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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Aug 17, 1988

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Array SSEY
Sullivan sizes
up BC schools
This photo speaks for Itself.
BC Transit balks at
student discount rates
Jennifer Cho
B.C. Transit won't offer concession farecards for post-secondary students unless another body
provides the funding.
"We provide transit, not subsidies," said B.C. Transit official
Diane Gendron. She added students aren't the only special interest group asking for reduced fare
rates.
"B.C. Transit is not in the
business of redistributing income," she said, adding student
transit subsidies should be paid
for by the Ministry of Education,
the AMS, or by grants.
The policy is normal in the
Canadian transit industry, said
Gendron, pointing out that a bus
pass is transferable and can be
used by more than one student.
Haje Protais, SFU student
society external relations officer,
said Monday the Transit Commission is dragging its feet on student
concession cards. He isn't happy
with the Commission's promise to
do another study by October.
"Students are being taken
advantage of by B.C. politicians,"
he said. "When student concession
cards existed, B.C. Transit was
making money."
The UBC and Simon Fraser
University Student Councils have
been lobbying for reduced transit
rates for post-secondary students
for years without success, he said.
Protais said most students
already live below the poverty
level.
"Post-secondary students deserve to have concession cards," he
said. "They pay taxes, tuition fees
have gone up, and most students
use the transit system."
At a Transit Commission
meeting earlier this month, Protais proposed that the current
zone system be removed.
There should be a car pool and
express bus lane set aside during
peak hours, he said. Seattle has
already set up a "very efficient" car
pool system and students on financial assistance in Washington
state can ride the buses for free, he
added.
He said students and senior
citizens should be allowed on the
Transit Commission for fairer input. But Transit Commission
members are currently elected
from the municipalities.
College and university administrations should go to the
Ministry of Education to get funding for concession cards, Protais
said. "It's high time to put funding
where it belongs."
He urged students to write to
the Transit Commission, the
newspapers, or their MLAs to
lobby for concession cards. "Students themselves are responsible
to get involved," he said. "No one
will solve their problems without
their input."
By Greg Davis
A provincial government report on education which advocates
major changes to the grade school
curriculum is being greeted with
cautious optimism by the educational community.
The Sullivan Royal Commission Report on Education, released earlier this month, recommends mandatory core courses in
high school and an ungraded primary program.
"The tone of the report is encouraging, especially (the sections
on) the consultation process with
the community and the Ministry,"
said B.C.Teachers' Federation
communications officer Elaine
Decker, Tuesday.
UBC education dean Nancy
Sheehan also commended the report for stressing collaboration,
not confrontation.
"It is a very positive report,
with a lot of good ideas, particu-
lary the comments about teacher
education. All the recommendations are in line with what we are
doing, spelling out philosophies
that many teachers have long
held," she said.
Barry Sullivan, head of the
Commission, said in the report
that his recommendations will
lead towards a high quality of
education in the province.
The report stresses the importance of the relationship between
society, schools, and the learners,
in the context of "the diversity that
exists in British Columbia society," and advocates greater cooperation between all parties involved, including parents, teachers, board officials and the government.
Education Minister Tony
Brummet has said he will work
with concerned groups in accordance with the report in order to
prepare his plan for Cabinet.
The extensive report, the first
since 1960, says the purposes of
education are cultivation of the
mind, preparation for vocational
life, and moral, civic, and individual development. It also states
schools should have a clearer, yet
more narrowly defined, mandate.
Key proposals in the report
include:
•total revision ofthe
School Act
•provincial Grade 12 exams
extended to all subject areas,
accounting for one third of
students' marks.
•increased teacher support
and training standards
•an interdisciplinary approach
to teaching grades 1-10
• the appointmentof a provincial
advisory committee
•increased input of nati ve bands
in the education of their young
•special attention to
gender equity
•more responsibility for
social agencies outside
the school
•creation of block funding
and increased capital
funding systems
•an annual financial report
to the public.
Although Decker is pleased
with the recommendations, she
said she was concerned that financing was "side-stepped" in the
report.
"We anticipate the bill will
deal with it when it comes time to
implement the recommendations.
We are certainly willing to partake in the consultation process,"
she said.
Mon Oncle Regis by Joe Fafard, AMS Art Collection
AMS treasures trove
By Carol Swan
Somewhere in the depths of SUB lurks an art collection worth
half a million dollars.
The AMS collection is celebrating its fortieth anniversary October 3 with a glossy catalogue and two shows to be held in the
AMS gallery later this year.
"Our goal is to build an awareness ofthe collection on the national level. We're also hoping that this will bring in donations so
the collection can reach its highest potential" said AMS art gallery
president Sarah Mair.
Since 1948, the AMS has set aside $1500 annually to purchase
Canadian, especially west coast, works of art.
But in recent years the collection has deteriorated from a lack
of interest in the project, said Mair.
The new catalogue is being sent to local and provincial art
galleries, universities, and members of the media as well as the
National Art Gallery.
Each ofthe artists whose work is in the collection were inter-
| viewed about their art and will each receive a copy ofthe catalogue.
Copies for the general public are available for $9.
While the catalogue was being written, three new paintings were
donated by West Coast artists, Mair added.
"I think it has potential for touring or loaning" said Mair.
The 56 painting collection is housed somewhere in SUB, but
for security reasons Mair refused to reveal the exact location ofthe
vault.
Before a new humidity controlled vault was built a few years
ago, six paintings had been stolen, possibly by members of the
AMS, Mair said.
"It's a good vault. Most of the paintings are professionally
boxed" said Mair, who added that some are still in need of
restoration.
The collection will be shown in the newly renovated AMS
gallery from October 2 to 15 and from January 2 to 14.
VOLUME 7, Number 7
Vancouver, B.C. Wednesday, August 17,1988 J AMS L
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2/THE SUMMER UBYSSEY
August 17,1988 Child care
funding up
Students benefit
By Deanne Fisher
Students with children will
receive a bonus from the ministry
of social services this fall, but only
some students will be able to take
advantage ofthe increase.
Student parents, who have no
employment income and are attending a post-secondary institution, will be expected to pay $50
less towards daycare costs as of
September 1.
Parents must contribute half
of their 'available income'—determined through an income test—
to child care costs. That 'available
income' is considered $100 lower
for working, and now studying,
parents.
"Ifs a small improvement,"
said Information Daycare coordinator Peter Ashmore, adding that
the government daycare subsidy
rarely covers the real costs anyway.
"Even ifyou qualify for maximum subsidy, you 11 probably be
paying more than the subsidy allows you," he said.
There are many technicalities, but social services ministry
spokesperson Fran Pardee provided an example of how the subsidy program works. A single
mother with one child on student
loan has a net income of $1000 per
month (an $8000 loan over eight
months).
She and her child are considered a'unit two'and she is allowed
an $882 income exemption, which
means "we will not look at [that
$882] as income," said Pardee.
$118 remains as available
income, but with the additional
$100 exemption, only $18 is left
available. Fifty per cent of that -
$9 - is the mother's required contribution for child care costs.
But Pardee agreed the subsidies are low: "The parent is also
responsible for the difference between our subsidy and the actual
daycare charge," she said.
"Our subsidy rates are lower
than the rate charged [by most
daycare centres]," she added.
The maximum government
subsidy for a child twenty months
old in a group daycare centre is
$360 per month, but the average
cost of daycare on the west side of
Vancouver is $495 per month.
UBC daycare director Mab
Oloman, is on vacation, but Penny
Coates, her SFU counterpart, said
the improvement "does nothing
substantial."
"If you're getting the full subsidy, it doesn't help you," said
Coates, adding that a student on a
loan with no other source of income is probably receiving the
maximum subsidy.
When student loans were increased, said Coates, "the government considered [the increase]
income," but they weren't allowing for increases in educational
costs such as tuition, she added.
The extra exemption just
"allows you $100 towards books,
etc.," she said.
Ashmore urged students who
are receiving less than the maximum subsidy, and who have already collected their child care
coupons, to have their eligibility
reassessed in order to take advantage of the bonus.
"You may call It a tricycle ... but I call It a bulldozer"
DEANNE FISHER PHOTO
J| fcj;£l! BflMlB ■ W::^m:M :-*&m fill
"..  \    ^^0^^ '""■..   »*&■_     ;?>*-   | ■"&$,
'■  . f_K-i«___Sa_*    '     - %ffi-/' ■'■ ■ '" .}    '■
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t*>.
4   ";-' *T '
A Chilkat blanket, from the late Andy Warhol's private collection, Is one of two such pieces purchased by
UBC's Museum of Anthropology. The blanket, originally worn by high-ranking Tlingrt people of southern
Alaska for ceremonial purposes, is hand-woven using an intricate technique which sometimes took a year
to complete. The MOA received a special grant from a branch of the federal government aimed at
repatriating Native art. The blanket and a Native headdress, also from Warhol's collection, can be seen
during the MOA's "Gifts and Giving" exhibition in early October. dan Andrews photo
Oh mighty
ISISSS
By Donna and Lorraine Yau
Fusing elements of a broad
liberal arts study, the semiotic
circle is a changing gestalt of
communications, social sciences
and all sorts of subcultural phenomenon.
Speaking with Lorraine Weir,
organizer for UBC's International
Summer Institute for Semiotic
and Structural Studies (ISISSS),
about elements of interdisciplinary work is relatively painless for
such an intimidatingly titled subject.
Founded in 1980 by professor
Paul Bouissac of the French Department at Victoria College at
the University of Toronto, ISISSS,
now reaching its tenth anniversary, holds conferences worldwide
for graduate students, teachers
and visiting scholars.
As opposed to the tendencies
to specialize in regular educational experiences, ISISSS works
somewhat in reverse by integrat
ing a specific topic into a holistic,
historic context.
Making its debut in Vancouver with such subjects as telethe-
ory, deconstruction and the ethnography of modernity, this conference, organized by Weir, caters
to one hundred and forty graduate
minds from the far flung reaches of
our great green globe.
Self-supporting and mobile,
the semiotic circle macrames its
foci of literary theory, anthropology and the cognitive sciences into
an academic nexus of succinct proportions.
This weekend (August 19-21)
features "Cultures in Conflict: The
Problem of Discourse" at the Vancouver School of Theology and the
UBC Museum of Anthropology.
The content ofthe conference
has been perceived as slightly
shocking in its novelty but surely,
modern people should be able to
appreciate the endoskeletic approach.
August 17,1988
THE SUMMER UBYSSEY/3 ^ &
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Guest Jazz Jam 8:00 pm
Oliver Gannon & Jack Stafford
Thursday
August 18th
Live Jazz 8:00 pm
June Katz, Michael Creber &
Oliver Gannon
Friday
August 19th
Dinner Jazz 8:00 -11:30 pm
Ron Johnston, Campbell Ryga
& Chuck Israels
Saturday
August 20th
Dinner Jazz 8:00 -11:30 pm
Ron Johnston, Campbell Ryga
& Chuck Israels
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your lips.
• If you are occasionally bothered by cold sores or fever blisters (chapped lips and cracked mouth
comers don't count)...
• If these sores feel tingly or itchy and then pop up at the edge of your lip...
• If they look blistery...
• If you are healthy, over 16, and unquestionably not pregnant...
• If you wish to participate in a study of a new cream treatment called undecylenic acid...
• If you don't mind that the study is "Placebo-controlled" (1/2 of the entrants get a "fake" cream with
no active drug)...
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Clinic or Vancouver General Hospital...
• Then follow these instructions as soon as possible. Do not wait for blisters or sores to form. CALL
687-7711 NOW and ask the operator to page beeper 2887 (give your name and a phone no. you will
be available al for the next 10-15 min). If it is after 5 pm, it is too late to do ihe study this recurrence,
so hold on to the paper and call next time if before 5 pm.
Corsage thrills pilgrims
By Sheila West
After the usual amount of
time passed watching
| several persons scuttling crablike across the stage to twiddle
with guitars, apply the necessary
electrical tape and twang-test
strings, Phil Smith of Corsage
emerged from the wings under
the cover of a droopy overcoat
and swished around mysteriously. The rest of the band joined
him one by one as physical and
then musical manifestations
until the whole ensemble of five
was up there pounding away.
The band included such local
notables as guitarists Steve
Twinn from Go Four 3 and Bill
Napier-Hemy, who played for the
now legendary Pointed Sticks
and is also one of Corsage's
founding members.
As I was admiring not only
the skill but the zebra and
leopard-skin shirt of the bassist,
a large man with a perm, an
American tourist of sorts,
collided with me as he made his
merry way across the floor. The
result of the above was my
relocation next to a sultry blonde
whom I overheard exclaiming to
the semi-famous journalist who
hovered on the balcony, "...the
drummer is a sex god and Bill's
mother is a teenage sex-therapist." Noticing that I was
transcribing, she extended an
alabaster arm towards the back
ofthe club and added, "All those
guys at the back ignoring the
band are ex-punk rockers who
now have long hair, and Phil
Smith has a teaching degree
from SFU." Spying again the
rotating tourist, I thanked her,
removed myself from his path
and continued my observations.
The band that dared
to bring you dry ice,
filmed visuals AND a
midget back in their
earlier years seems
to have settled down
somewhat...
The overcoat soon slid off as Phil
worked his way around employing the theatrical tactics that he
is known for. But this far from
equalled the sort of multi-media
presentations that used to accompany Corsage performances.
The band that dared to bring you
dry ice, filmed visuals AND a
midget back in their earlier
years seems to have settled down
somewhat, but at little apparent
loss. Phil himself supplied more
than enough physical/visual
interest even if no one in the
audience, save a bouncing few,
seemed to respond.
The songs, whose lyrics covered everything from Grecian
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Formula to burning snakeskin,
were banged out with a steady,
determined drive and wit. Musical talent abounded; self-indulgence seemed absent. These
"...the drummer is a
sex god and Bill's
mother is a teenage
sex-therapist."
guys knew their stuff. Having
been informed by a reliable
source that Phil harbors a
"huuuuge collection of Led
Zeppelin albums" and counts
Iggy Pop and the Doors among
inspirational influences, the
style of the music became
somewhat identifiable - heavy,
but not to the point of obesity
(i.e. plodding heavy metal); the
words and the tunes too interesting to get mired in the medium
of delivery.
All in all, it was a great
show which seemed to satisfy all
the pilgrims who congregated to
experience the mystical, momentary resurrection of Corsage.
Verdi goes video
By Olivia Zanger
Hj
ere's the idea: take a
.famous director, hand
him an operatic aria, have him
distill the emotion and
substance from it and then
infuse this essence into an
original film.
Now multiply by ten.
The result is a montage of
classical music videos, some
extremely successful, others
bombing like cans from the
bottom of a wet grocery bag.
What would Wagner say?
For the novice, Aria is an
easy introduction to some of
opera's most beautiful
selections. But for those who
really get off on the stuff, too
many ofthe segments are too
diluted.
The strong and the weak
both get equal time in this film.
A little Darwinism would have
helped immensely, but there is
still certainly enough meat
here to justify your five bucks.
Frank Roddam's
interpretation of Wagner's
Liebestod (from Tristan and
Isolde) is the highlight of the
ten; an erotic, sensual piece
that captures the passion and
tragedy of the lovers united in
death. Bring Kleenex. Aria is
worth seeing for this one alone.
Bizarre, but interesting, is
Jean-Luc Godard's typically
atypical presentation of Lully's
Armide. Set in a gym, the
opera is sporadically broken
with the sound of clanking
weights. Naked, knife-toting
nymphs alternate between
worshipping and attacking the
body builders. Love and
adoration for the Hero coupled
with hatred of him as Enemy.
Well done Godard, you caught
the very marrow of Armide.
Robert Altman's visually
extravagant Les Boreades,
though perhaps distracting in
its cast of a thousand freaks,
gets high marks, along with
Derek Jarman's lyrical
portrayal of an old woman
recalling youth and love.
Aria's greatest failing is in
quality control. Lip-synching
reminiscent of an early Japanese Godzilla flick can be
excused. Even using John
Hurt's meanderings through an
opera house as a feeble attempt
to link works as conceptually
diametric as 'kosher' and 'garlic
prawns' is forgivable.
But Ken Russel's banal,
emotionally vacuous storyline
and tacky not-so-special effects
are simply trash. Like lemon in
your milk or ashes in your beer,
the face you'll pull after viewing
this one can ruin the whole
film. My suggestion: close your
eyes and listen.
Naked, knife-toting
nymphs alternate
between
worshipping and
attacking the body
builders.
Another dog is Nicolas
Roeg's insipid tale about the
sexually ambiguous King Zog.
Should have been axed in the
rough cut.
Aria would make a terrific
example of a bell curve for first
year students; a few atrocities,
a few really exceptional bursts
of genius, but mostly pleasant,
enjoyable pieces falling somewhere between the extremes.
The directors, in order of
performance, are Nicolas Roeg,
Charles Sturridge, Jean-Luc
Godard, Julien Temple, Bruce
Beresford, Robert Altman,
Frank Roddam, Ken Russel,
Derek Jarman and Bill Bryden.
Performed are Verdi's Un
Ballo in Maschera, Verdi's La
Virgine degli Angeli, Lully's
Armide, Verdi's Rigoletto,
Korngold's Gluck Dar Mir,
Rameau's Les Boreades,
Wagner's Liebestod, Puccini's
Nessun Dorma, Charpentier's
Depuis Le Jour, and
Leoncavallo's Vesti La Giubba.
NEED COPIES OF YOUR
REPORT
TERM PAPER
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Family Physicians
required to work 6-8 sessions per
week in Family practice at the
Reach Community
Health Centre
Obstectrics required,
shared call 1 in 6
starting dates
August 1st and September 12th
send applications to:
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1145 Commercial Drive
Vancouver, B.C.
V5L3X3
234-1354
4/THE SUMMER UBYSSEY
August 17,1988 ENTERTAINMENT
Boss,
da plein!
ABBOTSFORD, B.C.—
efreshments, they thought eagerly as they spotted
the beer table in the media tent. The free beer
was uncapped and drunk, and it was Good, though they still questioned the wisdom of getting up so early to go see a buncha damn
planes, as one of them put it. Somewhere, they thought, amongst
the mass of man and metal, there was an angle. And they were
determined to find it.
They watched four jets perform an aerial ballet, and marvelled
at the trust which must exist between the individuals controlling those great machines. Not only must their faith in their
partners be unshakeable, so must their trust in the meehan
ics and the manufacturers who construct and maintain
their chariots. Five senses at work. Flawless execution.
The art of the system.
A Mozart piano concerto accompanied them, displacing the booming Big-Brotherly voice of the announcer, and for a few minutes the shiny pkines
seemed to be harmless projections of aesthetic
ideals. But then the engines' thunder drove
Mozart away, and the deep roar spoke of death
and destruction. Even in his wildest dreams,
Mozart could never have imagined this kind
of performance.
It'd be a bitch if one of them, ran outta gas
the photog said wistfully. At the front of
the media area, some twenty photogs
watched hopefully and muttered dis-
li, contentedly every time a manoeuver
was successfully completed.
There is a strange psychology
connected to military aircraft. The
most dangerous pieces of equipment, with
one exception (a strange mosquito-like
craft), were also the most beautiful. Take
the F-14 Tomcat. It's sleek, purposeful,
powerful. The lines of the craft are fine
and straight, and it's capable of speeds exceeding twice the speed of sound. It is (unusually, considering its function) a good
booking piece of technology. The troop
carriers are slightly different—they look,
^tp some extent, matronly. From the belly
ofthe beast pour forth nasty little children—reinforcements, rapid response
teams, even tanks. Fully loaded, the
troop transport is pregnant with death.
►      The photog decided that he needed a
crowd shot. Why not use the scissor lift
over at the media tent? asked the one
writer, we could get some more beer. But
the photog pointed to the control tower,
and said I wanna go up there.
It was not a Good thing to do.
^ Jseveral crewcuts looked on disapprovingly, and one of them said Where do you
think you're going? Who are you? They
:iT&mely offered their press cards and said
Press?? You can't go through here, said
the crewcut sternly. Can't you read the
sign?
The fighter aircraft also embody a
"strange dichotomy: a meeting of the
primitive and the sophisticated, beauty
>r>and evil. They are comprised ofthe most
up-to-date technologies available in the
world, yet their sole purpose is a timeless
one—to destroy the enemy, to kill another
human being. But the strange thing is
that neither it nor its pilots are held responsible for the lives they take. It is a
very impersonal form of death: high-tech,
adventure-packed, desk murder.
Why do people have a fascination
with this particular form of technology?
They don't trek en masse to see a software
show, or an industrial equipment show, or
even a car show. Are people more willing
to worship gods they can understand
because they can reach out and touch
their wings, examine their control panels
and walk through their hulls?
Has technology and the powers
associated with it replaced the Christian
God of the West? Has faith in God been
replaced by trust in the mechanical? The
technological God is always visible (and
divisible into simple components) and
allows the human being control over that
which controls. If this analysis approaches truth, it says something very
powerful about the way the post-modern
western individual views his/her self. It
says / am in control. But are we in control
of technology, of our god, or is technology
controlling us?
And what ofthe men—and it is
mostly men—who fly these machines?
They are looked upon as heroes, the
epitome, in our society, of the warrior.
Strong, lean, bronzed. Extremely individual—Nietzsche's Ubermensch. They
stand beside their machines and sign
autographs for adulatory children and
adults. Behold The Ego. Its sign is the
flash of lightning, the coiled, poised
snake, fire, the shield and the sword; this
is the mythology connected to the technology, painted in insignia behind the cockpit
visors.
In a sense, this technology is one of
the prime guardians of western truths.
Democracy, freedom, individualism and
even humanism are protected by machinery. Power anchors truth. Perhaps that is
another reason people are fascinated by
the artifacts on display here.
The paradigm shift between the
civilian and military mind-set is perhaps
best exemplified in the language used by
the latter, a language devoid of emotion.
The description ofthe Bl-B bomber reads:
"Instantaneous application of counter-
measures to all environments." It carries
cruise missiles. Nuclear weapons. It kills
people. A better description might read:
"This aircraft bombs the shit out of
anything it is told to bomb the shit out of."
Awed and frightened, with a newfound respect for technology, the three
returned to the media tent There was no
one at the beer table, said the one, so I
took matters into my own hands and
helped myself.  The other nodded approvingly.
When the photog returned, the one
ventured: We could think about coming
back tomorrow...
Forget it, snapped the photog. Too
much effort. He laughed harshly: Those
freak photogs are still hoping that
someone'll make a mistake and explode.
BOOKBINDING
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222-1688
August 17,1988
THE SUMMER UBYSSEY/5 ■.-.■^.y.
^w,,       . * L
*.r.
; •.^**k*^\^^ to rf .*^*^^V\*fes
Bill 41 delay
damns docs
Students contemplating a career in
medicine need to know if they will be able
to practise in this province. By delaying
the implementation ofthe Bill 41 ruling,
the government will once again keep
doctors in the deep freeze, awaiting a decision.
On August 5 the B.C. Court of Appeal
unanimously decided in favour of doctors'
rights to free access to billing numbers.
This judgment came after three years of
denying young doctors the right to practise medicine in this province.
Whether it concerns a doctor, hairdresser, or car mechanic, people must be
able to practise the vocation of their
choice. This is a fundamental right.
But now the government is stalling on
the implementation ofthe court ruling by
filing for an appeal to the appeal.
Peter Dueck, the honourable car
salesman responsible for health and
welfare, believes free access to billing
numbers will increase health care costs.
More doctors means more patients and
more billing, claims the honorable minister. Does that mean the more garages you
build, the more cars will break down?
The presence of more doctors does not
mean more people will get sick. It means
more people will have better quality
health care because the doctor will have
more time to spend with each patient. It
means the proportion of men to women in
the medical profession will begin to reflect the number of recent graduates. It
means people will be able to see the doctor
of their choice, and not that ofthe government. And it means a patient may receive
an appointment within days of making an
appointment, and not months.
The government has already placed a
limit on health care costs. This is necessary for budgetary reasons. But it is not
necessary or ethically responsible to limit
the number of doctors in an effort to limit
health care costs. It is an infringement of
human rights.
The B.C. court of appeal declared Bill
41 "procedurally flawed, and so manifestly unfair in substance, having regard
to the effect upon the appellants, as to
violate the principles of fundamental
justice." Doesn't that say it all Mr. Dueck?
TC__S§¥SSEY
August 17,1988
The Summer Ubyssey is published Wednesdays
throughout July and August by the Alma Mater Society of
the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are
those of the staff and not necessarily those of the
university administration, or ofthe sponsor. The Summer Ubyssey is published with the proud support ofthe
Alumni Association.The Ubyssey is a member of Canadian University Press. The editorial office is Rm. 241k of
the Student Union Building. Editorial Department, phone
228-2301; advertising, 228-3977.
The staff were flying Tuesday night. Chris Weisenger wai a NeiUschian Stuka
divebomber, flying like a bloated Hunter S. Thompson dropping bon moU over
Abbotsford. Joining him in formation were Martin Dawes, a Junkers J-226, and
Mandel Ngan, a Mesaershmidt photo reconniassance plane. Skywriting Alex
Johnson and Ted Aussem were matching homebuilt biplanes. Nearby Stephen
Wisenthal, a sputtering Piper Cub, screamed from the peanut gallery while
Katherine Monk, a cynical twin Otter, struggled with arial semiotics. On the
commercial side, 747-400 Greg Davis, and DC-10 Dianne Fisher waited to land
on the news page. Blackhawk rrpyplane late-night* Steve Chan reconoitered
page 7 while Carol Swan and Jenny Cho, candy-striped f-14's, fired their missiles at Donna Yau, Soviet helicopter gunship. Hot air balloon Lorraine Yau
floated slowly past the entertainment pages with Sheila West, a R-100 dirigible.
Olivia Zanger, an ultralight, zipped by all the action and cynically rejected it all.
entertainment:
Martin Dawea
news:
Deanne Fisher
city desk:
Katherine Monk
photography:
Mandel Ngan
production:
Chris Wleslnger
Letters
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any Issue. Letters must be typed and are not to exceed 300 words In length. Content
which Is judged to be libelous, homophobic, sexist, or racist will not be published. Please be concise. Letters may be '
edited for brevity, but It Is standard Ubyssey policy not to edit letters for spelling or grammatical mistakes. Please bring
them, with Identification, to SUB 241k. Letters must Include name, faculty, and signature.	
Help, Help ...
somebody call an election!
The polls have Brian
Mulroney as the Prime
Minister again, barely. A
Conservative minority government can and will be out
voted by the combined majority of Liberals and New
Democrats. Mr. Mulroney
and his cohorts are so bent
on the attributes of free
trade that they will wait
until the almighty polls give
them the confidence to call
an election.
But the Senate too will
sweat it out. The Liberal
senators are determined to
block the free trade bill until
an election is called. Meanwhile, we have a country in
political limbo while some
childish politicians play
juvenile games with democracy.
Virtually no one is free
of corruption in the Canadian political arena these
days. The Tories have deliberately denied Canadians
enough coherent information about the impact of free
trade so that few voters are
capable of making an informed decision on the issue. Tory success relies on
confused voters trusting the
likes of Crosbie and Carney
et al.
Mulroney was elected,
among other issues, on the
premise of being entirely
anti-free trade and has now
radically reversed his position. Implementing the free
trade deal without first consulting the public would be
deceitful and authoritarian.
But due to the weakness of,
(or lack of), his pro-free
trade propaganda, Mulroney is forced to either
replace the issue with another, hoping to distract the
public from this critical economic and cultural shift or
lose the election. Would the
latter be so bad?
John Turner's plea to
senate is a blatant abuse of
the system. He knows as
well as any Canadian that
the Senate should not be
furnished with the power of
which they are currently
taking advantage. Ignoring
that power is one thing. But
employing that power for
one's own political purposes
is another. The Liberal-
heavy senate is in turn
guilty of abuse of power and
the sin of patronage has finally reared its ugly head.
Party politics have their
place. That place is not in an
unelected body.
If the Liberals are so
vehemently anti-free trade,
where is the corresponding
dogma? The anti-free trade
movement appears predominantly grassroots in
origin. One can only surmise that free trade does not
horrify federal Liberals as
they would have us believe,
but that they are simply
attempting to catch the
Canadian sovereignty vote
and most of the undecided,
of which there are far too
many.
So all we have left are
the  New Democrats,  who
though they are still ranked
third in the polls, are only
five per cent beind the leaders. Their relative innocence in this whole affair,
though perhaps unintentional, can only benefit
them. And though they
have been left out in the cold
in this round, they are busily redirecting public concern towards round two. Ed
Broadbent's new and improved daycare subsidy program blows the Tories away
in terms of more immediate
results, which is what Canadians in favour of a federal
daycare program would
naturally prefer.
Too many Canadians
couldn't vote rationally
right now, even if they were
given the opportunity. They
either don't have access to
the information they need or
that information just doesn't
exist. But if free trade
doesn't escape from the Tory
economic verbiage, the eventual election will inevitably
centre on another issue,
most likely, which party i«-*
more corrupt than the other.
We are experiencing
one of many examples of our
sophisticated system of
democracy proving itself se- *
cumbersome that it becomes
is destructive. If politicians^
only seek power because
they have the public's best
interests at heart (Ha!) and
are striving to realize their
altruistic dreams, then-
prove it. Give the voters the
information and the credit
we deserve. And give us an
election.
Deanne Fisher is a Ubyssey
Editor who actually likes the
name Mabel.
ekchcr\ sfratejy e3rkf,nL&.
6/THE SUMMER UBYSSEY
August 17,1988 OPED
Moonlighting
professors slammed
Should university professors
^be encouraged to get involved in
Ho&siness ventures? ("Brains vs.
Bucks", Ubyssey Aug. 10)
Although professors going
into business may add money to
the university's coffers and generate other benefits, they are often
resented as moonlighters by col-
**_illagues. They may become lax in
their academic duties, increase an
already fashionable contempt for
teaching, and reinforce the idea
^hat university
R-esearch should
. emphasize   com-
■***H_ercial   applications.
We may view differently the
engineering professor acting as a
consultant in her field of expertise
.and the humanities professor
engaging in real estate speculations. Though it seems easy to
"distinguish between the two, in
practice there is no way to encourage the one and to hamstring the
other.
It's tempting to propose a
simple principle: Professors
should be free to pursue business
ventures as long as their academic
performance remains satisfactory.
But standards of academic
performance are vague and firing
an incompetent tenured professor
is practically impossible. This
•"principle would give business-
minded professors free rein.
Academics are sharply divided in their view of a university
professor's social role. Some consider it to be a secure and respected job accompanied by lots of
■—.ree time. Others see it as one of
society's most responsible and
privileged offices that deserves a
professor's very best.
I share the second view. The
pursuit of business interests is
generally   in   conflict   with   a
professor's official social role.
Take only the common case of
a professor whose business interests do not coincide with acceptable academic research. The
role of a professor is unlimited
with respect to the creative energies that can be invested and is
desired by far more talented
people than can be accommodated.
Therefore, those privileged to oc- i
cupy academic positions have a
moral obligation to give their best.
Many academics, had they
chosen business   careers,
would now be
rich. But having chosen academia,
they have no right to divide their
attention between academic work |
and business interests. '
Devoting much of one's
thoughts to the pursuit of money
almost always produces a philis-
tine mind. Business-minded professors are poor role models because they promote a destructive
value conflict between the pursuit
of wealth and the life ofthe mind.
They seem to tell their students
and colleagues that they can have
both: wealth and a life of the mind.
Not only can we return to the life of
the mind after making our fortunes, but we can make our fortunes while comfortably discharging our academic duties.
"If smart people like you and I
devote only an hour each day to the
stock market," one of my professors said, "well be rich in five
years." And another said: "Why
care about teaching? It's casting
pearls before swine."
With the door open to profes- j
sors   immersing   themselves   in I
business ventures, we should all
fear for the future of education.
Kurt Preinsperg
Ph.D. Candidate, Philosophy
■ffl-
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2620 Sasamat        222-1056
August 17,1988
THE SUMMER UBYSSEY/7 ARTS & ENTERTAIN WENT
Seven deadly sins unsettle
By Alexandra Johnson	
There is a multitude of talented artists decorating
the galleries in our enlightened city. It is not
unusual, on an afternoon, to wade through seas of
watercolour landscapes and pastel abstracts. It is
unusual to be suddenly grounded by something brilliant.
Local artist Ian D. McLeod screams unabashedly
into the conservative western psyche via a group of seven
three dimensional wall masks. They are "The Seven
Seven Deadly Sins" — the artist's explosive initial
reaction calculatingly coralled into the visual media of
acrylic, enamel, laquer and sequins on wood.
Their colors — the hot red-pinks of T_ust', electric
yellow and red of gluttony, cool marbled blue of'Pride' or
jeweled green and purple of 'Envy* — are predictable
choices, but seem impulsively applied by someone
familiar with the emotions represented.
The addition of random squares of electric-blue foil
paper on 'Greed', a sequined, scarlet apple in the slightly
red stained teeth of 'Gluttony", black feathers winding
quietly through 'Sloth' or the pointing coil of a hot pink
tongue in T_ust' are gross overstatements that possess
the viewer with their audacious familiarity.
"I chose "The Seven Deadly Sins" as the theme for
this series because of its' emotional content," says
McLeod. "Colours, expressions, even materials sprang
instantly to mind as I looked up the definition for each
'Sin'."
EXfflBITION
Ian D. Mcleod
Objects From Imagined
Exotic Civilizations
Art Works Gallery
Until August 30
McLeod fueled a growing fascination with 'Imaginary Anthropology during a recent month spent among
the boldly overdone visual culture ofthe Mexican people.
This experience inspired him to creat an 'Imagined
Exotic Civilization' from which the works of his present
exhibit evolved.
Arranged around the masks are a number of small
sculptures constructed from similar materials which
could easily be the product of an early civilization. The
smooth crafting, vivid colors and simplicity liken them to
children's toys that you can imagine being unearthed by
the hearth of some excavated ancient dwelling.
The artist relates that the pieces "arrived at Art
Works Gallery via a parade through the streets of
Vancouver." He explains that "they are very much
inspired by festivals and processions, by my feeling that
there should be more "magic' and 'sparkle' in our
culture...Both the process and presentation of these
masks and figures bring exotica home for me." ,
The ghosts of the artist's imagined civilization
pervade his corner ofthe gallery, and on moving around ^
the rest of the refined room, they seem to follow like an"
embarrassingly loud relative at a party full of people you
wish to impress.
Not unlike the intrusion of an insistent voice in a
quiet room, Ian McLeod's 'Objects From Imagined Exotic^
Civilizations' are not to be ignored.
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CONTACT: the dub office in person (room 216c SUB), or phone 228-4453
or Howard Daugherity at 266-1895
or Nancy Heimbecker at 732-9612
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24lk at the start of September and get
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est Sandwiches/
Daily Sandwich Specials
.4^
University of British Columbia
Student Union Building Lower Concourse
Open Monday to Friday 8 am to 5 pm
BIG SUMMER
SALE UP TO
80°/<
O OFF
• Adrianne Vittadini
• Coincidence
• Jones N.Y.
• Esprit
• Louben
• Alfred Sung
• Steilmann
• New Man
• Mexx
... and more
• Student Week
10% off
ALL NEW
FALL ARRIVALS
^Enda B Fashion^
YOUR NATURAL FIBRE FASHION SHOP
4325 W. 10th Ave.
Vancouver
228-1214
Summer Hours
Mon-Fri 10-9; Sal 10$; Sun 12-5
Image Plus
6050 No.3 Rd.
Richmond
270-7262
Open 7 Days A Week
8/THE SUMMER UBYSSEY
August 17,1988

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