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The Ubyssey Nov 3, 1972

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Array The profs in UBC's politicals
v science.., department; ..have
/ • ahyays; been "proud , of  their
track record in giving students
.representatiori^on -depart;,
'K mental committees.    '!-.''.
Until this week, that is, wlien
graduate   students   in   the
-department told the faculty, to
stuff their token committees
unless they're prepared to give
students a real say in decisionmaking.        .../■ 'J
,t~;A: meeting of slightly more
than half : ther 30 on-carhpus
* grad students Wednesday
unanimously passed a I motion
„ urging a boycott of all joint
committees until students are
given voting'representation in
/faculty meetings/ where final
decisions     on     committee
recommendations  are' made
In addition, the students' at"
^.Wednesday's  meeting? called
* on all graduate students to stop
attending faculty-sponsored
social occasions, described.by
one student as "bridge-
building bullshit."     ."''  -•"";■
To set up an alternative; to
, what they see as a sham Iat-
. tempt to build an academic
community in the department,
the students also plan i to
initiate a series of academic'-:
i. social seminars around, the
general topic of The Politics of
Everyday Life in the! Department. ; ; . ./;'■_/
• The meeting-,! held:; in .- the
department's     lounge// in
:   Buchanan,   had* no 'formal
authority...But student reps," on
■the development,  curriculum
and   liaison   committees   are
. expected to comply with the
* motion, since : their
dissatisfaction with the! lack of
power in committees led to the
/ calling of the meeting;       .
The      political      science
department was one of the first
to   grant   students   representation on committees and. thus
headed off the kind of) dissent'
which   Has   recently i racked.
? other UBC departments such
. as anthropology-sociology
But  complaints   aired   al
Wednesday's meeting show
that  this, representation   has
had little effect on the struc
ture of the department and thai
.. students are just as" effectively
excluded   irom.   decision
making as they, ever were ,
s      "We sit around and:talk to
' the profs on the liaison com
mittee," said one studehl, "but
* we   just   can't" get   a   com
m.ittment' fronv .them   thai
.... they'll, present  our  point   of
view   in   the   departmental
meetings." .;
It was also felt '-"that grad
students are not given credit
for  their  academic  insigbts,
* and that faculty are too often-
indifferent to their needs. ';
"We shouldn't let them go; on
with this.sham, this facade, if
they're not going to give ins rjeal
representation," said another
student. /   f.    j- ,
. The question of Student
representation in departmental meetings came up last
year, when the faculty, voted to
ip defer'consideration of it for one
year.   ...->..■    \\ -'■/ V ■
(Only   faculty   attend   the'
departmental     meetings,
although  minutes  are   cir-
culated to graduate students.)
'■.   The grad students say they,
hope the action taken  Wednesday wilr force the issue;
1-They don't expect- the! faculty-.'-,
./to accede to the:demand,(for
^representation    in    depart-:
mental   meetings,    but   by
- defining   more  clearly   the:
positions of faculty and grad
, students they hope discussion,
/sand  possible  further paction,
-will beeasier;-M■¥■;': d-i ->"■!"' ■■'•''..
Similarly, the boycott of such
social /.occasions as iL Friday"
afternoon /1-studerit-fa'culty
"bear-andbull? sessions" =may
force " profs twho £are ^ym-'
pathetic    -   to student
representation to show  their
true colors.
They, will have to either take
. up.theVcause ol the students in
* the"; meetings 'which" are-.now
closed* and work/to make the
: department 'rmdre /genuinely
democratic, or come down on
the   side  of  those   who   are
against student participation.
The demand for parity in; the
, /departmental: meetings,., which
has   been : present /in:-.other
departmental/^struggles/ at
• UBC .and elsewhere, was rnbt-
; part   of   the   grad- students'
motion: '.}'';'•.
In addition, while the grad
studentsvigordusly denounced
faculty elitism, ;they voted :not
to let undergraduates attend
the academicirsoclal seminars
they plan to organize:-
■-. Some students maintained
that no effective action can be
taken against entrenched
interests in the department
without • support from undergraduates.:/- / :; '.Lr,■:•■'■'.
But the, prevailing feeling
was that "at least for,the first
two or three sessions" the
seminars  should be  open  to
' graduate students only ' "to
give us an opportunity to form
some collecftive opinion1 ourselves." :
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'MY   BALL!'   As  three   Thunderbird  players  await  a  rebound   in Kosmic Basketball  League play begins Sunday.: It's more fun than
Thursday's practise, one is reminded, of Irving Fetish's famous.remark: T-bird play, because there isn't as much sweating and running. But
' "You/cah:t;alwaysgetwhat cybu;warit.''fOrie/is also 'reminded "that .. theVe^mor.eboozing,. moresmoking[arid-more freaks./         •   '   :   , Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, November 3,  1972
Colleges grab grads
A survey of the educational
aspirations of Ei.C. Grade 12
students released Thursday
shows that while the largest
group opted for UBC as their
choice in their foray into
higher learning, a large
number are turning to community colleges.
Of the 91 per cent of the
students who said they would
pursue higher education, 25 per
cent across the province said
they would attend university.
However, the greatest single
proportion of students in
districts where colleges are
located opted for their local
institution.
The survey was conducted
last spring by the B.C.
Research Council and UBC.
Principal researchers were
Alex Tunner, head of
operations lor the council and
associate education prof John
Dennison.
I'rovincially, UBC was the
first choice lor students' higher
education, with 17.5 per cent. A
breakdown for other universities is not given.
Forty-three per cent of the
provincial graduating class
said they planned to continue
their schooling the following
year, with the remainder
iaking time out to work or
travel.
The exact provincial percentage of students who said
they would attend community
colleges was not released, but
figures are given for each
district that show in most cases
more than 25 per cent decided
they would go there.
In Vancouver, 29 per cent of
the students listed Vancouver
City College as their first
choice with an identical percentage planning to go to UBC.
Similarly, Victoria students
were evenly divided at 28 per
cent each between UVic and
nearby Camosun College.
Dennison says the swing to
community colleges came
about for a number of reasons.
"They are closer to home, have
lower fees than universities,
offer academic programs that
are easily transferable to
universities and career
programs leading to jobs.
"And unlike the fairly
traditional entrance patterns
of universities, students can
attend colleges virtually on
their own terms. They can go
as part-time students, take
evening courses only, or attend
two or three days a week. They
can work out timetables that
enable them to hold down
regular jobs as well as attend
college. This is almost impossible at a university," he
said.
Dennison said concern,
voiced when the first of the
nine colleges opened seven
years ago that the college
could become "a dumping
ground lor the academically
inept" have proved unfounded.
Students      placed      their
reasons for being attracted to
the colleges in this order:
program offered (24.8 per
cent), closeness to home (19.9
per cent) and, running a poor
third, teaching reputation (10.4
per cent).
The survey covered about 70
per cent of the B.C. Grade 12
population. Questionnaires
were returned from 140 of the
144 secondary schools in the
province.
The reseachers, who. also
produced the survey of UBC
students' socio-economic
backgrounds released last
month, are now doing a follow-
up survey to see who many of
the students who said they
would continue their education
actually did so.
"Our major objective is to
identify and analyze two
populations of high school
graduates — those who continue on to post-secondary
education and those who do
not," Dennison said.
"We hope to determine the
characteristics which differ in
those populations. Are they
achievement factors or
geographical locations of their
residence? Or are there other
distinguishing variables of
which we are unaware?
"We have reason to suspect,
for example, that many of our
best students aren't going to on
to a post-secondary education.
Perhaps this next survey will
give us some clues as to why
this is so."
Women's status falling
By STKVK BROWN
The status of women in Canada is not improving as some would believe but in certain
areas it is getting worse, sociologist Lynn
MacDonald said Thursday.
Speaking before an audience of 100 in the
SUB ballroom MacDonald said there's been a
slight improvement in the professional areas
such as law or medicine, but these are trivial
compared with the losses in fields traditionally
associated with women.
MacDonald, a graduate of UBC and the
London School of Economics is now an
associate sociology professor at McMaster
University in Hamilton.
She said in education, social work and nursing men are taking more and more jobs and
are getting the majority of senior positions.
Differences in income between men and
women have changed little in 40 years, she
added. Women still are paid on the whole about
(i() per cent of what the men get.
Women have increased their work force in
the industrial and menial work category, she
said.
MacDonald said although legal barriers
preventing women from taking certain jobs are
dropping, the social, educational and
psychological barriers remain.
Men are just not willing to let women work
side by side with them.
She also said women are hindered in trying
to rise out of menial positions because of their
lack of union organization, the fact that unions
are run by males and the woman's recourse to
the law in working disputes is not taken as
seriously as it should be by labor dispute
boards.
Also, qualifications for important jobs are
biased toward men.
In spite of these difficulties there are some
optimistic trends.
"There is a good potential for change," she
said.
"Opportunities for co-operation between
men and women are increasing."
MacDonald also said women are much more
conscious of their status now this increased
awareness is not a passing trend.
Meszaros sues gov't aide
DOWNSVIEW (CUP) — Istvan Meszaros,
the Marxist scholar hired by York University
and now charged with illegal entry to Canada,
is suing Zavie Levine, assistant to immigration
minister Bryce Mackasey.
Levine was quoted in the Globe and Mail as
having said ""this is no golden-haired boy" in
response to a question as to why the federal
government had refused Meszaros' application
for an entry visa. There are unsubstantiated
rumours that Meszaros is a spy for the KGB.
"I have from my lawyer that such a remark
is highly slanderous and I intend to prosecute,"
Meszaros said Oct. 25.
He has also sent a telegram to prime
minister Pierre Trudeau asking that he initiate
a full-scale inquiry into the handling of his case.
The immigration board inquiry to determine
whether or not Meszaros is legally in the
country began Oct. 24, at which time it was
adjourned until Tuesday. On the previous
Monday, Meszaros' lawyer attempted to quash
the inquiry, but the action was dismissed by the
federal courts with costs to Meszaros.
Paul Copeland, Meszaros' lawyer, said the
tone of the inquiry is low-keyed and relaxed.
Ivan Whitehead, a refugee from the 1956
Hungarian uprising, like Meszaros, is counsel
for the immigration department.
The immigration department,IT it can prove
that Meszaros did enter the country illegally,
could begin actions to have the professor
deported.
Meszaros maintains that he came to Canada
to get legal counsel to fight his case after
waiting 17 weeks to hear from the immigration
department in London and finally receiving a
letter prohibiting him from coming to Canada
either as a visitor or an immigrant.
Both Meszaros and Copeland contend that
this letter was illegal, as it assumed powers
reserved for immigration officers at entry
ports. As a British citizen, Meszaros said his
legal advice was that he could travel to any
Commonwealth nation without problems — and
could only be stopped at point of entry.
Copeland said Whitehead has agreed with
this interpretation and that the letter has not
been introduced as evidence in the inquiry.
Meszaros entered the country Sept. 19,
unknown to York and government officials. On
Sept. 22, Mackasey made his review decision
known — the answer was no, and a telegram to
that effect was sent to Meszaros' home in
Brighton, England from York arts dean John
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THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Muzak, lounge emerging from SUB bowels
'SHALL WE JUMP?' queried the man of his nameless companion.
"Shall we pray?" he was answered. Really, these workers survey the
beginnings of the SUB expansion project, slated for completion eight
weeks from now. Plans call for a larger lounge and music room.
Greater comfort and more
breaching space will be the "in
thing" in SUB for 1973, SUB
building manager Graeme
Vance said Thursday.
Everyone is probably
curious as to what those
barricades and all that noise
pollution are doing in SUB, he
said.
There is no need to fear that
the building is being torn down.
An eight-week project, to
renovate and expand on the
lounge and music room, is
what it's all about.
"The project is causing a
great deal of inconvenience at
the present moment, but it's
either that or waiting until next
June," Vance said..
Everything seems to be in
shambles, but there will be a
great deal .more moving space
for students.
The renovations to the
lounge will allow room for 400
students, up from 150 in the old
lounge, and will cost students
$300,000.
The reading room will no
longer exist.
"It is difficult to set up a
lounging area just anywhere at
a reasonable cost, thus losing
the reading room for purposes
of expansion will be much
cheaper," said Vance.
A new reading room with a
few book shelves and desks can
be set up in any available
room, at very little cost.
In order to create a livelier
atmosphere, a new lighting
system will be installed and
various murals and other
forms of art will decorate the
walls.
The music room will be
expanded and a new ventilation system will be installed. The staff in the music
room will be cut and
everything will be run
automatically.
The reason for the cut in staff
is because of a cut in the music
room's budget, from $20,000 to
$4,500.
"There are plenty other
examples which I could give,
showing the great wastage of
valuable space," said Vance.
The project was originally to
have been started last May but
because of the construction
strike-lockout, everything was
delayed, he said.
The renovations will be
completed by Jan. 11973, at the
latest.
Muck
a consumer column
By VAUGHN PALMER
The Evelyn Wood Reading Dynamics course is
once again being advertised on campus and
through the city media.
Regularly, for about five years now, Vancouverites have been subjected to the promises of
this highly touted course — "learn how to read four
to ten times faster . . . comprehend more . . . and
retain what you have read."
Such a course is very tempting to students as
final exams, essays, and long reading lists begin to
pile up.
As a former graduate of Reading Dynamics my
advice is don't waste your time and your money.
I just got a letter from them offering me a free
brush-up course and asking me to spread the word
about the course — "our graduates are our own best
advertising."
Okay, Evelyn Wood, you asked for it.
The Reading Dynamics course involves eight
three-hour lectures for two months.
You are taught "the method", which is increased visualization of reading material (opposite
of speaking every word as you read it) by use of
your hand as a rapidly skimming pacer for your
eyes.
They also throw in some study techniques and
methods of picking "the meat" out of books.
The cost of this is $225 or $195 if you are a
student.
Assuming it worked, it might be worth it.
Speed as defined by Evelyn Wood is the speed at
which you read the material times the percentage
you score on a multiple choice test given right after
you have finished reading.
The flaws in such a system are obvious.
The books read at the lectures are easy stuff,
like John Hersey's Hiroshima, and John Steinbeck's The Pearl — no copies of Ulysses or
Paradise Lost.
Since anybody can score something on multiple
choice tests about either of these books without
having read them, one can flip through 10,000 words
per minute, score 30 per cent on dumb luck and
shazam! — 10,000 words per minute times 30 per
cent — Hey, I read 3,000 words per minute!
The annoyance of the hand skimming over the
page was so uncomfortable and the undivided
concentration required for even light comprehension so demanding that I lost all enjoyment
of reading.
For studying, the speed of the pacer has to be
slowed down so much to grasp all the material you
need for an essay or exam that it is next to useless.
Results, except for when I want to skim through
Time magazine, I read normally at a nice conservative 600 words per minute.
The cost of the course is ridiculously high for
most students. The question is why?
For 24 hours of lectures, the 20 students in each
course pay $195-$225 each or about $4,000.
That means the institute collects $15 an hour for
the lectures they provide.
Assuming they pay the highest rates to their
instructors, who may have several courses going at
once, and assuming the rental rates for their
buildings are also ridiculous, somebody's still
making a very tidy profit.
The study skills Evelyn Wood offers, and the
increase in reading speed they magically
guarantee can be gained by much cheaper, less
colorful means.
The centre of continuing education offers a six-
week course in reading improvement starting Feb.
5 at a cost to students of only $30.
Of this course, Don Mosdale of the centre says
simply that he would not compare it to Evelyn
Wood, but they have had 4,000 graduates who have,
through hard work, improved their reading.
Phone him at 228-2181. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  November 3,   1972
Decisions
We're really disappointed in the political science
graduate students.
Protesting the elitism of the political science
professors they decide to withdraw from departmental
committee meetings and Friday afternoon beer sessions at
the faculty club.
They know decisions are not made at the committee
or beer drinking level.
They want a more democratic department. They
want graduate students at the faculty meetings where the
decisions are made.
That's all well and good. But their level of
consciousness seems to end there.
The graduate students then decided to have their
own academic-social seminars to discuss the politics of the
department and ways to democratize it.
However, they decided undergraduate students
would not be allowed to attend these seminars.
Instead of working with the undergraduates to
restructure the department, they exclude them from
participation.
What does democratization mean? That only
graduate students should have representation on
department committees and only they should attend
faculty meetings?
We think not. If there is to be real democratization
of the university, all students and professors must
participate in the decision making process.
The division between graduates and undergraduates
is an artificial one. In trying to create a more democratic
university the poli sci graduate students fell into the old
power structure trap.
Someone always has to be on the bottom. Everyone
cannot have equal representation. In this case the graduate
students were being screwed around by the faculty, so
they screw around the undergraduates.
We think this elitism should be stopped. We suggest
undergraduates attend the graduate seminars.
Election blues
Well, the elections are over and democracy has been
done.
The political stage is set, complete with chorus of
bleeding-heart liberals crying them ol' minority blues
again.
The three major roles, as expected, have been taken
by Pierre (child of the universe) Trudeau, Robert Louis
Stanfield and little Davie Lewis.
Each wants to be the star but none are in a position
to do much about it.
It's a cinch Trudeau is in no shape to enhance his
position. With whatever momentum the campaign
produced going to the Tories, Trudeau can only lose seats
by calling another election.
Stanfield is in a similar position. Although he would
probably gain a few seats if another election were called, it
is doubtful he could make enough gains to change the
present situation substantially.
If Stanfield fails to make gains in the next election,
he could face a major revolt from Conservative premiers
Peter Lougheed and Bill Davis.
Stanfield's big problem is Quebec, where there is
little he can do to gain votes, short of resurrecting Sam
Champlain.
This leaves little David. His New Democratic Party,
with only 30 seats and 18 per cent of the electorate, now
holds power far out of proportion to its size.
But David, it seems, is in no condition to fight
another election either.
So David isn't kidding when he says he's not
particularly interested in upsetting the next government.
It seems all three leaders have good reasons for not
wanting an election.
Since it is not in their interests to call an election,
the politicians have no choice but to attempt to govern.
These attempts should reveal quite a bit about where
the fine dividing line between principles and pragmatism
actually lies.
To put it crudely, the politicians are caught by the
short and curlies in full public view.
Who? What? When? Where? and especially, Why?
Not to mention, under the influence of What?
•mm***
COfAPtJLTef
INSANE!
Letters
Exception
I must take exception to your
reply to professor Robert
Osborne's letter of Oct. 27.
Your intimation that the men's
athletic's budget is spent
"primarily... for things like
slying a football team to Hawaii"
is completely untrue.
The UBC football team last
travelled to Hawaii in 1966. That
year, and in all years, the
University of Hawaii provided a
substantial guarantee. The net
effect was that UBC students did
not have to pay one cent for this
competition.
One other point which is often
overlooked by opponents of the
athletic program is that UBC has
one of the largest sports programs
in North America, with over 26
active sports. In addition, student
funds for the program are among
the lowest per capita of any
Canadian university.
In closing, I would like to
mention that the AMS council
was highly involved in the
planning and implementation of
Recreation UBC. I suggest in
future that if you are going to poll
student opinion you consult with
your student council as well as
individuals and rumors.
Morley Jameson
president
Men's Athletic Association
Credit 1-2
In a previous letter I questioned Leo Fox's statement that a
credit union could solve the
problems of financing AMS projects, for "all the profits of
ownership would accrue to us".
Subsequently Fox asked for
details as to why the AMS would
not profit from such a venture.
The answer is simple. Credit
unions in B.C. operate under
provincial government laws which
restrict ownership to individual
depositors and all profits must be
returned as interest dividends to
these shareholders, (ie. a group,
or society, cannot participate in
ownership).
In last Friday's letters Dave
Dick, the AMS treasurer, supported the credit union proposal
and said he hoped the now
forming National Association of
Students would work on the
project. Dave also seems to be on
THI UBYSSEY
NOVEMBER 3, 1972
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The
Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room 241K of the
Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2307; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977.
Co-editors: John Andersen, Jan O'Brien
The newsroom crew groaned with relief Thursday as John Andersen
flew off in the big bird to 'Frisco. "Get's the authoritarian dildo out'of our
hair," Lesley Krueger told Karen Neilson as she put Vaugh Palmer back in
his drawer. However, Mike Sasges quickly pointed out that Jan O'Brien was
still around, but that Berton Woodward was thinking of dropping out. Paul
Knox, that grand old man, said he shouldn't. David Schmidt said he was
easy. Christine Krawczyk wasn't. Steve Brown said they were all crazy, and
went to Pit. Getting it all down in the darkroom were Sucha Singh and Ed
Dubois. At the sports desk, Kent Spencer's kids — Simon Truelove, Brian
Murphy and Doug Higgms— sleezed.
the wrong track for, in addition to
the above, a credit union cannot
extend beyond provincial borders,
i.e. you can't have a "national"
credit union.
If the society can't start its
own credit union, then it should
investigate the possibilities of
establishing its own bank. This
should not be as much of a
gamble as buying and operating
SUB food services, for the percentage of bankruptcies for banks
is much lower than restaurants.
Al Vince
student publications manager
Shoch
Re: The incipient thug in grad
studies 9 who so adequately
bemirched (sic) the letters page
last Thursday.
We are dismayed and shocked
that he still roams the campus
unhindered. Why has no one had
the good sense (sic) and Keenness
(sic) of judgment to rob this
intellectual jelly-fish of his pitiful
existance. Listen to reason
brothers. Dispatch him to the
heavens before his copious
overflows murder another paper,
before he again opens the bowel
of his neck and floods the campus
with his crass vacuities.
In closing we invite him to our
fine room (15th NB-3 Wally Gage
Towers) so that we may view his
mace and marvel in it and massage
it with our sharpest meat-cleaver.
We hymm!
Stuart Foster
engineering 3
Papering
My letter is directed not to the
editors but to any members of the
Communist Party of Canada
(Marxist-Leninist) who may be
reading.
Now that the federal election is
over, may I modestly suggest that
you cease, or at least reduce, your Friday, November 3,  1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
papering of buildings, light
standards, garbage cans, etc.
Perhaps you could even remove
your old posters, though it does
seem a shame after your efforts to
affix them so securely.
Although I would be the last to
suggest any repressive action, I
think perhaps one poster per
billboard would be adequate to
convey any stirring message in the
future. One day I was greeted by
so many of your posters that I
was sure the glorious revolution
was upon us. I'm sure your party
would be the first to try to clear
up any such confusion. I fear thai:
if another federal election occurs
shortly many of our concrete
walls will disappear completely.
And remember, as Smokey the
Reactionary Bear says: "Protect
our forests!"
Yours in comradeship,
George Abbott
arts 2
Bacteria
I write in regard to the
infamous bacterial phenomena
known popularly as GIR. It has
been known for a great many
years, to scientists, that this strain
in its early development stages
produces a highly corrosive
substance which will, under
prolonged exposure, infect the
brain of the victim and slowly
deterriorate all thinking and
operating centres.
On initial synthesis it was
thought that perhaps this bacteria
would be useful in warfare, but
after exhausting tests by my
research staff and I, proven results
indicated that prolonged
treatment to its growth tended to
modify the developing bacteria to
a type which maintains an
immunity to all, formerly
effective, anti-bacterial drugs and
techniques.
Therefore we decided, at that
time, to suppress the knowledge
of the 'germ' as the idea of a wild
mind-destroying strain of bacteria
freely exposed to the world is not
particularly desireable. Yet as you
well know our efforts were
frutlss and research,
independently as well as
government-controlled, continues.
It has come to my attention,
on first attending this university
that activities have been taking
place here and which surprisingly
enough, are condined by the
university, and which directly
oppose the security and well-being
of the people.
Specifically I refer to the
unusual effects obviously due to
an immature strain of GIR that
has  been  released  to  the   local
Letters
atmosphere. Certain
characteristics, fortunately, insure
that the bacteria's travel is limited
and that its area of effectiveness
has been confined to a few
thousand square feet surrounding
the west end of the campus.
Nonetheless its affinity for red
colored materials had let it to
infect freely one type of individual known here as the engineer.
Unless properly isolated, identified and tested this bacteria will
be difficult if not impossible to
stop.
We must rally together as
human beings and call a halt to
the development of something
that could destroy us all. Already
it has effectively destroyed the
intellect and usefullness of the
engineers.
It is my personal belief that the
Cihj tli^dU Tfuatr*
685-5631 lSOEMadfas
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"TAKING OFF" 8:00 p.m.
A Milos Forman Film
"BARBARELLA" 9:45 p.m.
Jane Fonda
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FRIDAY AND SATURDAY — 99c
MARX BROS, in
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"Ma and Pa Kettle on
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Marcel Home in a
Fireflight Concert— 8:45 p.m.
Live firebreathing and
light show (Mon.-Sat. only)
"I Never Sang For
My Father" 9:15 p.m.
Melvyn Douglas
GIR now present in those unfortunate individuals has developed to
a stage in which they are actually
controlling their minds and controlling what, where and how they
function.
The GIR is not stupid, mind
you, merely warped and morally
decadent. If their progress is left
unimpeded they could remain
inconspicuous within the bodies
of engineers until the time comes
to strike. They then will rule
unmercifully. In other words -
today UBC, tomorrow the world.
We therefore must rally behind
the flag of science  and destroy
these growths before we ourselves
are destroyed.
Sincerely,
Ron Vanderhelm
science 1
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JOSEPH WISEMAN JILL IRELAND   WALTER CHIARI   GERALD S   OLOUGHLIN
Screenplay by STEPHEN GELLER   Based on Ihe book "The Valachi Papers'   by PETER   MAAS
Music by RIZ ORTOLANI   From Columbia Pictures
MATURE: Warning: Coarse language
Swearing and brutality
R. W. McDonald, B.C. Director
Vogue
918 GRANVILLE
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SHOW TIMES:
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Hyland Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  November 3,   1972
OFS may
halt fee
demo plan
TORONTO (CUP) — The
Ontario Federation of Students
may be forced- to scrap plans
for a mass demonstration
against the provincial
government following the
University of Toronto student
council's refusal to participate.
Council refused to go along
with the protest, defeating the
proposal by a recent three-to-
two margin. An OFS general
meeting, would have brought
students from member
campuses across the province
to Toronto for the opening of
the provincial legislature early
next month.
Earlier this month, students
overwhelmingly endorsed OFS
demands for repeal of last
spring's $100-tuition fee hike
and increased student loan
ceilings, increased accessibility to student aid
schemes, and full consultation
of all concerned before any
further detrimental changes to
post-secondary financing
programs occur. They also
voted to withhold second term
tuition fees if negotiations with
the government fail.
Delegates from U of T,
Queen's University and the
University of Western Ontario,
representing the largest
member schools and the
constituencies which had most
strongly supported the OFS
demands in the province-wide
referendum, had opposed the
demonstration at the general
meeting.
OFS general co-ordinator
Craig Heron cautioned the U of
T council: "If U of T drops out,
it will cause a hell of a lot of
damage." He conceded that
the demonstration would not
likely be held denied U of T
support.
Debate on the protest
focussed on possible negative
public reaction and the amount
of time and organization
required., An engineering SAC
rep suggested it would be best
to sit back and negotiate for
more "credibility" rather than
staging the demonstration.
Ironically, the council
passed another OFS motion
supporting momentum-
building actions in the community and educational institutions prior to the
demonstration.
Heron said Sunday the OFS
executive would meet early
this week to decide whether to
cancel the demonstration.
No quorum
—no council
Wednesday's Alma Mater
Society council meeting was
cancelled due to lack of a
quorum AMS executive
secretary Marilyn Rayonas
said Thursday.
AMS president Doug
Aldridge and co-ordinator Bob
Angus were at conferences in
Ontario, where they will be
until Monday.
They are now attending the
Association of Universities and
Community Colleges conference in Toronto and will be
joined later by treasurer David
Dick and external affairs officer Terri Ball at the National
Students' Union conference in
Ottawa.
The NSU replaces the old
Canadian Students' Union.
Ideal for Students
SUMMER 1973
CAMPING TOURS
OF EUROPE!
5 WEEKS - SURF CAMPING TOUR - $260.00
(plus food kitty $37)
France, Spain, Portugal, Morocco
5 WEEKS - RUSSIA/SCANDINAVIA - $299.00
(plus food kitty $50)
Belgium, Holland, Germany, Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Finland, Russia,
Poland
6 WEEKS - GRAND EUROPEAN - $329.00
(plus food kitty $45)
Belgium,   Holland, Germany, Switzerland, Austria, Italy, Monaco, Spain,
Andorra, France
9 WEEKS - GREEK/SPANISH/TURKISH - $475
(plus food kitty $67)
France,    Andorra,    Spain,    Monaco,    Italy,    Greece,    Turkey,    Bulgaria,
Yugoslavia, Austria, Switzerland, Germany, Holland, Belgium
ALSO: 2-WEEK, 3-WEEK, 4-WEEK TOURS -
INQUIRE FOR DETAILS!
Book   early!   Students   from   many   countries   are   making
reservations now. You'll meet them in Europe!
We're in "THE VILLAGE"
"tef
burhe's
world wide travel
5700 University Blvd.
Phone 224-4391
CHOOSING THE RIGHT
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We'd like to offer you a challenge — a career in
dealing with professionals — a career in Life
insurance sales and/or sales management.
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unusually high measure of security and
personal satisfaction.
We know it isn't easy choosing the right career.
Perhaps we at Metropolitan Life can help you
make the right choice. Why not drop by and
see us. We'll be on Campus on:
November 1 and 2
Metropolitan
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We sell life insurance
But our business is life
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PRODUCT
OF NISSAN  Drama
Ubo Roi 'obscure'
Theatre is an illusion.
The dimming of the lights is the threshold
of our sleep, we close our eyes and slip into
the realm of dreams. We,as the audience,
do not doubt our reality, nor the reality of
watching an illusion. However, what would
happen if six characters, refugees from
another illusion, encroach upon the illusion
before us on stage? Pirandello's Six
Characters in Search of an Author explores
this perplexing question.
The illusion we are presented with is a
play entitled Ubo Roi. Director Alfred
Jarry, (Brian Haigh) welcomes us to his
production. Thirteen characters
materialize and Ubo Roi begins. It is a
piece of bombastic, frenetic and frenzied
theatre. The stage is a menagerie of rope
ladders, trapezes, raised platforms, endless stairways and exit curtains. The
various costumes the character wear;
clowns, strong men, trapexe artists, create
the circus atmosphere.
The focus of Ubu Roi is the quips and
barbs exchanged between Mr. ans Mrs.
Ubu. The other characters are a chorus. All
the dialogue and movement is stylized and
farcical. Men swing from the trapeze,
women do carwheels, everyone is in constant motion.
The burlesque atmosphere is abruptly
shattered by the intrusion of six characters. Sombre and conventional, the
characters dress, mannerisms and
dialogue are suited for an Ibsen play, and
bear little relation to Jarry's.  A father
(Matthew Walker), a mother (Eleanor
Nicholls), a son (Kenneth Ryan), a stepdaughter (Susan Jones and a boy and girl
are unresolved characters, in desperate
need of a playwright to complete their play
and their lives.
. Each character is compelled to play the
role he or she was cast in. Walker plays the
hypocritical and weak father smoothly, but
falls down when he must sustain high
emotion. Nicholls is the broken, ruined wife
who took a lover. Reproachful stares and
stony silences carry it off. Ryan handles
the arrogant, insensitive and callous role of
the son admirably. Jones' management of
the stepdaughter's role is not as successful.
The daughter is the lover's child, and she
is consumed by bitter revenge, uncontrollable hatred and inescapable
emotional scars. Jones is not convincing.
While the six characters struggle for
truth, the Ubu Roi cast never leaves the
stage. Raymond Clarke, director of the
entire production, has them mock the
characters, interject frequently or recreate
scenes from the characters' lives. It is
somewhat overdone, however. The comments, the retorts are distracting and interfere with an even continuity. At times
the Ubu Roi cast is too "busy" and shifts
our focus from the six characters.
Pirandello does not have a message, but
the extraneous movement and too casual
approach, bordering on flippancy, obscure
even further an already obscure play.
—Steve Morris
Books
No enlightened junk
You're straightening out with a cap of
heroin when the harness bulls break down
the door. They grab your machine and your
nuts. You try to jam the caps down your
throat, but the choke-hold they've got won't
let you swallow.
Billie Miller is a junkie. Booster, pimp,
con man and trafficker too. His 37 years
have been spent shooting junk in the flop
houses, shacking up with prostitutes and
behind the bars of numerous institutions.
Billie is a book about Billie Miller.
Novelist David Helwig edited Billie's
manuscript after meeting him in Collins
Bay Penitentiary in 1971.
Billie's story begins with his childhood in
Hamilton. His father was an alcoholic, his
mother slung hash and a bottle after hours.
Billie, the eldest of six kids, looked after the
household. There was never enough money,
and to make ends meet, 10 year-old Billie
stole. Authorities sentenced him to four
years in a juvenile delinquent home, and
from then on, it was one institution after
another:
The book is a detailed account of what
Billie did, where and with whom. We're
outside the Waldorf in Toronto when he
first met Norma, his 15-year-old prostitute
girl friend. We're in Millbrook when the
guards sadistically beat him. We're
shooting heroin with him in seedy hotels.
The book makes no attempt to be a
sociological or psychological case study.
Such perspectives are beyond Billie's
educational background. Any explanations
for Billie's condition, his relationship with
society or the forces which molded him
must be extracted from his eye-witness
narrative.
But after the twentieth raid and twentieth
beating, the horror of the junkie's life
escapes us. We get the picture, and the
story could be compressed to a third of its
length. Billie is entertaining, but not
enlightening.
—Steve Morris
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Page Friday, 2
THE       UBYSSEY
SUB FILM SOC PRESENTS
BREWSTER
McCLOUD
with
Bud Cort
Sally Keilerman
Michael Murphy
Stacy Keach
Directed by
Robert Altman
•
S.U.B.
AUD.
50c
Nov. 2-5
Thur.,7:00
•
Fri. and Sat.
7:00 and 9:30
•
Sun. 7:00
Friday,  November 3,   1972 ELECTION
1972
I
SPECIAL  LlH
REPORT
I
What rough beast
slouches to Ottawa ?
Things fall apart, the centre cannot hold
Mere Stanfield is loosed upon the world
Kicking his way through the broken sprockets and flywheels of the Liberal machine, Energy Minister Donald
Macdonald, a man likely to be assigned to try to put
it all together again, proclaimed the dreaded "backlash."
It was " ... a Tory redneck attack on Quebec," said
Mr. Macdonald. "It was an attack on the Government's
bilingualism policy, even though it didn't concern most
of Ontario."
Macdonald, the dispenser of favours and collector of
dues for the federal Liberals in Ontario, had just spent
a humiliating evening in his Toronto Rosedale constituency fighting off somebody named Beamish. He
warmed to his subject: "Immigration was also an issue.
They [the voters] were against immigration, French
Canada and better social justice ... that seems to be
the mood in Ontario and it's a pretty ugly mood."
Similiar thoughts sprang from the lips of other Liberals.
Gerard Pelletier, for example, put the Liberal defeat
down to greed — the rich provinces got tired of sending
money to the poor ones. Thus we are to believe that
the election was a classic confrontation between niceness
and charity, and nastiness and greed. The bad guys won.
It is a neat theory, and it partly explains what happened.
Robert Stanfield, cast in the mould of earnest incompetence, did provide shade for the weirdest assortment of
people — from the Nazi-minded Kupiak running in
Toronto's Lakeshore (he proclaimed that his victory
would embarrass Brezhnev more than both Bobby Fischer
and Team Canada .— fortunately we were all spared)
— to the blimpish Lt.-Col. (Ret.) Strome Galloway (big
on discipline up there in Ottawa-Carleton).
It was not only the strange cast the Conservative party
chose, but the lines it gave them to speak, including
the platitudes of the leader himself, that lend credence
to Macdonald's charges.
The election in English Canada was fought by the
Tories in a manner calculated to pander to latent racism.
Peter Reilly, the successful Conservative candidate in
Ottawa West, sensed it early in the campaign. "There
is a good deal of racism being given new life in this
area," he said. "It masquerades as being concern for
public servants." Reilly went on to say that racism "will
not be tolerated in my campaign." He then campaigned
against the federal government's policy of bilingualism;
the following passage appears in an article by Clair Balfour in the Toronto Globe and Mail:
"But he [Reilly] repeated that merit should be the
sole criterion for success in a public service career,
regardless of language.
'' He added the problem is so serious that the only
solution may be to slow the program to be fair to public
servants.
"That form of fairness to the English-speaking means
being unfair to French-speaking Canadians, he was
reminded. He shot back: 'I've never believed you rectify
one injustice by perpetrating a second one.' "
This supplement was prepared by Nick Auf der
Maur, Ken Bolton, Drummond Burgess, Robert
Chodos, Nick Fillmore, Dennis Forkin, Sharon
Gray, Dennis Gruending, Eric Hamovitch,
Richard Liskeard, Brian McKenna, Terry Mosher,
Rae Murphy, Malcolm Reid.
Berthio, Le Devoir
Bilingualism and biculturalism and the federalism represented by Trudeau were inventions of English Canada
to stifle separatism in Quebec without dealing with the
issue. What happens now, when even the empty gesture
is withdrawn?
Trudeau's
broken dream
Prime Minister Trudeau didn't fare too well at a
Chicoutimi rally only three days before the election. A
bunch of hostile students greeted him with the slogan
"Le Quebec aux Quebecois" to which he replied "Le
Canada aux Quebecois," thus confirming the fears of
those who were concerned that the prime minister was
engaging in "outright French Canadianism," to borrow
a phrase from Douglas Alkenbrack, Tory MP for the
eastern-Ontario riding of Frontenac-Lennox and Adding-
ton — heavy Loyalist sentiment there.
Whether Trudeau knew it or not, part of his 1968
mandate came from English Canadians who were fed
up with the antics of disgruntled Quebecois and felt that
at last here was a man to put them in their place. After
all, he was pretty tough on separatism, and he could
be tough with the separatists in their own language, no
mean feat. Besides, what harm could a few Frenchmen
do in Ottawa?
Trudeau has been tough on separatism — he delivered
a double whammy to some 497 law-abiding opponents
of the regime in October 1970. He has also engaged
in the tactic of sweet reason. (His reason may not have
been sound, but it was sweet.) By allowing French-
speaking Canadians to communicate with and work in
the federal civil service in his father-tongue (his mother
is English-speaking), what Trudeau regarded as the frustration which gave rise to Quebec nationalism could
largely be siphoned off, or so he reasoned.
Trudeau seems to have lost on two counts in his efforts
to bilingualize the civil service. On the one hand, he
misinterpreted the recommendations of the B&B Commission to read that all civil servants should be bilingual:
by jeopardizing the advancement of those who could
not speak French and by thrusting language courses upon
thousands of unwilling subjects, he alienated a substantial
number of Ottawa's deeply-ingrained English-speaking
civil servants (the Liberals lost two Ottawa-area seats
to the Tories).
On the other hand, his policy has failed to produce
substantial positive results. A report leaked to the
nationalist Montreal daily Le Devoir (and picked up by
the Toronto Star — strange ally — and other English-
language papers across the country) shows that the proportion of French-speaking people holding high posts in
the federal civil service has not increased appreciably
since Trudeau came into power.
The report says that 71 per cent of those hired to
fill such posts are unilingual English Canadians, that
only 5.2 per cent of civil servants in Ottawa are in French-
language units (1.1 per cent if you exclude language
services such as the overburdened translation bureau),
that only 8.1 per cent of those who take language courses
follow them far enough to obtain proficiency in French
(it costs $29,000 to make an English-speaking civil servant bilingual), and that there are no French-language
units in the prime minister's own department.
The federal civil service recruitment office in Quebec
City, which has by far the largest number of qualified
and experienced French-speaking civil servants of any
Canadian city, was closed as part of Trudeau's 1969
austerity drive. The 1975 target date for full bilingualism
in the civil service cannot possibly be met.
Yet there prevails among English Canadians the sentiment that somehow Trudeau is turning Canada into a
French country in which English-speaking citizens are
gradually losing their rights, and that the Quebec ministers in the federal government are sub-Canadians.
Late in the campaign Robert Stanfield admonished
two of his candidates for using advertisements that had
racist overtones. An ad for a Tory candidate in Thunder
Bay read, " John Erickson knows that we need a Canadian
(Continued on page 2)
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Cartoons by Aislin, 1
rhe Gazette
Friday,  November 3,   1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 A gift for Rene Levesque
The cartoon in La Presse summed up what the French
newspapers and radio hot lines were saying the day after
the deluge. Pierre Trudeau and three Quebec ministers
— Jean Marchand, Gerard Pelletier and Jean-Luc Pepin
— are depicted in a lifeboat, looking melancholy and
wearing life jackets. The name of the boat is "French
Power." And the tiller man is saying Tout I'monde
debarque.
The 32-year-old executive assistant to another Quebec
minister had trouble disguising his tears as the final results
from the west rolled in. "The bastards," he spat out,
"the bastards gave it to Levesque on a silver platter.
We sell Quebecers on the idea that French Canadians
can participate in federalism and play an equal role in
running the country. And just when it's starting to work,
English Canada kicks us in the teeth."
"It's a victory for wealth and bigotry," added a Liberal
backbencher from a Montreal working-class riding.
"And never mind the Tories or the NDP. A lot of the
Liberals who went down in Ontario and the West will
blame their defeat on nothing but the backlash to French
power. It's obviously a victory for Levesque and what
he's been saying. I almost hope Trudeau lets Stanfield
form a government. I think we would be very interesting
in opposition, especially since the only French cabinet
minister the Tories would have would be that pig
Wagner."
Quebec independentists were gleeful with the results,
calling the Conservative showing a "triomphe oran-
giste," and a crushing blow for Trudeau's brand of bicul-
tural federalism. "This shows us that Canada will never
accept a strong French presence in government and the
Ottawa bureaucracy," said Camille Laurin, Parti
Quebecois leader in the National Assembly. "The only
conclusion Quebecois can draw from this is simple. The
only government we can ever call our own has to be
located in Quebec City and not Ottawa."
Laurin's view was reinforced as he stepped into a
taxi the morning after the election.'' Hey'' said the driver,
"they told us they don't want us in Ottawa, eh, M.
Laurin. I guess we'll have to go with you guys." This
attitude was shared overwhelmingly by independentists
of all stripes in Quebec.
Pequistes noted that not only was over half the Liberal
representation in Quebec, but that many elected outside
the province were from French areas, like the five Acadian constituencies in New Brunswick, parts of Ontario
and St. Boniface in Manitoba. Only one candidate in
Quebec was endorsed by Rene Levesque and that was
Roch LaSalle, an independent who defected from the
Conservatives. Levesque even did some campaigning
for LaSalle in Joliette. In 1968 the nationalist MP was
elected by a margin of 172 votes as a Conservative.
This time he won by 5,000.
The feeling is that the results underscore Quebec's
isolation from the rest of Canada and will provide an
enormous amount of fodder for the PQ propaganda
machine. "We're going to say, 'you tried Trudeau's
road to Ottawa and it's a dead end'" explains one PQ
strategist. "The only road left is the road to independence."
The Pequiste explained that the party is gearing for
an influx of disappointed and disenchanted federalists.
"This federal election has turned out to be the greatest
recruitment program we could have imagined."
Left-wing unionists are somewhat fearful that an influx
of disillusioned federal Liberals will further prevent the
PQ from becoming a party of the left.
As for the Conservatives, they were all but demolished
in Quebec, losing almost 10 percentage points of their
popular vote, mostly to the Creditistes. Claude Wagner,
whose popular appeal was supposed to have built a solid
Conservative base in the province, barely scraped in in
St. Hyacinthe, winning by some 700 votes. The rest
of the Tories' Quebec caucus is composed of Heward
Grafftey, who is not on speaking terms with Wagner;
in fact, they loathe each other. Grafftey managed to
get elected by the simple expedient of never mentioning
either Stanfield or Wagner in his speeches or his campaign
literature.
The Conservatives had trouble making third place in
most Montreal ridings, usually losing out to Creditistes
and NDPers. The Liberal vote was so all-encompassing
in the 30 Montreal area seats that a grand total of only
two opposition candidates managed to save their deposits.
However, voter turnout, especially in the Pequiste
strongholds in the east-end working-class areas was very
poor. In some areas it was not even 40 per cent.
(Continued from page 1)
Cabinet and a Prime Minister that will represent all Canadians." Jack Horner, re-elected with a huge majority
in the Alberta riding of Crowfoot, advertised against
overexpenditure of federal money in Quebec.
In most parts of the country though, anti-Quebec feeling was not expressed quite so explicitly. British Columbians regard French as a foreign language, making the
Ottawa government seem all the more distant and alleviating the need for any explicit reference to the "French
issue." The same is true, to a large extent, for other
parts of the country.
Trudeau's most spectacular move during his time in
office was undoubtedly his invocation of the War
Measures Act in the absence of war or insurrection.
He told a Regina audience sarcastically that the opposition would also have taken a stand against the FLQ,
but "somehow the War Measures Act would have been
different. It would have been gentler." Liberal minister
Otto Lang told a Saskatoon rally that Trudeau had shown
himself to be "strong in that he would not be bullied
or blackmailed."
But one of the big surprises of the campaign was that
Trudeau did not play this up any more than he did.
Had he done so, he would likely have lost far less of
the anti-Quebec vote.
Trudeau's Quebec policy has been two-pronged, bilingualism on the one hand and the War Measures Act
on the other. He could have run on the WMA part,
but he didn't; he didn't run the anti-Quebec campaign
many had expected. Defending bilingualism became a
bit difficult after that report was leaked, but he stuck
to it.
Trudeau was supported in 1968 as a good Frenchman,
a credit to his race, so to speak. Now people aren't
so satisfied he's such a credit.
Of course, the racism implicit in the campaign against
the "privileged position of the French" was not all.
There was the cooked-up scandal over immigration: was
Canada's purity being undermined by uncontrolled
immigration policies? And the Canadian people were
also told that they were victimized by the unemployed.
In the Toronto riding of Scarborough East, the elected
Conservative was doused with champagne while he sliced
into his victory cake. People are fed up with the welfare
state, he told his cheering supporters. One of his chief
campaigners, an Ontario cabinet minister, gushed that
"mothers were concerned about the direction youth was
taking with government handouts."
Meanwhile, the defeated candidate, Labour Minister
Martin O'Connell, blamed his defeat on an "irritable,
grouchy" electorate. "The underlying issue," he said
"may well have been that middle income people were
not prepared to accept any more of the burden of the
just ... or more equal society."
The mean, miserable and reactionary campaign that
the Tories waged seemed to merge with the bitchy mood
abroad in the land. But then who created the national
grouch? Things really haven't been working out right
in Canada for a number of years.
An honoured place in the body of Canadian political
mythology is occupied by something called "traditional
voting patterns." These patterns are supposed to recur,
comet-like, at regular intervals, coinciding with general
elections. Their one function in life is to "reassert themselves."
The problem with the concept is that there are almost
no voting patterns in this country that have remained
"Everybody off"
Girerd, La Presse
Page Friday, 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, November 3,  1972 BELAND HONDERICH'S ADVICE
On foreign ownership, the Conservatives say
in a policy statement they would require that Canadians be allowed to participate in the ownership
and management of foreign controlled firms.
But Stanfield has said little about this program
or how it would be accomplished and, in fact,
has made statements recently which suggest he
would do little or nothing about foreign ownership.
He apparently is not prepared to establish a screening board and without a review board his policy
on foreign ownership is not credible.
The easy way for a newspaper, as for a citizen,
would be not to support any party in this election.
But this is not a responsible course for a citizen
in a democratic society — or for a newspaper that
believes it has a responsibility to provide comment
and opinion on the issues of the day.
We have concluded, therefore, that on the basis
of the two issues that concern us most—unemployment and Canadian independence — we must withdraw our support from the Liberals ... Of the
alternatives, both of which are unattractive, we
prefer the Conservatives.
— Beland H. Honderich, Toronto Star
stable for long enough that they could be called "traditional." British Columbia, for instance, will return
pluralities of Liberals, Conservatives or New Democrats,
depending on its mood.
Ontario oscillates back and forth between the Liberals
and the Tories. Newfoundland, once solidly Liberal,
then became solidly Conservative, and now isn't solid
at all.
The only pattern that seems to be stable is a continuing
instability. Five of the last seven elections have produced
minority governments, and three of them have been
totally inconclusive. Only twice in the last 15 years has
there been a countrywide trend of any kind, and only
once has there been a genuine sweep. John Diefenbaker,
in 1958, took a majority of the seats in every province
except Newfoundland. He won two thirds of the seats
in previously Liberal Quebec. He shut the Liberals out
in all except four provinces.
Pierre Elliott Trudeau's election in 1968 was a majority
of a different order. The Liberals took fifty seats fewer
then the Conservatives had ten years earlier. Large parts
of the country resisted Trudeau's appeal.
Newfoundland, bucking the tide again, voted Conservative out of dissatisfaction with the provincial Liberal
regime. In the Maritimes it was Robert Stanfield's coat-
tails, not Trudeau's, that were the decisive factor. The
prairies were still Diefenbaker country, and a large proportion of the people who drifted away from the Conservatives went NDP rather than Liberal. To the extent that
there was a sweep, it was concentrated in the three large
provinces of Quebec, Ontario and British Columbia.
And yet, in the context of 1968, the Trudeau victory
was a landslide. The country had had minority governments for the previous six years, and the happy political
certainty of the Louis St-Laurent era was evidently a
thing of the past. With Quebec crawling with separatists,
the west mad at the east, and campus-based radicalism
at its height across the country, a majority of any sort
was not to be sneezed at.
The man who achieved it had unquestionably struck
a popular chord. He would put us on the map, keep
the country together, give us some elan. It was 1968,
the year after Expo and the centennial, and in the Canada
that elected Pierre Elliott Trudeau, all things were possible.
There were two overriding promises in Trudeau's 1968
campaign, one of them explicit, and the other implicit.
The implicit promise was to do something about Quebec;
the explicit one was to do something about regional
economic disparities. "If the underdevelopment of the
Atlantic provinces," Trudeau said during the campaign,
"is not corrected — not by charity or subsidies but by
helping them become areas of economic growth — then
the unity of the country is almost as surely destroyed
as it would be by the French-English confrontation."
The Quebec policy was not the only one to have problems; the regional development policy ran into snags
too. The first snag was the Liberals' sorry weakness
in the Atlantic provinces, and the improbability of winning any more seats in that region so long as Robert
Stanfield was leader of the Conservatives: it made the
electoral motivation to show results in the area somewhat
CLAUDE RYAN'S ADVICE
In the last four years, the image that we had
of the Conservative party has given way to a different one. Mr. Stanfield remains the worthy man
we thought we had discovered in 1968. However,
as one goes west, the team that surrounds him
includes a high proportion of people who have a
conception of Canadian unity even more rigid than
that of Mr. Trudeau. Mr. Stanfield has shown that
he is open on the question of bilingualism: nevertheless, the fiercest opposition to this measure, which
is only the beginning of a real solution, has come
from his group. On the more difficult question of
relations between Quebec and the rest of Canada,
Mr. Stanfield has unceasingly reproached Mr.
Trudeau for his rigidity. Each time he has been
pressed to say what he would do himself, he has
generally repeated in different terms the position
defined by Mr. Trudeau ....
Where the quality of its candidates warrants it,
electors wishing to cast an independent vote Monday should support the NDP.
— Claude Ryan, Montreal Le Devoir
less urgent than it might have been.
Quebec, on the other hand, was not only a centre
of Liberal strength; it was an area of the country that
tended to act up, and there were distinct political advantages to keeping it quiet. More than had been expected
of the industrial incentive grants handed out by Trudeau's
new department of regional economic expansion went
to Quebec, with correspondingly less for the Atlantic
provinces. More important, the grants program showed
little sign of being of much value anywhere, if we ignore
for the moment its value to plant-owners.
By 1971, the government's regional development policy was coming under heavy criticism, notably from the
areas it was supposed to be developing. It was criticism
of the way the government was proceeding, and not of
(Continued on page 4)
The bored leading the bored
It is one of the more distasteful aspects of our parliamentary democracy that general elections afford the national
press the occasion to display by far its shoddiest wares.
Usually, it does little harm to be intermittently
reminded of the moribund state of political writing in
this country, which can be laid at the doorstep of incompetence, the generally inferior character of the public education system, and the fact that newspapers are, after all,
owned by the same class that operate used car lots, erect
tenements, and appear at weekly Chamber of Commerce
gatherings.
A country that has made Charles Lynch the highest-
paid reporter, and Peter Newman the most respected
political analyst, has much to answer for.
It is people like these, it must be remembered, that
brought us Trudeaumania, the Gerda Munsinger affair
and intermittent reports of Soviet infiltration, and skilfully
guided a troubled nation through the dark nights of the
War Measures Act with restraint, fortitude and keen perspicacity.
Rarely, however, has such spontaneous consensus
emerged from the Ottawa Press Gallery's Tower of Babble as during the months of September and October
immediately past. A deeply thought-out set of alternatives
were outlined for a people who after all, needed to have
the problems defined for them:
Check one.
Pierre Elliott Trudeau is:
— arrogant
— cloistered in an ivory tower
— unconcerned
— a man who never had to work for a living
— a crypto-socialist.
Robert Stanfield is uncharismatic but:
— honest
— diligent
— solid
— a man who deserves a chance.
The government is full of:
— technocrats
— bureaucrats
— autocrats
— hippies
— Frenchmen.
The country is:
— disillusioned
— weary
— searching
— angry.
Mr. Trudeau has many faults, but one of them is
not his contempt for the press.
The press believes — and perhaps it has a point —
that it made Pierre Elliott Trudeau. And the press has
been scorned. Hence it has the right to unmake Pierre
Elliott Trudeau. This is, if not acceptable, at least inevitable. The national press, however, went beyond.
"I know that one way to get a story onto the front
page this time is to make my lead somebody saying
there are no issues in this election," a Toronto reporter
lamented last month.
And the word spread. From the first week of the election, the editorialists — all failed grammar school
teachers — proclaimed this is a dull election, an election
with no issues save what Mr. Lewis was raising, an
election with no meat in it.
In 1968, Pierre Elliott Trudeau was bragging that he
conducted an election campaign making "no promises."
That is code for "no issues."
But 1972 had more issues than the last three federal
elections combined. Housing policy, pipelines, regional
disparity policy, the tax system, welfare, immigration
policy, Quebec, dying farms, wheat prices, fisheries policy, industrial development policy, local initiatives policy, youth policy, northern development, language pol
icy, civil service, unemployment, food prices, wage-price
controls, strikes, pensions ....
The press, however, was bored.
More than that, the press did two things: it consciously
and systematically avoided serious coverage reflecting
the debate over these issues, so as to give the public
the impression that nothing of any substance was being
debated; and it decided on its own what the real issues
were.
Of course, traditional lip-service was paid to unemployment and inflation as the key issues. That being
despatched, the Toronto papers decided that the awkward
influx of Caribbeans, and the excessive spending on unemployment insurance cheques, were the issues that the
government was ignoring. The Toronto Star boldly
declared on its front page that the unemployment insurance situation was such a scandal that it was the main
issue in the election.
Few Canadians are really aware of the domination
of the Toronto press over what they will read in Saskatchewan papers or see on Newfoundland television stations.
Because much of the Ottawa "commentator corps" is
employed or syndicated by the Toronto media, and
because Canadian Press carries lightly rewritten stories
from the Toronto papers on its service a great deal of
the time, the power of the Toronto claque is amplified
through CP, and Broadcast News, the CP service which
forms the basis of most private radio and TV newscasts.
Tied to the Toronto claque of the Toronto Star, the
Globe and Maclean's, is the Ottawa claque of Southam,
FP and CBC, which boast such hearties as Charles
Lynch, and Ron "No-Problem" Collister.
It is the task of these men, knit even more tightly
by being on the campaign trail together during election
time, to tell us when to be bored, and when to be angry.
Sensing their true calling, they achieved the former
magnificently.
Friday, November 3,  1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 5 with
THIS   TIME   Ottawa-Carleton is "going Conservative"
STROME GALLOWAY
"HE   IS   NOT   AFRAID   TO   BE   EITHER   FOR   OR   AGAINST'
H6 iS for — an 'incentive society' which encourages
honest effort, reduces unemployment, results in
social stability and gives Youth a challenge and a
decent chance to meet it.
H6 IS TOT — a sensible bilingual policy that will encourage friend ly communication between French-
speakjng and  English-speaking Canadians.
He iS for — a fair deal for Senior Citizens, older
War Veterans and other Fixed Income Citizens,thos«
who have worked, fought and suffered through hard
times to help build Canada.
He IS for — our Parliamentary heritage with its century-old traditions, its dignity and its democratic
processes.
He IS for — a Canada which accepts its role in the
Wf»'lJ  -*  a trustworthv  member of KIATO nnd  the  UN
He iS against - Trudeau's 'welfare society, which lives off the
taxpayers' hard-earned
dollars, accepts unemployment and breeds
social unrest.
He iS against - Trudeau's misoriented
bilingual policy, which
is dividing the country
and polarizing our two
Founding Peoples.
He is against - Wast-     	
ing    the    taxpayers' —————.————~
money on crazy programs in aid of Communist agitators,
homosexuals, drug addicts, U.S. Army deserters and draft*
dodgers,  as  the  Trudeau  government is  now doing.
He iS against — the "creeping republicanism" and  "Presidential   tendencies"   which   are   evident   in    the  Trudeau
administration, and completely  un-Canadian.
STROME   GALLOWAY
Strome Galloway was big on discipline up in Ottawa Carleton
(Continued from page 3)
the concept of a regional development policy, but it was
criticism nevertheless and Jean Marchand, the minister
responsible for the program, didn't like it.
By mid-1972 one of Marchand's most effective critics,
the Atlantic Provinces Economic Council, had toned
down, fearing its attacks might help kill the scheme
entirely. But there was another phenomenon to reckon
with: several corporations shut down their Ontario plants
and moved to the Maritimes, to escape high wages and
troublesome unions — and collect a government regional
development grant. That didn't help the government
much with the difficult task of selling its plan in Ontario.
It was the two rich provinces of Ontario and British
Columbia that were to cost Trudeau his majority.
The regional development program, and the Trudeau
government in general, also had the misfortune to be
around at a time when the economic boom of the sixties
was coming to an end. Liberal governments, prepared
to use only a limited range of measures, can have only
a partial effect on the state of the economy in the best
of circumstances. In Canada, tied to the United States
so that its economy is at least as sensitive to changes
in American policy as it is to anything Ottawa does,
the government is almost totally at the whim of circumstances beyond its control.
Still, what the Trudeau government actually did only
aggravated the situation. It perceived inflation as the principal problem, and in order to fight it took measures
to slow down the economy, with the inevitable consequence of increased unemployment.
The result, after three years of the policy, was high
inflation and unemployment. The United States, without
RAY GUY'S ADVICE
The best vote in this election is no vote at all.
No matter how you look at it.
They might, if they see there's no votes coming
in from Newfoundland, get excited and send us
down bigger parcels of money.
Better still, they might go about their business
and leave us alone.
For what little entertainment we got out of this
election none of these birds deserves a vote. That's
the only thing you get out of elections in the long
run — a few laughs while these nut cases are dashing about cutting each other's throats.
You may feel it's worth the effort just to get
at least seven of these jokers out of Newfoundland
and settled away in a nice house in Ottawa.
But they won't guarantee us they'll stay away.
Chances are that in a few years' time they'll
be back here inflicting themselves on us again.
Don't vote — it only encourages them.
— Ray Guy, St. John's Evening Telegram
the benefit of Trudeaunomics, had roughly the same
thing, but voters have always held their governments
responsible for the state of the economy and Trudeau's
burden was a heavy one.
As it became clear that the presence of Pierre Elliott
Trudeau in the Prime Minister's Office would not lead
to miracles, the perception of him as a man changed
too.
The streak of arrogance and aloofness in his personality
that had been overlooked in 1968 was noticed with
increasing frequency. He was the man who asked western
farmers why he should sell their wheat, who said opposition MPs were nobodies a hundred yards from the House
of Commons, who told the Lapalme Guys to eat shit
and Newfoundland Conservative MPs Jim McGrath and
John Lundrigan to fuck off.
The piddling
questions
His four years were running out. He- wanted to wait
until the economic situation improved before calling an
election, but the economic situation didn't improve. He
tried to patch things up with business, usually Liberal
but now reported looking longingly toward the Conservatives.
Finance Minister Benson had displeased business with
his talk of tax reform (which didn't amount to much
when it finally assumed the form of legislation): he was
replaced. Labour Minister Mackasey had displeased business with his reform of the labour code: he was replaced.
Corporate Affairs Minister Basford had displeased business with his competition act: he, too, was replaced.
A May budget included substantial tax concessions for
business; the long-awaited foreign-ownership policy
turned out to have all the power of a popgun.
First the election was going to be in April, then in
June; Trudeau played on the developing anticipation,
but always chickened out before it was too late. There
was still little sign that defections from the Liberals would
be massive (perhaps only because of the weakness of
the opposition), but the 1972 election would clearly not
be another 1968. When Trudeau finally bit the bullet
as August turned into September he did not walk, in
the immortal words of Peter C. Newman, "into the
future, burdened with hope." He was scared to death.
He put on a brave front, told Peter Desbarats of the
Toronto Star that he hoped people would listen to him
this time, presumably not just adore him. He also mentioned that he saw the election as "a catharsis, as a
bath of fire in which you're purified, and you settle all
the piddling questions of whether this little thing was
right or wrong."
And so he went among the masses. "The Land Is
Strong," he sloganized. He said that "the onslaught
of dissatisfaction and disbelief that Canada could even
stay together four years ago has been dissipated." He
said that "Canada now weighs in the world with the
full weight of its potentialities." In Summerside, PEI,
he asked for a mandate to continue the "social journey."
In Vancouver, B.C., he told a man pestering him about
Vietnam to "fuck off.'' Trudeau went from coast to coast
speaking to Canadians, but always the "piddling questions" came up.
Throughout the campaign, Statistics Canada kept issuing reports citing the jobless increase and the increase
in the cost of living. The so-called battle against inflation
had been lost although more than seven per cent of the
work force were thrown into the breech. As prices rose,
Trudeau expressed his joy that the farmer was getting
a better price — he wasn't, but that was just another
piddl\ng question.
There was a continuing shortage of jobs, but that was
because there were too many kids born after the war.
Regional disparity grew, but then that was yet another
piddling question. And so the Trudeau procession rolled
along.
With the exception of David Lewis, who took a leaf
from George McGovern's campaign book and launched
out at "corporate welfare bums" and other things that
go bump in the night during the later stages of People's
Capitalism, the campaign seemed to be programmed well
enough.
Yet things began to go wrong. Trudeau seemed (at
least to the Toronto Globe and Mail) to swagger, and
if the Canadian people didn't want a prime minister who
swaggered then Trudeau had had it. Simple.
And Trudeau was vulnerable. He was locked into a
set of policies which were centred on his brand of federalism, and the centre was not holding. Time was growing
short.
A bitter Bryce Mackasey, with an obvious allusion
to his Ontario cabinet colleagues, blamed the Liberal
loss on a lack of courage to defend government policies.
But what was there to defend? The essential attack on
the government came from the right, while it was itself
moving toward the right.
Thus the problem is not so much that Trudeau deserved
to be defeated and in fact was, the problem is how,
why and by whom. True enough, the Liberals deserved
everything they got. But in the debacle we seem to have
gotten Stanfield. And what did we do to deserve that?
m
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• Canada's plan to attack the U.S.: the story
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No. 1.
• The Hockey Brain-drain: the story of how
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plus: news briefs, Claude Balloune's Last Pssst,
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Page Friday, 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  November  3,   1972 Films
Reality bores
in Fat City
The doorman told me it was
the slowest weekend he'd seen
in six months. He wasn't
kidding. There were nine of us
in the theatre last Monday
night. They're moving Fat City
out this Friday and moving in a
Fat City. Starring Stacy
Keach, Jeff Bridges, Susan
Tyrrell. Screenplay by
Leonard Gardner, based on
his book. Directed by John
Huston.
James Bond double-bill. It isn't
surprising since this is a film
which is going to enjoy only a
very limited appeal.
Fat City is not an easy movie
to like. It's an essay on the
down-and-outers of the boxing
circuit in and around Stockton,
California and it's sad and
frustrating and mostly pretty
hard to take. What merit it has
comes from its hard-nosed
depiction of people trapped in a
social milieu that offers no
escape and little happiness or
fulfillment. You're in one day
and out the next and no one
gives a damn about you unless
you win. Relationships are
shallow and expedient and you
take what you can get. The
realism is mighty but director
John Huston goes overboard
with it.
There are certain conventions that must be accepted
when making a piece of filmic
theatre (which is what a movie
is unless it's documentary in
form). One has to remember
that the characters can't really
talk like they would if they
were real people. A totally
accurate picture of a punch-
drunk wino would reveal an ill-
spoken dullard whose conversation would hold your
interest for about two minutes.
Falstaff is a lout and a
reprobate but he doesn't talk
like one. If he did you can be
sure he would have died
ignominiously ages ago.
John Schlesinger's Midnight
Cowboy gave us Ratso Rizzi,
who was as low a slob as you
will find but who had a depth of
personality that made him
hard to forget.
In Fat City, we get two-bit,
boozed-out losers like Billy
Tully (Stacy Keach) who are
as dull and corny on the screen
as they are in real life. The
folly committed by Huston is
that he recreates the banal,
boring, empty lives of his
characters so authentically
that the whole film is a deluge
of things banal, boring, and
empty.
It's nothing new to portray
fear by making the audience
afraid or to show sadness bv
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moving them to tears. You can
do the same thing with happiness, suspense, and lust. But
when you try to show boredom
by boring the viewers to death,
you may get the point across,
but what "a drag.
There's no question that the
film is sensitive, boldly honest,
and faithful to those it portrays. No doubt some people
will rave about it. It echoes the
weird quality of Huston's
earlier film, Night of the
Iguana, and has that stark
toughness that characterizes
some of the literature of the
American South. If you are a
real aficionado you might dig
it. I didn't.
Before you go, decide what it
really is that you expect from a
movie.
—Clive Bird
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Friday, November 3,  1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 7 Films
cause
over
average
film
Oh! Calcutta! is nothing special. It is
being advertised as a "revolutionary
theatrical event". It is nothing of the sort.
Quite simply, the movie is a straightforward filming of the London/New York
play that has caused a certain amount of
stir.
The reason for the stir is blunt sexual
language and subject matter, and total
male and female nudity. The words,
"cock", "cunt" and "fuck" are used freely
and there are several incidents of
humorously simulated sexual intercourse.
Oral sex is often referred to, and is also
humorously simulated.
The play consists of about 10 short
satirical skits similar to those of The
Committee. The skits all concern some
sexual phenomenon; sex research, circle-
Oh! Calcutta!. Directed by Jacques
Levy, written by Kenneth Tynan et al.
$3.50 ! ! ! fat the Stanley.
Had Company. Written by David
Newman and Robert Benton, directed by
Robert Benton. At the Strand.
jerks, sado-masochism, swingers, etc.
None of them are seriously satirical, or
heavy in any way. Together they try, with
some success, to take a joyful, lightly
mocking look at the foibles of a sexually
permissive society.
The individual skits are of varying
quality. A few are clever and quite funny,
but most tend to be either adolescent or
overdone. All depend heavily on voyeurism
or "daring" sexual explicitness. But
reasonable taste has been exercised, and
there is nothing that would embarrass or
offend an open-minded adult. (I might add,
however, that a sizeable proportion of the
audience walked out the night I went.)
Rumors and statements to the contrary,
it is not a musical. The cast chants a couple
BAD COMPANY ... bad movie
performers that a play has, but a movie
does not.
Just for the record, the esoteric pun in the
title is that Calcutta is pronounced in
French roughly as "Quel cue t'a" which
means "what a marvellous cunt you have."
(Pardon my French.)
Oh! Calcutta! is not fantastic, nor is it an
insulting piece of trash. At its worst, it is
strained and obvious; at its best, it is entertaining and exciting. I'm not sorry I
went.
* * *
A good bet for a cheap movie this
weekend is SUB's presentation of Brewster
McLeod. It's a weird, weird film by
director Robert Altman, [Mash, McCabe
and Mrs. Miller]. The basic plot is a parody
on police detective films, but Altman takes
on much more than that. You may think it
goes too far in places, but Altman's ability
to exaggerate an incident until it becomes
absurd is the best thing about the film.
* * *
Westerns
I'd like to preface this episode in my
continuing coverage of Westerns with a
complaynte. Most people don't consider
Westerns a serious art form. Spy films,
thrillers, horror films, war films and police
films have all had serious critical attention
lately.  But Westerns have not received
OH! CALCUTTA!. . . nothing new
of songs at the beginning and end, but apart
from that, all music is background.
The play is given some overall structure
when the full cast (five men, five women)
give a mock strip-tease at the beginning, a
nude romp in the middle, and nude be-in at
the end. As you might guess, these don't
exactly create complete continuity, but
they do set the stage and the tone.
There is also a nude pas de deux which
was the highlight of the film for me. It
combines the best elements of modern
dance: drama, energy and sophistication,
and is danced in counterpoint to a
twanging, vulgar, country-style ditty. The
nudity of the dancers adds beauty and
power. Their bodies recreate an archetypal
male/female contrast; his rough, muscular
and dark; hers smooth, lithe and creamy
white. I found the total effect breathtaking.
However, the bulk of the audience exodus
mentioned earlier took place immediately
after this dance. There is no accounting for
taste.
The film is shot using some kind of
videotape that is often either fuzzy or
glaring. This can be annoying, but I suspect
it was done intentionally to prevent the
false glossiness of technicolor. This
slightly-off quality retains that small
measure of distance between audience and
more than a condescending glance since
Shane, way back in 1953. Those of us who
love them know that Westerns deserve a
better shake.
Some very fine films in the last few years
have been Westerns. The Professionals,
The Good, the Bad and the Ugly and Buck
and the Preacher would all have received
more attention if they hadn't been
Westerns. And two minor masterpieces,
Valdez is Coming and The Stalking Moon,
were shamefully ignored because of their
genre. In the future, I intend to rectify this
situation by giving Westerns the serious
attention they deserve.
* * *
Unfortunately, Bad Company is not a
case in point. It is one those realistic
Westerns about a young, high-principled
draft-dodger (Civil War) who goes west
and meets up with bad company. The pace
is slow and the action is painfully real, but
aimless. The plot doesn't build to any
climax, and doesn't seem to have any point.
There are some good things in the film —
the authenticity, the convincing air of
despair — but the pointlessness of it all left
me somewhat depressed. It's not a good
Sunday night movie.
—David MacKinlay
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Page Friday 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  November 3,   1972 Friday, November 3,  1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  15
USSR prefers Jews, but
By DAVID SCHMIDT
Jews are getting preferential treatment in
the Soviet Union, UBC political science
professor Paul Marantz said Thursday.
Marantz spent a month in the Soviet Union
this summer and he related his experiences
with Soviet Jewry at a noon meeting in Hillel
House attended by about 30 people.
"Oppression is not limited to Jews, it applies
to all national groups," he said.
"Jews are better off because they are
allowed to leave.
"The paradox is the hope of leaving dangles
bait in front of their eyes and the Jews are
unable to settle down. A Ukrainian has no
chance of leaving so he is not disappointed
when his is not allowed to leave," Marantz said.
Marantz said he met a grade 12 Toronto girl
who had smuggled in some prayerbooks.
"When she tried to pass them on to a young
contact, he wouldn't take them for fear the
KGB was watching," he said.
He told of five young Jews he met in
Leningrad who were hoping to emigrate to
Israel. Four had already applied for visas but
one had not.
"He was worried that if he applied for a visa,
his father would lose his job," Marantz said.
Two of the four who had applied were a
young couple, and both husband and wife had
lost their jobs upon application.
"The husband's parents wrote to the state
denouncing their son's actions so they would
retain their jobs," he said.
"The four have been refused and they may
be refused forever. There is also a high
probability that they- will be arrested,"
Marantz said.
"The general feeling is that Western
pressure definitely helps. The best thing
western Jews can do is to phone the Jews in
Russia. The KGB is listening in and if they
know that we know these individuals they tend
to be more lenient," he said.
Although he said he disagrees with the
actions of the Jewish Defence League, Marantz
said demonstrations such as the ones against
Kosygin this spring are the best actions.
"It's terribly embarrassing for them," he
said.
Ottawa wants research plan
OTTAWA (CUP) — The
federal government is seeking
a new research policy that will
increase research and
development done in Canada.
The government's growing
concern results from the
almost complete lack of
research work being carried
out in Canada by foreign multinational corporations.
Officials from the ministry of
state for science and
technology have scheduled
meetings with various
university representatives.
The government officials have
already met with university
presidents and deans of
engineering. A meeting with
the representatives of
graduate schools was
scheduled to coincide with the
annual     meeting     of     the
Association of Universities and
Colleges of Canada in Toronto
Tuesday.
The sessions so far have been
described as consultative
meetings to solicit the scientific community's views on
Canadian research policy.
The most concrete
suggestion from the meetings
is that "centres of excellence"
should be established to carry
out scientific research. The
centres actually would be
research establishments which
would deal exclusively with
one subject area.
The government says its
target date for completing its
research re-evaluation is the
end of 1973. Legislation
already being planned.
is
rushant
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THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  November 3,   1972
Chess cleanses mind
The chess club at UBC has
long been one of the strongest
university clubs in North
America.
In fact, in 1971-72, UBC had
what certainly must have been
the strongest five man team in
North America, but unfortunately could not prove this
due to lack of support from the
student administration. The
1971 Pan-American Intercollegiate Team tournament was held in Toronto at
Christmas, and was won by
Columbia University. Forty
colleges and universities,
including the University of
Santo Domingo, saw fit to send
a team, 15 of those sending two
teams.
In December 1971, the UBC
learn played in the Northwest
Intercollegiate Tournament in
Portland, Ore. As expected,
our team finished first, but
what was surprising was the
extent of the victory — 20 wins,
no draws, no losses. The next
team, Portland State
University, could only manage
1(1 points "out of 20. The UBC
team consisted of Duncan
Suttles. Peter Biyiasas,
Jonathan Berry, Bruce Harper, and Harry Satanove.
Suttles     was      Canadian
AUS wants
faculty reps
Members of the arts undergraduate society leafleted
the arts faculty meeting
Monday, demanding student
representation at the meeting.
In the leaflet the students
said it was not enough to place
students on joint faculty
committees if these students
are not allowed to participate
at the decision making level.
The meeting was called to
discuss the recently released
report of the curriculum
development society. The
report called for a more
structured   majors   program.
The meeting passed the
report but did not have time to
consider tne students' demand.
"The next step is to meet
with the graduate student
association early next week to
discuss joint action," said AUS
president Brian Loomes.
Champion in 1969, and earned
his International Master title
playing second board for
Canada in the 1968 Chess
Olympics at Siegen, West
Germany. Playing first board
for Canada, he guided our
student team to a third place
finish (just one-half point
behind the United States) in
the 1971 'Student Olympics'.
Peter Biyiasas, 21, has won
the British Columbia Championship four times, and
played sixth board in the 1971
Student Olympics. This
summer, he won the Canadian
Championship at Toronto,
becoming Vancouver's second
International Master in the
process. Both Suttles and
Biyiasas are currently
representing the Canadian
team at the Chess Olympics in
TUXEDOS
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Hours 9-6
TRIUMPH
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Saturday, Nov. 4, 8:30
HILLEL
Members 50c     Non members 75c
Skopje, Yugoslavia.
So, it is apparent that chess
is on. a very high plane at UBC,
although the number of people
playing is not great.
What's happening this year?
Chess is on the intramural
program this year, though it
seems interest is confined to
only a few faculties.
The Chess Club started a
tournament at the beginning of
October, as well as a perpetual
ladder. Interested people
should contact the bulletin
board in SUB 216 for further
information. The chess club
meets in the clubs lounge, at all
hours of the day, although one
would be more likely to find
people between 11 a.m. and 5
p.m. The membership fee is $2,
which includes use of the club's
sets, boards, and small library.
YOUR PRESCRIPTION . . .
... For Qlcmi
for that smart look in gloom ...
leek to
Ptesctibtion Optical
Student Discount Given
WE HAVE AN OFFICE NEAR YOU
"1
LIMITED
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GRANVILLE AT PENDER SINCE 1904
Grub Yours Today
The Handiest Book on Campus
BIRD CALLS
UBC's Student Telephone Directory
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Available at
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Inforniation^ujjlications^
NORTHWEST RELEASING PRESENTS
PACIFIC COLISEUM — SUNDAY, NOV. 12 AT 8:00
STEPHEN STILLS — MANASSAS
ONE PERFORMANCE ONLY  I
TICKETS — THE BAY BOX OFFICES
$4.50 in advance — $5.50 at door
Downtown, Richmond,
Lougheed, Surrey       Also Le Chateau on Granville Friday,  November 3,   1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  17
Hot flashes
Young
on inflation
John Young, former prices and
incomes commissioner now with
the department of economics will
speak on "Unemployment and
Inflation" noon today in SUB
111.
Asian
JMacPherson
Political scientist C.B.
MacPherson will speak again
Saturday, this time on "Can
Property Survive Democracy" at
8:15 p.m. in Buch. 106.
Students in last year's Asian
Studies 105 class can sell their
copies of The Japanese Inn at the
Alma Mater Society bookstore,
located in the basement of SUB
next to the games area, since 100
copies are needed for this year's
class.
'Tween classes
TODAY
GAY PEOPLE OF UBC
Social evening 8 p.m.  in the arts 1
building blue room.
AQUASOC
On   board  the  Vantonia,  Bayshore
Marina at 8 p.m.
PRE SOCIAL WORK
Guest     speaker     from    Vancouver
Volunteer  Bureau noon SUB 105B.
WOMEN'S ACTION GROUP
Faculty, staff and students welcome
to   meeting   at   noon   in   the   Grad
Centre board room.
UBC CYCLING TEAM
Organizational meeting room 211 of
the war memorial gym noon.
WOMEN'S FILM SERIES
Film showing: Salt of the Elarth, 8
p.m. at First United Church, 320
East Hastings. For women only
Friday, all welcome Saturday.
SKYDIVERS
General meeting SUB 205 noon.
CHINESE STUDENT ASSOCIATION
Graham Johnson on social
development and the individual in
contemporary China, followed by
slides and discussion at 8 p.m in the
grad student centre.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
John Young and Karl on inflation
and unemployment.
NDP CLUB
General meeting and election of
executive noon in SUB 113.
PHRATERES
All-phi meeting noon SUB 207-209.
ARTS UNDERGRAD
Anti calendar meeting noon Buch.
107.
ALLIANCE FRANCAIS
General meeting noon upper
lounge International House.
SATURDAY
CVC
Car rally 7 p.m. starting at Oakridge
gas station. After party TBA.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Banquet to celebrate the 55th
anniversary of the glorious Russian
Revolution   6   p.m.   1208 Granville.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Professor-student wine and cheese
party 7:30        upper        lounge
International House.
SUNDAY
AQUA SOC
Dive at Point Atkinson 10 a.m.
FIRESIDE
Christ Church Cathedral rock mass.
Leave 6050 Chancellor at 6:45.
MONDAY
EL CIRCULO
Presentation of a Cervantes play IH
402 noon.
VARSITY DEMOLAY
Meeting noon SUB 213.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Hockey   game  7  a.m.  Thunderbird
Sports Centre.
RlVlERA Meiis Wair Stylists
"NEW NATURAL HAIR STYLING"
- manicurist-
SPECIAL STUDENT DISCOUNT
MONDAY TO THURSDAY - 20% OFF
684-6910
650 Seymour St (opp. The Bay) Phones:     684_461,
rushant
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STUDENT DISCOUNT
Theft Insurance — Cables — Locks
3771 W. 10th (near Alma)
224-3536
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7 at 7:00 p.m. in the SUB AUDITORIUM
Dr. Thomas Szasz
Controversial psychiatrist and the
foremost speaker on "The Myth of Madness"
speaks on
"MADNESS IS METAPHOR"
Sponsored by AMS Speakers and Education Committee.
CLASSIFIED
Rata: Cwnput - 3 lines. 1 day $1.00; additional lines, 25c;
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines
35c; additional days $1.25 &.30&
Classified ads are nut accepted by telephone and are payable in
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Publications &ffice. Room 241 S.U.B.. UBC. Van. 8. B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
Greetings
12
Lost & Found
13
LOST — A KODAK INSTAMATIC
camera. Sat. Oct. 28 in SUB. Return of film alone would be
appreciated. Please call Phyllis at
253-3918 or turn into Lost - Found.
WOULD WHOEVER TOOK MY
case with notes and library books
from Seog. Library PLEASE return them to SUB Lost and Found
or call Diane at 732-0350.
Special Notices
15
DISCOUNT STEREO, EXAMPLE:
AM-FM receiver, turntable, base,
cover, cartridge, two speakers, 2-
year guarantee, list $200, your
cost $125. Carry Akal, A.G.S.,
Zenith TVs.  CaU 732-6769.
NO. 5 ORANGE STREET, MAIN AT
POWELL is having a Junk Contest! JUNK! Like stop signs, airplane wings, toilet seats, and as
original as you can get, cuz if we
pick your junk as a winner, you
too can win a dinner for two at
the White Lunch, a Free Bus Ride
to Burnaby, a gift certificate at
the Army & Navy, and many other
swell stuff. What will we do with
this Junk you ask? We're going to
plaster our walls, ceiling, and all
available places with it so that you
can point to a wrinkled stained
bedsheet for instance, and proudly
tell your friends "I did that."
So, starting when you want, start
bringing it in. Bring as many
as you can, but securely tie your
name, address and phone number
to each piece, so we'll know who
to contact. And don't forget, we
got second, third and fourth prizes
too, like 2 dinners for 2 at the
White Lunch, and 5 Free Bus Rides
to Burnaby. OKAY?	
DON'T MISS THIS GIANT BAZAAR
and Thrift Sale featuring door
prizes, handicraft and other gift
items, new & used clothing and
appliances. Novelties at exceptionally low prices. Sponsored by the
Scottish Women Association at
Scottish Auditorium, 12th & Fir
Street.  November 4, 1-5 p.m.
B.C. SPORTS EXCHANGE — WE
also handle ski gear — 8th and
Burrard.  736-7133.
EDITING SERVICE — ARE TOU
bugged by double negatives? Do
you suffer from verbal flatulence?
My forty years experience may
help you. Let DAN MURRAY
gather your dangling participles.
Phone 733-2337 for term papers,
theses, reports, etc.
$75 FOR 75*
40 Bonus Coupons In This
Year's Bird Calls
AVAILABLE  NOW
BUY   YOURS  TODAY!
Bookstore and SUB
Travel Opportunities
16
ASSOCIATION OF STUDENT
Councils Travel Service, Room
100-B,   SUB. 224-0111.
Wanted—Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous 18
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
1967 VOLKS DELUXE BEST OF-
fer.   224-0111 or 733-1802.
MUST SELL '65 FORD V8 STD.
new clutch, tires, shocks. 224-9900.
Ask for Mark.
69 VIVA DELUXE, IMMAC, 2
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2 new snows, extras, city-tested.
$950, 266-9009. Mark.
Automobiles—Parts
23
BUSINESS SERVICES
Photography
35
Photography (Cont.)
35
£tfje %tnti ana gutter
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DARK ROOM
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Until Nov. 10th, 1972
Gray—Lab Timers 33.95
Dia Enlargers for 35mm or
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Scandals
37
C-90 CASSETTES WITH PLEXI-
glas case. Buy minimum of 6 at
$1.50 each — get 3 FREE! Guaranteed against defects. Pickup point
on campus can be arranged. Call
732-6769.
LIVE BAND AT YAC FRIDAY.
Young Alumni Club. At Cecil
Green Park. 4:30 P.M. - 12:30 A.M.
For Alumni and Graduating Students.
Typing
40
PROMPT, EFFICIENT TYPING
(electric machine) of theses, essays,
examination papers, etc. Phone:
688-4027.
TYPING — FAST, EFFICIENT —
Essays. Papers. Theses. 41st and
Marine   Drive.   266-5053.
TYPING OF ESSAYS, ETC. DONE
quickly and efficiently, 35c a page.
Phone 224-0385 after 5:30 p.m.
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING
my home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat,
accurate work. Reasonable rates.
263-5317.
ESSAY AND BOOK MANUSCRIPTS
edited by retired publisher for
grammar, syntax, spelling, punctuation, clarity. 263-6565.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST—ESSAYS
Theses,  etc.  Mrs. Brown, 732-0047.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
INTERESTED IN  SELLING?	
Then why not be an advertising
salesman for the Ubyssey? This
part-time job offers an opportunity
to gain experience and to earn
worthwhile commissions. Reliable
2nd or 3rd year business-minded
student who will work hard for 10
or 12 hours weekly is needed. Must
have transportation. If interested
apply to Publications Office, Room
241, SUB, after 2 p.m..
CROSS COUNTRY SKI INSTRUC-
tor required for ML Seymour Ski
School. Phone 684-2494.
WEEKENDS MALE & FEMALE 1
full time day shift. Male apply at
Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre.
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Tutoring Service
63
BOGGLED MINDS AND WISDOM
Heads: Call the Tutorial Center,
228-4557 anytime or see Doug Brock
at Speak-Easy, 12:30-2:30 p.m. to
register.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ROOM — CAMPUS. HOT PLATE.
Male grad preferred. 224-1690.
FULLY FURNISHED, LARGE,
panelled room for non-smoker,
non-drinker male. Separate entrance.   Close to U.B.C.  224-3494.
Room & Board
82
CAMPUS ROOM AND BOARD, 5785
Agronomy Road. Sauna, color TV,
good food, recreational area. Phone
224-9684.
Communal Housing
85
CO-ED OPENING: WANTED, CON-
siderate, and serious students to
live in a very clean & quiet house,
in a very clean and quiet house.
Rent $60.00 month for singles, Kitchen facilities, and large fire place.
Place: 5680 Toronto Rd., UBC
Campus. Phone 224-9648, ask for
Dave.
BUY — SELL — INFORM
with UBYSSEY Classified Ads. Page  18
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 3,  1972
UBC sweeps tourney    Badminton finalized
At the first judo tournament
of the season, the Campbell
River Invitational held on
Oct. 28, UBC dominated
the competition placing eight
out of its 13 entrants.
In the division for green belts
and under, Jim Nakamoto took
first place in the weight
category for those under 139
lbs. In the category for those
under 154 lbs. first place went
to John Adams, second to Mike
Richey. Both were fighting
in their first tournament.
Allan McDonald took second
place in the wight category for
those      under      176      lbs.
Coach of the UBC judo team
is Doug Rogers, Canadian
heavyweight champion and
former Olympic silver medal
winner. Practices are held in
the basement of the War
Memorial Gym Mondays,
Wednesdays and Fridays from
4:30 to 6:30 p.m.
'Birds open season
The annual Grads-
Thunderbirds basketball game
tonight at the War Memorial
Gym, starting at 9 p.m., will
officially open UBC's new
season.
A large turnout of grads is
expected for the grad banquet,
which will be followed by the
Old Timer's game at 8:15 p.m.
Although the 'Birds won the
feature contest last year 79-53,
it could be a different story this
time, with Ron Thorsen, Derek
Sankey and Alex Brayden, all
National Team members,
playing for the grads.
UBC coach Peter Mullins,
while conceding the loss of
Thorsen, will field a strong
team of eight veterans from
last year's collegiate championship team.
By SIMON TRUELOVE
The men's badminton final
takes place at 12:30 p.m. today
in War Memorial Gym. It
promises to be an exciting
match.
Pete Dennert of engineering
will take on Bob Wilson of PE.
To get into the final, both
players beat last year's
champ, Bill Ruby of Betas;
Dennert lost to Ruby in last
year's final.
Basketball, probably the
biggest sport in intramural
competition, got under way
Wednesday night in Memorial
Gym.
There   has   been   only   one
Genera! Manager
Terry Kelly Says OUR
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OPEN FRI. NIGHTS -TIL 9:00
default so far and the
recreation team (last year's
champs) looks strong again.
The preliminary Division I
scores from Wednesday's
basketball were: recreation 51,
science 35; engineers 21, betas
47; law 42, arts 39; Totem Park
21, dentistry 34; commerce 26,
St. Andrews 55; and forestry
52, Place Vanier 31.
Hockey league play began
Thursday night and will
continue every Thursday 6:30-
11 p.m.
Intramural soccer has been
disorganized by too much
rescheduling, but competition
has been fierce.
At the moment betas are
looking the strongest, coming
from behind Sunday for a 4-1
win over Totem Park.
In other games Saturday
education beat pharmacy 2-0,
alpha delts lost to Carey Hall 2-
0. Betas overwhelmed Fijis 4-0,
and engineers eked out a 1-0
victory over Toten Park.
Sunday it was Fort Camp 3,
Fijis 0; Vancouver School of
Theology 2, science 0; and
pharmacy 1, Carey Hall 0.
In bowling the best teams
seem to be in Division III. The
best game so far was bowled
by the engineering team of
Peter Lake, Larry Isotami,
Leonard Giroday, and Nigel
Cornweth. They averaged 238
in their second game Thursday.
Members of the forestry and
beta football teams should
come to the intramural office
to get pictures of Wednesday's
game. The price of prints is
still undetermined.
Practice for intramural
rugby has started already for
alpha delts and dekes, who
played a tough hard-hitting
game Sunday. Dekes won 8-0.
Anyone who has signed up
for a sport but has not heard
anything since should ask at
Memorial Gym 308.
TflOCKW ON DOWN
THE LINC-
HOCKEY
CANADA COLLEGIATE TOURNAMENT
NOV. 3,4,5
(Tonight, Saturday and Sunday)
AT THUNDERBIRD WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
The Draw:—
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
—Un. of Calgary vs Un. of Victoria -8 p.m.
— 6 p.ra - Un. of Alberta vs Lakehead Un.
— 9 p.ra — U.B.C. vs winner of Friday's game
— 12:30 noon — Consolation game
— 3:00 p.m. — Championship game
General Admission—$260 Students—$125
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT WINTER SPORTS CENTRE AND MEMORIAL GYM Friday, November 3,  1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  19
'Pros look to college hockey'
Canadian collegiate hockey
is becoming the feeding ground
for pro hockey, Thunderbird
hockey coach Bob Hindmarch
said Wednesday.
At a Hockey Canada luncheon at the Hotel Vancouver
Hindmarch commented on the
growing importance of
collegiate hockey as an
amateur development league
for professional hockey.
In the past the pro leagues
have relied entirely on the
junior hockey system to supply
them with young hockey talent.
But in the past few seasons
this has changed, he said.
More than a dozen players
left the Canada West Hockey
League to join pro teams this
season. UBC alone lost four
starters to the National Hockey
League and the World Hockey
Association.
The University of Alberta
Golden Bears lost three
players to pro leagues including all-star defenceman
Steve    Carlyle,    while    the
Calgary Dinosaurs lost four,
including "Mr. Strange"
himself.   Frank    Richardson.
The growth of importance of
college hockey in Canada is
following the lead of the
National Collegiate Athletic
Association Hockey in the U.S.
In the past few years many
players have left the NCAA to
star in the NHL. Two examples are Ken Dryden of
Montreal and Keith Magnuson
of Chicago.
Canadian Collegiate Hockey
—sucha singh photo
THUNDERBIRD GUARD Bob Dickson drives in for lay-up in dummy basketball scrimmage held
Thursday noon, Dickson will have his hands doubly full tonight as the 'Birds take on the grads in the
annual grad game and Dickson takes on ex-teammate Ron (Mr. Everything) Thorson as his checking
assignment.
Board reinstates players
The Vancouver Sporting
Club soccer team comes to
campus Sunday for an
exhibition game against the
Thunderbirds at 2:30 p.m. at
the War Memorial Gym field.
In other soccer news Wednesday    the    B.C.    Soccer
Commission reinstated 26 of
the previously suspended
players who had been
suspended for playing in the
semi-professional Premier
Soccer League.
Games in the PSL pay about
$15 per player.
Of the 26 players allowed to
compete in amateur soccer
leagues around the province
again, 14 were from the Pacific
Coast league and 12 from the
Mainland and Inter-City
leagues.
The 'Birds play jn the PCL.
has now developed to a level
where it is at par with U.S.
College Hockey. In recent
games against U.S. competition Canadian teams have
faired about 50-50.
Negotiations   are  presently
•d:
underway to have the
Canadian hockey champion
meet the NCAA winner at the
end of the season. The series is
not likely to come off this
season but the prospects for
next season are very
promising.
Birds host tourney
By DOUG HIGGINS
The UBC Thunderbirds Hockey team plays host this
weekend to the Hockey Canada tournament, one of nine
regional tournaments across the country.
Forty teams are taking part in the regional playoffs in nine
cities across Canada. The winners of the regional tournaments
will advance to the national playoffs to be held in Hamilton at
Christmas.
The 'Birds will be out to repeat their performance of last
year when they won the tournament played here in December.
In the final game of the tournament, which included Sir George
Williams University of Montreal, the Toronto Blues and the
University of Alberta Golden Bears, UBC overwhelmed the
Bears 5-2 to take the championship.
There was no national final last year for the regional
tournament winners.
This year the opposition will include the University of
Victoria, the University of Calgary, the Universities of Alberta
(Edmonton) and Lakehead.
The strongest opposition for the 'Birds will likely come from
the Alberta teams. Both Edmonton and Calgary finished ahead
of the 'Birds in the league standings last year.
The University of Alberta always has a good hockey team.
This year should be no exception with the return of veteran
centre Dave Couves and goalie Barry Richardson, who is
probably the best collegiate goalie in Canada. He was a first
team all-star last year.
The tournament gets underway with one game Friday
night, Calgary versus Victoria at 8 p.m. Saturday Alberta and
Lakehead face off at 6 p.m. followed by UBC playing the winner
of Friday night's game at nine.
Saturday's losers play off in a consolation game at 12:30
p.m. Sunday followed by the championship game at 3 p.m.
Last year's tournament had capacity crowds for all the
games, and organizers for this year's series expect standing
room only crowds again. Tickets are on sale now at the Athletic
Office in War Memorial gym. General admission is $2.50,
student prices are $1.25.
If UBC is to repeat its victory of one year ago (UBC beat
Alberta 5-2 in.the final) they will need a repeat of the tremendous vocal support they received from their fans last year.
Gnuppers face Cavaliers
By BRIAN MURPHY
The semi-professional
Seattle Cavaliers return to
play the football 'Birds
Saturday at Thunderbird
Stadium.
The game will conclude the
'Birds' home schedule for the
year and the team hopes to do
so on a winning note. The task
will not be an easy one,
however, as the Cavaliers have
a team which won their league
championship this year, thus
capping one of their most
successful seasons.
The Cavaliers are a team
apart from anything seen on
the local gridiron. They have a
lot of fun — much of it liquid,
and often beat the hell out of
their opposition while doing so.
In addition, they sport some
offensive plays and formations
that are unparalleled in
football.
The 'Birds hope to finally get
their offense adjusted to
scoring some points, while the
defense has been changed
again this week to cut off the
many off-tackle plays and
variations that the Cavaliers
use.
Last weekend the 'Birds
dropped a 20-4 decision to the
University of Saskatchewan
Huskies, to move the Huskies
into a 2-4 tie with UBC.
After establishing a slim 4-3
lead at half time the 'Birds
could not contain the Huskies
who came on strong in the
second quarter on T.D.'s by
Bob Guedo (30 yds.) and Mike
Harrington on an 85 yard
scamper. Brian Blaskey
kicked two field goals and two
singles, while UBC's Bruce
Kiloh got a field goal and a
single on a wide field goal
attempt.
Game time for the Cavalier's
exhibition game is 2 p.m.,
Saturday, at the house that
Gnup built — Thunderbird
Stadium.
The 'Birds wind up their
season in Calgary Nov. 11. ■
Thunderettes leave town
The UBC Thunderette
volleyball team will compete
at the University of Victoria
Invitational Tournament
Saturday.
It is the first tournament of
the year for the Thunderettes
and there are some extremely
strong players.
Sandi Vosbrough, Betty
Baxter, and Maureen
Fishleight are this year's team
and all are members of the
Canadian National team.
Laura Buker and Faye Rose
are returning players from last
year.
The team's coach is Karen
Johnson, of Mission, B.C.
The women's golf team is
looking for members. Please
sign up in Memorial Gym rm
208. Page  20
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  November 3,  1972
NDP seeks civic credibility
Brian Campbell is the New Democratic Party
mayorality candidate in the Dec. 13 civic election.
This interview, with Ubyssey reporter Christine Krawczyk,
is the first of a Friday series which will run up to the election.
THE UBYSSEY: Why is the NDP running a full slate
of candidates in the civic election?
CAMPBELL: The decision to run a full slate was
made at a convention in March, and ratified at two
later conventions.
The reason behind the decision is that it gives the
NDP more credibility in the civic campaign. We
tried it two years ago on a partial slate basis and we
simply weren't able to get enough support on a
straight NDP slate. COPE (Committee of
Progressive Electors really had nothing to offer in
terms of manpower or votes. Harry Rankin is able to
attract a lot of votes but he is not able to transfer
those votes to anyone else on the slate.
So we think we have a much better chance of
taking advantage of the support that has been built
up for the CCF and the NDP over the years if we run
an entire NDP slate. We also believe that partisan
politics should be at City Hall. COPE does not. We
believe democratic socialism is a key issue. We have
a number of very basic policy differences which
simply did not make it possible for us to work with
COPE.
QUESTION: Do you think you can attract enough
votes to win?
ANSWER: We are not going to push just one person — myself — for mayor, but rather put forth and
push a whole slate. What we are out to get is a
majority on council, not necessarily mayor, although
I think that if Art Phillips and Bill Street are the only
two running we stand a chance in that area.
QUESTION: The NDP has been criticised for their
insistence on running a mayoralty candidate, on the
grounds that such action will serve to split the left
vote and ensure that control of city council will
remain in the hands of the representatives of ruling
economic elites.
ANSWER: COPE and us (sic) have political differences that have to be focussed on this political
campaign. I don't think we can just run over them by
declarations for unity of the left.
There is a very weak and disorganized left in the
city of Vancouver except for the trade union
movement and those who support the NDP both
provincially and federally.
QUESTION: One of the main NDP platforms is the
establishment of a ward system. Could you outline
what this ward system would be like.
ANSWER: There are four positions being forwarded
in this election. One is that we should not have a ward
system (that is the NPA position) that we should
nominate all aldermen at large.
Then there is the TEAM position that half the
aldermen should be elected by wards and half at
large. That essentially leaves the power alignment in
the same control that it is now.
The third position is the COPE position that we
should elect all the aldermen on a ward systen based
on 25,000.
The fourth position, the NDP position, states that
although ward system helps to ensure a geographic
representation it does not effect the power base
which still remains with the centralized city council.
The position we are putting forward is that we
should set up neighborhood councils in co-operation
with the neighborhood groups based on population of
10,000. Each neighborhood would thus elect a neighborhood council which would have certain specified
powers; control over recreation in its area, some
control over education, control over zoning until
there was a fully developed city plan. It would be
responsible for deciding policy for that area and
instructing the alderman how to vote. These powers
would be legislated and given to the neighborhood
councils. This would transfer the power base from
the city council to the neighborhood councils
QUESTION: How would these neighborhood
councils be structured?
ANSWER: Each neighborhood council would elect
approximately 20 people, who would be volunteers on
this council — they would not be paid. The alderman
or councillor from that area would be a full time paid
member of the council
QUESTION: What would the NDP do about changing
the discriminatory policy toward single unemployed
men practiced by the present administration?
ANSWER: I don't think there is any necessity for
meal tickets, and room vouchers. All people should
be treated as adults and given the money that they
have a right to, and social workers should act as their
advocates to make sure they are getting all that they
have coming to them.
QUESTION: Many people who are on welfare or
applying for welfare are totally unaware of what
their rights are. What would an NDP administration
do about alieviating this problem?
ANSWER: The welfare workers would be the advocates of those seeking welfare. It would be their
job to see that they got everything they had a right to.
A certain amount of money could also be set aside
for funding of welfare rights organizations to make
sure that the social workers did in fact protect the
rights of the welfare recipients.
QUESTION: Another common criticism of the
present administration is that it has allowed the City
Hall bureaucracy to run City Hall. What would the
NDP do to correct the situation?
ANSWER: I think that what has happened is that you
have a city council which is really active only on a
part time basis and a mayor who hasn't been interested in the city, and the initiative has therefore
been left in the hands of the bureaucracy.
The NDP would go into City Hall with a set policy
and the Civil Servants would know what that policy
was and they would have to tow the line.
We would set up committees to initiate policy.
These would work closely with the department
heads.
QUESTION: How would an NDP administration
handle the police department?
ANSWER: One of the problems now is that we can't
get at the police department to find out anything.
This is partly because the police commission is made
up of three people appointed by the provincial
government and the mayor.
We would insist that all members be appointed by
the city council, and broader representation would
be given to that police commission.
We would set up a civilian police review board,
which would deal with any charges against the
police.
This would protect the  police  as  well  as  the
citizens. In Vancouver the police has been used by
the powers at city council for their own ends.
QUESTION: What are your views on arming the
police?
ANSWER: Our position is that when one side
escalates the battle the other side escalates. And
arming the police is not the answer to the problem.
A better solution is to make the police more accountable to the public, have the police working in
neighborhood areas, and involving people through
the neighborhood councils in the solution to the
problems in their own neighborhoods.
QUESTION: Would an NDP administration de-arm
the police?
ANSWER: I think our policy would have to work
toward that by making the police more responsible to
the local neighborhoods. We would first take away
the riot clubs.
QUESTION: How would all these things be worked
out?
ANSWER: We would sit down with the policeman's
union to discuss these proposals, they would not
simply be handed down.
QUESTION: Would the NDP consider placing high
school students on the School Board?
ANSWER: I wouldn't have any objections to high
school students being on the school board but that
would entail changes in the City Charter regarding'
age I think.
QUESTION: Development has been and will continue to be an issue in civic politics. What are the
NDP's policies on development both in the downtown
area and in the West End?
ANSWER: The responsibility for development will
rest largely with the neighborhood councils. They
would become involved in developing a comprehensive plan for the development of the Vancouver area.
We have to deal with such issues as how many
people do you want living in the city of Vancouver,
what kind of a city do we want Vancouver to be?
These kinds of general issues could be decided on a
city wide basis.
QUESTION: You keep talking about asking the
people to decide what they want in the way of
development in the area they live in. Do you think
that it is possible that the people will decide they do
want more highrises, more roads? And if so what
would the response of an NDP administration be?
ANSWER: I don't think we have to worry about that
if the people wanted policies that were contrary to
the ones we advocated they would not elect us in the
first place, since we are running on a policy of no
third crossing, no freeways, a freeze in development
until a comprehensive plan is developed.
QUESTION: The present tax base in the city puts the
burden on the private homeowner rather than industry. How will an NDP administration change
that?
ANSWER: We would switch the burden of land taxes
from the private homeowner to the commercial
developer.
QUESTION: What kinds of legislation with teeth
does the NDP plan to bring in to curb pollution in
Vancouver? '
ANSWER: The most important would be in terms of
noise pollution. We would also press for federal and
provincial funds for a tertiary sewage treatment
plant so that we can clean up our end of the Fraser
River and the Burrard Inlet.
Our policy of discouraging the use of the
automobile by introducing rapid transit would
alleviate the problem of pollution from cars.
QUESTION: What kind of proposals would the NDP
bring in as far as rapid transit is concerned?
ANSWER: We would be opposed to any heavy duty
rapid transit partly because it would pre-determine
the way in which the city would develop.
We would be in favor of a free bus system subsidized by commercial taxes.
We would also ban the private automobile from the
downtown   area.   We   would   want   to   introduce
pedestrian lanes and bicyle lanes.
QUESTION:   What   is   your   policy   on   low   cost
housing?
ANSWER: We would do everything in our power to
encourage low cost public and co-operative housing.
We want to explore new concepts in low cost housing
and get away from developments such as Raymur
Place.
We would also encourage the residents of all such
developments to administer them.
QUESTION: What do you think will be the effect of
the NDP provincial win on your campaign?
ANSWER: The NDP win gave us a great deal of
credibility as a party, and this will mean greater
support.

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