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The Ubyssey Jan 22, 2015

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Array JANUARY22.2015 | VOLUMEXCVI | ISSUEXXXI1
JACK'S ANGRY ALCOHOLISM SINCE 1918
STUDENTS FEELING UNSAFE
The AMS' academic experience
survey found students aren't
feeling safe on campus at night.
HIDE YOUR BIKES
SHHS sends an email to Fair-
view residents warning them of
imnonHinn hj|<e removal.
Three students want to make
the arts and culture community
more accessible.
THE
UBYSSE
KIDS' PROGRAMS The Thunderbirds are busy mentoring the next generations of stars.   PIO
Warning:
Content not appropriate for
younger audiences
r-^y // Page 2
EVENTS        '/ THIS WEEK, CHECK!
MEMORIAL
6:00 - 9:00 P.M. @ UBC OLD AUDITORIUM (6344 MAIN MALL)
The Varisty Outdoors Club is hosting a public memorial for the three climbers
— Stephanie Grothe, Neil Mackenzie and Elena Cernicka—who died last
week. Join family and friends to remember and celebrate their lives.
THURSDAY ' 22
NE BIG C&AST
ONE BIG COAST PREMIERE
6:30 - 9:00 P.M. @ THE NORM THEATRE
This UBC-student-made film (and soundtrack) is premiering at The Norm.
The film is a documentary detailing the potential effects of the proposed
Northern Gateway Pipeline on Kitimat and B.C. Admission by donation
FRIDAY ' 23
FULL MOON BEACH PARTY
9:00 P.M. @ PSI UPSILON HOUSE #7 2880 WESBROOK MALL
Having apparently forgotten what month it is, Psi U is holding a beach-
themed bash. Swimsuits are strongly recommended, and there will be a DJ
on the upper and lower floors ofthe house. Girls $15, guys $20
ON
THE
COVER
A special thanks to the UBC Rare
Books and Special Collections
staff. -Photo Will McDonald
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your events listings to
ourcampus@ubyssey.ca.
<*-
^^*f^  ¥ ■ < -v t  ■  «
UBYSSE
\JTHE
Y
■*-                                   JANUARY22.2015 | VOLUMEXCVI | ISSUEXXXIV
EDITORIAL
STAFF
BUSINESS
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:@ ubyssey.ca
OUR CAMPUS//
ONE ON ONE WITH THE PEOPLE AND BUILDINGSTHAT MAKE UBC
=HOTOWILLMCDONALD^HE UBYSSEY
The OmniGlobe displays atmospheric, oceanic and terrestrial data in animated form.
The Earth and Ocean Sciences complex is UBC's Science World
Leo Soh
Senior StaffWriter
In some ways, the Earth, Ocean
and Atmospheric Sciences
(EOAS) building complex is like
any other at UBC: it has offices,
computer labs and lecture halls.
Unlike most buildings, however,
EOAS also has a tornado machine, a green screen 'do-it-yourself meteorological broadcast
station and a giant, interactive,
animated globe.
The complex is not only an
educational hub, it is also a
treasure trove of science- and
learning-based gadgets hard to
find anywhere else in the city and
possibly western Canada.
By using over 1,300
tons of B.C.- sourced
cross laminated
timber, the ESB
sequesters enough
carbon to keep the
atmosphere free from
over 2,500 tons of CO2."
The most recognizable building in the complex is the Earth
Sciences Building (ESB), opened
in 2012, which thousands of
students pass by daily on Main
Mall. Although it was a hefty investment of $75 million, it is now
a major contender for the title of
nicest instructional building on
campus.
The ESB's aesthetic design is
certainly breathtaking, but it is
also one ofthe most efficient and
functional structures on campus. The building is LEED Gold
certified, signifying its sustainable nature, and as the largest
panelized wood building and
the largest application of cross
laminated timber in North Amer
ica, it certainly gives our campus
some bragging rights. By using
over 1,300 tons of B.C.-sourced
cross laminated timber, the ESB
sequesters enough carbon to keep
the atmosphere free from over
2,500 tons of C02.
Tucked neatly behind
the facade ofthe ESB
are countless precious
stones, ancient bones
and other scientific
memorabilia, each
piece with a unique
and fascinating story
to tell."
The Earth Sciences Building's
modern interior design provides
spacious foyers and plenty of
natural light. Perhaps to take
advantage the building's traits,
the office ofthe dean for the
Faculty of Science has relocated
to the ESB, along with the earth,
ocean and atmospheric sciences,
statistics and the Pacific Institute
ofthe mathematical sciences
departments. The ESB also serves
as a place where industry leaders
in fields such as geology come to
connect with UBC students, staff
and alumni.
Touch one button
and a warm glow
fills the room as the
globe displays the air
temperature ofthe
earth over time."
Although most students know
ofthe grandiose nine-metre-
high head labs penetrating the
first storey ofthe Earth Sciences
Building with floor-to-ceiling
windows, very few have seen the
treasures it conceals. Tucked
neatly behind the facade ofthe
ESB are countless precious
stones, ancient bones and other
scientific memorabilia, each piece
with a unique and fascinating
story to tell. This is, in essence,
a secret mini-museum at UBC
and a resource not many students
even know exists.
At the heart ofthe complex's
natural sciences display is the
interactive, animated globe — the
OmniGlobe — which rests in a
small dark room and offers viewers the opportunity to observe
the climate, landscape and other
features of our planet change
throughout its history. Touch
one button and a warm glow fills
the room as the globe displays
the air temperature ofthe earth
over time. Press another, and the
ocean's currents stream across
the sphere. Other interactive
attractions include the wildly
entertaining tornado machine
and a live stream ofthe weather
courtesy of Global TV with a
camera and green screen that let
you fulfill your childhood dream
of being Mark Madryga.
The Earth and Oceans Sciences complex houses some ofthe
most incredible accessible technology at UBC, and while the new
Earth Sciences Building serves
as a place of study, work and
innovation, it is also a piece of art
in and of itself. At barely three
years old, it is already one ofthe
most frequently used structures
on the Point Grey Campus, and
has the potential to become an
even bigger player in the campus
community. A fusion of laboratories, office space, lecture halls, and
UBC's own Science World, the
ESB has a unique charm. Take a
look for yourself and help forge
the young structure's identity. Xi
Know
somebody
interesting?
Do you have a brilliant prof or a fascinating friend at UBC? Send an email to
aerhardt@ubyssey.ca with some contact info and reasons why you think they
would be a good candidate to be profiled in The Ubyssey. // News
EDITORS JOVANAVRANIC +VERONIKA BONDARENKO
VNUARY22.20
AMS»
INTERNATIONAL COURT »
Survey highlights students safety concerns
David Nixon
Senior StaffWriter
Results from the AMS' student
academic experience survey this
year show that many students are
feeling unsafe on UBC's campus.
These results are likely due
to the widely publicized sexual assaults on campus and the
offensive Frosh chants from
some Sauder students, says AMS
VP academic Anne Kessler, and
those issues also prompted new
survey questions this year.
"This year we added a set of
questions around discrimination,
and for the first time we asked
students to report how they identified in terms of their race and
ethnicity," said Kessler.
On the question of feeling safe
on campus at night, from 2013 to
2014, female students' responses
showed a drop from 55 per cent
to 31 per cent; students who
identified as "other" in terms of
gender dropped from 88 per cent
to 35 per cent.
"Students have begun to feel
significantly less safe on campus at night," concluded the
survey. One ofthe recommendations arising from these results
involved reviewing the sexual
assault counsellor position that
the Commerce Undergraduate
Society was obliged to put up
$50,000 for in 2014 - that was
only a one year commitment.
"As of yet there hasn't been
a promise by the university
that the funding will continue
every year," said Kessler, who
notes that the AMS is meeting
with UBC's VP Students Office
Wednesday, January 21 to start
discussions around this and
other issues.
Another new area of focus is
counselling services. Last year,
The Ubyssey reported that many
students were being turned away
from counselling services. A new
survey question this year showed
that only 36 per cent of students
were satisfied with their counselling service experience and
35 per cent said they weren't.
Law professor Nicole Barrett oversees
trial of Chad government agents
accused of murder and torture
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PHOTO COURTESY UBC PUBLIC AFFAIRS
Nicole Barrett is one of many attending the trial of former Chad government officials.
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUN/THE UBYSSEY
The AMS' academic experience survey highlighted students' biggest concerns in 2014.
Kessler says it's a tough area to
measure and the AMS will be
working with the university to do
more research on the subject.
"Students are going to counselling because they're in a really
difficult position so they might
leave not being totally satisfied
even if it was helpful for them in
the end," said Kessler. "There's
clearly a bit of a perception
problem... if [students] need help
they're going to get help, and we
don't want a stigma around it."
Other recommendations from
the survey involve pursuing academic policies to ensure syllabi
are required for every course (no
such policy exists currently), that
syllabi are provided earlier on,
around course registration time,
and that professors be required
to divulge a certain percentage
of a student's grades before final
exams so that students may
take corrective action if they're
doing poorly in a course. Some
mature students commented
about experiences with age
discrimination and less engagement with the AMS, which
Kessler says has prompted more
partnership with the GSS to find
out how to improve services for
mature students.
The first academic experience survey was run in 2012 and
collected about 2,000 responses.
The latest survey collected 4,000
responses: that's about eight
per cent of UBC Vancouver's
approximately 50,000 students.
The previous surveys honed
in on student stress as a core
concern and those results have
not changed significantly from
year-to-year.
There were 20 recommendations arising from the 2012
and 2013 surveys combined and
this year alone there were 16
new recommendations - nine of
those focused on student support
services. Xi
Veronika Bondarenko
News Editor
Nicole Barrett, a UBC Law
professor specializing in human
rights and criminal law, has been
overseeing a trial of former Chad
government agents accused of
mass murder and torture.
The trial, which began on
November 14, is looking at the
evidence against 21 government
agents who served for Hissene
Habre, the president of Chad
from 1982 to 1990.
Various international human
rights groups estimate that a total
of 40,000 people were killed during
Habre's eight-year presidency.
Saleh Younous, former director of
Habre's political police force, is one
ofthe agents being tried at the trial.
Accordingto a .Reuters article,
each ofthe 21 agents have pled
'not guilty' to the charges at the
beginning of the trial.
Barrett, who is also director
ofthe Joint International Justice
and Human Rights Clinic at
UBC and York University, has
previously overseen trials for the
former Yugoslavia and served as
a legal advisor for people who
had been detained at Guant-
anamo Bay.
Along with York University
Law student Eleonore Gauth-
ier, Barrett had been in Chad
from January 10 to 19 to mon
itor that the trial was being
conducted in accordance with
international standards.
Accordingto Barrett, the
trial is a particularly difficult
and important one, as families
of the people killed had waited
many years in order to receive a
sense of closure and justice for
the victims.
"The victims' families are
attending the trial as well, so the
courtroom is filled with emotion,"
said Barrett in a statement. "They
have been campaigning for 24
years to see Habre and his accomplices face justice."
Barrett also said that, as
the trial is being conducted at
the national level rather than
at The Hague or other international courts, it will set a
precedent for future countries
holding their former leaders
accountable through their own
judicial systems.
"If the trial meets international standards, the regime's
victims will finally begin to
regain a sense of dignity after
more than two decades," said
Barrett. "If fair trial standards
are compromised it will be yet
another insult to the victims and
their families."
The trial, which is being monitored by the Human Rights Association, is expected to continue
until the end of January. Xi
Survey Stats
36%
53%
of students say they or their friend
was satisfied with the current level of
services
drop of students — identifying as'other'
forgender — who feel safe on campus
at night
88 per cent to 35 per cent
47%
24%
of students have or have a friend who's
accessed UBC counselling
drop of female students who feel safe on
campus at night
55 per cent to 31 per cent
CIYEAWAT
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STOP BY SUB 23 TO PICKUP
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TICKETS AVAILBLE WHILE SUPPLIES LAST.
NON OPT-OUT STUDENTS ONLY NEWS    I   THURSDAY, JANUARY 22, 2015
EVENTS»
ENVIRONMENT »
This year's Faculty Cup to focus on community, health  Climate change a major topic as 2014
marks hottest year in history
Emma Partridge
Contributor
The UBC Faculty Cup has had
a makeover.
Faculty Cup is a campus-wide
tournament in which the different
UBC faculties face off for a day of
friendly sports and game competition. A version ofthe event grew
out of a similar tournament called
the UBC Legacy Games, then
disappeared for a while but was
picked up again five years ago.
This year, the AMS is trying to
bring something different to the
popular sports tournament.
"We kind of threw out the old
model and re-did it completely,"
said Alex Remtulla, fourth-year
political science student and chair
ofthe 2015 Faculty Cup. "This is, I
guess, our test year."
Along with a committee of other
student organizers, Remtulla has
been planning and revamping the
event since September.
The 2015 Faculty Cup, which
will be held on January 29, will be
about more than the sports and
competition that it has become
famous for in past years. The day
will centre on overall physical and
mental well-being.
"We've added so many free
programs throughout the day just
focused on finding ways to get active, to increase awareness around
mental health," said Remtulla.
BUSINESS »
This year's Faculty Cup will be held on January 29.
Sarah Richter, third-year
Kinesiology student, appreciated
the communal atmosphere at last
year's Faculty Cup.
"I liked the fact that it brought
together students from every single
year that may have not met," said
Richter. "At least go just to meet
other people."
This year will be the first
time that Faculty Cup features
additional activities as a part of
the day. The free programs that
Remtulla and his colleagues have
added to the event include a food
truck festival, a wellness fair and
various health activities.
Accordingto Remtulla, the
hope is that Faculty Cup will
offer something to all students,
even those not competing in the
tournament itself.
The food truck festival will have
three trucks to serve students. The
Wellness Fair will focus on increasing awareness about well-being, while the Wellness activities
running throughout the day will
give students a chance to participate in various physical activities
and win points for their faculties.
"We're really about building
UBC pride and faculty pride," said
Remtulla. "We wanted to create
programs and events that would
reach out to essentially everyone
on campus and try to bring everyone together." Xi
2014 was the hottest year in recorded history.
Veronika Bondarenko
News Editor
=HOTOJIMTAYLOR/FLICKR
Sauder expands partnership with Coast Capital Savings
Mateo Ospina
StaffWriter
Sauder is continuing to partner
with Coast Capital Savings in a
recent commitment to encourage
students to start their own social
entrepreneurial ventures.
The credit union, Coast Capital
Savings, has provided a $1 million
contribution over the course of four
years to fund UBC's Coast Capital
Savings Innovation Hub. Along with
the fund, Coast Capital Savings is
planning to assist in the training
and mentorship of students who
want to start their own startups
and companies.
For Coast Capital Savings, one
goal is to "promote economic, social
and environmental change in BC
communities."
Along with other factors,
projects proposed to The Coast
Capital Savings Innovation Hub
are assessed on their potential
to impact their communities in a
meaningful way.
Coast Capital Savings has
offered Coast Capital representatives as volunteer mentors who,
coupled with Sauder's Centre
for Sustainability and Social
Innovations staff, will help train
and educate Sauder students in
their ventures.
Though they will still be revenue-driven businesses, the social
ventures proposed by the students
must have a focus on social and
environmental factors that should
result in positive change for B.C.
communities.
"Social ventures are thriving
in Vancouver's dynamic entrepreneurial community and there's a
growing recognition ofthe power
of business to do good in the
world," said James Tansey, Executive Director of Sauder's Centre
for Social Innovation & Impact
Investing in a statement.
Each ofthe students participating in the program will also
receive the $2000 Coast Capital
Savings Accelerator Award to help
start their venture.
Businesses that have been
started within the last three years
are all able to apply to be part of
the Coast Capital Savings Innovation Hub. With this extra support,
Coast Capital hopes to encourage
a higher quantity and quality of
social ventures.
Coast Capital Savings will also receive top Sauder students as interns
during the summer term in order to
encourage a more cohesive training
environment for students.
With new companies springing
up within UBC and a strong support
system for students interested in
social entrepreneurship, Coast Capital Savings hopes that the new hub
and startup programs will promote
a new generation of socially-conscious entrepreneurs. Xi
As scientists confirm that 2014 has
been the hottest year in recorded
history, the topic of climate change
and rising temperatures is becoming all the more pressing.
A joint report released by NASA
and the National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration found
that 2014 has been the hottest year
since the 1880s. The report also
found that 10 ofthe warmest years
since scientists started measuring
global temperatures have all taken
place since 2000.
Simon Donner, a UBC geography
professor specializing in climate
change, said that while global temperatures during individual years
in the future may be better than
others, the overall trend of rapid
climate change is undeniable and
cannot be ignored.
"2014 is the warmest year in
recorded history, but this is just
more evidence ofthe drumbeat
of climate change," said Donner.
"2015 may not break the record,
but then 2016 might. The trend
is upwards and there's no doubt
whatsoever about that."
Donner also said that, if current
rising temperature trends continue,
we could see global temperatures
rise by four degrees by the end of
the century. This could also lead
to sea levels rising by as much as a
metre and parts of Vancouver and
the Lower Mainland becoming
inundated by ocean.
Accordingto Donner, a major
deciding factor in whether current
temperature trends will continue
has to do with whether governments choose to switch away from
fossil fuels as a source of energy in
the upcoming years.
"There are individual actions that
people can take, but it's also going to
take collective action," said Donner.
"It's going to take governments
seeing the value in switching to
renewable forms of energy."
At the same time, Donner
stressed the importance of
individual people also working
together to curb rising temperatures, whether it be through
making individual choices to live
more sustainably or lobbying for
the government to make climate
change a priority on the agenda.
As rising temperatures are a
pervasive and longterm problem, it
can often feel like individual choices
don't make a meaningful difference
when compared to the collective
decisions made by governments and
corporations. Still, Donner said that
as the problem of climate change is
complex, finding sustainable solutions will also take contributions
from many different people.
"It's not like we're polluting a
lake with mercury where if you
just plug the pipe everything will
get better," said Donner. "We
all have to take actions together
and so it can be easy to say 'why
should I do it?' and that's why it's
really important to coordinate
and to try and work together as
much as possible."
In particular, Donner said that
students and other young people
need to be at the forefront of climate change, as how they choose to
address it in the next decades will
shape whether it reaches a point
when it can no longer be reversed.
"You're being handed a debt from
the past of all these greenhouse
gases that were put into the atmosphere, but you're being handed the
opportunity to be the one to solve
the problem," said Donner. Xi
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THEN AND NOW
by Will McDonald
Between the new SUB, bookstore renovations and improvements on Main Mall, UBC
has undergone some major changes in the last five Years alone. Over the next few
weeks, we'll be documenting just how much campus has changed over the Years.
More photos are available online, and to come.
Back in the 70s, the Bookstore was quite a bit smaller.
Maclnnes Field used to be a field, and there used to be a skydiving club.
In 2009, students protested plans to build housing on the UBC Farm.
>!lll:     U\A
The store has expanded, partly to include more retail merchandise.
The field is currently dug up to make way for the new Aquatic Centre.
The old SUB hasn't changed much recently
The main part of what is now 1KB before renovations.
After a donation from Irving K. Barber in 2002, the library greatly expanded.
Archival photos provided by UBC Library and AMS Archives LAST WORDS//
AMS SURVEY REVEALS A
MAJOR PROBLEM
The results ofthe AMS' recent
student academic experience survey show that students, particularly women and those who identified as 'other' for their gender,
have been feeling significantly
less safe on campus at night over
the course ofthe 2013-2014 year.
While such results are hardly
surprising given that the sexist
Sauder Frosh cheer and string
of sexual assaults on campus all
took place within a few months
of each other, it also takes seeing
the numbers laid out in such plain
terms to really understand that
a large portion of students are
feeling unsafe during the time
they spend at UBC. And that
is unacceptable.
The survey put forth several
recommendations to make sure
the results are acted upon (such as
examining the position ofthe new
sexual assault counsellor, who
was only hired for one year to
follow the cheer), but there clearly
needs to be more done by the
university on a continual basis.
As the initial shock and press
coverage of last year's events wear
off, it is important that UBC still
takes active steps to make campus
a safer place for all students not
just through words, but through
actions as well.
PUBLIC GAY LIT IS A
PUBLIC SERVICE
UBC Library is now in possession
of two rare gay novels — which
is awesome. However, much
like the acquisition ofthe famed
Videomatica collection last year,
students aren't very aware of this
momentous addition to our library.
The addition of Teleny and
Des Grieux will allow students,
scholars and the public to access
and study the emergence and
development of homoerotic literature — which has been clouded
in mystery for some time. Not
only that, but UBC is the first
university to house these novels.
All other copies of these rare
artifacts are owned and housed
by private collectors, and one
copy ofthe Teleny exists at the
British Museum.
As students of a major research
university we should celebrate the
fact that our school has gone to such
efforts to acquire and house rare
and famous artifacts like the Teleny
and Des Grieux novels.
COMPOST DOESN'T HAVE
TO SMELL LIKE GARBAGE
Have you ever noticed how the
basement ofthe SUB smells like
rotting garbage? So have we. As a
group of students who practically
live in the basement ofthe SUB,
?—°—Ca*
nvus
yo. eme/msu uou'fte
poue peeua&iua
COPS, LET'S HAU6 OUT.
if           ^pL
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B     ttXKt/S-TAK-il^k
[pups. ARe you pom uerr)
WHOM! *
LLUSTRATIONPRESTYWULANSARIfTHE UBYSSEY
we've come to know all ofthe
different smells that have passed
through. But this garbage stench
has been around since the AMS
installed their new composter.
And while maybe we shouldn't
be complaining too much, given
the disarray of our own office,
the smell coming from the
garbage room in the SUB is off
putting. Our office, as well as a
major eating area, is only a few
dozen feet down the hall.
We understand that the composter is working with rotting
food. We really do appreciate what
it's doing for the environment, too.
The problem is that, for an apparently air-sealed container, it's not
doing its job very well.
If this is some new scheme to
get students to stop using the
SUB, it's working. With any luck
we'll get used to it by the end of
the week.1!!
BIKES »
Copy Editor's Corner: The condition
of my bicycle isn't any of student
housing's business
CIARAN DOUGHERTY
Copy Editor
Bike thieves have got to be one
ofthe most galling collections of
people that operate in our society.
This is particularly relevant to
students here at UBC. Many of us
are all too aware ofthe constant
paranoia that plagues bike owners
— one day they will go to get
on their bike and it'll be gone —
maybe a broken, overpriced bike
lock will be remain, but that just
serves as a visual reminder of your
absent possession.
Pretty much everyone with a
bike here goes to great lengths to
keep it safe. A bike has monetary
value, something we as students
have to be especially wary of, but
it is more than that; it's your way
around campus, an ever-present
companion that many will feel
distraught to be without. To
have it stolen is heartbreaking
and infuriating.
However, I'm not writing this
to complain about conventional
bike thieves: there's a new threat
to bikes on campus. The ever-dependable and amicable SHHS
(Student Housing and Hospitality
Services) has devised a new inconvenience for students living in
residence (at least in Fairview) —
or perhaps resurrected an old one
(I doubt this is the first year of
the practice). If SHHS deems your
bike to be in vaguely described
"poor condition" they will stick a
label on it. You might be thinking
'that doesn't sound too annoying'
but here's the kicker, if you don't
remove this tag and call SHHS
and report the code on the label
within a week, your bike will be
taken. I assume this means they
will cut your expensive bike lock
that you bought to protect it from
thieves. You then have one month
to reclaim your bike — although
your lock is probably beyond
repair — before it is gone permanently.
while it is only a removal of
a tag and a phone call to protect
your bike, even this is inconvenient, another unnecessary thing
to worry about in our busy lives.
Furthermore, the email to notify
residents of this process was
sent out only one day prior to
the start ofthe tagging. Dealing
with these nagging issues is not
what we pay for when we live
on rez, but the worrying thing is
that we are getting used to these
invasive practices because they
are so commonplace. We've paid
our rent so please let us live in our
houses in peace. Xi
Public Open House - January 28
Thunderbird Park Precinct Plan
UBC is upgrading the facilities at Thunderbird Park. The upcoming changes will
include both new facilities and the relocation and improvement to existing facilities
Please join us at a public open house to learn more about the proposed changes and provide your feedback
on the final draft plan
Date: Wednesday, January 28, 2015      Time: 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Place: MBA House Commons Room, 3385 Wesbrook Mall
Refreshments will be served.
Can't attend in person? A quick online
questionnaire will be available from
I  January 26 - February 4 at planning.ubc.ca
To learn more about Thunderbird Park go to:
sportfacilities.ubc.ca/thunderbird-park/
For additional information on the project,
contact: Aviva Savelson, Senior Manager,
Consultation, Campus + Community Planning
at aviva.savelson@ubc.ca or 604-822-9984
This notice contains important information which may affect you. Please ask someone to translate it for you.
itttA*#li*. SW« sian n. g# B^sht AHfs ss|sW7| hhWc+.
a place of mind
campus+community planning JENICA MONTGOMERY
University acquires two rare
homoerotic novels
by Andrea Gonzalez
1
UBC recently acquired two rare books through the efforts of a PhD candidate, an
associate professor and a crowd-funding campaign.
The UBC Library Rare Books and Special Collections is thrilled to welcome in
its stacks the renowned novels Teleny and its prequel, Des Grieux.
As the earliest pieces of English-language pornography to explicitly concern
homosexuality, Teleny and Des Grieux offer the platform for scholars from various
disciplinary backgrounds to explore the origins of literary representations of
homosexuality. Both books were acquired through the crowd-funding efforts of
PhD candidate Justin O'Hearn and Associate Professor Gregory Mackie, with an
outpouring of support from the UBC Library and departments as wide-ranging as
English, gender studies and history.
Teleny and Des Grieux, originally part of private erotic collection of Tony Fekete,
were acquired through Christie's auction house based in London, England. Upon
hearing of the opportunity to obtain the books from the Christie's, O'Hearn
reached out to his supervisor Mackie as well as fellow faculty members and UBC
Library personnel, including Katherine Kalsbeek, acting head for the UBC Library
Rare Books & Special Collections.
O'Hearn engaged in a crowd-funding campaign to purchase the books, where
tie successfully received a sum amounting to $3,000 from backers. On Tuesday,
Movember 18 O'Hearn, fellow faculty members and staff assembled in the Conference Room at the UBC Library to live-bid in the auction. In a relatively fast and
inergetic bidding war, UBC acquired Teleny and Des Grieux.
Accordingto O'Hearn, who was responsible for spearheading the acquisition
ofthe books, incorporating Teleny and Des Grieux as a complement to the Colbeck '
Collection "offers the opportunity for scholars from all disciplines to conduct
exciting academic research on works of literature that have remained private for
nearly 100 years."
Given that the UBC Library is a public institution, the acquisition not only   .
Denefits students and faculty members; community members with an interest in
:he material and an identification card now also have the opportunity to study the
texts first-hand.
For Mackie the acquisition of Teleny and Des Grieux in a tangible form is
particularly significant.
"One ofthe things that people tend to think erroneously about literature is that
all that matters are the words on the page. However, the book itself is another kind
of narrative. Having the first edition will tell us things that we could not really
know or would not have access to otherwise. For instance, the way that Teleny was
produced and circulated is much more apparent if you are able to read the various
codes that operate within the material book," said Mackie.
Despite the speculated connection ofthe texts to Oscar Wilde, the link remains
contested and open to debate.
"The story claims that Wilde dropped the original manuscript of Teleny, yet
there is no evidence to support it," said O'Hearn.
"The connection is a legend, really. The thing about Wilde is that he always generated these legends and mythologies, and it is another one of these Wilde mythologies that he secretly wrote this first homoerotic novel. However, in Teleny, it is
very unlikely and utterly impossible for Des Grieux," said Mackie.
Whether or not there is a connection to Wilde, the texts are still important,
added Kalsbeek.
UBC is currently the only university in the world that houses these novels.
"With the Des Grieux, there is only three copies known to exist, and the two
other copies are in private collections. Meanwhile, for Teleny, there are five copies
known to exist, one at the British library, one here and the other copies are in
private collections," said Kalsbeek.
Already, there is a lot of excitement beyond the boundaries of UBC, as news
ofthe books' addition to the Rare Books and Special Collections are transmitted
across the Vancouver region. SFU students will be coming in to see the material
later this term and it is likely that the scholarly interest will continue to build as
classes incorporate these texts into their syllabus. 8    |    CULTURE    |    THURSDAY, JANUARY 22,2015
COMMUNITY »
New website aims to strengthen
UBC's arts and culture community
|      , -,„
\ \ ,, [I,,11..
BOOKS »
If I Fall If I Die confronts mental illness head-on
PHOTO CHERIHAN HASSUN/THE UBYSSEY
Dive is comprised of Melissa Monaghan, Maciek Piskorz and Sam Masooleh.
Braedon Atkinson Pauze
StaffWriter
Establishing an arts and culture
community at a university as large
as UBC is a hard thingto do, however it's a challenge that the team at
Dive were willing to take on.
Dive is a new online initiative
dedicated to promoting UBC's arts
and culture scene. Melissa Monaghan, Maciek Piskorz and Sam Mas-
sooleh — the website's founders —
are three UBC commerce students
with a passion for arts and a distaste
for its lack of support at UBC.
The arts rely on a co-dependant relationship. Not only does it
require an immense amount of
creativity and talent on the part of
many artists but also an extremely
dedicated and appreciative group
of supporters. At a school with an
arts community as large and diverse
as UBC's, creating the group of
supporters becomes an even bigger
challenge. When the support group
struggles to thrive, so too does
the culture.
There's a perfectly logical reason
for why arts events are so hard to
support here at UBC: no one knows
about them. Tryingto keep track of
all the events being put on by all the
different arts departments and clubs
is a task all on its own. It's a task that
has unfortunately put a large barrier
between many students and the arts
at UBC, and it's one that Dive has set
out to tear down.
"From our experience we've been
to a number of places and usually
what happens is we get there and
there are about 20 people sitting
in the audience. It's just a terrible
shame to see these artists, they
spend six months preparing for
those three nights that they are
going to play for and yet no one
gets to see them. So that was kind
of our inspiration. We came to the
realization that it should be made
more accessible to a larger number
of people," said Piskorz.
Dive has taken on the job of
findingthe week's most interesting
arts and culture events and putting
them all in one easily comprehensible place.
Their simple yet elegant website
provides an easy to use platform to
locate both the events you wanted
to track down and events you never
would have heard of otherwise.
They have provided a medium
through which the arts at UBC are
more accessible and easier to support, bridging the gap between the
brilliant artist and the supporters
they so desperately need.
"There are two distinct groups
of people at UBC: the performers
and the spectators. And obviously one can benefit the other and
we hope to be the link between
the two," said Piskorz. The arts
community is one that can only
get stronger with more awareness
and support, Dive hopes to contribute to this.
Check out diveintoubc.com
to learn more about Dive and
upcoming arts and culture events
on campus. Xi
UBC alumnus Michael Christie is the author of If I Fall, If I Die.
Mischa Milne
Contributor
Confronting mental illness in
literature can often be difficult,
however UBC MFA graduate Michael Christie tackles this topic
head on in his new novel If I Fall,
If I Die.
The book follows the story of
a young boy, Will, whose mother
suffers from agoraphobia — an
anxiety disorder that involves a
fear of social situations that will
induce panic attacks. Sufferers
of agoraphobia are often unable
to leave their houses. This is
the case with Will's mother. She
keeps her son inside creating a
world within their home full of
books, paintings and everything
Will could want — until he steps
into the outside world to see
for himself.
Christie described the book
as a coming of age story, commenting that it was loosely based
on his own childhood growing
up with an agoraphobic mother,
but added that many parts ofthe
book were purely fictional.
"It's very much about family, the
relationship between parents and
children and how scary it is to grow
up... but also how amazing it is,"
Christie said.
After moving to British Columbia
at the age of 17, Christie completed
his undergraduate degree at Simon
Fraser University before going on
to his MFA in creative writing at
UBC. However, his career path was
not entirely traditional; he was originally a professional skateboarder,
and focused much of his time on
that while growing up. Previous
jobs also involved working for
skateboarding magazines, including a position as senior editor for
Vancouver skateboarding magazine
Color Magazine.
Now, married with two children
and living on Galiano Island, Christie said he loved the creative writing
program at UBC, noting that the
natural setting and the opportunity
to meet other writers was an amazing part of his time at the university.
=HOTO COURTESYCEDAR BOWERS
His first work of fiction, The
Beggar's Garden, is a collection
of short stories drawn from his
experience working in a homeless
shelter in Vancouver's Downtown
Eastside; he noted that the subject of mental health had always
interested him.
The most challenging aspect
of writing If I Fall, If I Die for
him was the transition from
short story to novel, and dealing
with the complexity and larger
number of characters that came
with it.
"It was hard, it was a learning
process for me and it was a lot
of fun as well, but it involved
throwing out tons and tons of
polished work in the process
... but that's writing. If it's easy
you're probably not writing stuff
that's going to be that interesting," said Christie.
Although he added he will
probably return to short stories at
some point, he said that he is currently mapping out a project that
is shaping up to be a novel. XI
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culture@ubyssey.ca THURSDAY, JANUARY 22,2015    |    CULTURE    |    9
FILM»
From the
Videomatica
Collection:
Something
Wild
=ILE PHOTO GEOFF LISTER/THE UBYSSEY
Lawrence Neal Garcia
Senior StaffWriter
At the beginning of Jonathan
Demme's 1986 film, Charles (Jeff
Daniels), a dull businessman who
occasionally thrills himself by
dining and dashing, is offered a
ride by Lulu (Melanie Griffith), a
vivacious, free-spirited brunette.
Spontaneous and wild, Lulu is
everything Charles is not; but he
takes her offer and gets in the car
anyway, not knowing in the least
what he is in for.
If the premise of Something
Wild seems to indicate a typically hackneyed trajectory — man
meets beautiful woman who
helps him discover another side
of himself — that's because in a
way it does; but it's also entirely reductive of what the film
actually is.
Like Charles, we are led to
expect one thing, are given more
than we bargained for — but
find it to be an entirely fantastic
experience. Jonathan Demme,
of The Silence ofthe Lambs fame,
already gave us the greatest concert film ever with Stop Making
Sense. With Something Wild,
he gives us one ofthe greatest
gearshift films ever. Upon the
arrival of a major character, what
initially seems to be a screwball
comedy turns on a dime and
becomes an increasingly dark
thriller; it's a shift that takes the
film from being merely good to
outright great.
Still, even after it takes that
turn, Something Wild is never less
than entertaining, and even finds
one of its most blissful and memorable moments in the middle of
a roadside convenience store in
the outskirts of Virginia, at what
is likely the lowest point for Daniels' character story-wise. In a
sense, that's Something Wild (and
Demme) in a nutshell: a euphoric
mix of manic energy, emotional
weight and outright bliss, all
without being too ponderous or
too slight.
In more ways than one, Something Wild lives up to its title. It
offers viewers a wild, electric
ride — and like Griffith's Lulu, it
doesn't let down. tJ
The UBC Bachelor + Master of Management Dual Degree
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UBC
W
a place of mind
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
SAUDER
School of Business
ROBERT H. LEE
GRADUATE SCHOOL // Sports + Rec
EDITOR JACKHAUEN
FIELD HOCKEY»
Head coach Shiaz Virjee instructs youth before they run a drill.
PHOTO CHERIHAN HASSUNTTHE UBYSSEY
Men's field hockey mentors
next generation of stars
Koby Michaels
StaffWriter
Along with being a national
championship team and comprising a majority ofthe Canadian
national team's roster, the UBC
men's field hockey team runs
a youth development program.
Head coach Shiaz Virjee said
that the program, sponsored by
Gulf and Fraser financial group,
is part ofthe team's ongoing
involvement in community outreach and relations.
"The program is great for
community relationship, and it
helps with recruiting," said Virjee. "The players are from Lower
Mainland high schools and many
are recommended to the program
by the Junior National Development program."
The program is run by Virjee
and is staffed by four to five players from the men's field hockey
squad. Lachlan Glen, a forward
on the team and a member ofthe
coaching staff for the program,
sees it as a great opportunity for
the high school youth. "Growing
up, there were only so many of
us that could play. It's great to
play with players five to six years
older."
Sterling Bickerstaff, a twelfth-
grade student at local secondary
school St. George's, has being
training with the Thunderbirds
for a year and a half.
"Being able to come out with
my friends and practice is really
sweet," said Bickerstaff, who
plays on the Thunderbird's junior
varsity team.
"Having the varsity guys from
the UBC team is really great,
because they know what they are
doing. Their experience is really
helpful."
Bickerstaff hopes to come to
UBC next year and play with
the Thunderbirds.
The boys, in matching
Thunderbird uniforms, straggled
into Wright Field as the sun set
on a rare, non-rainy day, and
geared up. They joked around
with UBC players before running
a few laps and warming up with
a variety of drills led by 'Birds.
The goalies broke off into their
own group and the players broke
up into two groups based on their
levels.
"We review the players each
week to see which group they
belong in," said Virjee. He hopes
the players will continue field
hockey in university, possibly
with his very team.
Joshua White, a secondary
school player who travels from
West Vancouver to attend the
twice-weekly sessions, is excited
to play with university level
players.
"I'm looking to improve in
field hockey. This is a source
of coaching for me. It's good to
work with the UBC team, people
who know what they're doing.
They have good tips as well."
The Thunderbirds, with four
games left in their regular season, have a .500 record. The upcoming match against UVic will
be a challenge, with many UBC
players currently in Chile with
the national team. Glen, Virjee
and the team remain hopeful
and plan to do well in this year's
championship. Xi
Practicing with the Thunderbirds is an important part ofthe program.
PHOTO CHERIHAN HASSUNTTHE UBYSSEY
BASKETBALL
PHOTO CHERIHAN HASSUNTTHE UBYSSEY
The'I'm Going to UBC program gives kids a taste of varsity athletics.
Elementary
school kids ball
with the T-Birds
Jacob Gershkovich
Senior StaffWriter
There was something peculiar
about the crowd gathered to
watch the UBC women's basketball team take on the Brandon
University Bobcats this Friday in
the War Memorial Gym. Sitting a
few rows behind the score table,
donning yellow Thunderbird
hockey jerseys and waving signs
wildly in the air throughout
the game was a large group of
elementary students.
The students, all of whom
hailed from either Strathcona
or Grandview Elementary, were
participating in the 'I'm Going
to UBC program. Attending the
women's basketball game as the
program's final scheduled event,
the students were fortunate
enough to be treated to a UBC
victory.
Now in its seventh year of
operation, the program exists
as a partnership between UBC
Athletics and Recreation and the
Center for Community Engaged
Learning. Inner-city elementary
students are bussed out to UBC
for a tour ofthe campus, a skills
clinic with UBC varsity athletes
and coaches and a chance to see
UBC's own square off against a
visiting school.
"We had about 20-30 athletes
that helped volunteer," said
Carrie Watts, one ofthe assistant
coaches on the UBC women's
basketball team. "They met the
kids and took them for a little tour
around campus. We ran about a
45 minute basketball clinic with
them. We taught them some skills,
ran them through some games
and had some fun with them. We
mostly wanted to get them in the
gym, on a big court, in a university environment and show them
the atmosphere that UBC is all
about."
The program provides a unique
opportunity for UBC's student
athletes to act as role models for
a younger generation. In the last
six years, over 200 Thunderbirds
have volunteered to participate.
"I think it's important to expose these kids to the university,"
said Watts.
"There were about 60 kids here
yesterday, and over half of them
had never been to UBC before, despite living in Vancouver. I think
it's a great opportunity for them
to see the types of facilities we
have on campus. It's great to show
them the opportunities that are
available if they are so inclined to
pursue them."
Anthony, a bright young
twelve-year-old boy from Strathcona Elementary who participated in Friday's program, was
especially pleased with the day's
events.
"We practiced basketball inside a gym, and we got free food
and drinks and right now, we're
watching a basketball game. It's
good so far."
Anthony, in addition to enjoying
the skills clinic and the game, was
particularly fond ofthe program
organizers' culinary choices. "The
cheese and pepperoni pizza was
really good," he said.
Anthony's friend and classmate, Ryan, also had some excellent things to say:
"I played basketball at the
gym. They taught us how to run
for the ball, and how to look up
and focus on your teammates
when passing."
The next scheduled date for
the program is January 30, when
another gang of young students
will bus out to see UBC host the
University of Calgary Dinos.
Ever thought
about sports
writing?   |
No experience required. All it take
sports@ubysseY.ca
I
i THURSDAY, JANUARY 22,2015    I    SPORTS    I   11
THUNDERBIRDS »
T-BIRDS 5-ON-5
KICKASS KINNERS
TOMMY
NIXON
Basketball
BROCK
STALLER
■ l
m
Rugby
i
1. You play and study sports ... what other
If 1 could do a different
Avid Harry Potter fan.
Besides rugby, 1
Myfine motor skills
1 also like to playthe
interests or hobbies do you have that may
degree, it'd be in music.
spend my time golfing,
and dexterity are pretty
guitar; more specifically,
surprise people?
Love listening to it, and
gardening and eating
good, and 1 try to be ar
Wonderwall.
love making it. Karaoke
feasts.
tistic, sol started doing
Tuesday's at the Gal
henna tattoos.
anyone?
2. What is something you have learned in a
KIN class that has either benefitted you in
your sport, or changed your perspective of
sports?
Barry's helped me construct a workout routine,
Janna taught me the
ethics and Gallo helped
me understand DOMS.
Creatine supplementation— Professor Gallo.
Ifyou'renotatease,
you're in a state of
disease.
Aftertaking KIN361
ntro to Athletic Training,
have a lot of respect
and appreciation forour
trainers.
have learned that the
mental side of sports is
just asimportantas the
physical side.
3. What's the most interesting partof the Thefunnybone-
humanbody? yet to discover it.
■I've Olecranon because it
sounds wonderful in a
song.
The hippocampus. It
sounds like a hippopotamus, looks like a
seahorse.
Obviously the slammin'
jammin' olecranon
(elbow). No explanation
necessary.
I would have to say the
male nipple, because
why?
4. What's the worst food you just can't stop
yourself from eating?
5 Tastes Chinese
Cuisine, and if it's
Tuesday, I'm going to
Triple Os.
Toaster Strudels. They
are delicious.
5 Tastes.
Ice cream. Any flavour,
would neversaynoto
RainorShine!
All food is good food.
5. What super power would you love to
SuperSaiyan.l just feel
Teleportation — would
The ability to teleport the
1 think my teammates
Probably teleportation
have, and why?
it could come in handy
be wonderful to be able
rugby team and alumni
and a few of other
because the walk from
down the road.
to travel around the
around the world, in or-
individuals would be ex
Fairviewto Wood is just
world. Oreven to away
derto attend a full moon
tremely disappointed in
too far.
games.
party with retired coach
Dave Johnston.
me if Ididn'tsaySpidey
powers.
HOCKEY»
Frosted Tips: how to improve your stickhandling
T-Bird defenceman Jason Yee talks to Anthony Bardaro on developing the softest of hands
=HOTO UBC ATHLETICS
Jason Yee
Contributor
In order to write this article, I
had to seek out the guy on my
team with the "silkiest mitts",
as they say. I chatted with the
Thunderbirds' leading men's
Hockey scorer Anthony Bardaro
about his top tips for improving
your stickhandling in hockey.
Here's what he had to offer:
Keep your hands away from
your body.
Your hands should move independently from your body.
Many beginners keep their hands
too close, or don't separate them
from their body. To avoid this,
keep your shoulders down and
relaxed and keep both hands in
front of your body while holding
your stick. As a general rule, your
top hand should be about a hand's
width away from your chest.
When you move your stick to
stickhandle, focus on only moving
your arms, not your body.
Your top and bottom hands
have different roles — know them!
Your top hand is the one you hold
closest to the top ofthe stick. Your
bottom hand is held about one
third to one half ofthe way down
your stick. Your top hand should
be the one to rotate the stick; your
bottom hand should push and
pull the puck. Your top hand is
best suited to rotating the stick —
consider your top hand to be the
steering wheel.
Meanwhile, your bottom hand
generates the leverage to actually
push or pull the puck — sort of like
the engine. If your bottom hand
tries to rotate, you won't have much
range of rotation, and if your top
hand tries to push and pull, you
won't have much strength. Once
you understand what each hand
should do, you'll find stickhandling
much easier.
When you're looking to improve
your stickhandling (or any physical
skill, for that matter), you can cut
your learning curve dramatically
by video taping yourself. Everyone
has smartphones nowadays that can
shoot HD video, so it's easy to capture yourself, either with the help of
a buddy or a stack of pucks.
I suggest doing some practice
reps, then taping yourself, then
checkingyour technique. Make
adjustments to your technique,
practice, then take another video.
You will gain valuable insight on
your technique that you can only get
from watching yourself.
Jason Yee is a fourth-year kinesiology student and a defenceman
on the UBC men's hockey team.
Check out his blog at train2point0.
wordpress.comXi
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Carleton
UNIVERSITY
Canada's Capital University 12    |    GAMES    |    THURSDAY, JANUARY 22,2015
Photo of the Day
A view of Jovana's favourite placeto relax on campus.
PHOTO JOVANAVRANIC/THE UBYSSEY
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ACROSS
1- What mind reader?
5- Biscuitlike quick bread
10- Authenticating mark
14-Singer Vikki
15-Month of showers
16-Comics canine
17- Molecular component
18- Quebec's Peninsula
19-Wrinkly fruit
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25-Director Preminger
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30- Ornamental coronet
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JAN 19 ANSWERS
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70- Defense grp. since
1949
11-Verge
38-Farewell
71-Stun gun
12-Has a bug
41-Goes ballistic
72-Denier's words
13-Hula hoops?
43-Sontag composition
21-Rocky hilltop
23- From head
44-Imperial unit of weight
45-Sugar suffix
DOWN
25-Buckeyes'sch.
46-Caterpillar rival
26- Behind bars
47- Hans Christian
1- Rent-
27-Strike
50-Teen follower
2-Spouse
28-Gallows loop
53- "Wheel of Fortune" buy
3-Golf club which can
Denum-
29-Afore
54- Pain and fevertablet
beredlto9
31-Conditions
58- Required
4-Spanish fleet
32- Big dos
62-Actress Ward
5-Wisdom
33- Actress Witherspoon
63- Departing
6-Tax pro
34-"As You Like It" forest
66- Elegance
7-Surgery sites, briefly
39-       es Salaam
67- Deer sir
8-Try to bite
40-One way to play
COURTESYKRAZYDAD.COM
41-
42-
44
48
49
51-
52-
54
55
56
57-
59
60
Part ofthe Holy Trinity
Imperil
Paving materia
Vanedir.
Land, as a fish
Leg of lamb
 Gay
Org.
Biological bristle
Land map
"Othello" villain
Hard, in Havana
Off-ramp
61- Ricky's portrayer
64- Fingers
65- Never, in Nuremberg

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