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The Ubyssey Nov 30, 1976

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THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LIX, No. 30
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 1976
228-2301
'Give McGeer Ec 100 lesson'
Changing UBC's budgeting
methods will not keep tuition fees
down, three board of governors
members agreed Monday.
Education minister Pat McGeer
said in a letter to administration
president Doug Kenny last week
that the university could keep
tuition fees at their current level by
beginning the faculty contract year
at the same time the fiscal year
begins, April 1.
Student board member Basil
Peters called McGeer's suggestion
"sort of silly."
'Students should take up a
collection and give McGeer a
lesson in Economics 100. The
economic thinking in the letter is
naive, he misses the point."
McGeer's letter came in
response to a letter from Kenny
requesting an adequate university
budget next year so UBC can avoid
increasing tuition fees.
TheMcGeer letter said: ". . .it is
the expectation of the government
and the department that each
university will adjust its budget to
coincide with the government's
fiscal year.
"... the purpose is to avoid any
contractual arrangements being
made which assume an increase in
the flow of operating grants."
But Peters said McGeer's
proposal is an attempt by the
education department to exert
more control over the university
through the government's
education grant.
. "What he is getting at is paying
the faculty and staff according to
government — it's a ludicrous
thing."
Peters said it is unfortunate UBC
is not getting a special grant this
year to cover the budget shortfall
resulting from the difference
between the starting dates of the
fiscal year and the faculty contract
year. UBC received $4.5 million
last year to cover the shortfall.
Gideon Rosenbluth, board
member and economics professor,
said McGeer's proposal would
improve accounting procedures
but would not solve the budget
shortfall faced by the university.
UBC needs the special grant this
year, he said.
Board member Ben Trevino said
McGeer's proposal is "not a bad
idea" but he is not sure changing
the faculty contract year would
enable UBC to hold down tuition
fees.
He said the proposal would have
to be negotiated with the faculty
association before it is implemented.
Board member George Hermanson said the university needs
the special grant to make the
proposal workable. "It doesn't
solve the problem," he said.
McGeer's letter also indicated he
disapproves of the $2,400 raise the
board gave Kenny and his vice-
presidents this year.
But board members interviewed
Monday defended their decision to
give the university's top administrators an unwanted  raise.
"Attacking the public is a red
herring," Hermanson said. "The
government should address itself
to the private sphere."
Trevino said: "Some get their
awards through politics. I'm sure
the premier hasn't an easy job but
neither has Doug Kenny."
Scuffle, punches
highlight ongoing
Waterloo battle
WATERLOO (CUP) — Punches
were thrown during a scuffle
Monday outside the offices of the
University of Waterloo student
newspaper The Chevron,
suspended by the student
federation two months ago.
The scuffle occurred during an
attempt by the federation to have
locks on The Chevron offices
changed. An administration
locksmith was prevented from
changing the locks when the
paper's staff members put their
hands over the door knobs.
The move came after more than
LOO students Monday defied a no
trespassing sign posted in the
Chevron offices Friday.
The notice said the Chevron
office "is not open to anyone but
those persons with direct
authorization from the president or
chairperson of the board of
publication. All other individuals
are hereby directed to vacate the
premises within 24 hours."
During the rally in the hallway
outside   the   Chevron   offices,
—doug field photo
WORN OUT after weeks of all-nighters, woman flakes out in Sedgewick over edifying tome of dreary import
and little social relevance. Unidentified student is among thousands of UBC scholars frantically trying to
finish assignments in time to study for upcoming exams.
Pranksters face possible expulsion
By MARCUS GEE
Engineering students staging
water attacks on classes face
possible expulsion from the
faculty, Fritz Bowers, associate
applied sciences dean, said
Monday.
Bowers said he has drafted an
open letter condemning the
students responsible for the attacks and has given it to applied
sciences dean Liam Finn.
"The engineers should obey the
rule of law on this campus and we
have to persuade them of this,"
Bowers said.
Groups of gears have attacked
classes with water bombs and fire
extinguishers at least six times this
term, he said. The attacks are
more frequent than they were last
year, he added.
"Six mindless incidents this
term so far is enough."
Bowers said he was prompted to
write the letter when he learned a
pregnant woman was hit by a
water bomb during one attack.
"It burns me no end when innocent people get hurt. The dean's
office gets calls about the attacks
and we have had several talks with
engineering students, trying to
persuade them this is not funny
and that people are getting hurt."
Bowers said he has asked Finn to
consider releasing the letter to The
Ubyssey to make people aware the
faculty disapproves of the attacks
and will take action to stop them.
He said victims of the attacks or
others who know about them
should tell the faculty so some
action can be taken.
"There must be hundreds of
people who know about it and
condone it. We would like to appeal
to people in the university to
identify the culprits."
Bowers said the faculty has
approached the engineering undergraduate society about the
attacks but the EUS has been
uncooperative.
"The first EUS reaction is that
we know nothing about it and it's
an old tradition.' "
But EUS president Keith Gagne
denied the society has been uncooperative.
"We have been more than
cooperative. But none of these
attacks have been reported to me
except one."
Gagne said the EUS was asked to
provide     the     faculty     with
photographs of all first-year
engineering students but could not
because its darkroom was out of
order. The faculty wanted the
photos so they could identify
students involved in an attack on a
history class, he said.
"The EUS doesn't condone water
bombing incidents. But when five
students go out and water bomb
what am I supposed to do? Go out
and find the people and beat them
on the head and drag them over to
the faculty office?"
The water attacks have probably
become more frequent this year
because the EUS has been moved
out of its old office, the erstwhile
civils building, and senior gears,
who he claimed exert a moderating
See page 2: PRANKSTERS
Heather Robertson, federation
councillor and Chevron staffer,
asked federation president Shane
Roberts to explain his notice to the
assembled students, but Roberts
did not appear.
Meanwhile, leaders of the
National Union of Students have
offered to mediate the dispute
between the federation and
Chevron staffers, who have been
publishing the Free Chevron since
the federation cut off funds to the
newspaper Sept. 30.
However, neither party has
responded to the NUS offer.
Free Chevron editor Larry
Hannant told NUS executive
secretary Dan O'Connor the staff
has not made a decision.
O'Connor said Monday he has not
yet heard from the federation,
although it held its regular meeting
Sunday, three days after receiving
the NUS offer of mediation.
The federation closed down The
Chevron after former editor-in-
chief Adrian Rodway resigned, and
cited political pressure from other
staff members as his reason for
resigning.
Federation councillors have
charged that a campus political
group, the Anti-Imperialist
Alliance, are taking over the
paper, but staffers deny the
allegation and say the federation
has never proved that a takeover
was occurring.
In its mediation offer, NUS said
it wants to restore "an independent, student-controlled
newspaper to the students of
Waterloo," and added, "students
need ... an active, democratic
student government."
The conditions of the NUS offer
are that both parties "negotiate
seriously," that the mediator
chosen be acceptable to both the
federation and Chevron staff and
the mediator would take "no more
than seven days to try and find a
mutually acceptable solution to the
dispute." Page 2
THE        UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 30, 1976
Fritz Bowers upset
Pranksters may face boot
From page 1
influence on frosh, are separated
from first-year students.
He said the lack of good counselling facilities for gears might
have contributed to the frequency
of the attacks.
Bowers said most attacks have
taken place in the computer
sciences   building,   formerly   the
civil engineering building. No
charges have ever been laid
against the gears involved because
no one has been willing to identify
them.
"It is out of the power of the
police to do anything. But if a
person is assaulted and another
person lays assault charges, then
that's another thing. A person who
gets his suede jacket ruined and his
notes soaked could decide to place
charges."
Bowers said he is also concerned
about vandalism by the gears, but
that this is less of a problem than it
was last year. "Vandalism which
damages property in a time of
restraint really bothers me," he
said.
Rot undo, SPAM crush
opponents in Scurvey
PANGO PANGO fUNS) — "I
love SPAM. Me, I'm voting SPAM,
SPAM, SPAM, SPAM,
SPAM. ..."
That seems to be the consensus
of voters of Scurvey, this tiny
island kingdom's famous
bathroom suburb. In Monday's
general elections, candidates of Al
Rotundo s Scurvey Political Action
Movement swept to power, ending
the 22-year reign of Ed McGum-
by's iron-handed regime.
Rotundo, former distorter for the
Vancouver Scum, entered politics
three years ago after reading a
magazine advertisement.
"I just got too big «£or the
gnuspaper business,'' Rotundo
explained recently. "I just decided
to spread out a bit."
SPAM's motto is Sensibility,
Pride, Ability and Maturity, the
initials of which, clever voters are
sure to have noticed, spell SPAM.
What really helped us in this
campaign was a $10,000 contribution we got from a donor
whose name we will never reveal,"
said the grinning Rotundo. "You
might call our election the result of
a little political poker game."
MOVING &  TRANSFER
Reasonable
Rates
S
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Big or Small Jobs
ALSO GARAGES
BASEMENTS
& YARDS
732-9898
CLEAN-UP
WHEN YOU LOOK GOOD
SO DO WE . . .
^PRESCRIPTION
OPTICAL!
Just a note to tell you
we stop publishing soon
The Ubyssey will publish only
once more this term, and that will
be Friday, the last day of lectures
of the first term. There will be no
paper Thursday.
Remember, deadline for 'Tween
Classes and Hot Flashes for
Friday's paper is noon, Thursday,
while the advertising deadline for
the same issue is 11:30 a.m.
Thursday.
Don't say we didn't warn you.
Coming up this week is a feature
looking at 25 common micon-
ceptions about Canadian law, with
drawings by Dave Wilkinson, our
budding architectural draftsman.
During the holidays, The
Ubyssey will host the :i9th annual
meeting of Canadian University
Press, the collective of 70
university  newspapers,  including
this one. The conference is Dec. 26
to Jan. 2 and UBC students are
welcome. We'll have more details
on that in Friday's paper.
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Telephone 687-5891. Tuesday, November 30, 1976
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 3
OTEU—no contract in 8 months
By STEVE HOWARD
Forty of UBC's technical employees working without a contract
since March 31, will ask the administration Wednesday to begin
talks about next year's contract.
Provincial mediator Jock
Waterston has been mediating for
three months between the Office
and Technical Employees Union,
local 15, and the administration,
union negotiator Bert Mitchell said
Monday. The union requested a
mediator at the end of the summer.
Mitchell said the main
unresolved issues are job security
and severance pay.
The most recent mediation
meeting was Nov. 22 and the union
met Nov. 23 to discuss the proposed
contract, Mitchell said.
'We were still not satisfied," he
said. "While it's possible the wage
proposals may be accepted, we're
looking for better wording for
seniority, contracting out and
security.
Mitchell said the administration's total wage offer is a
little greater than the amount
allowed within the Anti-Inflation
Board guidelines, but he would not
say how much greater.
Wes Clark, assistant director of
employee relations, also refused to
reveal the administration's wage
offer. In the first year of a contract
a wage increase is limited to eight
per cent plus two per cent for increased productivity, according to
AIB guidelines.
"We are prepared to face up to
that issue (the AIB guidelines) on
wages," Mitchell said. "But if we
haven't got job security, what have
we got?
"The university wants to make it
worse than it was before," he said.
"We want to stick with it the way it
was. They're laying off our men
with six to eight years of experience and getting supervisory
personnel to do our work."
Mitchell said the administration
Theessen raps
Blandford plan
By KATHY FORD
Student senator Joan Blandford
said Thursday she is going ahead
with her senate motion proposing
higher fees for foreign and out-of-
province students.
But Dave Theessen, president of
the student representative
assembly, which voted Wednesday
to reject the principle of differential fees, isn't worried.
"I don't really 'think it's
necessary to seriously consider the
effect Joan Blandford's putting
this motion before senate will
have. I have more faith in senate
. than that,'' he said Monday.
Theessen said student senators
are not bound to decisions made by
the SRA, even though student
senators are also SRA members.
"She's only attended one SRA
meeting,   and   that   was   at   the
BCSF broke —
six grand
in the red
The B.C. Students' Federation is
in the red.
Outgoing treasurer Moe Sihota
said Monday the organization will
have a deficit of about $6,300 this
year.
In a recent referendum UBC
students voted 58 per cent in favor
of belonging to BCSF and paying $1
per year membership fees. But the
referendum failed because the
Alma Mater Society constitution
requires that referenda on money
matters receive a two-thirds
majority in favor to pass.
Sihota said estimated income for
the year ending Oct. 31, 1977 is
$27,000, and expenditures for the
same period are estimated at
$34,000.
If the UBC referendum had
passed, BCSF would have received
another $21,000 this year.
The estimated expenditure is
based on salaries for two field
workers at $725 a month, field
expenses of $250 a month, a
telephone budget of $200 per month
and advertising and publication
expenses.
The financial situation for the
organization has resulted in field
workers finding an empty BCSF
bank account when they tried to
cash cheques recently.
Sihota said there is no way the
staff can be cut back. Two staff
people are essential, he said, and
the BCSF needs more money to be
an effective organization..
Pam Willis, elected BCSF
treasurer Nov. 20, said the BCSF
will try to get money from
organizations such as the UBC
Alumni Association, unions,
businesses and government.
beginninf of the term," he said. "If
she chooses not to take directives
from the SRA that's fine.
"We're here as a forum for
student senators, but they are in no
way bound to what we say.
"Usually more senators show up
for council meetings, but at this
last one, when we had this issue on
the agenda, only four showed up.
"I was quite disappointed. This is
the first issue we've had that
directly concerned senate members, and they were scared off."
Blandford's motion, which will
be put before senate January,
proposes a "differential fee system
which means out-of-province
students would pay higher tuition
fees than students from B.C., and
foreign students would pay even
higher ones.
"This type of system is intuitively appealing to a lot of
people on campus," Theessen said.
"For example the system appeals to conservative types. Some
people in medicine and commerce
think it's a good idea, on face
value. But when you give them the
facts, they change their minds."
Moe Sihota, the Alma Mater
Society's external affairs officer,
said Wednesday that differential
fees would increase UBC's income
by three tenths of one per cent.
There's that resentment among
some people against so-called
foreign students," Theessen said.
"But once you give them some
concrete facts, people who initially
have positive reactions to the
proposal switch to negative or ho-
hum attitudes."
claims a lack of experienced
personnel on campus forces it to
give jobs to outside contractors.
But Mitchell said that if a
physical plant employee does the
job it costs UBC less. "The average
architect's rate is about $50 per
hour. I wish we could sign a contract for half that amount."
He said there are plenty of experienced personnel in the OTEU.
"If we were to agree with the
wording (in the proposed contract)
we might as well pack up the
shop," Mitchell said. "We'd be
cutting our own throats."
He said the administration is
allowing the number of OTEU
workers to decrease through attrition. "It's been slashed from 55
to 40. They're not replacing people,
but they expect the work to be
done.
' 'The university has taken a very
poor attitude towards its employees. They're just pawns in the
general game.
"Another issue is severance pay
for technical change," Mitchell
said. "There's no way the
university will discuss severance
pay." He said in all the OTEU's
other contracts severance pay is
guaranteed. He said the union can
appeal to the minister of labor if
severance pay is not included in
the contract.
"Are we just going to say
goodbye to someone with 15 years
of service? Two weeks notice and
they're down the road," Mitchell
said. The union is asking for one
month of severance pay for each
year of service on campus, he said.
Mitchell said he is waiting for a
phone call from mediator Waters-
ton to arrange the next meeting.
"YOUR HEEL IS DIGGING INTO MY SHOULDER," said whale. "How can I help it?" exclaimed bear.
"This damn beaver's got his paws over my eyes." "Whine, whine, whine," mimicked beaver. "Will you stop
hunching your shoulders?" exclaimed frog. "Can't you guys stop wobbling and shut up so Mike Miller can
take this photograph?" commanded raven from atop totem pole outside north entrance of SUB.
SUS fee referendum swells coffers
By MIKE BOCKING
The purpose of the Alma Mater
Society's new constitution, introduced this year, was to
decentralize student government
by giving undergraduate societies
more power.
Power means financial independence, and so far two undergrad societies have taken steps
toward that goal. The science
undergraduate society took a giant
leap; the arts undergraduate
society stumbled.
SUS president Bob Salkeld says
an important change in the constitution has made it no longer
necessary for undergrad societies
to reach a quorum of 15 per cent to
pass a referendum involving
money matters. But it is still
necessary for a fee referendum to
obtain two-thirds of the votes to
pass.
If a referendum passes by two-
thirds but fails to get a quorum, the
measure is still applicable, but for
only one year. If a quorum is ob
tained a fee raise would become
permanent.
The science and arts undergraduate societies have held
referenda this term to finance their
operations. Salkeld says the
science referendum passed with 80
percent of the ballots in favor of a
$1 SUS fee. The referendum failed
to achieve a quorum — only 12 per
cent of science students voted.
The AUS referendum failed,
receiving approval from only 58
per cent of the voters.
The fact that the referendum
was held the same time as five
other referenda probably contributed to its defeat.
One of the ways by which the new
constitution is to pressure undergrad societies into becoming
self-supporting is the abolition of
Palmer grants, says Salkeld.
These grants were regular annual
payments to undergrad societies —
based on the number of students in
each — by the AMS.
The   AMS   now   gives   "con
tingency grants" to the societies,
which is the same amount of
money they were getting from the
original Palmer grants. Salkeld
says the purpose of these grants is
to tide the societies over until they
can become self-sufficient. "The
grants are by no means permanent," He said.
Another source of revenue for
the undergrad societies is vending
machines. Crowe says the income
the AUS receives from these
machines is $3,000 per year.
This source of income was
jeopardized earlier this year when
food services director Robert
Bailey tried to take control of
vending machines.
Crowe said the dispute between
the AUS and Bailey has been
resolved, and the AUS is again
receiving revenue from their
vending machines.
Crowe estimates the annual AUS
budget at $4,000.
The SUS budget is about $1,700,
Salkeld says. The fee levy will put
it up to $3,600 next year, he said.
Crowe said the new constitution
has not yet had much effect in
making the societies more independent of the AMS, and she
doubts the AMS would stop giving
undergrad societies constituency
grants if they could not raise
enough money from their members.
Salkeld agrees the new constitution has not yet gone far in decentralizing the AMS, but he expects the undergrad societies will
eventually become more independent.
Crowe said the AUS uses its
money for the publication of newsletters, advertising and running
elections and referenda, and
sponsoring clubs and associations
within their faculty, such as the
political science club and the anthropology-sociology association.
Crowe said they were also involved
in organizing a few intramural
teams such as hockey and
basketball. Page 4
THE        UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 30, 1976
Too much!
Ah yes. The Insurance Corporation of B.C. has reared its
monstrous head again.
We're referring, of course, to the recent announcement
that ICBC is reducing next year's premiums for drivers who
have not filed accident claims for which they were at fault.
All it goes to show is how stupidly the Socreds handled
the whole ICBC fiasco this spring when they doubled and in
some cases tripled the amount of insurance people had to pay
for their cars. And it shows how little they really knew about
ICBC.
The recent announcement said ICBC has some $52
million which it hasn't needed. And it's now going to be
rewarded to drivers who haven't earned black marks during
the past year.
The extra $52 million is simply money that has been
taken out of the hands of the people and used in what has
amounted to a game of political football.
Now, it seems, our cue is to appear joyous and cheerful
that if we haven't had accidents we get a piddling share of all
that money we paid back. We're supposed to overlook the
fact that we got hit with the increases in the first place, and
also that rates won't be any lower, except for those who
didn't have accidents in which they were at fault. Even then,
the rates won't come close to what they were one year ago,
before the Socreds came to power.
The amusing thing is all of this comes from a
government that prides itself on its knowledge and ability to
deal with money.
Let us register a protest. We are not impressed.
Letters
I feel there must be a conspiracy
being perpetrated on the students
of UBC by The Ubyssey.
In reaction to student apathy (of
whichto this point I admit I as well
have been guilty) The Ubyssey has
concocted some story about a
luxury convention centre and
apartment development on the
University Endowment Lands.
In this it had the implicit cooperation of the university administration and various heads of
departments who lent their names
to certain quotes.
The drawing of the convention
centre might possibly have come
from the office of Arthur Erickson,
Ubyssey
perpetrates
conspiracy
but only, only, surely to God, as
part of this trick.
This plan simply cannot be true.
It is inconceivable.
Humanity has come to understand itself better than it did at
Alan j where are you now?
I was glancing at a Ubyssey the other day that was lining a garbage
can here at residence, and couldn't help but notice the caricature on
the PF interview logo.
I said to myself, "My God! That's Alan Doree!"
I remembered the days wandering through the Ubyssey offices
having Doree warm up a dreary day.
Who will ever forget the Hallowe'en, 1974, issue — Alan with his
baseball cap on backward, doing his dirty on a pumpkin.
I was wondering if you could assist me on my nostalgia trip and tel)
me where he is and what he's doing.
The Ubyssey, nay, the university hasn't been the same since he
disappeared that fateful day in May 1975.
Stu Lyster
arts 4
THE UBYSSEY
NOVEMBER   30,   1976
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS
or the university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in room 241K of the
Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301;
Advertising, 228-3977.
Co-Editors: Sue Vohanka, Ralph Maurer
Chris Gainor, newly elected reischbureaucrat, and fear . . . oops, loved
leader of the Surrey Political Action Party was picking his new cabinet. He
had already settled on Jan Nicol. "Ouch," she remarked picking up her
portfolio and crawling away. Doug Rushton, new secretary of state,
suggested either Matt King, Mike Miller, Deryl Mogg or Doug Field as
minister of cheap pornography. Lecherous Tom Barnes and clean-shaven
Charlie Micallef were being considered for minister of public morals. Sue
Vohanka was to be party whip and leather thong. Former transport minister
Marcus Gee was replaced by the fun-loving mayor with Heather Walker (Ho!
Ho! Ho!) Steve Howard was a shoo-in for minister of supplies and services,
while Kathy Ford was a natural for solicitor-general. Veteran backbencher
Ralph Maurer was overlooked as Paul Wilson landed the post of sports and
recreation minister. It was a tight race between Mike Bocking and Scoop the
fearless newshound to see who would be last in the masthead.
the beginning of the industrial
revolution. No longer does interest
in pure profit, in personal gain at
the expense of any sense whatsoever of the value of the earth's
natural system, or of the preservation of individual human worth,
motivate people in power.
There are exceptions to this rule,
but in general we have learned
from our mistakes and are willing
to act more in the interests of what
future generations will think of us.
There is a progression of human
values that is not just a greater and
greater set of restrictions on our
greed and animal voracity.
We are learning. This trick of
The Ubyssey has succeeded only
insofar as it has perhaps made
some of us realize this.
In the event that such a development were to take place, perhaps
through the agency of some impersonal force, some machine —
then it would be our only prerogative as human beings to fight that
development to the end. But such
things do not happen nowadays.
Do not try to fool us with this
pretence too long, please.
Some of us may come to believe
it and understand its implications
— and that will not be a happy day
for anyone concerned.
Earle Peach
arts 2
UEL building plan appalling
I am positively appalled at the
Socred government's alleged plans
to build downtown Manhattan in
the heart of the University Endowment Lands (Ubyssjpy, Nov.
26).
What appalls me more is the
incredible, supine acceptance of
the whole concept by the "older
and wiser heads'' on this campus.
If administration president Doug
Kenny's only reaction is the one
The Ubyssey printed, he must hold
the record for pure egotism — it's
either him or George Woodcock,
whose mercenary attitude boggles
my mind.
Malcolm McGregor's detached
pedantry on the subject made my
eyes bulge. Has the senior faculty
at this university gone nuts?
A paltry 3,000 units of housing
will not come near to solving
Vancouver's housing problems,
which have their roots in national
and international population
movements.
What they will do is create awful
traffic jams on West Sixteenth
(and of course increase pressure
on other entrances) and attract
more developers to the UEL.
This is where we students —
25,000 of us — spend the greater
portion of our waking hours. It is
Band-aid solution for crisis
Part of our humanness is that we
often overreact when confronted
with a crisis.
Joan Blandford's senate motion
(re: differential tuition fees) is a
response to a fear that many of us
have to a substantial increase in
tuition fees. Unfortunately her
response is nothing more than a
band-aid solution to an issue soon
to be faced by all of us.
Since education is getting to be a
far more costly operation year
after year, how do we respond?
How do we insure and maintain a
high standard of academic
achievement along with easy and
open accessibility to all members
of society?
My response would be to say that
it is time for a new approach to
educational funding. If we as a
community and society fee) that
education is a priority (and we
must or there wouldn't be 23,000 of
us here) then our solutions must
take on a broader vision of reality.
The increased revenue realized
from the higher tuition fees of a
few hundred foreign students
would hardly solve our continuing
fiscal problems.
Obviously it is time for some
serious dialogue and action among
all members of the community to
ensure that the price of a
university education will not
restrict a majority of the
population from attaining it.
Surely this a step to consider
immediately so that each year we
won't be running around trying to
plug the holes in our ever-
increasing budget.
At least that's the way I see it.
Dave Jiles
arts rep
student representative assembly
also, aside from a few small parks,
the last chunk of virgin bush in
Vancouver proper. Does anybody
care?
:. ; ',::,'.. JimFraser
arts 4
Condolences
I wish to extend my condolences
to the poor struggling student,
Jeremy Ralph, who suffered
through the anguish of hurdling
those "considerable barriers" to
come and study at UBC.
Unfortunately, no one forced him
to take on the burdens of "service
in the armed forces, hassle(ing)
with both governments or just
scraping an incredible amount of
money together'' to study here.
Education is a privilege and he
should recognize it as one. To be
given the opportunity to be allowed
to study in a foreign university
may require more money but it is
even more of a privilege.
To suggest that the taxpayers of
Canada should subsidize him is
slightly egotistical to say the least.
Don't feel -quite disgusted"
Jeremy, feel quite privileged.
It is also interesting to hear of
your combined efforts" to inflict
the burden of your educational fees
onto the back of the Dutch taxpayer and thereby shutting your
eyes to the inflationary world in
which you live.
Considering the not inconsiderable effort this action
must have required, pray tell, why
did you abandon what you fought
for to come to Canada to pay so
much more?
This Jeremy, suggests that
perhaps you are not quite as badly
off as you pretend.
Before you get hostile Jeremy,
and combine your fearful efforts,'
let me point out that there are one
hell of a lot of people, one hell of a
lot smarter who pay one hell of a
lot more taxes toward subsidizing
this university than you do, and
you complain because you can't
understand that you're not entitled
to all the advantages of a Canadian
student while at the same time not
suffering the disadvantages.
Sorry, I don't agree.
Steve Pocock
education 3 Tuesday, November 30, 1976
THE    -   UBYSSEY
Page 5
Kenny, McGeer
neglect duties
in tuition issue
By MOE SIHOTA
Last week The Ubyssey featured a series
of articles on the question of tuition increases.
One story informed students about a letter
that administration president Doug Kenny
had sent to education minister Pat McGeer.
In his letter, Kenny strongly suggested that
he was not in favor of tuition increases.
In reply, last Friday, McGeer stated that
he too "would consider a fee increase unfortunate."
.All of this sounds very confusing. If both of
these men are against tuition hikes, then
why is the issue being discussed at all?
In fact, since the threat of tuition increases is so real, one would have to wonder
whether or not both McGeer and Kenny are
simply making these statements for the
sake of public relations.
Neither McGeer nor Kenny have done
much to convince students that they are
indeed opposed to tuition increases.
McGeer has repeatedly failed to recognize
and accept his responsibility to acquire
adequate operating funds for universities. If
McGeer was truly sincere about his
statement, he would be actively demanding
that the provincial government adopt
education as a priority and that the
provincial treasury be instructed to provide
enou$i money to insure that universities
and colleges can at least maintain their
present level of operation.
However, McGeer has not done this. He
has neglected this responsibility and has
further ignored the tuition issue by claiming
it-is-a-imiversity decision. -   -
The only reason it is a university decision
is because McGeer has forced institutions to
consider tuition hikes by not providing
adequate operating money for the campus.
McGeer's actions are totally irresponsible
for a minister of education, and it's about
time he recognized his obligations and did
something constructive.
As for Kenny, he too has done little to back
his statement against tuition fees.
Neither McGeer
nor Kenny
have convinced
students that
they oppose
tuition increases.
Kenny has written a letter to McGeer
requesting that tuition not be increased. So
what? About 5,000 students at UBC have
signed a letter to McGeer expressing
similar sentiments.
McGeer is not going to be motivated to
reverse his irresponsible stance on the basis
of one letter.
Kenny is going to have to do much more
than simply write a letter. If Kenny truly
wants to prevent increases and maintain a
functional campus, he is going to have to
consider other actions.
As radical as it may sound, he is going to
have to insist that adequate operating funds
must be provided or else he will have no
choice but to close down the university.
Without adequate funds, courses will have
to be eliminated, class sizes increased, and
professors fired, all of which will do injustice to the primary function of the
university — that being to provide an
education.
If the quality of eudcation at UBC is to be
retained, then the university must have
sufficient   operating   funds.   If   Kenny
"v^!
I am
Joe* s
m-
honestly believes in the concept of minimal
tuition, then he should be willing to adopt
this extreme position.
In fact, he has no choice but to take an
extreme position. One has to be pretty extreme when dealing with a government that
is callous enough to double insurance and
ferry rates as well as attempting to close
down a university (Notre Dame University
in Nelson) despite cries from citizens across
the province.
Kenny has stated that he will not take any
such stance because he does not want to be
involved in "political crossfire." Well,
Kenny must realize that this is a political
matter.
When a government begins to threaten a
university with less funds, it becomes a
political matter. When the actions of a
government force a university to increase
tuition, it becomes a political matter.
Therefore, Kenny has no choice but to
enter the political arena and oppose tuition
increases.
Kenny has
no choice
but to enter
the political arena
and oppose
tuition increases.
He must enter the political realm much as
his counterparts Pauline Jewett at Simon
Fraser University, Howard Petch at the
University of Victoria and Roland Grant at
NDU have, and must publicly oppose and
pressure the government to adopt a more
realistic position.
Kenny, as the president of this campus,
should do his utmost to enunciate and act
upon the concerns of the university community.
Anything short of this represents a gross
neglect of his responsibilities to the campus.
More than 5,000 students at UBC have
opposed increases in tuition fees. Members
of the faculty have expressed concern at the
lack of funds from the provincial government.  "     /
Hundreds of professors and workers on
this campus stand to lose their jobs as a
result of education department irresponsibility. Kenny, as the president of UBC must
recognize these concerns and his obligation
to react to these issues.
So far, Kenny has not done much, and he
must be more responsive before anyone can
begin to believe his claim to no tuition increases.
Similarly, McGeer must become aware of
his obligation to the education community
and insure that sufficient funds be available
for the proper functioning of that community.
Until these men take some initiative, one
can only assume that their claims to no
tuition increases are merely a cheap and
dirty public' relations gimmick.
Sihota is external affairs officer of the
Alma Mater Society.
He initiated the letter campaign asking
McGeer to prevent tuition increases, and the
drive which resulted in about 5,000 UBC
students signing the letter to McGeer.
Calling at night can save you money ©Trans-Canada Telephone System Page 6
THE        UBYSSEY   •
Tuesday, November 30, 1976
Tween classes
TODAY
CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Prayer and sharing, noon, SUB 205.
CHINESE STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
Chinese instrumental practice, 7:30
p.m., International House.
LUTHERAN STUDENT
MOVEMENT
Supper followed by discussion on
justice and prisons in Canada, 6:30
p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Bible study, noon, SUB 213.
AMS ART GALLERY
Exhibition of photographs and
modular paintings, daily through
Dec. 10, SUB Art Gallery.
CUSO
Guest speakers seminar, noon, SUB
212; development awareness, a look
at China and Cuba, 8 p.m., Bu. 202.
ASIAN RESEARCH  INSTITUTE
Seminar on South Asia, with prof.
Nirad Chadhuri, 2:30 p.m.,
mechanical   engineering annex  209.
WEDNESDAY
SIMS
Introductory lecture on
transcendental meditation, noon,
Bu. 313.
BAHA'I CLUB
Discussion on perspectives for world
unity, noon, SUB 213.
UBC POTTERY CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 261.
CHINESE STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
Choir practice, 7:30 p.m., SUB 212.
DEVELOPMENTAL DRAMA
STUDENTS
Free presentation of the Chile show,
concerning 1973 military coup, 8
p.m.,   Dorothy  Somerset   The  atre.
STUDENT WIVES
ASSOCIATION
Christmas Lasagna dinner, bring
your own utensils and refreshments,
7:30 p.m., Cecil Green Park.
NEWMAN CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 205.
THURSDAY
YOUNG CONSERVATIVES
Walter  Dinsdale,  M.P., speaks, 1:30
p.m.,   academic  quadrangle,   Simon
^Fraser University.
SIMS
Group    meditation    and   advanced
lecture, noon, Buto 297.
CPSC
Tom      Boulanger     from     Crown
Zellerbach     will     speak     on     data
processing     in     industry,     noon,
computer sciences 201.
INTER VARSITY
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Christmas    worship    service,    noon,
Lutheran Campus Centre.
UBC POTTERY CLUB
Clear-out pottery sale, 11 a.m. to 4
p.m., SUB 207.
CHINESE'SCIENCE
ASSOCIATION
Lecture    on     Chinese    calligraphy,
noon, Bu. 106.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
ORGANIZATION
Testimony    meeting,    noon,    SUB
224.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
A new life, noon, SUB 205.
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY
There  will  be no meeting held,  no
time, no place.
SQUARE DANCING
Practice   and   dancing,   noon,   SUB
212.
FRIDAY
SF FEN
Funeral,
211.
bring   flowers,  noon,  SUB
CALCULATOR
REPAIRS
ALL MAKES AND MODELS
FREE ESTIMATES
CAL-Q-TRONICS
434-9322
4861 Kingsway, Burnaby
Will you be a winner this winter?
You can be if your register now at the
Tutorial Center. For $1 we will match
you with a tutor in the subjects that are
knocking you out. Call 228-4557
anytime for information, or register
between 12:30 and 2:30 p.m. at
Speakeasy.
A PROGRAM OF THE UBC
A L UMNIA SSO CIA TION
WANT A FIRST
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In the very near future you're going to make one of the
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We know this isn't for everyone, but for those of you
who want the challenge and rewards this type of career
has to offer, come and see us and open up a whole
new world.
See your Placement Office or fill in the coupon.
ti*
CANADA LIFE
The Canada Life Assurance Company
Education Department
The Canada Life Assurance Company
330 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1R8
I am interested in attending an interv;ew for The Canada Life Sales
& Marketing Management Program.
NAME	
ADDRESS
COURSE	
(Include resume if possible)
ARTS CHRISTMAS PARTY
FRI. DEC. 3rd
^Sc° 8-12:30
^   SUB 307-209
WHITE - RED - AMBER LIQUIDS
FREE MUNCHIES
AND
GOOD COMPANY
EVERYBODY WELCOME
13 EJG]E][3E]E]E)E]E]E)E]E]E]E]G]E]E] gggggggE]E]E]E]B]E]E]E]G]E]G]B]E]|0]
1       C ATVDIA TAVERNA        S
[| FAST FREE PIZZA DELIVERY 13
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[g 4510 W. 10th Ave., Open 7 Days a Week 4 p.m.-2 a.m. [§]
13 rsEEEEIaEEEEEEEEEEEEBIallilalala BBBBSIaralsBlalalgla 13
2132 WESTERN PARKWAY
(IN  THE  VILLAGE)
224-3015
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c.
Commercial —  3 lines,  1 day $2.50; additional lines
50c. Additional days $2.25 and 45c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S. U.B., UBC, Vancouver.
5 — Coming Events
ECKANKAR
Learn   how   we   are   the   cause   of
everything that happens to us  and
how we can control our own future.
FILM:    "ECKANKAR,    A   WAY    OF
LIFE"
Thurs.,    December   2nd.
7:00   p.m.   S.U.B.   213
10 —For Sale — Commercial
ITS FUN, fast and easy—complete instructions. Do-It-Yourself Picture
Framing—3657 West Broadway. Open
till  9:00 p.m.  Thursday.
11 — For Sale — Private
FOR SALE. Two Season Tickets Vancouver Symphony. Seven concerts.
Value $47.00 each. Best Offer.
922-1108.
20 — Housing
JOIN A FRATERNITY and live on campus. Kappa Sigma Fraternity has
rooms available January 1st for pros-'
pective members. Preference given to
first-second year. Drop by 2280 Wesbrook, phone 224-9679.
30 - Jobs
FOOD STORE DEMONSTRATOR. 'Home
Be" experience an asset but not essential. December 13th to 31st.
Mostly evening work — 4 p.m. to 9
p.m. daily. Rate $4.00 per hour. Dress
provided. Reply Box 30, Ubyssey.
65 — Scandals
POTTERY SALE — Original pot* by
Bastings. Dec. 2-3, 6:30-10 p.m.; Dec.
4-5, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 7120 Maple (near
54th).
70 — Services
SUNSHINE MAIL SERVICES" invites
you to use our box for your private'
mail. We receive and forward your
mail FIRST CLASS, DAILY. A strictly
confidential remaining service. For
more info. WRITE TO: Dept. J, P.O.
Box 80840, South Burnaby, B.C. V5H
m.
70 —Services (Continued)
NEED HELP for the Christmas Exams?
If you are having problems in any
1st or 2nd year math courses, call
Murray  at 942-4968.   $4.00  per hour.
80 — Tutoring
QUALIFIED COUPLE will proof-read,
edit, discuss term papers, etc. $5.00
per hour. Call 228-0471.
85 — Typing
EFFICIENT Selectric Typing — My
Home. Essays, Thesis, etc. Neat, accurate work. Reasonable rates.
263-5317.
PROFESSIONAL typing on IBM correcting typewriter by experienced
secretary.   Reasonable.   224-1567.
EXPERIENCED SECRETARY to do fast
accurate typing in West Vancouver
home.   922-4443.   Reasonable   rates.
CAMPUS DROP OFF for fast accurate
typing. 731-1807, 11:00 a.m.-9:00 p.m.
Good rates.
FAST, EFFICIENT TYPINO near 41st
and Marine.   266-5053.
90 - Wanted
NEEDED — Two or three tickets for
Sunday, December 5th afternoon,
Vancouver Symphony Concert. Call
224-3080.
SKI WHISTLER
Rent cabin day/week.  732-0174 eves.
lr^r=Jr=lr=ir=Jr==Jr==Jr==Jr=lr=ir=)
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
TO SELL - BUY
INFORM
jr=Jr=ir=ir=ir=Jr=ir=Jr=ir=Jr=Jr= Tuesday, November 30, 1976
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 7
Basketball team moves into 1st...
By PAUL WILSON
The UBC Thunderbirds basketball team moved into a tie for first
place with the Alberta Golden
Bears in the Canada West league
by defeating the Lethbridge
Pronghorns in two straight games
on the weekend.
But the Bears have two games in
handover the Birds because they
played in a tournament in Toronto
on the weekend.
The Birds were hot Saturday
night as they convincingly
defeated the Pronghorns 107-71.
The Birds dominated the game
by virtue of their height and rolled
up a half time 52-35 lead.
High point man for the 'Birds
was Ralph Turner who sank 10 out
of 18 shots and added a free throw
UJihU*
for a total of 21 points. Mike McKay
scored on six of seven shots from
the field and made six free throws
to add 18 points.
This brings McKay's shooting
record for the season to 27 for 48,
making him the fifth most accurate shooter in the conference.
Centre Jan Bohn, in fifth place in
the league scoring race, added 16
points. Bohn is averaging 17.5
points a game this season.
The Pronghorns were dominated
on the boards by the 'Birds 40-34.
Mike McKay and Bird captain
David Craig pulled down 11 and
eight rebounds respectively.
Mirkovich was the Pronghorns' big
man on the boards, hauling down a
total of 15.
Mirkovich is the leading
rebounder in the league, averaging
more than 12 a game.
In the Friday night game the
Birds ran up a total of 98 points to
Lethbridge's 60.
...but puck 'Birds slip to 2nd
By TOM BARNES
The University of Golden Bears,
with two one-goal victories over
the UBC Thunderbirds on the
weekend, vaulted over the 'Birds
into first place in the Canada West
hockey league.
Playing before capacity crowds
in Varsity Arena in Edmonton, the
Bears clipped the Birds 5-4 Friday
and 3-2 Saturday.
In Saturday's penalty filled
game in Edmonton, Marty Matthews continued his goal-scoring
streak for UBC as he gave the
'Birds a 1-0 lead. Alberta's Kevin
Primeau tied it before the first
period ended.
After a scoreless second period,
the Bears got a power play goal
from Jim Ofrim early in the third.
Peter Moyles tied the game for
UBC after some inspired penalty
killing by the 'Birds. With about
seven minutes left in the game
Darrel Zaperniul slid a shot between the post and Ron Lefebvre's
pad to give Alberta the win.
Lefebvre turned in another
strong performance for the 'Birds
as he came up with 28 saves. Ted
Poplaski came up with 30 for the
Bears. UBC was assessed 27
minutes in penalties, Alberta 12.
On Friday night the Alberta
power play accounted for four
goals in a 5-4 game. Dave Hindmarch, son of former UBC coach
Bob Hindmarch, led the way for
Alberta with three goals.
JOIN THIS
UNCOMMON HERD
that gathers in the most
congenial surroundings
on campus
THURSDAYS
8 p.m. - 12 Midnight
FRIDAYS
8 p.m. - 1 a.m.
, HAPPY HOUR ,
1    (FRIDAY ONLY!    |
4 p.m. - 6 p.m.   .
Memberships to YAC open to
graduating students and
U.B.C. alumni, are available
at the door.
THE YOUNG ALUMNI
CLUB is a program of t!ie
U.B.C.   Alumni  Association.
,-or further information call
Program Office
CECIL GREEN PARK, 228-3313
Trailing 4-2 in the third, the
Birds rallied around goals by Tom
Blaney and Ross Cory to tie the
game. But a late goal by Brian
Sosowski decided the game for the
Bears.
Blaney with an earlier tally and
Matthews scored the other UBC
goals. Lefebvre stopped 39 Alberta
shots.
The weekend games were the
last Canada West action until
January.
In the meantime the 'Birds will
keep in trim with four exhibition
games. The first comes this Friday
when the Northwest League All-
stars come to Thunderbird Arena.
Game time is 8 p.m.
League standings:
Alta.
UBC
Sask.
Calgary
GPWLFA Pts.
8 6 2 36 27 12
8 5 3 36 22 10
8 3 5 33 42 6
8    2   6 26 41      4
Independent Optician*
Come in and experience good old-fashioned Service!!
U.F.O. SPECIAL      $24.95
Extended till Nov./30/76
Plus Lenses
Christian Dior - Silhouette, & others 25% Off
Open Mon.-Sat. and Sundays 12-5 p.m.
44 Water St., Gastown    681-6626
Evening Credit Courses
UBC
Jan-April 77
Application deadline: Dec. 31
Registration deadline: Jan. 6
Further information available from:
The Registrar's Office
The University of British Columbia
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1W5
or telephone 228-2844 or 228-2657
 1
Extra-Sessional
Credit Courses
Please send a calendar supplement to:
Name	
Address   	
City  	
Please check one of the following:
[ ] I have enrolled previously in
credit courses at UBC.
[ ] I have not enrolled previously
in credit courses at UBC.
Bohngot 15points for UBC, Chris
Trumpy added 14 and McKay
potted 13.
For the Pronghorns, Mike Urban
scored 15 points, Jim Duxbury
added 10 and Mirkovich shot very
poorly for just six points.
At 8:30 p.m. Friday in War
Memorial Gym, the 'Birds play an
exhibition   game   against   the
Vancouver
league.
UBC
.Alta.
Victoria
Calgary
Lethbridge
Sask.
As  of the  Dogwood
GP W L F A Pts.
6 4 2 517 403 8
4 4 0 367 329 8
6 3 3 424 431 6
4 3 1 304 281 6
6 2 4 424 431 4
6 0 6 419 515 0
Hockey Stick Sale!
LOUISVILLE
VICTORIAVILLE
ALL Vi PRICE
The
Hockey
Specialists
620 E. Broadway - 874-8611 3771 W. 10th - 224-3536
One
Last Shot
When you're drinking
tequila, Sauza's the
shot that counts.
That's why more and
more people are
asking for it by
name.
TEQUILA SAUZA
Number one in Mexico.
Number one in Canada.
THE BOTTLED KftWtCF OT MEXICO
rfouii* wj*». Page 8
THE
UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 30, 1976
UofS rags battle for survival
Open rehearsal
in old Auditorium
Tues. Dec. 7-8 p.m.
Sponsored by
UBC CONTEMPORARY
DANCE CLUB	
SASKATOON — Two newspapers at the University of
Saskatchewan here, both claiming
to be student oriented, are in the
middle of a cut throat competition
for readers and advertisers in the
university community.
Staffers from both papers have
said the competition is a battle for
survival because there is not
enough advertising revenue and
student funding on campus to
support two papers.
The conflict started several
months ago, when Sheaf staffers
disagreed about what position the
Sheaf should take on controversial
issues and how much local student
news should appear in the paper.
Former Sheaf editor Chris
Mushka and three other salaried
staffers resigned and began
producing Shadowfax, which
consists solely of local student
news.
Shadowfax has been funded by
the university's arts and sciences
student society, and in its first
issue ran a half-page ad that said,
"Students have $$$ to Blow," and
asked advertisers to place ads in
the paper.
—doug field photo
PRETEND NOT TO NOTICE, FRANK, but one of them asshole photographers from the Rubyssey, or
whatever they call that vile student rag, is taking our picture. Guess it's time for another of them gratuitous
kicks-in-the-groin that rag unloads on us every so often. It really burns my ass — we're only following orders.
It's those fools in the administration that have screwed up parking out here, not us.
This protest
should oause
some grey hairs
NEW YORK (LNS-CUP) —
Women at the University of
Washington in Seattle are
protesting the Clairol Loving Care
Hair Color ad for grey hair that
appeared in the June, 1976 issue of
Good Housekeeping magazine.
The ad pictures a businesswoman with the headline, "On
men, grey hair is distinguished. On
me, it's just plain old." The copy
beneath the headline begins,
"Sure, it'sunfair. I have only a few
greys. If I were a man, I'd be
growing them gracefully. Instead,
I'm plucking them furiously."
The Seattle women state that the
ad is based on a comparison between men and women that
capitalizes on inequities that
women face in the U.S. today. Men
are given automatic prestige for
aging: women are made to feel
ashamed of the natural process of
aging.
Come together,
Beatles urged
SAN FRANCISCO (CUP) — The
Committee to Reunite the Beatles
has announced the release of a
single titled Get Back Beatles.
The new tune will be performed
by Gerald Kinney and the New
York Bank on the Let It Be label
and all profits will go toward
convincing the infamous mop-tops
to come together again.
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481 4
In the same paper, Mushka
wrote an editorial denouncing the
Sheaf as an "ad-hungry twice
weekly monster."
Sheaf ad manager Glenn Craig
has accused Mushka and another
Shadowfax staffer of approaching
Sheaf advertisers, telling them the
Sheaf has been taken over by a
"communist faction," and asking
them to remove ads from the Sheaf
because students were no longer
reading the paper.
Since the split, the Sheaf staff
has reorganized in the form of a
collective, which holds twice-
weekly news conferences to decide
what stories should appear in the
paper and where they should be
placed and decides longer term
policy at weekly staff meetings.
The above story is not a news
story. It was written by a member
of the Sheaf collective in an attempt to explain what has been
happening at the Sheaf. Canadian
University Press, of which the
Sheaf is a member, is currently
compiling a chronicle of events at
the Sheaf, and a news story on
same will appear Friday.
rd
hair studio inc.
UNISEX HAIRSTYLES
FOR APPOINTMENT
224-1922
224-9116
5784 University (Next to Bank of Commerce)
UBC Alumni Chronicle
Creative Writing
Competition '76
TO PROVIDE RECOGNITION
OF CREATIVE WRITING
BY UBC STUDENTS
THE PRIZES . . .
* a total of $400, donated by the UBC Alumni Fund, is to be apportioned
at the discretion of the judges.
THE RULES.. .
* open to full-time and part-time registered UBC students.
* entries this year are restricted to short stories, previously unpublished.
* maximum length allowed is 3,000 words.
* entries are to be submitted in duplicate, typed double-spaced on white
paper.
* only one entry per student allowed.
THE DEADLINE. . .
* entries must be received at the UBC Alumni Association office, 6251
Cecil Green Park Road, Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1X8 (campus mail will
reach us) by January 31, 1977. A panel of writers and critics will judge
the stories and the winners will be announced in April.
* entries must be clearly identified with the author's name, student
number and an address and telephone number where contact can be
made in April.
* the author should retain a copy of the entry as the alumni association
assumes no responsibility for submitted manuscripts. However, we will
endeavor to return all entries which are accompanied by a self-addressed
envelope.
PUBLICATION . . .
* the winning entries become the property of the UBC Alumni Chronicle,
the association's quarterly magazine, and will be considered for
publication.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION .. .
* call or drop in to the UBC Alumni Association office at Cecil Green
Park, 228-3313.

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