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The Ubyssey Jan 6, 1966

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THS UBYSSEY
Deutsch?
Vol. XLVIII, No. 32
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 1966
48
CA  4-3916
1
Education comes first
r
—dennls gans photo
"GODDAM SNOW",  says Joe Catskinner a s he pushes gobs of filthy white stuff around
campus Wednesday. Joe's sentiments  were   echoed   by  students   who,   by   afternoon,
were glad for the first time in history to see rain.
Loan club brandished
at Victoria fee rebels
Victoria College board of
governors unveiled a new weapon in the fee-withholding
fight Monday.
Victoria bursar R. W. McQueen is having the 1,516 students withholding $56 of their
second-term fees sign a statement saying they are aware
their bank might be notified
that they are not fully enrolled
students and are therefore not
eligible for student loans.
The students are withholding
their fees to fight future tuition fee increases.
McQueen said the statement
was drafted to protect the administrative officer usually a
faculty member, who is required to sign on the student's
behalf.
In a telephone interview
Sunday night, Victoria College
president Malcom Taylor said,
"Political   considerations   pre-
MALCOLM TAYLOR
.  .  . supports students
vents the board of governors
from meeting student requests
as   outlined   on  pledge   cards
signed last term, but the board
otherwise supports the student
stand".
Victoria AMS president Paul
Williamson met with the board
of governors Wednesday afternoon.
Taylor said, "The board of
governors is responsible and
independently trying to develop the best quality in a university it can."
"Our independence depends
on our not taking a political
position. To comply with student requests would be taking
such a position."
But Taylor said he supported the students attempt to
dramatize the problem of financing higher  education.
He added that students signed an agreement when registering to abide by the rules
and regulations of the university.
Economic council
hits cash barriers
By RON  RITER
Ubyssey News Editor
Canada must accord investment in education the highest
priority, the nation's economic council said Wednesday.
A major point of the influ
ential council's second annual
report was Canada's need for
more post-secondary school
education.
It stressed that financial
handicaps must not be allowed to be barriers to those seeking further education.
The 193-page report was
written by a committee chaired by former UBC dean of
economics Dr. John J. Deutsch.
The 26-member Economic
Council of Canada was established in 1963 by the Liberal
government.
Speaking at an Ottawa press
conference after the report's
release, Deutsch said that while
lack of funds should not be a
barrier to education, he would
not go as far as advocating
free higher education.
In a press release Wednesday, UBC president John Macdonald said the report's emphasis of education's crucial
economic role "should come
as no surprise to informed
persons".
He said his own report on
higher education in B.C. in
1962 had stated: "IThe nation
making inadequate use of its
citizens ithrough failure to educate them will be a nation
doomed to economic distress
at best and economic disaster
at worst."
Govt action  welcome'
In spite of all the statements,
Macdonald said, Canadian universities — including UBC —
are still seriously under-supported.
Macdonald said B.C. premier
W. A. C. Bennett has stated
that education and health represent high priorities for B.C.
"It is to be hoped that this
laudable statement of policy
will be reflected in the 1966-67
budget," Macdonald said.
(The provincial legislature
will probably hand down a
lump sum education budget in
late January. UBC's share is
not likely to be known until
April.)
Macdonald also repeated
Prime Minister Lester Pearson's pledge of federal money
to meet the Bladen report's
recommendations on higher
education.
Macdonald said the premier's
and prime minister's statements are encouraging.
"Action to provide the necessary support would be even
more welcome," he said.
The economic council report
said Canadians themselves are
the nation's most underdeveloped resource and their lack
of education is a major reason
why Canadian incomes lag behind those in  the  U.S.
It said the U.S.-Canadian
"educational gap" is widening.
The council also voiced criticism — which could be directed at both federal and provincial governments — for less
than-maximum efforts in increasing Canada's educational
facilities.
"There is a lot of room for
improvement," Deutsch said,
at his press conference.
JOHN  MACDONALD
. .  . 'no surprise'
The report repeatedly emphasized that Canada's shortage of management, professional and technically-skilled
labor threatens the country's
prosperity and   advancement.
"We recommend that the advancement of education at all
levels be given a very high
place in public policy, and that
investment in education be accorded the highest rank in the
scale of priorities.
"Continuing improvements
in productivity are an essential basis for the satisfactory
achievement of all our social
and  economic goals.
"A mounting volume of evidence points to education as a
crucially important factor."
The report called for an immediate goal of at least high-
school education for all young
Canadians. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 6, 1966
SNOWBOUND     BROOMBALLERS
.   . . funds for WUS
Sloshing slushers
shiver for SHARE
By CHRIS BROCKHURST
What's red and flounders in the snow?
A thundering herd of engineers as they battled to a 2-2
tie with frosh in Wednesday's
broom-ball slushbowl in the
stadium.
The two teams Were sloshing it out in an effort to raise
funds for World University
Service's SHARE campaign.
Proceeds from the campaign
will go to the construction of a
new health clinic at the National University of Nicaragua.
The end of the first half saw
a tie and fans made their sentiments known by snow-balling
both teams and each other.
People who scored goals
were not identified and seven
penalties by the referee went
unnoticed.
Action was .faster in the
second half.
It was a period climaxed by
the drowning of the frosh
goalie under 37 assorted players.
All fans were repaid in kind
at the end of the game for their
half-time loyalty and those who
escaped untouched were few.
The game was made exciting
by the need to duck flying
white tokens of loyalty and the
only winners were SHARE
campaigners who collected $65
in donations at the gate.
Canadian fire brigade
in minor league smoke
Canada regards herself as
the international fire brigade.
This was the opinion of UBC
history professor Dr. John Conway who spoke Wednesday on
Canada's position in the nuclear arms scene.
He said, "We regard ourselves as the fire brigade that
rushes across the world to put
out the fire on international
crises.
"This system, only works on
very small fires. And it will
not continue to be effective in
the distant future."
He said Canada probably
would not tolerate a "minor
league" standing among the
newly-equipped nuclear power
nations o the world. "Sooner or
later, long-term considerations
must be made."
Conway was the only speaker of three scheduled to speak
on 'Profile'66' who showed up.
He was speaking on behalf of
the UNAN drive to raise funds
for a university in Nicaragua.
JOHN   CONWAY
. . . arms scene
Wonted
Language Lab
Assistant
:30-10:30, Mon., Wed.. Fri.
Apply  Supervisor:
Bu. 112
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE has received two trophies. One is from Mr. Justice N.
T. Nemetz, to be presented to highest faculty collection in current SHARE campaign.
The other, from arts dean Dennis Healy, for best collector.
Chinas political culture
cited as bar to equality
China can meet the west if
it can rise above its traditional
political culture, Dr. John Fair-
bank, former American-ambassador to China said Wednesday.
Fairbank, now director of
the East Asian Research Institute at Harvard University,
spoke on China at UBC and its
relation to the west.
Fairbank discussed the early
development of political maturity and the bureaucracy in
China.
He said the principles of
social order and the principle
of mutual responsibility which
are a part of the Chinese history are carried over into modern politics.
"The Chinese are accustomed to a system of hierarchy
centered in Peking and have
to learn how to develop relations with equal powers in
an equal capacity."
Fairbank said the conflict of
China with the western world
is a conflict of cultural values
and concepts of government.
* The Americans push forth
the concept of self-determination and the Chinese have a
concept of China as a realm,
civilization, and entity, including all Chinese peoples," he
said.
He said the United States i through the policies of the
is not the successor of colon- British navy, in the nineteenth
ial power. "She inherited the century and the Japanese ex-
situation    of   power    politics | pansion of the 1930's," he said.
BEAVER LUMBER
COMPANY   LIMITED
will interview
graduating students
on       January 10 and 11
BEAVER LUMBER is the largest retailer of
building supplies in Canada, and has career
opportunities in many fields. The challenges
offered in merchandising will have special
appeal for graduating students in these
courses:
STARTS
Ef COMMERCE
ET BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Our recruiters will be pleased to meet others
interested in considering a merchandising
career.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CHECK THE COMPANY
PUBLICATIONS AT YOUR PLACEMENT OFFICE
FORESTRY
GRADUATES
Business Administration
Logging
Other Options
MacMILLAN, BLOEDEL & POWELL RIVER LIMITED
LUMBER - NEWSPRINT - PULP - PLYWOOD • PACKAGING  - FINE PAPER - PANELBOARDS - SHINGLES
Invites you to discuss
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES in our
FOREST PRODUCTS INDUSTRY
interviews will be held on campus on
JANUARY 11, 12 and 13
For information  applications and appointments please see your
STUDENT PLACEMENT OFFICE Thursday,  January  6,   1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
—val zuker photo
THEY'RE PILING IT deep  in front of the administration  building.  The snow that is,
and   it's   the    hardy   buildings   and   grounds men who are doing the piling. Relief is
in  sight however. The snowed-in  weather-man  at Sea  Island  is forecasting  rain and
more  rain  to wash  away all the dirty   piles of white stuff around the city.
Senior students  urged'
to take new arts course
Students going into third and
fourth year arts next year need
not worry about being forced
into the new arts program.
Classic head Dr. Malcolm
McGregor said Wednesday students would be urged, rather
than required, to take the new
program.
The program, announced in
December, replaces the two
nine unit major system with a
single 15 unit major.
McGregor said several students have been worried about
the implementation of the program in September, 1966.
"We never make rules that
are retroactive," said McGregor. "A student entering
third year will be urged to
take the new program but he
will not be required to."
McGregor said the same condition applies to students entering fourth year.
"We assume students entering fourth year will carry on
with two majors."
The honors program under
malcolm McGregor
. . . not required
the new plan would probably
remain the same, said McGregor.
McGregor said the advantage
of the new program was that
students would be able to con
centrate more on a specialized
field of study before going into
graduate studies.
He pointed out that under
the present system, students
are split between two faculties
and have little or no contact
with faculty members.
"Further, a student with five
courses will be in a much better
condition to go into graduate
studies."
A student presently graduating with nine units has extra
courses to make up in his first
year of graduate studies.
McGregor refused to comment on implementation of the
controversial Discipline and
Discovery report published by
a group of arts professors in
spring 1965.
"The program for first and
second year students has yet
to be worked out," he said.
He said announcements concerning the D and D report
and the first and second year
program would be forthcoming
in March.
BUILDING COSTS UP
Deficit hits 3-U fund
Rising construction costs
have run the Three Universities Capital Fund at UBC 13
per cent over its budget.
The $30 million expansion
program, begun in 1963, will
be between $3.4 million and $4
million over its budget by the
time it is completed, UBC bursar William White said Wednesday.
White said construction costs
have risen 36 per cent since
1963, and he has no definite
idea of where the extra money
is coming from.
"The position now is wait
and see," he said.
There are four UBC projects
presently financed by the plan
which may have to be postponed because of the deficit.
They are: the dentistry build
ing and the forestry agriculture complex, both now under
construction; and the new music building and a metalurgy
building both on the drawing
board.
"Our next move is to the
federal government," said
White.
If the Bladen Report is implemented in the budget speech
this spring, operation grants to
universities will go up more
than 100 per cent.
The five year plan, financed
partly by the provincial government and partly by donation from the public and industry, is a joint project of
UBC, Victoria College, and
Simon Fraser.
Its total target is $68.7 million, $40.7 million of which is
being provided toy the provincial government.
Of the $40.7 million, UBC
and SFA receive $18 million
each and Victoria the remaining $4.7.
If the public responds and
donates the $28 million planned, UBC and SFA's share will
rise to $29,760,000 and Victoria's to $9,180,000.
"Initial response to the campaign has been favorable," said
White.
He said the money required
to complete the four UBC projects would not come from student fees.
"The plan is a capital project," he said.
Student fees are counted into
operating costs.
FACULTY FAVORABLE
Anti-calendar
starts for arts
The arts undergraduate society starts work on its first
anti-calendar Monday.
Every arts student will receive a questionnaire Monday,
when professors distribute
15,000 of them in class.
The Arts U.S. will collect
the questionnaires  after class.
AMS president Chuck Campbell said Wednesday "It will
be the biggest anti-calendar in
Canada — certainly bigger
than Harvard's or Berkeley's."
"But we're not soliciting student opinion in first year
courses or English 200."
Small seminar groups and
tutorials will also be omitted.
"The anti-calendar is designed to give people information
and help in selecting courses,"
he said. "It will cover only
lecturers and exams — not
course content."
Faculty reaction is favorable,
said  Campbell.
Dean Dennis Healy said in
a letter to the Arts U.S. "the
questionnaire should elicit a
great deal of useful information."
Faculty members will be approached by Arts U.S. volunteers for their comments on
course content and exams.
Campbell said he hopes to
have the first edition of the
calendar   printed   by  March.
"There will toe 2,100 copies
printed at that time," he said.
He said a second edition,
complete with timetable and
list of lecturers would be available in September.
Harlow new
writing head,
creatively
The   department   of   creative
writing has found a new head.
UBC president John Macdonald announced in December the appointment of novelist
Robert G. Harlow, 42 to the
position.
Harlow has been acting head
of the department since its
establishment July 1,   1965.
Creative writing before then
was part of the department of
English.
Among Harlow's works are
two novels*' "A Gift of Echoes"
and "Royal Murdoch", and the
scenario for Larry Kent's current movie, "When Tomorrow
Dies."
Harlow has also written several plays and scripts for radio.
After leaving the RCAF as
flying officer in 1945, Harlow
enrolled at UBC and obtained
his Bachelor of Arts, majoring
in English. He attained his
Master of Fine Arts at Iowa
State University before returning to UBC.
Harlow t then taught evening classes at the UBC extension department's cfcmrse in
creative writing for several
years.
"We are very happy that a
writer of Harlow's status has
accepted the headship of the
new department," said Macdonald.
DR. NEIL BARTLETT
. . . wins prize
Prof honored
for inert gas
breakthrough
A UBC chemistry professor,
has been awarded $10,000 for
his discovery in the field of
the "inert"  gases.
Dr. Neil Bartlett's discovery
that the element xenon would
unite with another substance,
platinum hexafluoride, to form
the previously unknown substance xenon hexafluoroplatin-
ate, proved false the belief that
inert gases would withstand all
chemical assault.
As a result, chemistry textbooks the world over have
been  revised.
The 33-year-old professor
was the 30th recipient of the
Research Corporation Award.
"That this very important
award has come to Dr. Neil
Bartlett is no surprise" said
UBC President John Macdonald. "His work on the inert
gases represents one of the
great advances of modern
chemistry.
"Dr. Bartlett's work has received wide national recognition and has created a whole
new field of chemistry engaging scientists all over the
world."
Curtain call
for alumni
Where are Mussoc's alumni?
The UBC Musical Society is
staging its 50th anniversary reunion Feb. 8.
And it is looking for all the
past members it can draw.
The reunion program includes a cocktail party and a
command performance of this
year's production, Take Me
Along.
All Mussoc's former members are invited.
Alumni are asked to notify
Mussoc president Steve Chitty,
1750 Knox Road, Vancouver, if
they are coming. munm
Published Tuesday, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
.Loc. 26. 'Member Canadian University Press. Founding member, Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa,  and for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 1966
"Nobody shoots at a dead duck."
-W. A.  C.  Bennett,  Nov.  5,   1965
SHARE 'nuftl
It's not every day you meet a man who wants to
build a medical clinic at Leon, Nicaragua*.
And it's not everyday you meet a man who wants
to raise $5,000 from university students to help pay for
the medical clinic at Leon, Nicaragua.
But Tim Roberts, head of a keen collection of World
University Service types at UBC wants to do just these
things.     And it's you and me he's appealing to.
Though largely innurred to the usual charity drives
designed to tap the rapidly dwindling student wallet, we
nevertheless think Tim's plea is a good one.
Just as at Victoria College now 1,500 fee-increase
withholders are facing real trouble to make sure all
B.C's university students (including us) know about
the next fee increase before next June, so 16,500 UBC
students are being asked to shell out to help the bodily
welfare of the students of the National University of
Nicaragua.
Every time we've gone running to Wesbrook with
a hangnail or a hangover (or for a birth-control pill)
we've been glad UBC's Health Service was there.
And that's what Nicaragua IFs clinic will provide
for its 2,500 students — as well as more important care.
Tim Roberts and his WUS workers have set up some
ways of pretty painless giving.
Can-rattling, today's international fashion show in
Brock, and Friday's folk sing-song make up his appeal.
We urge you to SHARE with him.
"Why the delay, officer? I've got my snow tires on."
LETTERS  TO  THE   EDITOR
Yeah, yeah, ECC
Huzzahs and hurrahs to the Economic Council of
Canada for its clear call to spur higher education in
this country.
Apparently without political slant or bias of any
kind, the Economic Council has shown the need for more
institutions of post-secondary education in Canada.
This is like a clear breeze from Ottawa, after Dean
Vincent Bladen polluted the air over the higher education front with statements Dec. 1 that his commission
had lacked the courage of its convictions.
The latter statement, of course, throws serious doubt
on the integrity of the whole report. What university
president or government can now press for the implementation of the report, when the chairman of the
investigating commission has said the report is not a
true representation of the group's beliefs?
And, of course, the good dean's call for doubling
of tuition fees needs no comment.
Rather, let us put the uncomfortable past behind
us, and cheer the Economic Council's statements:
"We recommend that the advancement of education
at all levels be given a very high place in public policy,
and that investment in education be accorded the highest
rank in the scale of priorities."
And, says the Economic Council, financial hardship
must not be allowed to be a barrier to those seeking
higher education.
And  if  those  statements   seem  vaguely  familiar,
there's just a chance you heard them before.
During National Student Day, perhaps?
xc;,-;,:       ,       - - ,
EDITOR:  Tom  Wayman Having   FUN   amid    the    chaos
Wednesday were the old reliables:
News                                            Ron   Riter Chr'S   Brockhurst,   Pat   Hrushowy,
...,.„'. "" ~"        "   "'z Joan Fogarty, Brent Cromie, Anne
Associate   George Reamsbottom Balf,   Craig Tapping,   Sheila   Dob-
City   —    Al    Donald son, Peggy Stein, Fearon Whitney,
Photo                                        Norm    Bett« Jim   Go°d.   Claudia   Gwin  who   did
,..rt,            ™   °.    , Tween   Classes,   and   a   couple   of
sports    Ed Clark refugees   from   photo,   Denis   Gans
A«s't News    Dan  Mullen and   Val   Zuker.
   Richard   Blair,   Robbi  West There's    a    staff   meeting    noon
A..'t r>i*„                    r,,„„..  c*„«»~  today to discuss plans and money
Asst City    Danny  Stoffman for   Saturday's   victory   party   at
Page   Friday       John   Kelsey Gleneagles.  So if you want to go,
Managing     Ian   Cameron come.  There's  a  meeting for new
c..»>',... «j-i~   =-■.. _ staff  at the  same  time,   and,   in-
Features    Mike   Bolton ciaentaiiy,  we will be putting out
CUP       Don   Hull a  newspaper.
Heartiest  Congratulations1/
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Heartiest congratulations on
being acclaimed the best campus newspaper in Canada, for
a fifth successive year!
I'm delighted that you
proved us wrong.
Please convey my salutations and warm, good wishes
to the members of your prize-
winning staff.
STUART KEATE
Publisher
Vancouver Sun
'SELF-ADULATION'
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
IN THE EAR
If last Tuesday's  Ubyssey,
with its screeds of self-adulation and   Ian  Cameron's  infantile tantrums, is typical of
the nation's best student newspaper, then Canadian journalism must be going to the dogs.
NORMAN THYER
Assistant Professor
Physics
'CANADA'S GREATEST'
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
While clipping and committing to the files (for the enlightenment of future genera
tions) The Ubyssey of January
4, I noted with dismay that
my name had been omitted
from the staff list.
Since I had been looking
forward to the publication of
the list to prove that I actually do work for "Canada's
Greatest", I was truly disappointed.
May I also humbly suggest
that I be given my full title:
Chief AND ONLY File Clerk?
CAROLE McFARLANE
Chief File Clerk
BY IAN CAMERON
Here's the lowdown on notes
Now that the new term is
here, I presume that you have
all   made   grandiose   resolutions to attend all your classes
and take copious notes.
Most of you will probably
find  this   a
traumatic experience,    so
to   help   you
out    I    have
pre pared   a
set of suggestions that will
enable you to
take    notes
Cameron      easily.
Lecturer says (LS): "Chapters five to eight are vital to
complete understanding of succeeding material.   They   will
not be examined, however."
You   write    (YW):    "Omit
chapters five  to  eight.
LS:  "Next  period we will
have a guest lecturer. I am
sure that the lecture will be
interesting   and   informative.
Attendance will not be taken."
YW: "No lecture Friday."
LS:  "Lieman has a rather
interesting view of this aspect
of the problem. While I do not
altogether   agree   with   his
opinion ..."
YW: "Ignore Lieman."
LS: "Johnstone's book is a
classic in this field. It is well
worth the $5.95."
YW: "Ignore Johnstone."
LS: "Brobanovitch, though
misguided, had the best interests of the people at heart.
He did what he thought was
best for the country, and . . ."
YW: "Brobanovitch was a
fink."
LS: "I have put two copies
on reserve, but there are two
hundred students in this
course ..."
YW: "Nothing. Ask to be
excused and get to the
library."
LS: "This year we are going to do something different
for the final. The questions
will not be those that have
appeared for the past four
years."
YW: "Check exam five
years ago."
LS: "My grandmother died
last week and I have to attend her funeral next week."
YW: "He's off to another
bridge tournament."
LS: "The papers in this
class are a disappointment, to
say the least."
YW: "Try to transfer from
this course." Thursday,  January  6,   1966
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
FOREGROUND
CUP
New CUP rules establish
freedom from council controls
The following policy statement of the constitution committee of Canadian University
Press was adopted at the final
plenary session of the 28th
National Conference of CUP
at Calgary Dec. 30.
Appendixed to the CUP
Code of Ethics, and the Charter of the Student Press in
Canada, its adoption by student councils across Canada—
a long range project for CUP
—should virtually insure freedom of the student press.
Its adoption should give
teeth to the CUP investigation commission machinery
also adopted at the 28th Conference's final plenary.
Canadian   University   Press
finds  the  following  are  prerequisites to the advancement
of the freedom and autonomy
of the student press:
• •      •
Whereas: CUP must be free
to act effectively as an internal policing force on the conduct of its member papers
and their adherence to the
CUP Code of Ethics and the
Charter of the Student Press
in Canada; and
Whereas: CUP must be free
to act effectively to protect
their members from any form
of interference which lessens
their ability to present unbiased news and stimulate
student thought;
Therefore,   Be   It   Resolved
That:
(I) The Canadian Union of
Students should be requested
to recognize the legality of
the investigation machinery
established in section IV of
the bylaws of CUP; and that
(II) CUS and student councils at all institutions of post-
secondary education where a
CUP member paper is published, recognize that they have
no legal right to discipline an
editor or interfere with a
member paper before a CUP
investigation commission reports on any disputed situation; and that
(III) All CUP member papers
budget funds to cover the cost
of  any   investigation   commissions with   which   they  might
be connected, and that each
regional   president   obtain
funds   to   allow   him   or   his
representative   to   serve   on
such    investigation    commissions.
(Ubyssey/Varsity
Silhouette/McGill Daily)
• *     •
INVESTIGATION
COMMISSION
1. Purpose: The purpose of
the investigation commission
shall be to investigate and report the facts involved in an
alleged violation of the Charter of the Student Press in
Canada and the Code of Ethics of Canadian University
Press.
For the purposes of this
commission violations of the
Charter and Code shall be defined as:
(1) interference in the operation of the paper by any individual or group not directly
associated with the paper, and
(2) any internal operation
of the paper in such a manner as to unduly limit the
paper's effectiveness in unbiased presentation of news and
stimulation of student thought.
2. Membership: The investigation commission shall consist of three members:
(I) the CUP national president or his appointee,
(II) a student from the
masthead of another full member paper from the region,
to be appointed 'by the regional president. In the case
where a paper on which the
regional president holds a
masthead position is involved
in an investigation, selection
of the second commission
member shall be made by
the  regional   vice-president,
<III) a member of the professional press in the regional
area appointed by the editor
of the paper involved in the
investigation.
• •      •
The CUP national president
or his appointee shall act as
chairman of the commission.
In all cases of dispute concerning the membership of
the commission the CUP national president shall act as
mediator. Appeals against bias
on the part of the commission members may be sent to
the national executive. Following such an appeal the
executive shall reconstitute
the investigation commission
replacing biased members and
consulting with the appointing party and the unchallenged members of the investigation commission.
3. Operation: The investigation commission shall be put
into operation in one of the
following ways:
(I) Upon written request to
the national executive by the
member paper involved,
(II) Upon written request to
the national executive by the
student council involved,
• •     •
(III) Upon written request
to the national executive by
any three member papers in
the region,
(IV) Upon the request of
the national executive. This
request could arise upon petition to the national executive
by members of the staff of a
member paper. In all requests
to the national executive for
the establishment of an investigation commission petitions must present could
cause, to the satisfaction of
the national president for the
establishment of such a commission.
IThe investigation commission shall convene within one
week after such a request to
the national president for the
establishment of such a commission has been received and
approved by the national president.
•     •     •
Within two weeks of the
date of convening, the commission must present to the
national executive of the CUP
a final report of the findings.
4. Jurisdiction: The investigation commission shall make
specific recommendations «to
all parties involved and to
Canadian  University   Press.
The findings and recommendations of the commission
shall be binding on all parties involved and on all mem-
The  modern  way  to see is with
Contact Lenses
Have them expertly fitted at a
reasonable price by
LAWRENCE CALVERT!
MU 3-1816
705 Birks Bldg.
TWO WEARY UBYSSEY DELEGATES, The Sun's Bill Rayner
(left) and reporter Pat Hrushowy, take a respite from
action-packed CUP conference in Calgary over the
Christmas holidays.
bers  of Canadian   University
Press.
Member papers who do not
act upon the investigation commission's recommendations
must justify their actions at
the next national conference
in a brief submitted to that
conference.
5. Finances: The CUP national president shall be responsible for obtaining the
necessary funds from member papers to cover the costs
of the investigation commission.
(Varsity/McGill Daily)
the
GEORGIA AT GRANVILLE
Invites you to consider an executive career in retail merchandising.
Our Training Programme offers a challenging and thorough framework
in which you can make rapid advancement tuned to your personal drive
and ability.
A career with "The Bay" can lead you to any of the major cities
between Victoria and Montreal. As a merchandise executive you could
be sent on buying trips to markets in North America, Europe and Asia.
Retail Merchandising will enable you to use your abilities to manage
people, to judge demands of customers, to administer the operations
of a department, to be creative and imaginative; it will challenge your
initiative and drive in the ever changing world of retailing.
Graduates in
Commerce,   Business  Administration  or   Arts
are eligible Sor our Training Programme oS:
* Initial rotation  programme showing you the major sales supporting
departments such as Advertising and Display.
* 2 year course in merchandising which supplements on-the-job training.
* Training under an experienced Department Manager in Sales Management, Buying and Department Administration.
Make an appointment now with your Placement Officer to see our
Representatives for full details or come in and see us in the store. Our
Personnel Office is located on the 5th floor.
Interviews will be
conducted on Campus
January 10th and  11th Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 6,  1966
MORE   FOREGROUND
SHARE drive
—norm   betts  photo
THIS CHINESE SHEATH DRESS, held by Linda Rees, Home
Ec. VI ,is one of many featured at the World University
Service's fashion show noon today in Brock. Admission is
by donation.
War-born WUS
now spans the globe
Dormitories converted from
dilapidated barracks, unused
jails and other ruins . . .
Canteens where girl students cooked food grown by
their male colleagues . . .
Women mending clothes
while men made shoes . . .
This was the picture of university life in war-torn Europe
when World University Service began in 1920.
Inaugurated in Geneva,
Switzerland, it was originally
called European Student Relief.
Its initial aims were to publicize the urgent needs of students and professors in many
European countries who were
suffering the results of the
First World War.
The name was changed to
International Student Service
in 1926 and to World University Service in 1950, but the
aims of the organization, although broadened greatly, are
still basically the same.
Its activities now extend
throughout Asia, Africa and
Latin America in such projects as helping build student
health facilities, hostels and
canteens; providing books,
typewriters and laboratory
equipment, and promoting international conferences and
seminars in student matters.
JAN.  10 - JAN.  15
AGGIE WEEK
Tues., Jan.  11  — Support Crippled Children's Apple Day
SATURDAY, JAN.   15
FARMERS FROLIC
Hard Times Dance in UBC Armouries
9-1 a.m.      -    -    -    $2.75 Couple
Tickets at AMS and Aggie Building
Nicaragua needs a student clinic
—so  UBC plans  to provide it
By DR. F. R. HAMLIN
Ass't Prof., Romance Studies
UBC has Wesbrook, but the
University of Nicaragua's student health department is
only in the planning stage.
Basically, that's why the
first UBC SHARE Campaign
will concentrate its effect on
"putting a clinic in Nicaragua."
Nicaragua's University is
older than ours but smaller.
IPA  vital  in
WUS  program
The major program of World
University Service, which is
administered by a secretariat
in Geneva and carried out
locally, is the International
Program of Action.
The program is financed by
students and faculty, university
administrations, students' councils, and the proceeds of campus fund-raising events.
IPA has as its principal areas
of activity: providing material
aid and scholarship opportunities to refugee students and
faculty, combatting ill health
among students by operating
clinics, supplying drugs, building sanatoria, improving student living conditions or assisting or establishings canteens,
restaurants, hostels and community centres, and encouraging the development of student
facilities by providing textbooks, laboratory apparatus,
and teaching equipment.
The IPA program for each
year is decided by the International General Assembly.
The "Universidad Nacional
de Nicaragua", familiarly
known as UNAN, has grown
out of the University of Leon,
founded in 1812.
Its administrative centre is
still at Leon, but the major
faculties are divided between
Leon and Managua.
IThis year the total enrolment is 2,597 with the largest
faculties — Education (555),
Economics and Business Administration (285), Medicine
(277), Arts and Science (206).
Only a small proportion of
these students live in the few
hostels in Leon and Managu.
Most have to rent rooms,
which are usually completely
inadequate.
The University residence
situation is paralleled by
many other inferior facilities
at UNAN. But progress is being made under the leadership of Dr. Carlos Tunner-
mann Bernhein who was appointed President of UNAN
in 1964.
World University Service
at UBC has directed this
year's money-raising SHARE
campaign toward building a
student health service clinic
at UNAN.
President Bernheim has
stated "the clinical laboratory
... is an urgent necessity for
our  student health section."
"fThis clinic will have an
important place in the work
of caring for our students'
health and will considerably
augment our present health
service.
"Moreover it will serve
some of the teaching members
of our faculty of Medical
Science."
JOIN
KITSILANO
CREDIT UNION
Low Cost Loans
to Members - Insured
Phone or Call:
2821 W. Bdwy.    RE 1-4531
/fc||gj||
IfclaS?^* /
College
Students
Faculty
Members
College
Libraries
SUBSCRIBE
NOW
AT
HALF
PRICE
Printed in
BOSTON
LOSANGQB
LONDON
Clip this advertisement and return it
with your check or money order to:
The Christian Science Monitor
One Norway St., Boston, Mass. 02115
□   1   YEAR  $12        □  6  mos.  $6
P COLLEGE STUDENT
P  FACULTY MEMBER
P-CN
Career Opportunities in
Iron Ore Industry at
QUEBEC CARTIER MINING COMPANY
Opportunities are offered in ENGINEERING:
CIVIL ELECTRICAL
MECHANICAL
MINING
Quebec Cartier Mining Company is one of the largest iron ore mining companies
in Canada. The mine and concentrator are located at Gagnon, Quebec, with
shipping facilities and Headquarters located at Port Cartier, Quebec.
Company recruiters will interview interested candidates on U.B.C. campus, on
Thursday, January 13, 1966.
For more information on job openings, benefits, etc., please contact your Placement Office immediately. Thursday,  January 6,   1966
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
—norm  betts photo
PRETTY PENNY DWYER, education IV, checks over
questionnaires seeking information for arts anti-calendar.
Forms will  be distributed  Monday.  (See  story  page   3).
I!1'h:j'J
Husky Oil Canada Ltd.
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
IN
EXPLORATION GEOLOGY
INTERVIEWS: JAN. 17 and 18, 1966
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ASSOCIATE DEAN
Meds get more brass
The UBC department of
medicine now has an associate
dean.
UBC president John Macdonald appointed Dr. Donald
C. Graham, editor of the Canadian Medical Journal to the
new position in December.
Witnesses meet
Resurrection of the dead will
be discussed in a three-day
seminar of Jehovah's Witnesses at UBC, Jan. 7-9.
District supervisor R. W.
Arnett will lecture Jan. 9 at
3 p.m.
"Resurrection of the dead is
a true source of hope for those
who have lost loved ones,"
says Arnett.
He joined dean John F. McCreary Jan. 1 in directing the
affairs of UBC's Health Sciences Centre.
The new post was created to
ease McCreary's administrative
load in UBC's expanding medical facilities.
"McCreary will be more involved with inter-relationships
between the faculties and
school in the centre and the
development of the university
teaching hospital," said Macdonald.
"Graham will help with the
administration within the faculty itself."
Graham will also be an assistant professor in the department of medicine.
Graham took his degree in
medicine at the University of
Toronto, and served in the
RCAF during the war.
He taught for several years
at the University of Toronto
before becoming editor of the
Canadian Medical Journal in
1960.
McCreary said: "Graham
brings to the university an
ordered, scientific mind, great
organization ability and unmatched editorial experience."
Trans-Canada Pipe Lines Limited
Applications are requested from
Civil, Mechanical and Electrical
engineering graduates who are interested in:
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
HYDRAULIC CONTROLS
PIPELINE DESIGN
COMPRESSOR  STATION   DESIGN
COMMUNICATIONS
Comprehensive company benefits. Good starting salary.
For Further information and/or interview, please contact:
Personnel Department
TRANS-CANADA PIPE LIMES LIMITED
150 Eglinton Avenue East,
Toronto 12, Ontario
Telephone: Area Code 416, HU 7-3811, Local 297
ORIGINAL
DUFFLE
COATS
by GREENGATE
Suppliers to British Navy
Men's Sizes — S, M, L, XL
Women's Sizes — 34, 36, 38
Wright Mariner
SUPPLY LTD.
1869 W. Georgia
MU 2-3788
1 Block East at Stanley Park
Whatever became of:
Mac Beth,
CLASS OF '40?
A natural leader for the underground
Scottish Nationalist Army, Mac startled
the college by riding to classes on a
Shetland pony. Unfortunately, the pony
passed but Mac failed his year. Nevertheless, his scholarly thesis "The Claymore
And Its Application to Tank Warfare" is
still talked about wherever military minds
gather. Convivial evenings at the Mac
Beth's often got a bit out of hand with
Mac looking daggers at his wife while she
washed her hands of the whole affair.
After a party for his boss was spoiled by
a gate-crasher named Banquo, they gave
up the ghost entirely. Mac Beth finally
suffered a sharp stroke in a quarrel with a
Mr. Macduff over a real estate deal involving Birnam Wood. Characteristically,his
final words were:   "Lay off,  Macduff".
To handle your bawbees with real Scottish
thrift, put a muckle in your BofM Savings
Account and a tnickle in your Personal
Chequing Account to pay your current
bills.
Bank of Montreal
THE BANK THAT VALUES STUDENTS' ACCOUNTS
Your Campus Branch:
The Administration Building:      G. F. PEIRSON, Manager Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 6,  1966
1WEEN CLASSES
Politics go a go-go
Present Bob Stachan '66 on INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Politics A Go Go, Friday noon
Bu 106.
PRE LAW SOC.
General    meeting    Tuesday,
Jan. 11 at 12:30 in Bu 221.
Guest speaker Leon Getz.
ALPHA OMEGA SOC
General meeting Bu 223
Monday noon.
• •      •
PRE MED SOCIETY
Meeting noon Friday in Wesbrook 201 about weekly trips
to Okalla. Curious from all
faculties welcome.
• •      •
ARTS U.S.
Meeting Friday noon for all
those interested in working on
the Arts Anti-Calendar Bu 100.
• •      *
AGGIES
Support Crippled Children's
fund by buying an apple on Aggies Apple Day Tuesday, Jan.
11.
UNIVERSITY  QUAKER
GROUP
Meeting for worship this
Sunday at 535 W. 10th instead
of on  campus.
Old Rome
in Piranesi
etchings
Etchings of Rome by 18th
century Italian artist Piranesi
will be exhibited by UBC's
Fine Arts Gallery Jan. 13-29.
The 120 etchings are on loan
from the Portland, Oregon Art
Museum.
Three lectures on Rome will
be given during the exhibition
by Dr. H. P. Oberlander, dept.
of community planning; Dr. M.
L. Mackenzie, English, and Dr.
George Rosenberg, of fine arts.
The lectures are scheduled
for January 14, 18, and 20 in
Lasserre 104 at 12:30 p.m.
The exhibition is sponsored
by the school of architecture,
the Dante Alighieri society,
and the departments of romance studies and fine arts.
French Language Days resume in the upper lounge each
Friday beginning Jan. 7.
STUDENT   COMMITTEE   TO
END THE WAR IN VIET NAM
Film   showing   of  Berkeley
anti-war protest march Friday.
Sun  publisher
to  be  honored
Vancouver Sun publisher
Stuart Keate, a member of
UBC's board of governors,
has been named to receive a
Press Club of Canada award.
Keate and Ross Munro,
publisher of a new national
supplement magazine, The
Canadian, will be honored
"for outstanding contributions to journalism" at the
annual press club ball in
Ottawa Feb. 11.
Keate is also president of
The Canadian Press, former
Ubyssey staffer, and former
- publisher   of   the   Victoria
Times.
FORMAL AND
SEMI-FORMAL
Rental  and  Sales
TUXEDOS - WHITE DINNER
JACKETS - TAH.S - MORNING
COATS        -        ACCESSORIES
Complete Size Range
McCUISH
STUDENT   RATES
FORMAL WEAR
LTD.
MON.-SAT.-9:30 to 5:30
2046 W. 41st
PH. 263-3610
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE - 1965-66
Effective September 24th 1965 to April 15th 1966
TUESDAYS
WEDNESDAYS
FRIDAYS
SATURDAYS
SUNDAYS
12:45—2:45 p.m.*
2:00—3:30 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.
3:00—5:00 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.**
3:00—5:00 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.**
12:45—2:45 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.
(Beginners & Preschool Children)
*   Special student admission:  15 cents.
** Except when hockey games scheduled — Nov.  19 & 20,
Jan. 28 & 29, Feb. 11 & 12 and two more dates not scheduled,
ADMISSION: Afternoons   —    Students .35*    Adults .600
Evenings — Students .50* Adults .75c
Skate Rental .35* per pair — Skate Sharpening .35* per pair
NOTE:   The  Centre  will  be  closed  all  day  Christmas  Day
and Good Friday.
For further information:   Call 224-3205  or  228-3197
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day. $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall, Ext. 26. 224-3242
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
FOUND ADS inserted free. Publications office, Brock Hall. Local 26,
224-3242.
RELIABLE TRANSPORTATION
'57 Volks, radio, snow tires; engine, trans, recently rebuilt; interior in top condition. Clean
throughout. Best offer. RE
1-7496.
LOST   —   LADY'S   GOLD   WATCH
htetween  H.   Angus  and   library,   on
Monday,   9:15   -   10:15'  a.m.,   or  in
the  library.    Large   reward.     Call
_RE  3-6097 after 5:30.      	
TAKEN PROM PURSE OUTSIDE
room 424, Chemistry Bldg., Tuesday, 8:30, 11:30 a.m., blue wallet.
Please return library and student
cards  ta Box   141,  Steveston.
LOST—RUSSIAN    TEXT    BEFORE
Xmas.    Would finder please phone
224-7157.
FOUND — STAEDTLER SLIDE
rule; also man's Marlow wrist-
watch, in Brock Lounge, last day
of exams. See Proctor in Brock
Hall.
FOUND — OUTSIDE BU. 2244
shortly before Xmas exams, man's
umbrella and pair men's black
leather gloves. Loser can claim
items   at  Angus  463.  	
LOST ON 23rd DECEMBER, one
zippo lighter engraved with Borden cow. Virtually valueless but
dripping with sentiment. Reward
for   return.     Telephone^ 228-2131.	
FOUND AT HENNINGS BUILDING
set of keys with cache Creek holder, Jan. 5, Ubyssey Adv. Office,
Brock Hall.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Typewriters & Repairs
42
GOOD CLEAN TYPEWRITERS, $20
up. Also Typewriter repairs at
50 percent savings. Poison Typewriters, 2140 W. 4th. Phone RE
1-8322.
Typing
43
PROFESSIONAL TYPING, ARDALE
GRIFFITHS LIMITED, 70th and
Granville, Phone 263-4530.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING, ARDALE
Griffiths Limited, 70th and Granville.     263-4530.
Help Wanted
51
$400 PER MONTH WHILE BEING
trained to sell Business Life insurance. Career position with unlimited possibilities; age 21-30.
Good education and background.
Character subject to scrutiny.
MU   5-7234.
Instruction Wanted
66
Special Notices
13
WHY PAY high auto insurance
rates? If you are over 20 and have
a good driving history you qualify
for our good driving rates. Phone
Ted  Elliott,  224-6707.	
DANCE TO THE CHESSMEN SAT.,
Jan. 8th, in Brock Hall, starting
at 9 p.m. Don't miss the term's
first  really  big  dance.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO CATHY
Auld from all her friends in the
Ed.  Lounge.    We're  impressed!
Wanted
15
WANTED
boots, size
8-8929.
PAIR   MEN'S   SKI
Phone   Derek,   CA
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
WANTED — CHEM.     205     TUTOR.
Phone 321-0833 after 6.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
"VOX AMPLIFIERS, CLASSICAL
Guitars, Gretch & Guild & Isabella Nylon Strings. Ward Music
Ltd. 412 West Hastings MU 2-
5288.
Rooms
81
STUDENT (MALE), FURNISHED
single room, kitchen privileges,
frig; 1 block to shops and buses.
Vacant    now,     non-smoker.      RE-
3^8778.	
LARGE BED-SITTING ROOM IN
quiet home, private bath and entrance. Phone, frig included.
$45.00.     AM   6-8078.
Room & Board
82
ROOM. AND BOARD FOR MALE
student. To share with 3rd year
student.     263-6488.
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Selections Committee
The Toronto conference which was to ibe held this
term has been cancelled. Any person who wished to
go to this conference and who now wants to redirect
their application to other conferences, is asked to
contact Mr. Ray Larsen, Chairman of the Selection
Committee.
NEW PAPERBACK ARRIVALS
List No. 74 - December 29, 1965
Administrative Process.  Roy.  (J.  Hopkins.)         1.95
American   Railroads.  Stover.   (U.  of  Chicago)     1.95
American Tory.  Nelson.  (Beacon  Press.)       _        1.90
Ancestors &  Immigrants. Solomon.  (Science Ed.) -   _  1.80
Ancient   Near   East.   Pritchard.   (Princeton   U.P.)         --   --- 3.70
Andrew Jackson: Portrait of a president. James. (Grosset's U.L.)     . 2.50
Atoms, Radiation & Nuclei. Osgood. (Science Ed)          2.25
Balkans.   Jelavich.   (Spectrum.)      .... _    _       2.25
Basic Quantum Chemistry.   Phillips. (Wiley.)        4.25
Bees:  Their vision,  chemical  senses,   language.  Frishh.   (Cornell.)   __ 1.55
Beyond the Hundredth Meridian. Stegner. (Sentry Ed.)     —       2.65
Blackfoot Lodge Tales: the story of a prairie people. Grinned. (Bison
Books)    - 1.60
Blasphemers:  the  theatre of  Brecht,   roesco, Beckett, Genet.  Gross-
vogel.  (Cornell.)   .    .  .   .              2.10
Boy Life on the Prairie. Garland. (Bison Books)       1.50
Calculus on  Manifolds. Spivak.   (Benjamin.)             3.50
California   Gold:   selected   source   materials   for   college   research
papers. Bingham. (Heath) :    2.10
Call  it Sleep.   Roth.  (Avon) •  .95
Canadian  Economic  Policy.  Brewis.  (Macmillan.)                              4.95
Challenge of Development in Latin America. Urquidi. (Praeger)    2.15
Children of the Kibbutz. Spiro. (Schocken Books)                              3.45
Coming   of  the   Revolution   1763-1775.  Gipson.   (Harper  Torch.)   .._ 2.10
Commerce of the Prairies. Gregg. (Lippincott)                             2.10
Common Sense & Other Political  Writings.  Paine.  (Liberal  Arts.) 1.00
Concise   Cambridge   Bibliography   of   English    Literature.   Watson.
(Cambridge U.P.)                                                           —_ 1.95
Cottage   Six:   the   social   system   of   delinquent   boys   in   residential
treatment.   Polsky.   (Science   Ed.)             ...     1.45
Course of Empire. De Voto. (Sentry Ed.)                             -                   2.85
Crazy Horse: the strange man of the Oglalas. Sandoz. (Bison)      - 1.80
Critical   History   of  Old   English    Literature.   Greenfield.   (New   York
U.i>.)           '.._...   2.35
Discord &  Collaboration:  essays  on   international   politics.  Wolfers.
(J.   Hopkins.)                         -  2.25
Domestic  aMnners  of  the  Americans.  Trollope.   (Vintage)         1.65
Econometrics.   Tintner.   (Science   Ed.)                                                    -    — 2.45
Education of Slow Learning Children. Tansley. (Routledge Kegan) 1.90
Frontier & Section:  selected essays of F. J. Turner. (Spectrum)     2.25
Frontier Military Posts of Arizona. Brandes. (Dale S. King)         . 3.25
Frontier  Mind.  Moore.  (McGraw-Hill)                                                         . - 2.40
Geography of Life & Death. Stamp. (Cornell.)                                       . 2.10
German  Social   Democracy  1905-1917.  Schorske.  (Science   Ed.) 2.45
Granger Movement.   Buck.   (Bison   Books)                                         .. _. _ 1.75
Hawthorne.  James.   (Great   Seal   Bks.)                                           ...        _.. 1.45
Hinduism Through the Ages. Sarma.  (Bharakiya Vidya  Bhavan.) 2.50
Human  Problems in Technological Change. Spicer.  (Science Ed.)   __ 1.65
Hunting  of  the   Buffalo.   Branch.   (Bison   Books) ,1.50
Ibsen: a collection of critical essays.  Fjelde.  (Spectrum) 2.25
Immigration as a Factor in American History. Handlin. (Spectrum)       . 2.25
Intro,   to   Special   Relativity.   Smith.   (Benjamin.)           3.50
Joyce,   James.    Ellmann.   (Galaxy)                                     ... 4.35
Look of the West 1860: across the plains to California. Burton. (Bison
Books)                                                      _.        1.75
Making   of   Music.  Williams.   (Cornell.)                     . . .       ..     ....   _... 1.00
Mexican  War.  Singletary.   (U.   of Chicago)          .. 1.75
New American Story. Allen. (Grove Press) 1.90
"New" Math for Teachers & Parents of Elementary School Children.
Barker.    (Fearon.)                           .    .   .                    2.10
Nurse & the Mental Patient. Schwartz.  (Science Ed.) 1.80
Old  Jules.   Sandoz.   (Bison  Books) 1.75
Our Landed Heritage: the public domain  1776-1936.  Robbins. (Bison
Books)            ....             2.10
Patterns  of  Culture.   Benedict.   (Sentry  ed.)                               2.10
Pawnee Hero Stories & Folk-tales. Grinned. (Bison Books)       1.80
Philosophy  of  Language.  Alston.  (Prentice  Hall)                                  1.90
Picasso: his life  & work.  Penrose. (Schocken Bks.)       .. -   -     2.75
Plato  &  Milton.  Samuel.   (Cornell.) 1.55
Political Realism & the Crisis of World Politics. Thompson. (Science)
Ed.)                                                 ____ 1.65
Popular   Gemology.   Pearl.   (Science    Ed.)                                               ... 2.10
Population, Evolution, Birth Control. Hardin. (Freeman)     2.15
Practice of Wlidlife Conservation. Wing.  (Science Ed.) 2.65
Primitive World & It's Transformations. Redfield. (Cornell U.P.) 2.25
Psychological Treatment of Children.  Freud.  (Schocken  Bks.) 1.65
Psvchopathology: a source book. Reed. (Science Ed.) 2.95
Readings in  Ecology.  Kormondy.  (Prentice  Hall.) 4.30
Reasearch Techniques in Human Engineering. Chapanis. (J.  Hopkins.) 2.45
Rome of the Caesars. Africa. (Wiley.) 3.20
Scarcity &  Growth:  the  economics  of  natural  recourse  availability.
Barnett.   (J.   Hopkins.)  2.25
Science and  Imagination.  Nicolson. (Great Seal Bks.)          1.90
Secular   City.   Cox.   Macmillan.)                                                          .... 1.65
Selected  Papers on  Molecular Genetics.  Taylor.  (Academic.) 5.95
Silver.   Taylor.   (Pelican)                                                   . _  2.95
Sociol Science in Nursinq. MacGregor. (Science Ed.) 1.95
Spain in  America  1450-1580.   Bourne.  (University  Paperbacks) 2.50
Story of My Life.  Keller.  (Dell.)                    .       .   . . _ .50
Strange  Empire.  Howard.   (Swan  Pub.)       ...          _ ...     1.25
Techniques  of  Monetary  Control.  Aschheim.  (J.  Hopkins.) 1.95
Thirty  Years of Army  Life  on  the  Border.  Marcy.  (Lippincott) 2.10
To   Hell  with   Culture.   Read.   (Schocken   Bks.)            ... .      1.95
Traaedy:  a view of life. Myers.  (Cornell.) 2.10
Truth   about   Geronimo.   Davis.   (Yale   U.P.) 1.95
Western  Hemisphere Idea:  its rise  and decline. Whitaker.  (Cornell.) 2.10
Westward Movement in the U.S.  Billington.  (Anvil)     _.    ...  1.75
Westward the Briton. Athearn. (Bison Books) 1.75
What   Science   Knows  About   Life:   an   exploration   of   life   sources.
Wolterek.    (M.I.T.   Press) 2.75
Why Do Chemical Reactions Occur? Campbell. (Prentice Hall) 1.65
Year of Decision  1846.  De Voto. (Sentry Ed.)            2.65
"            4.25
Yeats, W.  B.,  1865-1939.  Hone.  (Macmillan)
I      Teats, W.  B.,  1865-1939.  Hone.  (Macmillan)
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