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The Ubyssey Oct 28, 1975

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 SUB's food
scrutinized
—doug field photo
,      TESTING FOR CRAWLIES, microbiology grad student Mark Muller probes mysteries of alleged food sold in
Robert Bailey's SUB food services snack bar. Muller checks out a tuna sandwich while an infamous "quarter
pounder" (ah, but of what?) quivers on the sidelines awaiting its turn as a subject of scientific scrutiny.
. Hacks, rookies split election
By MARCUS GEE
A UBC microbiology grad
student is testing SUB cafeteria
snack bar food for bacterial contamination.
Mark Muller said Monday his
evaluation of hamburgers, tuna
and milkshakes will be the first
test for unhealthy amounts of
bacteria in cafeteria food.
"I was shocked to find they were
not doing routine analysis of SUB
food," Muller said. "The inspectors never look at food bacteria counts."
Muller said he is most concerned
about SUB snack bar hamburgers
which become susceptible to
bacterial growth when they are left
near human body temperatures
under an infra-red lamp.
Even if the amount of bacteria in
the meat is very small it can
multiply rapidly and render the
hamburger unfit for consumption,
he said.
Boundary health unit inspector
Susan Aikman confirmed Monday
that food served at SUB cafeteria
and other food services outlets has
never been tested.
"I would like to do lots of food
sampling around UBC but our labs
just do not have the facilities," she
said.
Aikman said previous inspections,' which occur annually,
have only dealt with handling and
serving of food services fare, not
with the bacteriological purity of
the food.
"I think our tests probably are
very superficial," she said.
Muller .said results of his tests
will be ready in a day or two,
whereupon he will send them to the
Boundary health unit for analysis.
Results and analysis will be
presented to food services within a
week, he said.
If the results show an extraordinary bacteria count Muller
said he will ask food services. to
take measures to eliminate the
high counts. But if food services
does not respond he said he would
use the results as "leverage" to
force the UBC operation to clean
up its act.
Aikman and Muller, who
collected the samples together
Monday, agreed it will be difficult
By SUE VOHANKA
Two weathered political hacks
and two inexperienced newcomers
were elected to Alma Mater
Society posts in Friday by-
elections.
• In what has become a standard
feature of student elections, only
1,290 of UBC's 22,000 eligible voters
had the energy to cast their ballots.
In an upset victory, newcomer
Bob Goodwin defeated former
AMS co-ordinator Lake Sagaris to
become external affairs  officer.
Dave Coulson, commerce rep on
council, became treasurer,
defeating CITR radio member
Ralph Bedford.
New co-ordinator is Nadine
McDonnell, an arts rep on council,
who won over Thomas Chan.
And Moe Sihota was elected
ombudsperson over Graham
Nicholls.
Former treasurer Dave
Theessen was earlier acclaimed
new internal affairs officer.
The by-election became
necessary after a rash of
resignations in the AMS executive
in September and early October.
Stew Savard resigned his external affairs post Sept. 10 because
he failed to be readmitted as a
student and was temporarily
replaced by Janet Neilson.
Former internal affairs officer
Jennifer Fuller resigned in mid-
September because of poor health.
Sagaris and Theessen resigned
their previous positions Oct. 2 after
deciding to run in the by-election.
And interim ombudsperson Dave
Johnson, chosen after Students'
Court ruled February's ombudsperson election invalid, said in
early October that he wouldn't
continue in the position.
Sagaris, McDonnell and Coulson
were running as members of the
Student Unity slate, which swept
six of the seven executive positions
in February's general election.
Sagaris said Monday she was
'"'shocked" by her defeat. She is an
executive member of. the B.C.
Students' Federation, and works
with the off-campus student
housing office in SUB.
Goodwin, who defeated her, said
in an all-candidates meeting
Thursday that, "in this political
arena, I'm a newcomer."
He apologized for his lack of
experience with student
organizations, adding that he is a
second-year student and as a first-
year student wasn't eligible for an
AMS executive position.
Sagaris said Monday she will
continue on the BCSF executive
until November, when her position
will be up for re-election.
. She also said she will continue
her work with the National Union
of Students to promote student representation on government
financial aid committees.
She said she also plans to continue working for the off-campus
housing office, and with attempting to reduce student
unemployment.
"I'm certainly not going to give
See page 2: RESULTS
>\i
Shrunken budget seen
Universities Council chairman
William Armstrong said Monday
the federal government's wage
controls will not mean more money
for other segments of university
budgets.
He said the council will probably
have-to draw up budgets for B.C.'s
three public universities on the
basis of 10 percent wage increases,
instead of the much higher ones
budgeted for before Trudeau's
controls.
Finance minister Dave Stupich
had earlier implied that money
originally set aside for predicted
double-digit wage increases would
be freed for other use by the
universities.
However, Armstrong called this
possibility "most unlikely."
The Universities Council coordinates and prepares for
presentation to the cabinet the
budget requests of UBC, Simon
Fraser University and the
University of Victoria. .
They were submitted Oct. 15.
to determine if the foods are
dangerously contaminated
because there are no federal
standards for bacteria levels in
cooked meats.
Muller said: "The whole hassle
is interpreting results. All I have to
go by are proposed standards."
Tests are aimed at determining
whether high counts of fecal and.
aerobic bacteria are present in the
food, he said.
SUB cafeteria manager Denis
Zomar said snack bar hamburgers
have been tested before but did not
say when.
Zomar, who became SUB food
services manager at the end of
August, said the Boundary health
unit has checked SUB food many
times.
He said the health inspectors
take away different food items
each of the "five, six, seven or
eight times" they inspect the
cafeteria every year. But he said
he does not know where the food
goes or what health officials do
with it.
But Aikman denies health officials have taken food services
items to public laboratories.
"To my knowledge we have not
recently or in the past taken food
items from UBC or taken bacterial
counts of food," she said.
Zomar said hamburgers in SUB
snack bar are not left beneath
infra-red warmers long enough to
allow bacteria to proliferate. He
sa|d one and a half hours is the
longest most hamburgers stay in
the warmer.
Food services head Robert
Bailey said he is not aware of
Muller's study.
But he said food services is
."constantly checking", its
operation for cleanliness. Food
services has conducted tests on the
food it serves in the past by sending
samples to authorities on the UBC
campus but there has been no
evidence the food is contaminated,
Bailey said.
Muller criticized the B.C.
government's "primitive" food
standards and health regulations.
He said municipal organizations
like the Boundary health unit are
left to do most of the testing of food
outlets despite their inadequate
facilities.
Davis asks for permanent
off-campus housing office
By HEATHER WALKER
The student-run off-campus
housing office will continue to
operate at least until December,
administration vice-president
Erich Vogt said Monday.
Acting housing head Michael
Davis has recommended to the
university administration that
funds be provided to operate the
office permanently, Vogt said.
Vogt said the administration will
not make any decision on Davis'
recommendation until a report on
the office prepared by.its staff, is
presented. The report is due Nov.
20.
"No decision will be made on the
off-campus housing office until we
get that report," Vogt said.
However, neither Vogt or Davis
would comment on the. amount of
the permanent housing office
budget request.
Dave Johnson, a spokesman for
the off-campus housing office, said
that Davis' report asks for. a
housing co-ordinator, a secretary,
and several student assistants.
Johnson said he did not know
what Davis' budget proposals
were.
Johnson said the report which
the office is to submit to Vogt and
Davis asks that the office be kept
open on a permanent year-round
basis.
They will also submit a budget
proposal, but do not yet know how
large it will be.
"We'll ask for either five full-
time people or three full-time
people and a number of part-time
people. This will come to a total of
175 working hours per week," said
Johnson.
An interim report presented
earlier to Vogt and Davis by the
office proposed a budget of $44,000
based on a staff of four — two full-
time employees at $12,000 per year
and two part-time employees at
$6,000 per year. But Johnson said
he "couldn't say" how this budget
would compare with his next
budget.
The office is also recommending
a change in its listing service in its
report.
"We want it to be a matching
service rather than a listing service," Johnson said.
"We plan to operate on a key sort
system," he said.
In a key sort system, cards are
filed with different specifications
for housing, and the student then
looks at the file for the type of
housing he "wants, Johnson said. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 28, 1975
PEI classes boycotted
CHARLOTTETOWN (CUP) -
Students at the University of
Prince Edward Island are blocking
university entrances and
boycotting classes in support of
maintenance workers on strike
here since Oct. 17.
At a meeting Sunday the
students voted unanimously to
continue a boycott of classes which
began after a referendum last
week in which students decided to
stage a two-day walkout in favor of
worker demands.
The striking workers, electrical
workers, carpenters, truck drivers
and grounds keepers, are seeking
better wages and working conditions.
Most earn $4,700 a year and are
seeking an increase of $1.25 an
hour, which would raise the lowest
salary to $7,500.
The university has offered them
$6,300.
University president Ronald
Baker claims student fees would
have to be raised to meet the
strikers' demands.
Although the students are on the
picket line, many are concerned
about the threat to their education
the boycott of classes poses.
According to student union vice-
president Tom Hayward, many of
the classes are in the midst of
writing mid-term examinations.
While the students remain in
sympathy with the workers,
Hayward says he does not think
they can continue the boycott for
any length of time.
The workers and the university
are scheduled to meet again at
which t|me the students will meet
to discuss the progr.ess of the
negotiations and decide whether to
continue their boycott or not.
Meanwhile the students are
picketing classrooms where
sessions continue and are marching on the provincial buildings in
continued support for the striking
workers.
Acid trip vaccine found
SAN FRANCISCO (ZNS-CUP) —
Medical researchers, believe it or
not, have developed a vaccination
against LSD trips.
Medical World News reDorts the
"anti-acid" .vaccination is the
work  of  microbiology  professor
Results
From page 1
up   all   the   work   I've   done   to
someone else," she said.
Final election tallies are:
External affairs officer:
Bob Goodwin
Lake Sagaris
Treasurer:
Dave Coulson
Ralph Bedford
Co-ordinator:
Nadine McDonnell
Thomas Chan
Ombudsperson:
MoeSihota
Graham Nicholls
634
550
685
486
735
509
712
551
Edward Voss of the University of
Illinois.
The vaccination has been tried
only on animals thus far; it has
been used successfully to bring
quick ends" to "trips" being experienced by laboratory rabbits
and mice.
Doctor Voss suggests that it can,
be injected into humans to treat a
person who is suffering from an
unpleasant LSD experience.
But the Village Voice, says "The
government will probably start
vaccinating high school kids so
that they'll never be able to get a
high."
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] Tuesday, October 28, 1975
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Vogt upholds status quo
When administration president Doug
Kenny moved into office July 1, he brought
with him four vice-presidents. Their
salaries, together with Kenny's, cost B.C.
taxpayers a total of $275,200 a year.
Arethese men [no women here, of course]
worth it?
-     Ubyssey    reporter    Mark    Buckshon
recently conducted two interviews with o'ne.
of them, Erich Vogt. Decide for yourself.
By MARK BUCKSHON
i UBC vice-president Erich Vogt claims he
provides "a great deal of consideration" to
student services and faculty affairs.
That is what his job title — "vice-
president of student and faculty affairs" —
says he is supposed to do.
Interviews with a student newspaper
reporter are part of his job. Preserving the
power of the president's office and of senior
faculty is another part.
In recent interviews, Vogt hinted at the
importance of the latter function. No
mention was made of student power, mainly
because it doesn't really exist . . . and with
people like Vogt in power, it will likely
remain that way.
• Vogt's formal responsibilities include
watching over student housing, food services, counselling and placement, ap-
" pointment of new profs and liaison with the
Alma Mater Society and the B.C. Medical
Centre.
The responsibilities aren't altogether new.
But at UBC they've never before been
consolidated under one person.
VOGT .. . students as 'clients'
Vogt took the post last summer during
new administration president Doug Kenny's
high level restructuring of the university
administration. Before then he was a
physics prof actively involved in the Tri-
University   Meson   Facility (TRIUMF).
Vogt is, he says, "a male inlhe middle of
my menopause." He says he is a pacifist and
optimist.
". . .and more than anything else I'm the
sort of person that, as my wife says,
someday I'm going to enter hell carrying a
tennis racquet and wearing swimming
trunks."
Now he is one of the most senior and,
though he won't admit it, most powerful
people on the campus.
"I don't view the president's office as
being ... a sort of absolute authority sitting
in a godlike position and making all the
decisions," he said.
At another point in the interview he emphasized: "I don't believe, I personally
don't believe at all in any sort of monolithic
structure for student services."        ,   -
Later he asked rhetorically: "Where does
the power in the campus reside?"
"It resides largely in the faculties and
departments," he answered to himself.
But there are four vice-presidents under
Kenny, while his predecessor, Walter Gage,
had only two deputies. (One, William Armstrong, moved to the B.C. Universities
Council. Bursar William White became one
of Kenny's four vice-presidents.)
That, Vogt says, means there is more time
for the president's office to scrutinize the
university and watch over its people.
"Things like student housing,  the food
services, the bookstore, some 'of them
reported to someone in finance, for instance,
rather than someone that had directly to do
with students," he said.
"The way they reported before to the
president's office was perhaps in many
ways efficient but it didn't lead to a great
deal of consideration where student services
were going."
But when the conversation rolls around to
student representation, Vogt reveals his
true self: an ardent preserver of the status
quo with a condescending attitude toward
the same students whose fees pay part of his
$54,800 per year salary.
He speaks of students as "clients" with
some right to involvement in services he
claims are of direct interest to them — food
services and residences.
"I think there are certain areas such as
residences and the bookstore where
students are interested and should be involved," he.said.
But the answer is a flat "no" to allowing
students on tenure and promotion committees.
These are the committees which, using
essentially arbitrary standards, meet
behind closed doors to decide who will or
will not teach students at UBC.
They are not interested in, do not solicit
opinions of, and do not answer to students
once they have reached a decision.
Students, Vogt says, should "contribute
toward teaching evaluation."
But when it comes to evaluating other
concerns — research and university administration — students have nothing to
contribute, according to Vogt.
Meanwhile, without any student involvement and acting in conjunction with
senate appointments committee and senior
profs and deans, Vogt can push through or
hold back faculty appointments.
His power shows clearly in this job of
approving or. rejecting almost every new
teaching appointment in every department
and faculty.
Vogt emphasized that the appointments
must be initiated by the deans and faculties
and he doesn't have the power to "just arbitrarily veto appointments."
But. . .
"Now, if there is something odd about the
appointment —" you know there could be
many things, the salary, the term of appointment, the title, the benefits — many
things are unusual.
"And I have to then use my judgment as to
whether or not I disagree with the depart-
mentand take it up with them to correct it."
The Ubyssey asked Vogt: "How often do
you go back to the faculty and say: ;look,
there's something troubling me about
this?' "
Vogt: "With appointme t forms, I would
say roughly one or two* day. But maybe
that's an exaggeration. Maybe one or two,
three or four a week is better."
Ubyssey: "How many (appointment
forms) come across your desk?"
Vogt: "Forms and things, I'd say about to
10 a day."
Ubyssey: "On how many, after consulting, is a change made?"
Vogt: "Almost all. Certainly sometimes
the faculty will convince me that the
arrangement they were proposing in the
first place is the right one, simply that it
wasn't explained well enough. . . . But more
often, I guess more often in a case of
disagreement we (the president's office)
were right.
"I guess the president's office sits in the
position where it should be right more often
because it has a more global view of the
appointment problem."
Students have a narrow and restricted
view, he claims.
But a much deeper power exists in the
conferences between Kenny and his four
vice-presidents.
Vogt admitted, "perhaps a place where
the president's office has some power" is in
encouraging the expansion of some
departments or faculties at the expense of
others.
Students, again, have little direct involvement in this process.
"In principle, when a person leaves or
retires, (the) position could revert to the
university administration and you could
change appointments from one department
or even one faculty to another."
Ubyssey: "Is that happening?"
Yogt: "Yes, that's happening."
Ubyssey: "Can you tell me how?"
Vogt: "I think in all such cases . . . you
know it is the deans and the departments
who really lead and the president's office is
here in a sense to support their initiatives."
Ubyssey: "Well, who is being supported
by the president's office?"
Vogt: "Well, the budgets of all the deans
and faculties go through the president's
office."
Ubyssey: "Can you be specific and name
names?"
Vogt: "I think that's very difficult to do. I
think that. . . I would say that the
president's office would intercede very
rarely in transferring budget lots or
positions from one faculty to another.
"You know we've come through a period
of about 20 years of growth in which, if you
wanted to change the university, you did it
by the areas in which you gave increments
(extra funds).
"Now, as the university is approaching a
steady state in the number of people that are
there, you of.course don't have that option
open to you.
"Therefore it is (now) more important to
the campus to exercise options it wasn't
necessary to exercise before ... to look at
priorities."
Vogt said much of the responsibility for
setting long-term priorities lies with a
second new vice-president, Michael Shaw,
and referred The Ubyssey to him for more
details.
How does Vogt use his power?
Sometimes he has to clamp down on
persons responsible to him, but that kind of
hard-nosed behaviour, he says, is rare.
"You asked me some examples of
whether people always listen to me," he
said.
"Occasionally people will listen to me but
it certainly happens that I make mistakes
and that people then come and argue with
them and sometimes convince me that I'm
not right."
He did clamp down, he says, on some
people in the residence administration who
last summer erroneously allowed some
students who shouldn't have been admitted
to take rooms.
The residence officials decided, in spite of
having already offered the rooms, to reject
the previously accepted applicants.
Vogt ordered that the students be allowed
to stay.
"In that case my voice was strong enough
to persuade them tha't I was right," he said.
Vogt criticized a Ubyssey article last
month which quoted him as saying he would
take no action on a rape petition.
He claimed the Ubyssey made a "false
caricature" by implying he didn't want to do
anything about rape.
But the result of the newspaper story was
a tour of dark spots on campus and a
promise to attempt to find money for additional lighting and security patrols.
Why was Vogt chosen for the job?
"You'll have to ask Doug Kenny that
question," he answered. "I think my guess
is that Doug wanted to choose people who
had a solid academic.base and people whom
he could work with.
"And he found I was one of the people —
there were many people on campus — he
could work with well. I've certainly found
that to be true."
Vogt says he will leave the minute Kenny
doesn't want him around.
"I  feel  I'm here to  help  Kenny's  administration and if we were not tahit it off-
the slightest hint of that, I would be happy to
go back as a professor."
Vogt says that when he is through being
vice-president, he holds no ambition to be
president'himself:
"I don't perceive, I don't understand,
people who enter a job like this with the
intention of sticking at it indefinitely.
"I'm going to keep my foot firmly in my
academic background.
"Nothing would make me happier than to
be merely a professor.
And I'm keeping up, hopefully, with my
graduate students and am going to continue
to do some teaching.
"I think that he (Kenny) felt that I did
have this very deep interest in students and
teaching and that he wanted to have people
in his office working with him who did have
that kind of feeling about the university."
"I'll be happy at any time to back to that.
And I'm gojng to act in the president's office
as though I can do that at any time."
What does Vogt think of himself?
"Different people, I guess, have different
views of themselves.  I think that I'm a
VOGT .. . looking in
person who's very enthusiastic about things
and has an irrational fondness for teaching.
"I still do teach. I have a strong commitment ... a strong feeling about research.
And I'm a work addict and probably have
more energy than's good for me.
"Doug Kenny will tell you I'm always
running across campus, never walking,
which is ti*ue.
"I tend to be a person who expresses
himself.too forcefully at times for his own
good, probably also too openly. I'm not the
sort of person who plays games With people
very well."
Aicouple of seconds of silence.
"And also, perhaps the thing I care about
most is to improve this university
academically.
'T think that a university is not a Marxist
seminary — it's a very complex thing which
looks at a very wide range of problems and
has to be flexible,-has to change with them,
but above all its people are good if its people
are first class.
"And that's easier to judge in some
disciplines than in others. But even overall
it's possible the university is the place
where one more or less pursues those
subjects in which it's possible to decide at
least partly what are good ideas and what
are not.
"And I think it's a good place if there are
people who have first class ideas and are
capable of first class ideas.
"And I'd like to make this a university
where - or help make the university where
(there are) even more, even better people." Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 28, 1975
Corporate interests bared
Blackmail.
That's the game B.C. supermarkets are playing when they try
to weasel around premier Dave
Barrett's food price controls implemented last week.
A lot of food will not be on the
shelves under Barrett's controls, the
supermarkets cry. Nutrition and
health to the winds, they imply.
■m Let 'em (the public) starve — our
profits come first.
This is the kind of mentality
behind the operations of these
supermarkets like Safeway and
Super-Valu which are revealed during their objections to the
provincial government's economic
plan.
Everyone, including the federal
government, expects the wage
earners of Canada to freeze their
incomes   —   that   is  to   sell   their
commodity (labor) at a controlled
rate.
But What the wet-noodle Liberal
cabinet failed to do was ensure that
business — especially big business
like supermarkets, banks, oil
companies and mortgage firms —
also be subjected to the same
control.
This is why the Barrett clan
■moved to shore up the weak and
?R0G&£SSj?
By "poplar" demand; getting rid of dead wood .
unfair federal 'anti-inflation'
legislation.
And then comes the crocodile
tears from business. If it means
cutting into profits to sell food
lower, so be it.
And that goes for a lot of other
firms as well, like some drug store
owners who also predict empty
shelves under the B.C. controls.
Unlike the federal program, the
plan here relies on the public being
on its toes to report any flagrant
violations to the consumer affairs
department. There is no B.C.
anti-inflation board to make sure
business adheres to the new
controls.
Judging from the initial reaction
of some of these companies, the
public had better be alert.
When company spokespeople
speak out about the Barrett
controls listen closely. It's one of
the few times you'll actually" hear
them talk about their first priority
— money (profits) and not a service
to the public.
Don't be sucked in by this
blatant case of blackmail. Any
company that threatens to -let its
shelves go bare should be boycotted
immediately.
But do pay attention to the
company complaints. It shows
where their interests really lie.
Staff tv anted
This is an editorial calling for
staff.
That's not staff as in infection
(staph) mind you. It means staff for
The Ubyssey - reporters,
photographers, cartoonists, and
anyone else who can help us put
out our sterling publication.
The Ubyssey is an equal
opportunity employer — we'll take
virtually anyone and turn him or
her or it into a first rate journalist.
Come and join us anytime, SUB
241-K.
Letters
T~Cup
complaint
I am writing regarding the
inaccurate and incredibly brief
Teacup football article reported in
The Ubyssey Oct. 24.
The short caption about the
game ended with "Nurses win 14-8.
Yahoo!" The accurate score of the
annual ■ nurses versus home
economics game was 14-8 for the
"home wreckers."
This annual event is a tradition
on campus and involves approximately 80 girls as well as
volunteer practising in order to
display an exciting and interesting
football game.
Also any proceeds from the
game go to a worthy cause, in this
case the crippled children's fund.
In conclusion such flimsy and
inaccurate coverage both before
andafter the contest exhibits poor,
lazy journalism and does no justice
to all those involved. •
Hugh Mackinnon
education 3
assistant coach of
home ec teacup football team
The reason there was no
coverage in advance of the T-Cup
was no one connected with the
game bothered to contact The
Ubyssey sports staff about it ahead
of time.
A result of lazy organization of
the game.
No one covered the game
because no sports writer was interested in it. You see Mr.
MacKinnon all our staff are
volunteers. We don't order any'one
to do anything.
As a result coverage is limited to
snorts in which the staff is interested. This is why there have
been numerous appeals for additional staff. That is not poor
journalism, it is a fact of life.
We do, however, apologize for
the inaccurate score.
Letters should be addressed to
the paper care of campus mail or
dropped off at The Ubyssey office,
SUB 241-K.
Although an effort is made to
publish all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
letters for reasons of brevity,
legality  grammar or taste.
Pen names will be used when the
writer's real name is also included
for our information in the letter or
when valid reasons for anonymity
are given.
Fire
Thank you for drawing attention
to the emergency procedures for
SUB.
This memo (Ubyssey, Oct. 23) is
an update of an existing procedure
developed over the last six years in
co-operation with the RCMP
university patrol, fire department,
physical plant, Canadian forces
and building staff. It is directed
mainly at staff and service areas,
thus the reference to cash and
equipment.
In no case does this take more
time than to pull a switch or take a
key from a cash register. This
shuts down operating machinery
(a potential hazard) and prevents
the customers cleaning out the
cash register (it has happened.)
As students are responsible for
the operation  of SUB  the Alma
THE UBYSSEY
OCTOBER 28, 1975
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and' not of the
AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly
commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are
located in room, 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; Advertising,
228-3977. Editor: Gary Coull
"You people are all such assholes," quoth Marcus Gee. "Why can't
you guys be nice to each other?" So, since we have close to 70 mastheads a
hear, we can spare one in wtiich we're nice to everybody.
Ralph Maurer always brushes his teeth. Mark Lepitre, Tom Barnes,
Cedric Tetzel and Larry Hill have good table manner, and Carl Vesterback
never eats in the bath tub, as far as we know. Gary Coull and Doug
Rushton have neat wheels and give people rides lots of times. Doug Field
and Matt King will gladly give directions to any stranger who asks, and
Mark Buckshon returns library books on time. Anne Wallace never raises
her voice in anger. Heather Walker and Brian Novak always have a nice
word   for  everybody,  and Sue Vohanka  bakes good  bread.
Mater Society is always first on
any notification list concerning the
building.' In this case AMS building
staff.
Memos of this type cannot
possibly cover all contingencies
and in no way are intended to override common sense. In this case it
was felt that the emergency
telphone list and accident information would be useful and
deserved wider circulation.
I appreciate your concern for
safety in SUB.
Graeme Vance
SUB building manager
Beef
An open letter to the Rec UBC
attendant working Oct. 21, 4:30
p.m. in the new education gyms:
It is ali very fine for you to kick
people out of the facilities for
illegally using them (non-
possession of a Rec UBC card), but
anyone, such as you mate, who
stomps across gym floors in hard-
soled hiking boots, and, leaves the
equipment cage which is full of
equipment wide open and unattended, with an open money box on
the counter, whilst completing
your duty, ought to be fired for
disrespect and irresponsibility.
Katherine J. Ourom
recreation 3 Tuesday, October 28, 1975
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
soopbox
mz^mmmmm^m::^;}^mm!mmsi
'NUS should expand goals'
By JAKE van der KAMP
The frame of mind in which a
delegate goes to a National Union
of Students conference is not
necessarily the frame of mind in
which that delegate returns.
I went to the October NUS
conference with intentions of
seeing NUS further regionalized
and concentrating more of its time
and energy in B.C. This was my
primary interest although I was
also interested in evaluating NUS'
performance in student aid, post-
secondary financing and CRTG
policy on student radio.
Van der Kamp, Alma Mater
Society president, returned from
the NUS conference in Fredericton
last week and prepared the
following report to be presented at
Wednesday's student council
meeting. Parts of his report have
been edited for space reasons.
I'll deal with the regionalizaiioii
issue first. At this time, three years
after its founding, NUS is an
organization that can be compared
to tightrope walkers doing their
stunts without a balancing pole.
The organization's continued
existence is far from assured.
The main reason for this is the
continued divisiveness among NUS
members. NUS is torn by regional
affiliations, west versus east; size
affiliations, small colleges versus
large universities; and political
affiliations; right versus left. If
NUS members adhere to these
affiliations on the national level the
organization is doomed.
I believe, after having attended
the conference, that UBC has not
had a bad deal out of NUS. Lwas
quite surprised during the
workshops and Caucuses to find
that the Ontario Federation of
Students was annoyed at the lack
of contact it has had with NUS. In
the past five months, no NUS
personnel have spent any time with
Ontario institutions.
If B.C. is complaining about
getting no returns for what it puts
into NUS, the Atlantic, Ontario and
the Prairies complain just as much
if not more.
The reason for the general
complaint is that the NUS staff and
central committee are busy at this
time trying to get the $1 fee
referendum passed at member
institutions. At this point .eight
institutions with a combined study
body of 45,000 have passed the
referendum.
Only the" "University of Alberta
has turned it down. Sixteen more
referendums, including UBC's, are
scheduled to be held before the end
of May. If they all pass NUS will
have a budget of $180,000 next year.
The general attitude at the conference was that NUS can only
survive the existing extensive
factionalism if it has its membership approved by referendum
and has a guaranteed fee levy. Let
me state again that NUS'
organized existence is not assured.
The impression you will have
had from my report so far is that
all my reservations about NUS are
gone. That is not true. I have
considerable reservations, in fact,
more than I had when I left for this
conference. These reservations
deal primarily with the effect of
the $1 fee referendum.
I'll state first that NUS, with a
budget of $180,000 can and will do a
considerable amount of work. Its
lack of success so far is directly
attributable to the great amount of
energy that has to go into
organizing it. Remember that
successive national unions have
failed. If this one is to sticceed,
three years of organizational work
is not exorbitant.
But what.I'm worried about is
that NUS will be an effective lobby
for. issues that deal only with
student financing and that, I
believe, is much too narrow a
perspective. I think we all like to be
consistent in our views. Right now
we may favor free tuition and free
housing for students, goals that lie
at the basis of the national union's
philosophy.
Butwhen we have left university
AGRICULTURE
GRADS!
WANTED:
ASSISTANT DISTRICT
AGRICULTURALISTS
Alberta Agriculture is currently recruiting for the above
positions. If you are graduating with a B.Sc. in Agriculture with
course work of a general nature including animal science, plant
science, soil science and some specialization in agricultural
economics and farm management, we would like to talk to you.
Courses in agricultural engineering, horticultural science, rural
sociology and communications will be an asset. You must be
eligible for membership in the Alberta institute of Agrologists
and be able to provide an automobile for business travel.
How to Apply:
Read the career literature and the Alberta Agriculture poster in
the campus Placement Office. Written applicants must be
submitted no later than November 5, 1975.
YOUR FUTURE
OUR FUTURE
Liberia
GOVERNMENT (
for several years these goals will
be, at best very minor concerns.
We're much more likely to be
concerned with such things as drug
addiction, destruction of the environment, prisons and
rehabilitation, mental illness,
women's rights, the national
economy and a host of other
concerns.
If such issues will be important
several years from now, are they
not important right at this
moment? Should we, while at
university, concentrate on free
tutition to the exclusion of other
issues that affect all society and do
so more deeply than tuition fees
affect students?
Personally, I think one junkie
has more problems than 10,000
students whodon't like their tuition
fees. And personally, I think it will
do the Alma Mater Society no
harm to spend time on issues such
as drug addiction by promoting
discussion of them and encouraging the university to spend
money in research on those issues.
I also think NUS could be an ef
fective co-ordinating for such a
drive in all Canadian universities.
But it appears that is not the
route NUS is taking and that's why
I have some reservations. Two
years from now I'd hate to think
that the NUS I supported is
spending a large amount of money
to lobby for an easier life for
students when compared to other
groups in our society students have
it comparatively easy.
In addition I'm not convinced
that free tuition will do much for
universal accessibility. The
economic barriers to university
are not that harsh right now and
the reasons for the prevailing
middle-class composition of
university students lie much
deeper than tuition fees.
In my' opinion, NUS should
restrict itself to eradicating injustices in federal programs that
affect students. For example, the
Canada student loan stipulation
about dependent and independent
students is unjust and should be
fought at the federal level. But
lobbying for large scale changes
that would substantially decrease
direct costs to students should go
on the back burner so long as we
still have such things as young kids
under their teens with no parents to
speak of facing a life of misery
because their upbringing has taken
other options away from them.
I'm pessimistic. With a budget of
$180,000 NUS will be able to take its
lobby off the back burner and start
hitting the federal government for
an easy life for students. It will
happen unless we are very
cautious and sure that the students
who follow us will also be cautious.
I'm in favor of holding that
referendum but I want to make
sure that we don't hoodwink the
students when we do it. If NUS is
only to be a federal- lobby we
shouldn't have any part of it. On
the other hand, if it is to be a union
with broad societal concerns, we
should tell the students that instead
of giving them a sales pitch along
the lines of look what we can do for
you. We should also tell NUS that a .
narrow lobby is not to be the result
of a successful referendum.
if
^
Greyhound...
a lot more
than just a bargain.
Greyhound's low economy fares — what a reasonable price to pay for all this: air-
conditioned, restroom-equipped Scenicruiser, tinted panoramic picture windows,
luxurious reclining armchair seats, safety-trained professional driver, frequent no
reservations service and miles and miles of beautiful close-up scenery.
FROM VANCOUVER
TO
TRIPS DAILY
FARE
KELOWNA
3
$11.20
PENTICTON
5
9.50
TORONTO
2
86.75
PRINCE GEORGE
3
18.75
MONTREAL
2.
91.70
KAMLOOPS
47/77/74
5
Wacom..
9.35
7 days of
_   travel freedom
^LaniiomrHQO *76.
Add 3% if travelling in U.S.A.
■  Ask about 15, 30 and 60 day Ameripass packages, too.
For travel information, call your local Greyhound agent at: 683-2421.
GREYHOUND CANADA
^^ Leave the driving to us. Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 28, 1975
Hot flashes
Trudeau's
turkey
Not everybody — even in the
upper middle class — thinks
Trudeau's Thanksgiving turkey,
the wage and price controls, is
what the doctor ordered.»
Economics profs Robert Evans,
Stuart Jamieson, Jonathan
Kesselman and Philip Neher will
get together Thursday, take sides
and natter at one another on the
cons and  supposed   pros  of the
alleged controls.
It's a two-hour discussion, so
bring a1unch_and plan to^skip that
boring lecture and wander over to
Buchanan 202. You might learn a
great deal ... or catch up on your
sleep.
Good God
Hello, theological students out
there.
The   people   with   the   money
A   <    *^ **•&.,' *~*jf   **'    % y*r*f$<~?' <
haven't forgotten you — there's a
fellowship award just waiting for
you to apply.
All you have to do to qualify is
be' under 31 years old, have a
bachelor's degree and profess an
interest in becoming a person of
the cloth (a reverend, not a
tailor).
For more information phone
228-2721 or, if you're hungry,
come to a dinner at 6 p.m., Nov.
10 at the grad student centre.
'Tween classes
TODAY
STUDENTS' INTERNATIONAL
MEDITATION SOCIETY
Introductory   lecture,   8   p.m.,   Bu.
232.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Dinner     meeting,      6:30     p.m.,
Lutheran Campus Centre.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Dr. Hunt on emergency ward, noon,
IRC 1.
GAY PEOPLE
Women's drop  in,  noon, SUB  230.
KAYAK AND CANOE CLUB
Meeting, noon, SUB 205.
PRO-LIFE SOCIETY
Meeting, noon, SUB 117.
CHARISMATIC
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Prayer and sharing, noon, Lutheran
Campus Centre conference room.
WEDNESDAY
NEWMAN CLUB
Meeting, noon, SUB 125.     »
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
ORGANIZATION
Testimony     meeting,     noon,    SUB
113.
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
Meeting  to   discuss   finances,  noon,
Angus 24.
CLASSICS DEPARTMENT
Lecture   on   aims   and   methods  of
HELP YOURSELF
TO HIGHER GRADES
LARGEST SELECTION IN B.C. OF
* COLES NOTES
100 Titles
* MONARCH NOTES
300 Titles
*SCHAUMS OUTLINES
60 Titles
* COLLEGE NOTES
50 titles
All available from
IVancouver. B.C
4393 W. 10th Ave.
Some diamonds
were born
to be
a cut above
and Ben Moss
has them
6 diamond bridal set in white
or yellow gold
Engagement Ring  $375
Wedding Ring  s110
%ZBm cjlloss
<Jeuelters
Pacific Centre
Oakridge Shopping
Centre
Philip   and   Alexander,   3:30   p.m.,
Bu. 205.
DEAN OF WOMEN FREESEE
Film,   the   Ascent   of   Man,   noon,
SUB auditorium.
CANADIAN COUNCIL ON
CHILDREN AND YOUTH
Public  forum  on  planning  for  play
in   our urban environment,  8  p.m.,
VCC, Langara campus A130.
KUNG FU CLUB
Practiqf,    4:30   to   6:30   p.m.,   SUB
ballroom. I
ENGLISH DEPARTMENT
Poet  A. J. M. Smith reads from his
works, noon, Bu. 202.
STUDENTS' INTERNATIONAL
MEDITATION SOCIETY .
Introductory  lecture,  noon,  IRC 3.
VARSITY OUTDOORS CLUB
Meeting     to    discuss    constitution,
slide show, noon, Angus 104.
OPEN HOUSE '76
Organizational   meeting   for   under-
gradute society  open  house  reps, b
p.m., SUB 215.
THURSDAY
SKI CLUB/VOC
Used   equipment   buy   and   sell,  all .
day, SUB 211-213.
CANADIAN COUNCIL ON
CHILDREN AND YOUTH
Polly   Hill,   CMHC   hack,   on   playgrounds, noon, education 204.
DEAN OF WOMEN FREESEE
Free    Pacific     Woodwind    Quintet
concert, noon, old auditorium.
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY
Clinic   tour,   12:45   p.m.,   2732  W.
Broadway.
AMS ART GALLERY COMMITTEE
Poetry  reading  by  Cathy  Ford  and"-
Peg   McKinlay,   noon,   SUB  art  gallery.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Film:   Road to Armageddon, noon,
SUB 207-209.
Get the truth about your
hair with a hair analysis.
We i,in tell .i lot j bo Lit your hair by
working with it. But hair .maK-i^.
five's i!-- thi' iiT-aJe Morv ^ ien ti hi. a liv.
shou-- the ^tate ot vour hair'^ structure, it shtnv'- u^ 'what vour h/ur neeeU
to help make it look its best.
Simplv lomo in and till out an RK
Hair Analysis Questionnaire. A
sample ot your hair is examined
mil. rosLopieallv. Later, we'll ^how vou
a magnified photograph ot vour hair
and discuss the Imdings with you.
Our s'hop Hair Analysis Program,
operated in lonjunetion with Redken
Laboratories, helps lis recondition
your hair and keep it in top shape.
Call for a hair analysis appointment
today.
APPOINTMENT SERVICE
3644 WEST 4th AVE., AT ALMA
731-4191
FREESEE
CONCERT SERIES
Presented by the Office of the Dean of Women in co-operation
with the Department of Music and assisted by trie Alumni
Association.
First Concert
PACIFIC WOODWIND
QUINTET
, Program.
Elliot Carter:
Heitor Villa-Lobos:
Anton Reicha:
Woodwind Quintet (1948)
Chorus No. 2(1924)
Quintetto Opus 88 No. 4
Thursday, October 30, 1975
Old Auditorium
12:40-1:40 p.m.
FREE FREE
OCTOBERFEUST
Dance to 'Alpine Echo'
Friday Oct. 31 -1975
8:30 p.m. - 12:30 a.m.
SUB BALLROOM
Admission $4.75 includes a large mug (15 o?.) and five refills.
ADVANCE TICKETS ONLY
AMS TICKET OFFICE
Note: Limited number of tickets available.
NO TICKETS SOLD AT DOOR
hair studio inc.
UNISEX HAIRSTYLES
FOR APPOINTMENT
224-1922
5784 University (Next to Bank of Commerce)
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 25c. •
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 day $1.80; additional tines
40c. Additional days $1.50 & 35c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
5 — Coming . Events
40 — Messages
SKI CLUB - V.O.C.
GRAND RIPOFF SALE
Thurs., Oct. 30 (all day) in SUB 211/
213. Sell your old skis, boots, packs.
Whatever. Bring equipment to SUB
18F or 216*= any noon hour prior to
the sale, OR to SUB 211/213 on the
day  of  the  Ripoffl
FREESEE   —   Thursday,   October   30th.
■Pacific     Woodwind      Quintet.    JTree   ;
concert,   Old   Auditorium,   12:40 - 1:40
p.m. |
—»	
WANT   TO   GAMBLE?   Don't  Mortgage
your hooks.   Come   to RENO   NIGHT,
Sat., Nov. 1, 7:00 p.m. SUB Ballroom.
$2.50 admission & 5,000 commbucks to   ^
gamble with . . . Commerce & guests   I
tickets in Angus 302C at noon. I
Canada Student Loans
Bank  of  Montreal
Are you one of the 400 who
haven't done it yet?
If you had a . Canada Student Loan
last year and are not obtaining one
/his year before 31 October, 1975,
Schedule 2, Confirmation of Enroll
ment, must be delivered to the Bank,
soonest. Interest will be payable
after 1 November, 1975. Hurry and
pick up a Schedule 2 at B. of M. SUB
LIVE RADIO COMEDY! Dr. Bundolo's
Pandemonium Medicine Show, Thursday, Oct. 30,  12:30 p.m. It's FREE!
10— For Sale — Commercial
11 — For Sale — Private
1965 DODOE. Good running condition.
Ring 525-4219.
ROTEL RX-6500 RECEIVER, brand new,
12 month guarantee, $400 or best
offer. 224-9679 Ron, .message.
65 — Scandals
20 — Housing
LIVE-IN STUDEMt REQUIRED. Room
& board in exchange for babysitting.
261-0746 after 4:00 p.m.
2-BR.   COTTAGE,   POINT   ROBERTS   —
$150   a   month,   for   further   information — 224-5874.
30 - Jobs
70 — Services
PERMANENT HAIR removal by Electrolysis Kree Method in my home.
Prices are reasonable. Phone 738-6960.
80 — Tutoring
WANT   TO    HOWL   ON    HALLOW'EN?
Do it at the Cage Hallowe'en Party,
K Fraternity, 2280 Wesbrook Crescent, Oct 31, 8 P m. Admission 75c.
Free with costume. Full facilities.
Don't miss it!
THE ALTERNATIVE Alternative "THE
CENTRE." A coffee house in the best
tradition of coffee houses. Opens with
FRED BOOKER Nov. 7. Univ. Blvd. &
Wesbrook Cres. — Lutheran Campus
Centre.  $1.00 cover.
HALLOWEEN EXTRAVAGANZA, come
see Dr. Bundolo scare himself this
Thursday, Oct. 30, 12:30, SUB Theatre.
It's FREE!
85 —Typing
FAST, EFFICIENT TYPING near 41st &
Marine Dr. 266-5053.
TYPIST AVAILABLE. Elite (small) type.
Essays, terms papers, thesis. Phone:
327-5381.
EXPERIENCED MATH TUTOR will
coach 1st year. Calculus, etc. Evenings. Individual instruction on a
one-to-one basic. Phone: 733-3644. 10
a.m. to 3 p.m. dally.
EFFICIENT     ELECTRIC     TYPING, my
home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat accurate work. Reasonable rates —
263-5317.
90-Wanted
WANTED   —   PEOPLE   TO   SHARE   ski
cabin at Whistler. $400 for the season.
Evan Cardiff, 988-2141 days; 980-7457
evenings.
99 — Miscellaneous Tuesday, October 28, 1975
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
SFOMTS
'Birds hammer Huskies 43-20
By TOM BARNES
When Frank Smith took over" as
head coach of the Thunderbird
football team last year, he lost his
first game 63-0 to the University of
Saskatchewan Huskies. That
defeat was atoned for last Saturday as the 'Birds whipped the
Huskies 43-20 in their most important game of the year.
If the truth be known, the
Huskies are lucky the score was so
close. UBC had to settle for a field
goal when an illegal procedure
penalty nullified a touchdown;
later they lost the ball on downs
inside the Saskatchewan two. The
lone Huskie score in the second
half came when safety.Len McFarlane scooped up an errant UBC
snap and dashed 49 yards for a
touchdown.
Mike McKay-Dunn got the 'Birds
rolling when he intercepted a
Barrie Fraser pass on Saskatchewan's    fourth    play    after
receiving the opening kickoff.
It was the first of four Fraser
passes the 'Birds picked off in the
game.
The running of Gord Penn and
the passing of Dan Smith moved
the 'Birds deep into Huskie
territory. They took the lead for
good on Gary Metzs' field goal.
Metz, in his first game back after
being out of the lineup with appendicitis, was good on each of
three field goal attempts and four
of five convert attempts.
Penn and Smith each scored'
majors on short rushes. The other
three UBC touchdowns came on
Smith passes: Evan Jones on a 33-
yard play, Shaun McGuinness on a
37-yard throw, and Digby Leigh on
a 12-yard toss.
Offensively,   UBC   amassed   a
total of 579 yards, their highest
. total of the season. Smith enjoyed
his finest game as a Thunderbird,
completing 19 of 27 passes for 377
-T sf srsrjr*
yards. Jones with eight receptions
for 129 yards and Leigh with six
catches for 118 yards were Smith's
favorite targets.
Penn led the UBC rushing attack
piling up 150 of the 'Birds 202 yards
.gained oh the ground.
Despite the totals, the real offensive standouts were the
linemen, led by Al Cameron. Smith
was not really pressured while
trying to pass at all. Several times
he kept Penn and halfback Mike
MacLeod back to block, only to
have the two running backs hard
pressed to find a Huskie to take on.
At the same time neither Penn nor
MacLeod had a hard time finding
holes to hit on the running plays.
Although the second quarter
proved to be less than an artistic
success, the defensive play of the
'Birds was near perfect.
Henry Booy and John Turecki
led a tenacious defensive line that
was   putting   pressure  on   the
—sucha singh photo
UBC'S GORD PENN is pulled down by three Huskies while on his way to one of numerous romps of game.
Penn ended game with 150 yards and UBC trounced Saskatchewan 43-20.
Volleyballers thrash Vikings
The Thunderbird volleyball team
crushed the University of Victoria
Vikings on Sunday^ in B.C. Senior
Men's Volleyball league play,
winning the best of the five-game
match three straight.
The 'Birds, playing in Victoria
for their first away match,
dominated play in all ways,- winning 15-4, 15-3" and 15-8. Their
defence was excellent and at no
time was Victoria able to generate
a real offence. The 'Birds, on the
other hand, had a very quick offence which seemed to catch the
Vikings unaware many times.
It must be said, however, that
Victoria did not seem to be at their
best. .The 'Birds were expecting
tougher competition and were
determined to win. They will not
have such an easy time when they
meet the Vikings again.
The 'Birds also played the B.C.
Olympic's second team. BCO'sare
a Vancouver city team and they
were also in Victoria on Sunday, to
play the 'Birds and the Vikings.
The 'Birds had a little trouble in 'Birds overran BCO winning 15-4,
the first game, being a little
overconfident after defeating
Victoria so badly. They pulled
together, however, and Won 15-10.
In the second and third games the
15-1.
The 'Birds are now unbeaten in
three starts, and have outscored
the opposition 135-40. This puts
them at the top of the league.
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Saskatchewan passers the entire
game. Middle linebacker Marshal
MacLeod showed the home town
fans the kind of play that has
earned him the reputation of being
one of the best in the league.
Veteran defensive back Ten Hon
Choo in his first game back
following a knee injury filled in
more than adequately for the in-
juried Vic Wasilenko.
While it was essential for the
'Birds to win the game to keep
their hopes of a Western Intercollegiate Football League title
alive, its importance diminishes in
light of their encounters with the
University of Calgary Dinosaurs in
Calgary Friday. The winner of that
game will likely emerge as league
champion.
The loss to UBC was Saskatchewan's third of the season, effectively eliminating them from
contention.. In other WIFL action
Saturday the Universityof Alberta
Golden Bears lost to the Dinosaurs.
The Bears' four defeats leave the
Dinosaurs and 'Birds as the only
two teams left in the fight for top
spot.
WIFL Standings:
GP   W L
F
A
Pts
Calgary     6     5   1
178
108
10
UBC            6      4   2
184
132
8
Sask.           7      4   3
198
152
8
Alta.           7      3   4.
138
145
6
Man.           6      0   6
72
233
0
More sports
See p. 8
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(Include resume if available.) Page 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 28, 1975
iff ore sports
Soccer 'Birds in trouble
By CEDRIC TETZEL
"It's the straw that broke the
camel's back," said UBC Thunderbirds' soccer coach Joe
Johnson after the 'Birds' 4-0 loss to
the University of Victoria Vikings
Sunday.
Playing their first Canada West
UBC runners
are strong
UBC runners did well in the B.C.
cross-country championships
Saturday at Mundy Park,
Coquitlam.
Many UBC runners competed in
the highly contested open men's
12,000-metre race, won by Louis
Groarke.
UBC's first finisher John
Wheeler placed 6th with teammate
Chris White finishing seventh.
Jerry Lister, Doug Webber and
Rob MacKenzie rounded out UBC's
top five, finishing 15, 18 and 24
respectively.
John Wheeler said that he was
generally pleased with his race.
"I ran about as hard as I could,"
he said. "Louis ran a really good
tactical race. Jerry and Chris and I.
all ran with the front group for the
first half of the race. Louis was
very unfamiliar with the course.
About halfway through he asked
me where we were on the course. I
told him, and he made a surge to
break away from the field immediately. It was a very successful
tactic on his part. We all tried to go
with him, which broke up the
pack."
Chris White said he "felt good for
the first four miles or so." "For the
next 2-1/2 miles I got quite tight
and slowed down considerably;" he
said. "But in the last mile I started
to feel good again, and picked up on
my pace. "I gained a lot on John in
that last mile. I think "neither John
nor I ran poorly, but neither of us
were completely pleased with the
race."
UBC women won the team title
for their open 5,000 metre race.
Sheila Currie of UBC won the race.
Maureen Crowley of SFU finished
second. Linda Rossetti of UBC
finished strongly in third place.
Teammates Leslie Stubbs and
Carolyn Vanderpoll followed her in
seventh and twelfth places
respectively.
UBC will take a seven-man team
to the Canada West championships
this fall. There has been considerable competition among team
members for the last few places,
which could have been filled by
several runners of similar ability.
■ The results of the junior men's
8,000-metre race helped provide
the deciding factor for who would
earn a berth on that team.
Justin Marples ran strongly in
that race, finishing first for UBC
and fourth over-all in 28:23. He was
followed by teammates Dave
Taylor, Al Favell and Jack Isenor
in seventh, thirteenth and sixteenth places respectively.
The Canada West meet will be
. held next Saturday in Edmonton.
"I'm a little more confident
about the team's chances than I
was at the start of the year," said
Wheeler. "We've got a really good
chance of winning it, and also of
doing well at the Canadians. Our
junior runners did very well,
especially Justin."
White said, "University of
Saskatchewan should be tough."
Also in the conference are the
University of Victoria, the
University of Alberta and the
University of Calgary.
UBC's men's team will be made
up by: John Wheeler, Dave Taylor,
Jerry Lister, Chris White, Doug
Webber, Justin Marples and Rob
MacKenzie.
match against a weak UVic team,
the UBC team gave up four goals to
let the Vikings waltz to victory.
According to Johnson, the
Vikings were not strong enough to
win. In fact, UVic players admitted
after the game that they did not
deserve to win.
On the other hand, the UBC
defense made costly errors and the
forwards could not find the net on
the other side of the pitch.
Johnson said many of his players
are used to being on the winning
team and are not happy to be in a
situation where they have to work
to win.
As a result, the UBC coach has
made some important changes in i
the lineup. Veterans Ken Beadle,
John Nelson, Ron Hurley and Al
Fleming will not be making the
trip to Edmonton for the remaining
games in the Canada West title
race.
Filling in the vacancies will be
rookies Brian Loader with Garry
Carr on defense and Tom Lachlan
on offense.
John Kipplewhite will be taking
care of the goalkeeping chores for
the 'Birds, while Loader and Carr
together with veterans Roy
Zuyderduyn, John Pandolfo, Mark
Rizzardo and Doug Gordon will
take turns defending against the
prairie teams.
Playing linkmen will be Jim
Hunter, Ken Garret, Terry
Thompson and in front of them
Craig Campbell, Ray Webster,
Chris Suzuki and Lachlan, who will
try to reintroduce scoring to the
'Birds.
If the 'Birds want to play at the
national championships in Victoria
next month, they have to blank
both Alberta and Saskatchewan
and hope one of them slaughters
the Vikings. Impossible? Not quite.
The Vikings are not exactly invincible and if the Lions can beat
the Roughriders there is no reason
why the 'Birds cannot come up
with a miracle or two.
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One of the reasons
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Whether it's telephone exchanges, microwave relay networks or
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Northern Electric
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