. Forsecondary
school and high school, most
schools were in the countryside.
He was attending a school for
students with a higheracademic
average, 45 minutes away from
La Havana.
"We would stay in the school
during the weekand do work
every day in agriculture, industry,
or, in my school, we also had a
small factory making sports goods
and radios," he said.
Tonel explained that in Cuba
a full education required students to do some manual work.
But it wasn't child labour; it was
intended as an educational
experience. Tonel learned how
to grow tobacco, something he
recalls enjoying.
But the school system has
changed considerably since the
'80s and '90s. "The country has
gone through a deep crisis in the
economy that has changed everything in society," he said.
Tonel wanted to be an artist,
but he didn't pass the admission
test at the country's art school, so
he went into art history, which he
considered the next best thing. He
continued making art on the side.
Tonel hasn't lived in Cuba since
2000, but he has been travelling
and doing residencies in many
countries since the '80s, including
Germany, Italy and the U.S.
"Every experience shapes the
way you think about art, both as an
artist and as a critic and curator....
What the experience of travelling
gave me was an exposure to art
that I wasn't seeing in Cuba,"
he explained.
Tonel currently splits his time
between Canada and Cuba. He
goes to Cuba once or twice every
year, spending a month and a half
or two months there.
"When I go [to Cuba], I enter a
reality that is completely different from the reality I live here.
Everything is different: the light,
the way people interact, the urban
landscape, the natural landscape,
the language, the sounds, smells."
Unfortunately, Tonel admits the
city has changed for the worse.
The architecture of the city has
been deteriorating for lack of
maintenance, but it's a city with
many layers.
"Havana is my hometown, so
even though there is a distance
now between the city and myself, I
still feel at home when I'm there." xi
—Aurora Teieida
Tonel's signature cartoon style was fea-
CULTURE VULTURE
Art-(-architecture
The work of Niranjan Garde,
a master's candidate in the
School of Architecture, is
curently showing attheSUB
Art Gallery near the main concourse. The exhibition features
carefully rendered plein-air
drawings in pencil, ink and wa-
tercolour of an array of architectural sites across Western India,
including temples, forts and
modern-day homes. The exhibit
ends on Jan. 17.
Awards
Several UBC faculty members,
alumni and honorary degree
recipients were made Officers in
the Orderof Canada on Dec.30.
In the Faculty of Arts, appointees include Nancy Hermiston,
the director of the School of
Music, and Sherill Grace, a
professor in the department of
English. Hermiston received the
appointment for her contributions to the fields of opera and
education, while Sherill Grace
was recognized for her promotion of Canadian culture and
identity in her work, 'ffl //Opinions
The ins and outs of
letting one rip
KONRAD
KOBIELEWSKI
Etiquette Guide
Dear Konrad,
-LUSTRATION JETHROAU3THE UBYSSEY
LAST WORDS//
A CHANGED CAMPUS?
UBC welcomed us back to campus with an emailed warning
reminding students not to walk
alone at night. That's a decent
warning, but as the RCMP has
still failed to catch the perpetrator ofthe 2013 assaults, one
has to ask whether this is the
new normal for Point Grey. Five
years from now, will we still be
forced to call Safewalk after the
sun goes down? If they catch the
assaulter after, say, a few more
months, can we assume that the
security on campus will be good
enough to stop another monster
from preying on students for a
few months before the police
catch him?
The answer may be that things
have permanently changed at
UBC, and that's too bad. However, UBC is expected to unveil a
security action plan sometime in
the next several weeks, and we
can only hope it will return some
sense of security to campus.
SUB SHOULD BE
MAINTAINED DURING
HOLIDAYS
Students don't want to be on
campus during the winter break.
It's a known fact. But sometimes
it's inevitable to pop by before
the winter semester starts up,
and when students do come to
the Student Union Building, it's
for a reason.
We at the Ubyssey came back
on the Sunday before classes
because we put out an issue on
Monday. However, the conditions in the SUB weren't really in
our favour. First of all, the WiFi
wasn't working and our server
was iffy, which kind of makes
it hard to manage our content.
Thankfully, ubc_secure decided
to cooperate, for the most part.
Another issue was that all
the U-Pass machines in the SUB
were out of passes on Sunday,
and perhaps earlier, which
undoubtedly irked students who
went out of their way to pick
one up before classes started.
Since the January passes aren't
available until Dec. 16 — when
the majority of students are
finished with exams — this
means that several students left
the SUB empty-handed. Yes, the
Bookstore has passes, but their
irregular hours are inconvenient,
and you'd think that when the
SUB machines are empty they
would be refilled.
And speaking of refills, even
the WaterFillz machine on the
main floor ofthe SUB was out
of order. So much for free water.
There was also a leaky ceiling
near a first-floor washroom during the exam period.
Yes, it is winter break. But the
building that is meant for students should be able to accommodate them at all times.
WE NEED MORE GYMS!
While the three on-campus
fitness facilities we highlighted
(P4) do offer students a place to
burn some calories, the reality
is that there needs to be more
fitness space on this campus.
The main UBC-run gym is the
BirdCoop, and at 8,000 square
feet, it is smaller than most other
university gyms in Canada and
has a tendency to get overcrowded. By comparison, The Pulse
at McMaster is listed as 20,000
square feet, and UTM has a
13,000-square-foot facility with
120 cardio stations.
There are plans to add fitness
facilities to the existing SUB
when it gets renovated, but will
that be enough to fulfill the university's vision of a healthy, active student body? Probably not.
FRUIT FLIES SUCK, MAN
When the Ubyssey returned back
to their hole — ahem, office — in
January, we were greeted by a
swarm of fruit flies. This appears
to be a problem in other parts of
the SUB as well, particularly by
the organics bin. We could rant
about how annoying it is that
they don't die even though you
keep killing them, but we won't.
The organics bins was probably
just doing its job, composting
leftover seaweed and shit. Or
better yet, let's see the fruit flies
as things from 2013 that have
overstayed their welcome: bad
habits, unhealthy obsessions, annoying people in our life we keep
saying we're going to cut out but
don't. Things you keep swatting
but that just don't die. It's never
too late to start now, and it is also
never too late to use a vacuum
to get rid of those pesky little
things.
GOOD ON YA, GATEMAN
STUDENTS
While the pages of our newspaper often tell you about the
amazing projects that students
undertake to address large issues
in society, the two students who
took a Gateman econ project and
actually implemented a realistic idea are awesome (P3). All
too often, the Gateman projects
end up being annoying or even
destructive; it's refreshing to see
people come up with something
more involved and community-minded than just trying to
duck out of every student fee
possible. XI
I carpool to school with three of
my friends, and the other day I just
really let one go in the backseat. It
was raining so we couldn't open the
windows and the heat sort of circulated it around so I didn't think it was
obviously me, but at the same time
everyone in the car knew something
had gone funky. How do I diffuse this
awkward situation without admitting
it was me?
Sincerely,
Stinky in a Saturn
Nobody should be called out for
their bodily functions. When
burping, coughing, or yawning, you
should cover your mouth and say
"excuse me". Flatulence is a different story. It is best to excuse yourself
beforehand and go to another room
or the bathroom. Unfortunately Sat-
urns, while named after the second
largest planet, do not provide much
personal space.
In this case, you did the right
thing by not calling attention to
it. Apologizing would make it
even more awkward since nobody
would know how to respond. The
solution is to start a conversation
or comment on something totally
unrelated. This will get the whole
car thinking and talking about
something else. The smell will blow
away almost as fast as it arrived.
ITS HARD TO RUIN
SOMEONE'S MOOD WITH A
QUESTION ABOUT FOOD
Dear Konrad,
Now that I'm out on my own and no
longer have access to mom's cooking
I'm always looking for recipes, especially those that don't require me to
buy a pricey cookbook. I want to ask
some of my Asian friends for recipes,
but I can't think of a way to ask "what
do your people eat" that doesn't sound
racist in my head. Especially since
some of them have lived here for three
generations and I don't know if that
makes it especially presumptuous.
Sincerely,
Hungry awkward white girl
Since food is an important part of
any culture, asking about its cuisine
is just like asking about its arts or
history. Those friends of yours who
grew up in Asia or visit there often
will probably see your question as
a thoughtful attempt at getting to
know their background. They will
be happy to tell you about the foods
they eat and how to make them.
Those whose familiarity with
Asian culture are less apparent may
get embarrassed or annoyed if you
ask them about something they
do not know about. Instead, you
should take a less direct approach.
Many third generation families are
proud of their heritage and maintain
at least some of their ancestors'
traditions. You can ask your friends
what they like to eat. If they grew
up eating Asian food, their taste
will likely reflect that. Should they
mention something you'd like to try,
ask for the recipe.
ONE. MAYBE TWO, THEN
YOU'RE THROUGH
Dear Konrad,
What is a nice way to say to a guy at
a bar that I appreciate the free drinks
all night, but never in hell would have
sex with you?
Sincerely,
Thirsty Thursday
Dating experts disagree on whether
or not it is OK to accept drinks from
someone you are not interested in.
When someone buys you a drink,
they are either doing it because
they are attracted to you or because
they want to show off. Whatever
the case, as long as the person isn't
a total creep and you watch the
bartender make the drink, it is
acceptable to take the first one. Once
the guy approaches you, thank him
and let him talk to you. If you're still
not interested, start dropping hints.
You can say you already have a boyfriend (warning: this might annoy
him if you've already accepted a
drink), or start talking about other
guys you are attracted to like your
celebrity crush. After buying you
one or two drinks, he should get the
message and not be too disappointed. According to a recent survey,
only two per cent of men have found
a relationship at a bar. XI
For more etiquette solutions to your
awkward moments, visit www.
notawkwardanymore.com or tweet
@notawkanymore. 8    |    GAMES    |    THURSDAY, JANUARY 9,2014
1
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=UZZLE COURTEST BESTCROSSWORDS.COM. USED WITH PERMISSION.
ACROSS
1-Type of ranch
5-Darn!
9-1 smell !
13-Tolstoy heroine
14-Les -Unis
16- Dr. Zhivago's love
17-Age unit
18-Intoxicated
19-Med school subj.
20-Armada
22-Drink
24-He's a catch
27-"Not guilty," e.g.
28-Fly
29-Fellow inmate
33- Does a Daffy Duck impression
34-Swiss artist Paul
35-Mil. truant
36- Back muscle, briefly
37-Concerning
38-Illustrative craft
39-City near Provo
41-Afternoon affairs
42-Hubert's successor
44- High temperature thermostat
46-Heed
47-Call for
48-LikeCheerios
49-Method
52-Not to mention
53-Satiate
57-Scottish body
58-Examined furtively
60- sapiens
61-I've Got in Kalamazoo
62-1,000 kilograms
63-Brit's exclamation
64-Fool
65-Like not
66-King mackerel
DOWN
1-It breaks daily
2-Article in Le Monde
3-Kind of fingerprint
4- Side covering on a hat
5-Night flight
6- Grows in Brooklyn
7-Lacking slack
8-RRstop
9- Montgomery's state
10- Title bestowed upon the wife of
a raja
11-Kaffiyeh wearer
12-London art gallery
15-Frying pan
21- Permits
23-Actor Gibson
24-Beat soundly
25-Bird enclosure
26-Assessor
27-Hammer parts
29-Wedge
30-Anticipate
31- Baseball manager Joe
32-SingerJohn
34-Massage
37-Try
40-Each month
42-Join a poker game
43-Mental
45-Call on
46-Climbing device
48-Bridge bid, briefly
49-Smelting waste
50- Indian exercise method
51-Strike breaker
52-Isn't wrong?
54-Fail to win
55-Actor Epps
56-Spoollike toy
59-Louis XIV, e.g.
ANIMAL MAZES COURTESY KRAZYDAD. USED WITH PERMISSION.
UBC
Write for The Ubyssey and have your words be seen by thousands. | Stop by our office in the basement of the SUB (Room 24).
CALL FOR NOMINATIONS
UBYSSEY
BOARD OF
DIRECTORS
Nominations close January 10,2014 and elections run January 27-31,2014.
Nomination forms are available at SUB 23. This is not an editorial position.
Members ofThe Ubyssey Publications Society Board of Directors are
responsible for overseeing the finances and administrative operations of
the newspaper. Responsibilities include attending board meetings, tending
to business as it arises and overseeing personal projects.
For further details please email fpereira@ubysseyca /'
Call for Nominations
Killam Teaching Awards
Every year the Faculty of Science awards five Killam Teaching
Prizes to acknowledge excellence in undergraduate teaching
and to promote the importance of science education. Professors,
instructors or lecturers appointed in any of the Faculty of Science's
departments and units are eligible. Students, alumni or faculty
members are welcome to submit nominations, including a brief
supporting rationale,to:
bchan@science.ubc.ca
Please include "Faculty of Science Killam Teaching" in subject line
Term 2 Deadline
January 22
For more information, including nomination criteria, visit
science .u bc.ca/kil la m
a place of mind
UBC SCIENCE

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